Department of Anthropology

Paola Canova


Assistant ProfessorPh.D., University of Arizona

Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies (LLILAS)
Paola Canova

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 471-2762
  • Office: SAC 5.144
  • Campus Mail Code: C3200

Interests


Gender and sexuality, indigeneity, ethics, political ecology; Latin America, Paraguay

Courses


ANT 324L • Globalization In Latin Amer

30775 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SRH 1.320
(also listed as LAS 324L)

This seminar critically examines globalization from an economic perspective in contemporary Latin America.  It combines theoretical approaches with ethnographic work to explore how global flows of capital, people, commodities, media, and ideologies are shaping the region and different groups of people at the local level.  Among the questions that this course addresses are: Is globalization a new phenomenon? How does it shape relations with other parts of the world? What are the roles of multinational corporations and multilateral institutions such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund in economic globalization? How do people mediate processes of globalization in culturally specific ways? How does globalization shape inequlities? Themes that will be explored include main debates and critiques of globalization, historical backgrounds; political economies; cultural aspects; and ecological dimensions.

ANT 391 • Indig Ppls Neolib And State

30995 • Spring 2018
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.118
(also listed as LAS 391)

This seminar examines theoretical and ethnographic approaches to understanding the ways in which the neoliberal State is constructed and experienced in different contemporary contexts. Challenging conceptualizations of the State as bounded and homogenous we will critically engage key themes such as governmentality, bureaucracy, welfare, development politics, multiculturalism, and citizenship to reflect on the multilayered and oftentimes contradictory nature of the State. The course will provide students with analytical tools to understand the State as a set of processes, discourses, practices and representations embedded in unequal power dynamics that are in constant flux and that respond to particular historical and cultural contexts. While readings will cover a different range of case studies, particular attention will be given to the experiences of indigenous peoples and the State in Latin America.

ANT 324L • Global Indigenous Issues

31305 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 4.120
(also listed as LAS 324L)

This course examines contemporary issues facing indigenous peoples around the world. It takes an historical and ethnographic approach to critically analyzing the ways in which indigenous peoples have been impacted and continue to respond to forces such as colonialism and capitalism in different regions. Drawing on topics such Contact and Colonial Expansion, Self Determination the Nation State, Human Rights, Gender, Ecologies, and Social Movements, the course will explore the lived realities of different cultures, examine the impact from European contact up to the present, and discuss major contemporary issues facing indigenous peoples today. 

ANT 391 • Gend In Latin Am: Cont Iss

31450 • Spring 2017
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM SRH 1.313
(also listed as LAS 391, WGS 393)

Gender is a fundamental part of contemporary socio/cultural, economic and political life. This seminar will analyze dynamics of power, culture, histories and inequalities in various parts of Latin America by focusing on gender as a category of analysis and its intersections with sexuality, race/ethnicity and political economy. The course will provide students with an anthropological framework to explore topics such as colonial legacies, development, neoliberalism, social movements and migration, as these have impacted and continue to shape the daily lives of different groups of peoples in the region.  We will highlight the continuities, changes and possibilities brought by these processes. Readings will draw on theoretical debates and ethnographic case studies from different cultural and geographical regions of Latin America.

ANT 324L • Globalization In Latin Amer

31225 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SRH 1.320
(also listed as LAS 324L)

This seminar critically examines globalization from an economic perspective in contemporary Latin America.  It combines theoretical approaches with ethnographic work to explore how global flows of capital, people, commodities, media, and ideologies are shaping the region and different groups of people at the local level.  Among the questions that this course addresses are: Is globalization a new phenomenon? How does it shape relations with other parts of the world? What are the roles of multinational corporations and multilateral institutions such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund in economic globalization? How do people mediate processes of globalization in culturally specific ways? How does globalization shape inequlities? Themes that will be explored include main debates and critiques of globalization, historical backgrounds; political economies; cultural aspects; and ecological dimensions.

ANT 391 • Neolbrlsm, Indig Ppls/State

31440 • Fall 2016
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM SAC 5.124
(also listed as LAS 391)

This seminar examines theoretical and ethnographic approaches to understanding the ways in which the neoliberal State is constructed and experienced in different contemporary contexts. Challenging conceptualizations of the State as bounded and homogenous we will critically engage key themes such as governmentality, bureaucracy, welfare, development politics, multiculturalism, and citizenship to reflect on the multilayered and oftentimes contradictory nature of the State. The course will provide students with analytical tools to understand the State as a set of processes, discourses, practices and representations embedded in unequal power dynamics that are in constant flux and that respond to particular historical and cultural contexts. While readings will cover a different range of case studies, particular attention will be given to the experiences of indigenous peoples and the State in Latin America.

ANT 324L • Global Indigenous Issues

30423 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM JES A203A
(also listed as LAS 324L)

This course examines contemporary issues facing indigenous peoples around the world. It takes an historical and ethnographic approach to critically analyzing the ways in which indigenous peoples have been impacted and continue to respond to forces such as colonialism and capitalism in different regions of the world. Topics include: Self Determination the Nation State, Human Rights, Gender, Ecologies, Migration and Social Movements.

 

ANT 391 • Gend In Latin Am: Cont Iss

30568 • Spring 2016
Meets M 1:00PM-4:00PM SRH 1.313
(also listed as LAS 391)

Gender is a fundamental part of contemporary socio/cultural, economic and political life. This seminar will analyze dynamics of power, culture, histories and inequalities in various parts of Latin America by focusing on gender as a category of analysis and its intersections with sexuality, race/ethnicity and political economy. The course will provide students with an anthropological framework to explore topics such as colonial legacies, development, neoliberalism, and social movements, as these have impacted and continue to shape the daily lives of different groups of peoples in the region.  We will highlight the continuities, changes and possibilities brought by these processes. Readings will draw on theoretical debates and ethnographic case studies from different cultural and geographical regions of Latin America.

ANT 324L • Sexuality In Global Persp

30536 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 4.118

This course will explore the ways in which sexuality intersects with money, intimacy, power and labor, in the context of global economic processes. The course combines abstraction and theorization of concepts such as sexuality, exchange and commoditization of bodies, with concrete explorations of how people experience their sexuality in different contexts. Drawing from ethnographic case studies from different cultural and historical contexts, the course will re-examine theoretical debates that relate sexuality to globalization, capitalism, and notions of intimacy and romantic love. The class aims at reflecting on questions such as: What are main theoretical debates surrounding the commoditization of intimacy? What are different sex/money arrangements and how are these expressed and understood in different contexts? How are global economic processes re-inscribing notions of love and desire? Students will gain an understanding of how sexuality reveals important dimensions of power, inequality, and mobility in today's changing world.

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