Department of Spanish and Portuguese
Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Pablo Postigo Olsson


LecturerBA in Spanish Philology, BA in German Philology, MA in Spanish as a Foreign Language Pedagogy, Universidad de Salamanca & Universidad de Barcelona

Contact

Biography


I have graduated in Spanish as well as German Philology (Licenciado) from the University of Salamanca (Spain) and also acquired an MA in Teaching Spanish as a Foreign Language from the University of Barcelona (UB). Currently I am working on my dissertation on a co-tutelle with the Universities of Salamanca and Humboldt at Berlin (Germany). Both as a student and visiting researcher I have obtained parts of my education at the universities of Granada (Spain), Edinbrugh, Lomonosov State University in Moscow, University of California at Berkeley, University of Illinois at Chicago and University of Colorado at Boulder.

My two main lines of research are both related at the same time to linguistics and education. The first line (which my dissertation is related to) studies the reception of modern, 20th-century linguistic theories in Spanish school text books and explores how these theories have changed the understanding and conceptualization of language and grammar in those materials. Directltly connected to this research is a very strong interest in the history of 20th-century linguistics and in the role of linguistic historiography as a linguistic sub-discipline within the current, scientific approach to linguistics.

The second research line is devoted to the analysis of classroom-interaction in FL courses and follows a qualitative, ethnographic approach. I have particularly devoted my attention to the influence of culuturally constrained interactive parameters both on the interactive patterns of the classroom and the learning outcome. Furthermore, I am also interested in the construction of learners' individual and collective identities in a FL-classroom-setting.

Courses


SPN F346 • Sounds And Intonation

86360 • Summer 2016
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM MEZ 2.118

SPN 327C • Adv Gram & Writing In Context

45535 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.108

SPN 327C • Adv Gram & Writing In Context

45565 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 308

SPN 330L • Intro Lang And Ling In Society

45615 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 2.124

SPN 367P • Spanish Hlth Care Professns

45690 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM MEZ 4.136
(also listed as LAS 322)

Develops vocabulary, grammar, expressions, and interactional skills that are related to foreign language for professional purposes. Also covers cultural issues that affect professional activities in Spanish-speaking communities. Designed to exercise fluency in both spoken and written language in health care situations. Focus on the complex grammatical concepts and cultural issues that affect professional activities in Spanish-speaking communities.

SPN 327C • Adv Gram & Writing In Context

45560 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM MEZ 1.216

SPN F346 • Sounds And Intonation-Spn

87265 • Summer 2015

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

46100 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM MEZ 1.120

SPN 327C • Adv Gram & Writing In Context

47260 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.124

SPN 327W • Adv Gram/Comp II-Biling/Bicul

47495 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 2.124

SPN 345L • Intro To Hispanic Linguistics

47550 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM MEZ 1.120

SPN 368L • Spanish Language Structure

47610 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BEN 1.106

SPN 610D • Intermediate Spanish I

47045 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 3:00PM-5:00PM BEN 1.122

1.  PURPOSE, GOALS, AND OBJECTIVES OF THE LANGUAGE PROGRAM

The objective of the Spanish language program addresses the basic tenet of a liberal arts education: the development of a critical thinking approach towards the analysis of language in society. This objective is framed in an overall worldwide trend towards political and economic internationalization and an increasingly diverse and multicultural work environment.

 

The Spanish language program focuses on the development of multilingual literacies through the analysis and use of Spanish as a second language. The program focuses on the development of three major types of competencies (all equally ranked in terms of importance):

 

(1)  linguistic competence (Spanish phonetics / phonology, morphosyntax, lexicon, discourse, etc.)

(2)  communication / interactional competence (sociocultural uses of the language, pragmatics, cultural background / perspectives)

(3)  metalinguistic competence (language as a conceptual, symbolic system)

 

 

2.  COURSE DESCRIPTION, GOALS, AND OBJECTIVES

 

A. SPN 610D is the second course in The University of Texas lower-division Spanish program. This is a six-credit course. The course focuses on further developing speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in Spanish while building vocabulary, learning basic rules and terminology of Spanish grammar, and gaining a better understanding of Hispanic cultures in order to communicate in an accurate, effective, and informed manner within a variety of sociocultural situations. 

 

PREREQUISITE for 610D: SPN 601D, 604, 507, or 508K (or equivalent transfer course), with a grade of at least C, or an appropriate score on the University of Texas Placement Test.  For questions concerning prerequisites or eligibility, talk to your instructor or make an appointment with one of the Liberal Arts Advisors for Spanish: Liz Hastings (eyhastings@mail.utexas.edu) and Christine Fisher (fisher@mail.utexas.edu).  Their office is located in BEN 2.108.

