Department of Middle Eastern Studies
Department of Middle Eastern Studies

James A. Neely


Professor EmeritusPh.D., University of Arizona

James A. Neely

Contact

Interests


Prehistoric & early historic cultural development & culture change; processes of plant & animal domestication; development of urban life; ancient technology, Mexico, Iran.

Biography


Courses taught:
Archaeology
Cultural Ecology
Village Life and the Development of Urbanism
Irrigation/Water Control Systems
Ceramic Technology

Recent Publications:

"Sassanian and Early Islamic Water Control and Irrigation Systems on the Deh Luran Plain, Southwestern Iran." In Production and Exploitation of Resources, edited by M. G. Morony, pp. 21-42.

The Formation of the Classical Islamic World, Vol. 2. Ashgate Publishing Limited. Aldershot, Hampshire, England. 1999.

"A Lat Susiana Society in Southwestern Iran." In The Iranian World: Essays on Iranian Art and Archaeology Presented to Ezat O. Negahban, edited by A. Alizadeh, Y. Majidzadeh, and S. Malek-Shahmirzadi. Iran University Press. Teheran. 1998. 21pp. (with Henry T. Wright).

"Early Settlement and Irrigation on the Deh Luran Plain: Village and Early State Societies in Southwestern Iran." Museum of Anthropology University of Michigan, Technical Reports, No. 26, 234 pp. Ann Arbor. 1994. (with P. Storch) "Friable Pigments and Ceramic Surfaces: A Case Study from Southwestern Iran," Journal of Field Archaeology, 15 (1988).

Courses


ANT 398T • Supv Teaching In Anthropology

26540 • Spring 2003

The purpose of this course is to provide you with theoretical and practical knowledge

about teaching and learning at the postsecondary level, ultimately to help prepare you for a

teaching position in a higher education setting. Major topics that we will cover include (1)

teaching effectiveness, (2) modes of learning, (3) teaching philosophy, (4) course design, (5)

lecture design and delivery, and (6) graduate education and the demands of academia.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

26480 • Fall 2002
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM UTC 3.122

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 453 • Archaeological Analysis

26730 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 9:00AM-11:00AM EPS 2.136

The purpose of this course to provide you (the course participants) with a background to “the kinds” of archaeological analyses that often occur, “what” is involved in archaeological analysis, and “how” archaeological analysis may be approached. This means learning what questions to ask about a field or laboratory project and the steps needed to understand the type of analysis required. From this course you should also become aware of “how to do” an analysis from start (first learning about certain material culture) to completion (doing the analysis and the report writing).

 

 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 304 or Archaeology 301.

 

ANT S304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

82375 • Summer 2002
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM EPS 2.136

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 453 • Archaeological Analysis

27175 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 9:00AM-11:00AM EPS 2.136

The purpose of this course to provide you (the course participants) with a background to “the kinds” of archaeological analyses that often occur, “what” is involved in archaeological analysis, and “how” archaeological analysis may be approached. This means learning what questions to ask about a field or laboratory project and the steps needed to understand the type of analysis required. From this course you should also become aware of “how to do” an analysis from start (first learning about certain material culture) to completion (doing the analysis and the report writing).

 

 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 304 or Archaeology 301.

 

ANT F304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

81900 • Summer 2001
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM EPS 2.136

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 398T • Supv Teaching In Anthropology

27075 • Spring 2001

The purpose of this course is to provide you with theoretical and practical knowledge

about teaching and learning at the postsecondary level, ultimately to help prepare you for a

teaching position in a higher education setting. Major topics that we will cover include (1)

teaching effectiveness, (2) modes of learning, (3) teaching philosophy, (4) course design, (5)

lecture design and delivery, and (6) graduate education and the demands of academia.

ANT 453 • Archaeological Analysis

27310 • Fall 2000
Meets TTH 9:00AM-11:00AM EPS 2.136

The purpose of this course to provide you (the course participants) with a background to “the kinds” of archaeological analyses that often occur, “what” is involved in archaeological analysis, and “how” archaeological analysis may be approached. This means learning what questions to ask about a field or laboratory project and the steps needed to understand the type of analysis required. From this course you should also become aware of “how to do” an analysis from start (first learning about certain material culture) to completion (doing the analysis and the report writing).

 

 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 304 or Archaeology 301.

 

LAS 399W • Dissertation

36240 • Spring 2000

Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

Curriculum Vitae


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