Department of Anthropology

Pauline Strong


ProfessorPh.D., University of Chicago

Director of the Humanities Institute; Professor of Anthropology and Women's and Gender Studies
Pauline Strong

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 471-8524
  • Office: SAC 4.130
  • Office Hours: Fall 2016: Tuesdays 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: C3200

Interests


Cultural, historical, feminist anthropology. Identity and difference. Politics of representation. Public culture. Youth organizations. Museum studies. US, Indigenous North America.

Biography


Pauline Strong received her bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Colorado College and graduate degrees in sociocultural anthropology from the University of Chicago.  She has published on the representation of Native American cultures and identities in North American literature, scholarship, film, art, museums, sports events, legislation, social movements, and youth organizations. Her current research concerns the role that 20th-century youth organizations played in the development of racialized and gendered U.S. citizens.

She is the author of American Indians and the American Imaginary: Cultural Representation Across the Centuries (2012) and Captive Selves, Captivating Others: The Politics and Poetics of Colonial American Captivity Narratives (1999). She is also co-editor (with Sergei Kan) of New Perspectives on Native North America: Cultures, Histories, Representations (2006). Her articles appear in journals and anthologies in the fields of American Studies, cultural studies, history, media studies, Native American Studies, and sports studies as well as anthropology.

She currently directs the Humanities Institute at the University of Texas at Austin, which offers a variety of programs  for interdisciplinary intellectual engagement across the campus and community. Previously she served as President of the Society for Cultural Anthropology and Councilor of the American Society for Ethnohistory.  Her community service includes serving as President and Director of the Board of the Balcones Council of Camp Fire USA.

Undergraduate courses

  • Research and Writing Culture (UGS 302)
  • Difficult Dialogues: Cultural Identities and Differences (UGS 303)
  • Cultural Anthropology (ANT 301)
  • Indians of the American Southwest (ANT 322M/AMS 321)
  • American Indian Cultures North of Mexico (ANT 336L/AMS 321)
  • Peoples of the North (ANT/CREES)

Graduate courses

  • The Structure of Organizations (HDO 287)
  • Introduction to Graduate Social Anthropology (ANT 392)
  • Introduction to Graduate Feminist Anthropology and Archaeology (ANT 391/WGS)
  • Indigenous Cultural Politics (ANT 394)
  • History and Culture of Youth Organizations (ANT 391/RGK)
  • Representational Practices (ANT 394)
  • Workshop in Theory and Method (ANT 391)

Courses


ANT 392S • Intro Graduate Feminist Anthro

30605 • Spring 2016
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.118

This seminar considers the history and contemporary practice of feminist anthropology. After a survey of the impact of first, second, and third wave feminism within anthropology, we will turn to contemporary topics including feminism and science; feminist methodologies; culture and biology; sex, sexuality and gender; the anthropology of reproduction; and the anthropology of power. This seminar considers perspectives from several subdisciplines in Anthropology, and fulfills a core course requirement for Anthropology graduate students.

ANT S302 • Cultural Anthropology

81100 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM SAC 4.174

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Honors

30490 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.106

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 392S • Intro Graduate Feminist Anthro

31925 • Spring 2014
Meets M 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.118

This seminar considers the history and contemporary practice of feminist anthropology. After a survey of the impact of first, second, and third wave feminism within anthropology, we will turn to contemporary topics including feminism and science; feminist methodologies; culture and biology; sex, sexuality and gender; the anthropology of reproduction; and the anthropology of power. This seminar considers perspectives from several subdisciplines in Anthropology, and fulfills a core course requirement for Anthropology graduate students.

ANT F302 • Cultural Anthropology

81850 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM SAC 4.174

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 391 • Representation

31487 • Spring 2013
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 4.118
(also listed as WGS 393)

This seminar considers theories of representation current in anthropology, women’s studies, and other disciplines as well as a variety of representational practices, especially the representation of collective selves and others in ethnographic narratives, collections, and displays.  Among topics to be confronted are the politics and poetics of representation; representation and historical memory; the relationship of representation to objectification and appropriation; postmodern and postcolonial crises of representation; and contemporary experiments in representation.