 

 

 

B.  GOALS FOR SPANISH 610D

By the end of this course you should be able to do the following:

 

            (a)     express opinions, reactions and recommendations;

            (b)    discuss possible, probable and certain future events and situations;

            (c)     narrate past events and react subjectively to them;

            (d)    speak hypothetically about various events and situations;

            (e)     analyze moderately complex language data in order to draw conclusions regarding                       parts of speech, functional uses of grammar, etc.;

            (f)     recognize dialectal, social and contextual variation;

            (g)     understand the main ideas of moderately complex written texts (with improved                            skimming, cognate recognition, and inference skills);

            (h)    understand the main ideas of moderately complex oral discourse (with improved                          recognition of tone, content, context, intonation, etc.);

            (i)     maintain conversations of a substantial length (with improved fluency strategies,                         such as circumlocution, discourse markers, etc.);

            (j)     produce written work of a substantial length (with improved organization,                                               connectors, and appropriateness of register)

 

3.  COURSE MATERIALS

 

  • Acercándome(Murphy, Ogando-Lavín and Méndez-Montesinos). 2nd edition.  Dubuque, IA: Kendall Hunt, 2010.   [at the Co-op or online at www.kendallhunt.com]

 

  • A Spanish-English dictionary (recommended)

 

 

For further details, please refer to the syllabus

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

47250 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM MEZ B0.302

1.   Course description and objectives

The objective of the Spanish language program addresses the basic tenet of a liberal arts education: the development of a critical thinking approach towards the analysis of language in society. This objective is framed in an overall worldwide trend towards political and economic internationalization and an increasingly diverse and multicultural work environment.

The Spanish language program focuses on the development of multilingual literacies through the analysis and use of Spanish as a second language. The program focuses on the development of three major types of competencies (all equally ranked in terms of importance):

 

(1) linguistic competence (Spanish phonetics / phonology, morphosyntax, lexicon, discourse, etc.)

(2) communication / interactional competence (sociocultural uses of the language, pragmatics, cultural background / perspectives)

(3) metalinguistic competence (language as a conceptual, symbolic system)

 

Within the language program, SPN 327G is the first in the Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition two-course sequence. It is a bridge course between lower and upper-division Spanish designed to

  • help you inductively master grammar points of particular concern to speakers of English,
  • perfect your grammar skills through a variety of tasks designed to clarify grammatical points, including oral, reading, and writing activities,
  • strengthen the organization, cohesion and coherence of your writing, and
  • promote critical and integrative thinking skills.

This learner-based course will lead you through a “guided inductive approach” in which you will analyze selected samples of both native and non-native speech in order to

  • discover patterns of oral and written discourse,
  • formulate hypotheses about the linguistic and communicative functions of the Spanish language, and
  • develop an understanding of the fundamental differences between native and non-native discourse.

2.   Course methodology

Accounting for the diversity in learners’ needs, each class and the entire evaluation will be planned as to provide numerous opportunities for active, significant learning adjusted to each student’s specific requirements. Students are therefore expected to display a high degree of participation and to engage in a responsible, self-committed learning process, which will require continuous self-assessment and autonomous decision-making as to decide what steps should be undertaken at every stage of the learning process. The instructor will provide support and guidance for this process to the extent it is necessary.

Due to the fact that the department implements a mix of guided inductive and communicative approach to language teaching, students will be exposed to language data (written or oral) and will be encouraged to formulate their own rules and test their own hypotheses regarding language forms and structures in the classroom. Students will not only be expected to reproduce language within different registers and geographical varieties, but will also be given new data, about which they will be asked to draw conclusions.

As for the compositions, texts will be approached not as a product but as a process. Hence, a significant part of the course work (both in class and at home) will be devoted to practicing the different stages of text production, e.g. planning, writing and revision. The review and peer-review of texts in a collaborative work-setting as well as their improvement on the basis of generic guidelines or hints rather than unambiguous corrections shall also be part of the approach.

All material used in class (texts, multi-media files, handouts, .ppt-slides, etc.) will be made available through Blackboard. This will not make it necessary for students to take notes constantly and will enhance opportunities for learning.

 

For further details, please refer to the syllabus

Curriculum Vitae


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    The University of Texas at Austin
    BEN 2.116
    150 W. 21st Street, Stop B3700
    Austin, TX 78712-1155
    512-471-4936