Department of Anthropology

Maria Franklin


Associate ProfessorPh.D., Anthropology, University of California at Berkeley

Associate Professor; Faculty Graduate Advisor
Maria Franklin

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 471-8513
  • Office: SAC 4.150
  • Office Hours: Fall 2016: Tuesdays and Wednesdays 12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: C3200

Interests


Historical archaeology, archaeological theory, African Diaspora studies, race and gender, feminist theory

Courses


ANT 324L • Archaeol Excavation Analysis

31210 • Fall 2016
Meets T 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 4.174

This is a lab-based course where students will work directly with artifacts recovered from a historic site in central Texas. The assemblage largely consists of a wide spectrum of household- related artifacts, including ceramics, container glass, decorative objects, personal effects, and so on. The general goal is to train students in basic archaeological lab methods, technical report writing, and artifact analysis. These are foundational skill sets applicable to all practices of archaeology.

By the end of the semester, students should be able to demonstrate:

  • -  basic identification and cataloging of artifacts, mainly dating from circa 1900 to the

    1960s.

  • -  How to create tables and graphics and write a descriptive analysis of artifacts for a

    typical archaeological site report.

  • -  How to assess various artifact types in terms of their potential to address different

    research questions (e.g., site dating, site transformation processes, household economy, identity, etc.). 

ANT 398T • Supv Teaching In Anthropology

31517 • Fall 2016
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.124

The purpose of this course is to provide you with theoretical and practical knowledge

about teaching and learning at the postsecondary level, ultimately to help prepare you for a

teaching position in a higher education setting. Major topics that we will cover include (1)

teaching effectiveness, (2) modes of learning, (3) teaching philosophy, (4) course design, (5)

lecture design and delivery, and (6) graduate education and the demands of academia.

ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

30235-30270 • Spring 2016
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM FAC 21

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 324L • Archaeol Excavation Analysis

30514 • Fall 2015
Meets F 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 4.174

This is a lab-based course where students will work directly with artifacts recovered from a

historic site in central Texas. The assemblage largely consists of a wide spectrum of householdrelated

artifacts, including ceramics, container glass, decorative objects, personal effects, and so

on. The general goal is to train students in basic archaeological lab methods, technical report

writing, and artifact analysis. These are foundational skill sets applicable to all practices of

archaeology.

By the end of the semester, students should be able to demonstrate:

- basic identification and cataloging of artifacts, mainly dating from circa 1900 to the

1960s.

- How to create tables and graphics and write a descriptive analysis of artifacts for a

typical archaeological site report.

- How to assess various artifact types in terms of their potential to address different

research questions (e.g., site dating, site transformation processes, household

economy, identity, etc.).

ANT 398T • Supv Teaching In Anthropology

30735 • Fall 2015
Meets M 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.124

The purpose of this course is to provide you with theoretical and practical knowledge

about teaching and learning at the postsecondary level, ultimately to help prepare you for a

teaching position in a higher education setting. Major topics that we will cover include (1)

teaching effectiveness, (2) modes of learning, (3) teaching philosophy, (4) course design, (5)

lecture design and delivery, and (6) graduate education and the demands of academia.

ANT F662 • Field Archaeology-Cent Tx

81020 • Summer 2015

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

30495-30530 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM FAC 21

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 398T • Supv Teaching In Anthropology

31745 • Fall 2014
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.124

The purpose of this course is to provide you with theoretical and practical knowledge

about teaching and learning at the postsecondary level, ultimately to help prepare you for a

teaching position in a higher education setting. Major topics that we will cover include (1)

teaching effectiveness, (2) modes of learning, (3) teaching philosophy, (4) course design, (5)

lecture design and delivery, and (6) graduate education and the demands of academia.

AFR 376 • Senior Seminar

30835 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEL 232

A capstone course fpr AFR majors focusing on black intellectual traditions.

ANT 324L • Archaeol/Hist Slavery In N. Am

31325 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 4.174
(also listed as AFR 372F)

Course Description:

This course is a comparative survey of the institution of slavery on the American mainland from thecolonial through the antebellum periods. An interdisciplinary perspective will be employed through readings, exercises, lectures and discussions related to the archaeology and history of slavery. We will begin with discussions of some of the key issues and questions that scholars of American slavery have addressed over time, and consider a few of the theories concerning identity formation and enslaved Africans. Following lectures/discussions focus on the development of plantation societies, particularly among the English, and later, the Americans. While plantation economies will be covered, the emphasis will be on issues related to society and culture from the viewpoint of enslaved Africans and blacks. Further, rather than view slavery as a dominant institution, the class will consider the ways in which those in bondage covertly and overtly resisted their enslavement. Their social and cultural practices,it will be argued, were crucial in carrying out these acts. By considering a variety of case studies from the 17th to the 19th centuries, covering diverse regions and locales, we can study the development of race-based slavery, understand its role in the transformation of American society and culture, and recognize the diversity of experiences that shaped, and were shaped by, this institution.