ANT S302 • Cultural Anthropology

82125 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTH 1:00PM-3:00PM SAC 4.174

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 392M • Intro To Grad Social Anthro

31205 • Fall 2011
Meets T 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.118

This course introduces doctoral students to major texts in sociocultural theory that have been central to the development of the discipline of anthropology from its colonial roots in North America and Western Europe to the contemporary period. While not a comprehensive history of anthropological theory, this course provides a chronological and contextualized perspective as it explores and interprets the relationships between varying and, at times, competing theoretical, epistemological, and ethical claims on anthropology and related disciplines. Based on classical scholarship by some of the “founding fathers” of modern social science, this course traces parts of the genealogical trajectories taken by the anthropological study of culture and society. Following that intellectual legacy, this course asks a central question: How can we make sense of sociocultural anthropology as an academic discipline today? Problematizing the role the concept of “culture” has played in shaping the idea of the “field,” we will look at “location” as a principal site of epistemological limitation and possibility for anthropological research.

ANT F302 • Cultural Anthropology

81805 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTH 9:00AM-11:00AM SAC 4.174

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT F336L • Natv Amer Culs North Of Mex

81833 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTH 1:00PM-3:00PM SAC 4.174

This course is a selective introduction to the cultures and histories of the peoples of Native North America.  The readings represent a variety of geographic areas, historical periods, and scholarly approaches.  Required readings will be supplemented with ethnographic films.  Among the topics to be considered are cultural identity and community, religion and world view, sovereignty and recognition, cultural appropriation and repatriation, historical and cultural representation, and ethnographic research and writing.  The course fulfills the undergraduate cultural diversity requirement, as well as the culture area requirement for Anthropology majors. 

ANT 394M • Indigenous Cultural Polit

31562 • Spring 2011
Meets T 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 4.120

 

 This seminar considers the growing national and   global significance of indigenous cultural politics.  What has given rise to this development? What are its possibilities? How has it been institutionalized? What are its limitations? Readings consider such topics as indigenous identities, indigenous rights, indigenous movements, and indigenous forms of representation. Student will develop and present an original research project on some aspect of indigenous cultural politics.  

ANT 392M • Intro To Grad Social Anthro

30360 • Fall 2010
Meets T 9:00AM-12:00PM EPS 1.128

Course is team taught by Prof. Jemima Pierre and Prof. Pauline Strong.

 

This course introduces students to theory in sociocultural anthropology from its colonial roots to the contemporary period. This course is not a history of anthropological theory, but will provide a chronological and contextualized perspective as we explore and interpret the relationships between varying and, at times, competing theoretical, epistemological, and ethical claims on anthropology.

ANT 392P • Intro To Graduate Folklore

30140 • Spring 2009
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM EPS 1.128

Seminar Description: Today cultural analysis is being applied more widely than ever before, across varied domains—expressive, corporate, scientific, and social—that require different types of expertise and knowledge to properly comprehend. In this expansion of the scope of “cultural” as an explanatory framework, a focus on form provides a free-floating type of attention across a range of milieus and mediums. The analysis of form is as ancient as Greek philosophy (e.g. rhetoric) but as current as our interests in the latest technologies. This seminar surveys the variety of ways that an overarching interest in form is fueling interdisciplinary research, particularly in projects that track disparate cultural phenomenon across complex landscapes as they manifest in dense, multi-layered arrangements, often fusing financial, aesthetic, and political interests. We will examine the trend towards melding topic areas—such as “media ecology” or using “publics” with collectives of nonhuman life forms—to devise distinct ways of comprehending emergent cultural objects and activities. Media—as it references an array of substances, instruments, or channels—and mediation (in biotechnologies, communication infrastructures, legal practices, and market expansions) will serve as a basic point of orientation for seminar readings and discussion. Other examples of emergent phenomenon will be drawn from current work in science studies, post-human and biodiversity projects, and urban ecologies, which are each held together by an overriding attention to cultural forms of expression and exchange. The seminar will be divided into thirds: the first provides an overarching framework for an attention to form; the second examines a variety of forms (visual, sonic, urban, etc.); the final third focuses on applying these perspectives.

