Department of Middle Eastern Studies
Department of Middle Eastern Studies

Rachel Green


Ph.D. in Comparative Middle Eastern Literatures, University of Texas at Austin;, M.A., University of Texas at Austin in Comparative Middle Eastern Literatures; B.A., University of Chicago in Comparative Literature and NELC

Rachel Green

Contact

Interests


Empathy, translation and affect in Arabic, Hebrew, and Francophone literatures; dialect, language standardization and cultural memory; literature and language pedagogy

Courses


HEB 601C • Intensive Hebrew I

41395 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.206

This course is the first semester of intensive Hebrew language instruction.

Texts

Raizen, Modern Hebrew for Beginners

Grading

To be provided by instructor.

MES 342 • Conflict Lit/Media Mid East

41821 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 206
(also listed as C L 323, J S 363, MEL 321)
Imagining Conflict in Modern Middle Eastern Literature, Media and Culture.

 

What is the role of the artistic creativity in making sense of conflict and imagining a better future? This course will explore a range of films, graphic novels and literary works in order to develop a deeper understanding of the interplay between conflict and the imagination in the Modern Middle East. Conflict is at once a literary device and sociopolitical reality, while the imaginary is a space of endless possibility, the common origin of stories, dreams, and social change. 

 

The course will be organized geographically, including units about Egypt, Israel, Palestine, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, and the Persian Gulf. We will encounter the dark humor and transformative vision of unlikely street-rabble heroes in dystopian Egyptian and Iraqi futures; we will follow the daring beats of a Palestinian Eminem. We will meet Israelis whose search for wholeness, whether in the Holy Land, or back in Poland and Iraq, remain just beyond arm's reach. We will consider the newfound prominence of the graphic arts and their role in salvaging hope amidst breakdown in Syria and Lebanon. We will grapple with aesthetic workings-through of the environmental, social and psychic changes wrought by oil exploitation in the Gulf. Lastly, we will consider the myriad ways in which the imaginary crosses real boundaries, whether via translation, smuggling and/or piracy, thus defying the boundaries of conflict itself. Examples of this include the refashioning of Western literary styles and tropes to critique the effects of foreign military intervention, as well as the underground traffic in cultural products across the Israeli/Arab divide. 

 

Course meetings will be comprised of a combination of lecture and discussion. In addition to deepening their understanding of Modern Middle Eastern cultures, students will also have the opportunity to develop both their academic and popular writing skills, in consultation both with the instructor and with peers. 

 

 

Course will be taught in English; no knowledge of Arabic or Hebrew is necessary. Students with an interest in working with course material in the original languages are invited to attend additional meetings with the instructor outside of scheduled class times. 

 

 

Texts/Readings:

  • Adrift on the Nile, dir. Hussein Kamal [film] (Egypt)
  • The Committee, Sonallah Ibrahim (Egypt)
  • Utopia, Ahmed Khaled Tawfiq (Egypt)
  • The Square, dir. Jehane Noujaim [film] (Egypt)
  • Rags and Tatters, dir. Ahmed Abdallah [film] (Egypt)
  • Touch, Adania Shibli (Palestine)
  • Junction 48, dir. Udi Aloni [film] (Israel/Palestine)
  • "Agunot," S. Y. Agnon (Israel/Ottoman Palestine)
  • And Europe Will be Stunned, dir. Yael Bartana [film/art installation] (Israel/Poland)
  • "Tantal," Samir Naqqash (Israel/Iraq)
  • Hovering at a Low Altitude, Dahlia Rabikovitch (Israel)
  • Katschen, Yoel Hoffmann (Israel)
  • Waltz with Bashir, dir. Ari Folman [film] (Israel)
  • Tiller of Waters, Hoda Barakat (Lebanon)          
  • Bye, Bye Babylon, Lamia Ziade [graphic novel] (Lebanon)
  • The Arab of the Future, Part I, Raid Sattouf [graphic novel] (France/Syria)
  • Excerpts from Jurists of Darkness and Caves of Hydrahodahose, Salim Barakat (Syria)
  • Frankenstein in Baghdad, by Ahmed Sa'adawi (Iraq)
  • "The Ill-fated One (al-Mankud)," Abd al-Rahman Munif (Jordan/Iraq/Saudi Arabia)
  • The Bamboo Stalk, Saud al-Sanousi (Kuwait)
  • Supplemental secondary readings drawn from a range of fields, including history, sociology, economics, philosophy, and literary/film criticism

 

HEB 611C • Intensive Hebrew II

41465 • Spring 2017
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM MEZ 1.206

Course Description

The course, which builds upon HEB 601C, emphasizes composition, comprehension and conversation in Modern Hebrew, and provides a segue to upper-division Hebrew courses such as Hebrew Grammar, Advanced Conversation and Composition, and Introduction to Hebrew Literature. Oral discourse is maintained at maximal level, and small group/individual instruction sessions supplement the regular class routine. Audio-visual materials are frequently used. Students write short papers, present topics to the class and lead class discussions. Active participation in class discussions is a decisive element in students' participation grade. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew.

Grading Policy

Participation 15%; Quizzes 30%; Homework 20% Presentations 5%; Midtem exam 10%; Final exam 20% May vary with instructor.

Texts

Information on texts will be provided by the instructor.

 

This course meets Monday through Friday. Please check the online course schedule for TTH meeting time and location.

HEB 601C • Intensive Hebrew I

41290 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.206

This course is the first semester of intensive Hebrew language instruction.

Texts

Raizen, Modern Hebrew for Beginners

Grading

To be provided by instructor.

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    Austin, TX 78712
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