Topics to be covered include the following:

I. Race and gender

II. Life within the enslaved community

A. Cultural practices (for example, foodways, landscapes, religion, and craft production).

B. Social institutions (for example, families, slave quarter communities, and marriage practices).

III. Relationships between slaveowners and the enslaved.

IV. Plantations: cotton, sugar, rice, and tobacco.

V. Institution of slavery: legal codes, planter ideologies, relationship to race and racism.

VI. Labor diversity within the system of slavery: urban vs. rural, artisans and skilled labor, field labor,domestic work.

VII. Opposition and resistance: slave uprisings, abolitionism, the Underground Railroad, maroonage, runaways, etc.

VIII. Interpreting historical sources related to slavery.

Course Goals:

By the end of the semester, you should be able to do the following:

? Compare and contrast the diversity of plantation systems by considering the following factors: settlement patterns, built environments, labor forces, and planting/processing techniques involved in sugar, rice, cotton, and tobacco agriculture.

? Discuss the diversity of experiences of enslaved blacks and Africans with regard to different sociohistorical contexts (e.g., 17th-century Chesapeake, Spanish Florida, 19th-century Louisiana, etc.).? Critically analyze the role of gender in shaping the experiences of enslaved individuals.

? Demonstrate how enslaved groups actively participated in the creation of cultural practices and socialinstitutions.? Assess the various strategies of resistance used by both the free and the enslaved to challenge the system of slavery.

? Possess some basic knowledge on how to use primary historical documents and material culture to interpret the lifeways, experiences, and perspectives of slaveowners and the enslaved.

Course Requirements: Final grades will be based on the percentage of points scored out of a possible “100”. The total points possible are divided as follows:

(1) Two in-class group exercises (5 pts. each) = 10 points

(2) Journal entries (4 pts. each) = 40 points

(3) Discussion (5 pts. each) = 10 points

(4) Wiki project = 40 points

Group exercises

You must arrive on time to class in order to receive full credit for completing each group assignment. The handouts needed for both will be posted on Blackboard. Please print these out (bring the handouts to class), read them over and be prepared to start the assignment at the beginning of class.

Journals

The “Journal” tool in Blackboard has been set up. I will post the questions and/or issues that you should address foreach entry on Blackboard (under Announcements), and announce them in class (or via email).The journals will help me to evaluate and keep track of your progress over the semester in comprehending course content and in meeting course goals. Focus on the readings when journaling. The main things that I am looking for when grading (but you don’t have to incorporate all 3 for each entry) are: comprehension of the author’s objectives and your ability to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of his/her arguments, your ability to relate the reading to the day’s topic(s) and contextualize it more broadly within the major course goals, and, importantly, how well you address the issue/question assigned for each entry using specific evidence from the reading(s). Please feel free to provide your reflections on how well you’re doing in the course. Your journals will only be viewable by you and I.

Due dates for journal entries are listed in the schedule below; you must complete your entry by 11am on the due date or it will be considered late. Each entry should be around 250 words.

DiscussionsGoal: To provide a forum for class discussion of course materials as a means of ensuring that students are wellversed on the subject matters to date before moving forward. This is an opportunity to engage in friendly debate, ask questions that still linger for you, and to try and grasp how specific readings, etc. relate to broader course goals.

You will be assigned two discussion dates; there are six altogether. You are required to coordinate with your codiscussants (you can email one another via Blackboard) in completing the following:

1) Each co-discussant must come up with 2 questions/topics/debates related to the readings, video, and to a lesser extent, the lectures assigned to your group. These should be grouped by themes (e.g., plantation labor, resistance to slavery, women’s experiences, cultural production, etc.). Please do not recycle questions assigned for journal entries.

Your questions should be aimed towards generating a productive class discussion, so don’t make them too easy. Feel free to post questions that you yourself don’t know the answer to!

2) One student will be responsible for putting together a handout of the above and forwarding the document to me via email by 9am on the day of the discussion. I will bring copies to hand out in class. Please be sure that the name of each student who contributed to the assignment is listed on the handout. This is the document that I’ll use for grading.3) Finally: you must be present on the days that you are assigned or you will receive no credit even if you contributed to this assignment.