Seminar Dynamics: This initial stage of the seminar will feature a combination of lectures and readings: the first half of each session will primarily be lecture-oriented with a discussion following in the second half. Depending on the pace of discussions we can shift away from lectures entirely as we progress through the semester. A key objective is for participants to apply these analytical approaches, either in relation to their specific areas of research or in a more general manner. The mechanism for doing this will be a series of short, informal essays (3 or 4) in which participants develop sketches of objects, settings, or dynamics via an attention to cultural form.

ANT F336L • Amer Indian Cul North Of Mex

82610 • Summer 2008
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM MEZ 1.122

This course is a selective introduction to the cultures and histories of the peoples of Native North America.  The readings represent a variety of geographic areas, historical periods, and scholarly approaches.  Required readings will be supplemented with ethnographic films.  Among the topics to be considered are cultural identity and community, religion and world view, sovereignty and recognition, cultural appropriation and repatriation, historical and cultural representation, and ethnographic research and writing.  The course fulfills the undergraduate cultural diversity requirement, as well as the culture area requirement for Anthropology majors. 

ANT 392P • Intro To Graduate Folklore

30205 • Spring 2007
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM EPS 1.130KA

Seminar Description: Today cultural analysis is being applied more widely than ever before, across varied domains—expressive, corporate, scientific, and social—that require different types of expertise and knowledge to properly comprehend. In this expansion of the scope of “cultural” as an explanatory framework, a focus on form provides a free-floating type of attention across a range of milieus and mediums. The analysis of form is as ancient as Greek philosophy (e.g. rhetoric) but as current as our interests in the latest technologies. This seminar surveys the variety of ways that an overarching interest in form is fueling interdisciplinary research, particularly in projects that track disparate cultural phenomenon across complex landscapes as they manifest in dense, multi-layered arrangements, often fusing financial, aesthetic, and political interests. We will examine the trend towards melding topic areas—such as “media ecology” or using “publics” with collectives of nonhuman life forms—to devise distinct ways of comprehending emergent cultural objects and activities. Media—as it references an array of substances, instruments, or channels—and mediation (in biotechnologies, communication infrastructures, legal practices, and market expansions) will serve as a basic point of orientation for seminar readings and discussion. Other examples of emergent phenomenon will be drawn from current work in science studies, post-human and biodiversity projects, and urban ecologies, which are each held together by an overriding attention to cultural forms of expression and exchange. The seminar will be divided into thirds: the first provides an overarching framework for an attention to form; the second examines a variety of forms (visual, sonic, urban, etc.); the final third focuses on applying these perspectives.

Seminar Dynamics: This initial stage of the seminar will feature a combination of lectures and readings: the first half of each session will primarily be lecture-oriented with a discussion following in the second half. Depending on the pace of discussions we can shift away from lectures entirely as we progress through the semester. A key objective is for participants to apply these analytical approaches, either in relation to their specific areas of research or in a more general manner. The mechanism for doing this will be a series of short, informal essays (3 or 4) in which participants develop sketches of objects, settings, or dynamics via an attention to cultural form.

AMS 391 • Hist & Cul Of Amer Youth Orgs

30075 • Fall 2006
Meets W 6:30PM-9:30PM EPS 1.128

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

30275-30330 • Fall 2006
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM ART 1.102

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Honors-W

28975 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RAS 215

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 336L • Amer Indian Culs Nor Of Mex-W

27795 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM ENS 109

This upper-division undergraduate course examines contemporary articulations of indigenous cultures and practices in the U.S. and Canada. Because the present cannot be understood without understanding historically how we got to here, this course includes histories that inform the contemporary. We will cover critical developments that shape and are shaped by late 20th century and early 21st century indigenous life. Issues include but are not limited to the American Indian Movement; IdleNoMore; tribal and First Nation citizenship politics; the politics of race and indigeneity in the U.S. and Canada; gaming and other economic development strategies; residential schools; evolving kinship practices; indigenous feminisms, masculinities, and sexualities; indigenous environmental and religious politics (including how “environment” and “religion” are inadequate for understanding those politics!); food sovereignty movements; and science, technology and Native Americans. Course readings come from anthropology, U.S. and Canadian indigenous studies, history, and cultural studies. We will read scholarly work, blogs, and other popular literature. The course features several guest speakers, some via Skype.

 

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

28150-28215 • Fall 2004
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM ART 1.102

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Honors-W

26015 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM EPS 1.128

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 392M • Intro To Grad Social Anthro

26885 • Fall 2002
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM EPS 1.128

This course introduces doctoral students to major texts in sociocultural theory that have been central to the development of the discipline of anthropology from its colonial roots in North America and Western Europe to the contemporary period. While not a comprehensive history of anthropological theory, this course provides a chronological and contextualized perspective as it explores and interprets the relationships between varying and, at times, competing theoretical, epistemological, and ethical claims on anthropology and related disciplines. Based on classical scholarship by some of the “founding fathers” of modern social science, this course traces parts of the genealogical trajectories taken by the anthropological study of culture and society. Following that intellectual legacy, this course asks a central question: How can we make sense of sociocultural anthropology as an academic discipline today? Problematizing the role the concept of “culture” has played in shaping the idea of the “field,” we will look at “location” as a principal site of epistemological limitation and possibility for anthropological research.

ANT 336L • Amer Indian Cul North Of Mex

26485 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 101

This upper-division undergraduate course examines contemporary articulations of indigenous cultures and practices in the U.S. and Canada. Because the present cannot be understood without understanding historically how we got to here, this course includes histories that inform the contemporary. We will cover critical developments that shape and are shaped by late 20th century and early 21st century indigenous life. Issues include but are not limited to the American Indian Movement; IdleNoMore; tribal and First Nation citizenship politics; the politics of race and indigeneity in the U.S. and Canada; gaming and other economic development strategies; residential schools; evolving kinship practices; indigenous feminisms, masculinities, and sexualities; indigenous environmental and religious politics (including how “environment” and “religion” are inadequate for understanding those politics!); food sovereignty movements; and science, technology and Native Americans. Course readings come from anthropology, U.S. and Canadian indigenous studies, history, and cultural studies. We will read scholarly work, blogs, and other popular literature. The course features several guest speakers, some via Skype.

 

ANT 392M • Intro To Grad Social Anthro

27360 • Fall 2001
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM EPS 1.128

This course introduces doctoral students to major texts in sociocultural theory that have been central to the development of the discipline of anthropology from its colonial roots in North America and Western Europe to the contemporary period. While not a comprehensive history of anthropological theory, this course provides a chronological and contextualized perspective as it explores and interprets the relationships between varying and, at times, competing theoretical, epistemological, and ethical claims on anthropology and related disciplines. Based on classical scholarship by some of the “founding fathers” of modern social science, this course traces parts of the genealogical trajectories taken by the anthropological study of culture and society. Following that intellectual legacy, this course asks a central question: How can we make sense of sociocultural anthropology as an academic discipline today? Problematizing the role the concept of “culture” has played in shaping the idea of the “field,” we will look at “location” as a principal site of epistemological limitation and possibility for anthropological research.

ANT S302 • Cultural Anthropology

82010 • Summer 2001
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WEL 2.304

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Honors-W

26605 • Spring 2001
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CBA 4.344

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 392M • Intro To Grad Social Anthro

27480 • Fall 2000
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM EPS 1.128

This course introduces doctoral students to major texts in sociocultural theory that have been central to the development of the discipline of anthropology from its colonial roots in North America and Western Europe to the contemporary period. While not a comprehensive history of anthropological theory, this course provides a chronological and contextualized perspective as it explores and interprets the relationships between varying and, at times, competing theoretical, epistemological, and ethical claims on anthropology and related disciplines. Based on classical scholarship by some of the “founding fathers” of modern social science, this course traces parts of the genealogical trajectories taken by the anthropological study of culture and society. Following that intellectual legacy, this course asks a central question: How can we make sense of sociocultural anthropology as an academic discipline today? Problematizing the role the concept of “culture” has played in shaping the idea of the “field,” we will look at “location” as a principal site of epistemological limitation and possibility for anthropological research.

ANT F302 • Cultural Anthropology

82060 • Summer 2000
Meets MTWTHF 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 2.304

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

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