Wiki project

Your major project for this class is to create a wiki page based on interpretations of a selection of ex-slave narratives from the Federal Writer’s Project. You are responsible for coming up with a research question on life during antebellum slavery, choosing a minimum of 7 narratives and 3 scholarly readings to address it, and then writing an essay based upon your interpretation of the sources. Your essay should be between 1,700 to 2,000 words (about 3.5- 4 single-spaced pages).

Do not use the narratives assigned to our class for this project. As for articles/books, you can use one from class, but you are expected to conduct research for this paper in finding appropriate source materials.

You will be given a tutorial on working with Dupral wikis, which are very user friendly. The wiki editor allows you to incorporate hyperlinks, images, sound bites, etc., into your text. Be creative in constructing your wiki page by using these features since part of your grade will be based upon your resourcefulness in finding relevant media to integrate into your essay. There are ample sources on the web that can be used.

A 100-150 word abstract of your project, stating your main question and listing your 3 scholarly reference works, is due on November 1. The abstracts will allow me to assess whether or not you have a suitable question and supporting references. You may be asked to revise your topic or find alternate readings. Note: Abstracts will not be graded, but 6 points will be deducted from your wiki assignment for failure to turn this in.

A handout with more specifics will be made available in October. If you prefer to get started on this assignment sooner, there are plenty of books at the PCL containing the ex-slave narratives, or you can simply go to:

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/snhtml/snhome.html

Policy on late assignments: A late assignment will only be accepted with prior approval from the instructor.

In this case, only a one-week extension of the deadline will be granted and 50% of the points possible will be deducted from the final assignment grade.

Grading Scale:

90 – 100 = A

80 – 89 = B

70 – 79 = C

60 – 69 = D

59 and below = F

Required Texts available at the UT Co-op:

1. Ira Berlin, “Generations in Captivity,” 2003. This book is also available electronically via UTnetcat.

2. Leland Ferguson, “Uncommon Ground”, ([1992]2004).

ANT 398T • Supv Teaching In Anthropology

31680 • Fall 2013
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 4.120

The purpose of this course is to provide you with theoretical and practical knowledge

about teaching and learning at the postsecondary level, ultimately to help prepare you for a

teaching position in a higher education setting. Major topics that we will cover include (1)

teaching effectiveness, (2) modes of learning, (3) teaching philosophy, (4) course design, (5)

lecture design and delivery, and (6) graduate education and the demands of academia.

ANT 324L • Theories Of Archaeology

31290 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 4.174

This course is a senior seminar for students who are pursuing studies in archaeology, and satisfies the “theory” requirement for the Anthropology degree. It is a broad survey of the major theoretical trends that have shaped anthropological archaeology over time. As such it is a course on the history of archaeological thought that highlights the major debates and key issues that have influenced the ways in which we diversely claim to know what we know about the past.

Why a course on theories of archaeology? We tend to envision archaeology as the discovery of sites and the pursuit of artifacts since field excavations dominate its public persona in print, documentaries, and of course in Hollywood movies. Yet archaeologists actually spend more time dealing with the analyses of excavated materials and moving from data to interpretations or explanations of the past than we do digging. The various intellectual approaches that we take towards drawing conclusions, if even tentative ones, are influenced by the different perspectives we have of the relationship between the past and the present, what kinds of information or meaning we believe can be derived from the archaeological record, the questions we seek to answer, and indeed, how much of the past each of us posits is knowable. Thus, what we often refer to as “archaeological theory” is best stated in the plural since there are multiple and competing ways that archaeologists theorize archaeological remains in order to interpret past societies and lifeways. That is to say, there is not a single, proven “archaeological theory” widely accepted by all. Theories are intertwined with practice/methodologies and are what frames and drives our interpretations, or what serve as the basis for our generalizing explanations of the past. Rather than bemoan the discipline’s heterogeneity, it is hoped that students will come to appreciate its diversity and breadth.

While we will spend the majority of the semester with a focus on how archaeologists deal with the archaeological record and past cultures and societies as subjects of inquiry, we will also explore the politics of the discipline. That is, what role does archaeology play in the contemporary world with respect to urgent issues such as inequality and nationalism? Some of the topics that are now central in archaeology that will be addressed include professional ethics, social responsibility, working with the public, and Indigenous rights over their past.

A note on the format and workload of this course:

This course was designed to provide students with sufficient background knowledge of archaeological theories in order to prepare them for graduate studies in archaeology where the subject will be a core feature of the curriculum. Moreover, it will be taught mainly in the style of a graduate seminar, where student-led discussions are an integral part of the learning process. Thus, students will be expected to give careful consideration to the assigned readings in preparation for discussions. Please note that there is a relatively heavy reading load for this course, and that most of the readings are advanced and may be complicated (i.e., these are not introductory readings). 

ANT 392R • African Diaspora Anthropology

31505 • Spring 2013
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM BEL 232
(also listed as AFR 381)

Almost three decades ago, anthropologist and pioneer of African Diaspora Studies, St. Clair Drake, asserted, “the diaspora analogy...needs constant critical analysis if it is to be a useful guide to research as well as a striking metaphor.” This seminar is designed to introduce students to the variety of ideas that underlie the articulation of the construct of the “African diaspora.” Although structured through the understanding of the African diaspora as an historical formation, the focus is on the African diaspora as a distinct intellectual project as well as a political one. As such, we will explore the ways scholars have conceptualized and theorized the “diasporadic condition” of Black peoples, and how the community is imagined. These questions have undergirded the contemporary struggle over the meanings of race, place, identity, and consciousness within the African diaspora. Thus, their full examination necessitates intensive discussions and explorations of a number of issues.

In our engagement with theorizations of the African diaspora, we will explore, among other things, global/transnational understandings and articulations of Blackness; the (indispensable?) role of Africa in diasporic identity formations; the relationship between politics and Black cultural production and expression; the interrelationship of race, culture, gender, sexuality and ethnicity; notions of “roots” and “routes” in structuring the diasporadic condition; issues of cultural syncretism and hybridity; and the unstable contradiction between notions of “essentialist” origins and social constructions of Black identities.

This seminar meets the Dept. of Anthropology’s core requirement. As a “sixth” core course, it addresses both the anthropology and archaeology of the African Diaspora. 

ANT 324L • Archaeol/Hist Slavery In N Am

31141 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 4.118
(also listed as AFR 374D)

This course is a comparative survey of the institution of slavery on the American mainland (with some discussion of the Caribbean) from the era of seventeenth-century European colonialism through the antebellum period.  We will begin by exploring Portuguese, French, Dutch, British and Spanish colonizing efforts in the Americas, and their varying roles in the trans-Atlantic slave trade.  The class proceeds with discussions of the Middle Passage, and the development of plantation societies.  Whileplantation economies will be covered, the emphasis will be on issues related to society, culture, and identity formation, particularly amongst the enslaved.Thus, the course will cover the daily life experiences of enslaved peoples within a variety of sociohistorical contexts marked by relations of domination and resistance.  Through historical and archaeological evidence, one begins, however, to understand that there existed no monolithic enslaved experience.  Rather, a diversity of experiences, and a range of cultural and social institutions characterized enslaved life.  The issue of identity formation is central here: race, as a social construct, was variously instituted and negotiated under different colonial powers, but nonetheless served as a powerful marker in slave societies.  We will, therefore, consider racial formation from a comparative perspective. 

ANT 380K • Meth And Thry In Hist Archaeol

31300 • Fall 2012
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM SAC 5.124

This seminar will attempt to map the development of historical archaeology, and will delve into themultiplicity of theoretical and methodological approaches currently in vogue.  The focus will be onAmericanist historical archaeology and its relationship to anthropology, prehistoric archaeology,and history.  By discussing a number of topics and divergent theories and methods, this ambitious seminar will be both comprehensive and critical.  We will cover subjects ranging from the basics of artifact analysis and the role of documentary sources, to issues such as the sociopolitics of archaeology,social inequality, and cultural contact.

ANT 324L • Archae/Hist Of Slavery In N Am

30990 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as AFR 374D)

This course is a comparative survey of the institution of slavery on the American mainland (with some discussion of the Caribbean) from the era of seventeenth-century European colonialism through the antebellum period.  We will begin by exploring Portuguese, French, Dutch, British and Spanish colonizing efforts in the Americas, and their varying roles in the trans-Atlantic slave trade.  The class proceeds with discussions of the Middle Passage, and the development of plantation societies.  Whileplantation economies will be covered, the emphasis will be on issues related to society, culture, and identity formation, particularly amongst the enslaved.Thus, the course will cover the daily life experiences of enslaved peoples within a variety of sociohistorical contexts marked by relations of domination and resistance.  Through historical and archaeological evidence, one begins, however, to understand that there existed no monolithic enslaved experience.  Rather, a diversity of experiences, and a range of cultural and social institutions characterized enslaved life.  The issue of identity formation is central here: race, as a social construct, was variously instituted and negotiated under different colonial powers, but nonetheless served as a powerful marker in slave societies.  We will, therefore, consider racial formation from acomparative perspective. 

ANT 392S • Women's And Gender Studies

31208 • Fall 2011
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.118

This seminar considers the history and contemporary practice of feminist anthropology. After a survey of the impact of first, second, and third wave feminism within anthropology, we will turn to contemporary topics including feminism and science; feminist methodologies; culture and biology; sex, sexuality and gender; the anthropology of reproduction; and the anthropology of power. This seminar considers perspectives from several subdisciplines in Anthropology, and fulfills a core course requirement for Anthropology graduate students.

AFR 376 • Afr/Afr Amer Stds Senior Smnr

30605 • Spring 2011
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM JES A230

A capstone course fpr AFR majors focusing on black intellectual traditions.

ANT 392R • Diaspora Studies

31525 • Spring 2011
Meets T 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.118

Almost three decades ago, anthropologist and pioneer of African  Diaspora Studies, St. Clair Drake, asserted, ?the diaspora  analogy?needs constant critical analysis if it is to be a useful guide  to research as well as a striking metaphor.?  This seminar is designed  to introduce students to the variety of ideas that underlie the  articulation of the construct of the ?African diaspora.?  Although  structured through the understanding of the African diaspora as an  historical formation, the focus is on the African diaspora as a  distinct intellectual project.  As such, we will explore the ways  scholars have conceptualized and theorized the ?diasporadic condition?  of Black peoples.  (And, as we will see, the anthropology of the  African diaspora can be traced to the paradigmatic debates on Black  identity formations.)Throughout the semester, we will critically explore the two  fundamental questions that have oriented the bulk of scholarship on  the African diaspora over the years:  who belongs to the diasporic  community and, how is this community imagined?  These questions have  undergirded the contemporary struggle over the meanings of race,  place, identity, and consciousness within the African diaspora. Thus,  their full examination necessitates intensive discussions and  explorations of a number of issues.  In our engagement with  theorization on the African diaspora, we will explore, among other  things, global/transnational understandings and articulations of  Blackness; the (indispensable?) role of Africa in diasporic identity  formations; the relationship between politics and Black cultural  production and expression; the interrelationship of race, culture,  gender, sexuality and ethnicity; notions of ?roots? and ?routes? in  structuring the diasporadic condition; issues of cultural syncretism  and hybridity; and the unstable contradiction between notions of  ?essentialist? origins and social constructions of Black identities.This seminar meets the Dept. of Anthropology?s core requirement. As a  ?sixth? core course, it addresses both the anthropology and  archaeology of the African Diaspora.

ANT 324L • Theories Of Archaeology

30155 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM EPS 1.128

This course is a capstone seminar for juniors and seniors who are pursuing

studies in archaeology, and who hope to continue on in either the academic or

non-academic sectors of professional archaeology. It surveys the major

theoretical trends that have shaped the discipline over time.  As such it is a

course on the history of archaeological thought that highlights the major

debates and key issues that have influenced the ways in which we diversely

claim to know what we know about the past. Our focus will be on anthropological

archaeology in the U.S., although major developments in the UK have also been

largely influential in the recent past and will also be covered.

 

Some of the major issues/topics

that we will address include:

 

- How has American archaeology transformed through the years, and what factors

have influenced its development?

- How do archaeologists variously bridge method, data, and theory to interpret

the past?

- How is archaeology politicized? What are the ethics of archaeology, and what

are our responsibilities to the public?

ANT 380K • Inequality And Archaeology

30240 • Fall 2010
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM EPS 1.128

This seminar is a survey of theoretical approaches to the issue of
inequality/power/hierarchy in archaeological research and in archaeology as a political practice.
We will begin by considering early case studies of archaeological thought on the rise of social
and political hierarchy, and status, difference and power, in order to familiarize students with the
“roots” of subsequent discourses on inequality in the past (with scholars either building upon or
contesting – sometimes both – these early works). During most of the semester we will focus on
the various trajectories that contemporary archaeologists have taken in theorizing inequality as
they’ve sought to explain or interpret the myriad range of sites, cultures, and time periods that
now represent the field. Rather than organize the seminar by regions or theoretical frameworks,
the topics are organized roughly by the kinds of societies and issues that scholars have typically,
though not exclusively, evaluated when considering power relations. The rationale here is to give
students some sense of the range of approaches, including competing ones, that can be applied to
similar case studies. The relationships between theory, site, method, scale of analysis, and
research objective(s) should be discussed as the semester unfolds.
This seminar’s objective is to also critically assess archaeology’s role in contemporary
social and political discourses and practices. This occurs in two interrelated spheres: 1) within
the discipline itself with respect to knowledge production, unequal relations between
practitioners, etc., and 2) between archaeologists and the societies within which we work. An
intention of this seminar is to get participants to think about the ways in which our scholarship
on inequality in the past can and should be considered relevant to archaeology’s role in today’s
world.

AFR 376 • Afr/Afr Amer Stds Senior Smnr

35560 • Spring 2010
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM JES A230

A capstone course fpr AFR majors focusing on black intellectual traditions.

ANT 392S • Anthropology: Wom'S/Gend Stds

30620 • Spring 2010
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM EPS 1.128

This seminar considers the history and contemporary practice of feminist anthropology. After a survey of the impact of first, second, and third wave feminism within anthropology, we will turn to contemporary topics including feminism and science; feminist methodologies; culture and biology; sex, sexuality and gender; the anthropology of reproduction; and the anthropology of power. This seminar considers perspectives from several subdisciplines in Anthropology, and fulfills a core course requirement for Anthropology graduate students.

AFR 376 • Afr/Afr Amer Stds Senior Smnr

35080 • Spring 2009
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM JES A230

A capstone course fpr AFR majors focusing on black intellectual traditions.

AFR 301 • African American Culture-W

32860 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM EPS 2.136

This course surveys African American cultural production from the 1600s to the present. Topics cover the circumstances and responses of blacks during North American enslavement, the Civil War, Reconstruction, Great Migration, The Harlem Renaissance, The Civil Rights Movement, and in contemporary contexts. Class sessions will reflect our reading of primary and secondary texts that embody a wide range of African American religious, political, social and artistic thought and production. The class will fill gaps in students’ knowledge about African American culture and history and provide a foundation for future Black Studies course work.

Required Texts:

Kindred (Octavia Butler)

Souls of Black Folk (W.E.B. Du Bois)

Why We Can’t Wait (Martin Luther King, Jr.)

Price of the Ticket (Frederick Harris)

Good Ole’ Fashioned Composition Notebook

Graded Assessments (100 points available):

Unannounced (10) Quiz #1 Kindred, lectures & other readings Unannounced

(10) Quiz #2 Souls of Black Folk, lectures & other readings

10/9/14: (30) Mid-term Test

Unannounced (10) Quiz #3 Why We Can’t Wait, lectures & other readings

Unannounced (10) Quiz #4 (Price of the Ticket; lectures & other readings

12/5/14: (30) Final Test 

AFR 301 • African American Culture

31565 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 201

This course surveys African American cultural production from the 1600s to the present. Topics cover the circumstances and responses of blacks during North American enslavement, the Civil War, Reconstruction, Great Migration, The Harlem Renaissance, The Civil Rights Movement, and in contemporary contexts. Class sessions will reflect our reading of primary and secondary texts that embody a wide range of African American religious, political, social and artistic thought and production. The class will fill gaps in students’ knowledge about African American culture and history and provide a foundation for future Black Studies course work.

Required Texts:

Kindred (Octavia Butler)

Souls of Black Folk (W.E.B. Du Bois)

Why We Can’t Wait (Martin Luther King, Jr.)

Price of the Ticket (Frederick Harris)

Good Ole’ Fashioned Composition Notebook

Graded Assessments (100 points available):

Unannounced (10) Quiz #1 Kindred, lectures & other readings Unannounced

(10) Quiz #2 Souls of Black Folk, lectures & other readings

10/9/14: (30) Mid-term Test

Unannounced (10) Quiz #3 Why We Can’t Wait, lectures & other readings

Unannounced (10) Quiz #4 (Price of the Ticket; lectures & other readings

12/5/14: (30) Final Test 

AFR F301 • African American Culture

84285 • Summer 2003
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:00PM EPS 2.136

This course is an exploration of African American culture that provides students with
analytical tools to critically examine and consciously participate in the ongoing
construction of African American culture. Particular attention is given to key terms such
as race, culture, Blackness, hegemony, aesthetics, and politics. Emphasis is placed on
Black agency as demonstrated through the social, political, and representational choices
made by African Americans.

HIS 366N • Archaeol/Hist Slavery In N Am

36802 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM EPS 2.136

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

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