Department of Asian Studies
Department of Asian Studies

Joseph Schaub


Ph.D, University of Maryland, College Park

Lecturer

Contact

Courses


ANS S372R • Jpn Pop Cu: Anme/Mang/Otaku-Wb

79540 • Summer 2021
Internet; Asynchronous
GC (also listed as AAS S320J)

This course examines a variety of Japanese popular manga and anime, focusing mainly on those works Japan has exported since becoming an economic superpower in the 1980s. We will explore utopian/dystopian expression in Japanese sci-fi narratives, examine the ways that the Japanese entertainment industry has responded to changing notions of gender, and chart the evolution of traditional genre categories as they accommodate new hybridic representations of the posthuman body. We will also consider the significance of global fandom with the rise of the transnational otaku, and its relevance to Japan’s exercise of soft power.

 

Grading Percentages:

  • Discussion Responses 15%
  • Paper 20% Tests (4) 40%
  • Final Exam 25%

ANS 372R • Jpn Pop: Anime/Manga/Otaku-Wb

32760 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
GC

This course examines a variety of Japanese popular manga and anime, focusing mainly on those works Japan has exported since becoming an economic superpower in the 1980s. We will explore utopian/dystopian expression in Japanese sci-fi narratives, examine the ways that the Japanese entertainment industry has responded to changing notions of gender, and chart the evolution of traditional genre categories as they accommodate new hybridic representations of the posthuman body. We will also consider the significance of global fandom with the rise of the transnational otaku, and its relevance to Japan’s exercise of soft power.

Grading:

  • Discussion Posts 20%
  • Paper 20%
  • Tests (5) 60%

ANS 372 • Jpn Pop Cul:anime/Manga/Otaku

32280 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM
GC (also listed as AAS 320)

This course examines a wide variety of Japanese popular media within the historical context during which

these unique cultural forms developed. Our focus will be on the popular manga and anime Japan has

exported since becoming an economic superpower in the 1980s. We will explore utopian/ dystopian

expression in the Japanese sci-fi narratives of tis era, and the complex interplay of genre and technology

in the new posthuman societies this narratives envision. We will also consider the significance of global

fandom as we chart the rise of the transnational otaku, and its relevance to Japan’s exercise of soft

power.

ANS 372 • Japanese Science Fiction

31707 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 204
GC

DESCRIPTION:

This course introduces some of Japan’s important works of sci-fi and speculative fiction in the postwar era. We will explore the ways that literature and film’s futuristic narratives and imagery change during periods of economic prosperity or prolonged recession. Central to our discussions will be the slippage between utopian and dystopian worldviews, the fascination and fear of high-tech society, the ongoing threat of global apocalypse, and the gradual dawning of the posthuman era. No prerequisites are required for this course, although familiarity with postwar Japanese history will be helpful.

TEXT:

Japan Sinks, (1973) Sakyo Komatsu

All You Need is Kill (2004) Hiroshi Sakurazaka

The Best Japanese Science Fiction Stories (1989) Edited by John Apolstolou & Martin Greenberg

Speculative Japan 4 (2018) Edited by Edward Lipsett

Additional readings will be made available on Canvas

GRADING:

Attendance and Participation 25%

Quizzes and Unit Tests 25%

Written Assignments 25%

Final Exam 25%

ANS 372 • Jpn Pop Cul:anime/Manga/Otaku

32243 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GDC 4.304
CDGC (also listed as AAS 320)

This course examines a wide variety of Japanese popular media within the historical context during which these unique cultural forms developed.  Our focus will be on the popular manga and anime Japan has exported since becoming an economic superpower in the 1980s.  We will explore utopian/dystopian expression in Japanese sci-fi narratives of this era, and the complex interplay of gender and technology in the new posthuman societies these narratives envision.  We will also consider the significance of global fandom as we chart the rise of the transnational otaku, and its relevance to Japan’s exercise of soft power.

AAS 320 • Jpn Pop Cul:anime/Manga/Otaku

36015 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM PAR 301
GC

Since the late 1980s, interest in specific forms of Japanese media has increased dramatically around the world.  In the United States, manga and anime are now household words with substantial sections in book and video stores, while American remakes of films like Ringu (The Ring) and Ju-on (The Grudge) have introduced us to new forms of fear in the Japanese horror film.  In this course we will examine a wide variety of Japanese manga, anime, horror movies and video games, and discuss their relevance to contemporary Japanese and American society.  We will consider the transnational migration of Japanese popular media and its origins as Asian American hybrid by studying its historical development during the American occupation following World War II.  Our particular focus will be on the pop culture texts Japan has exported since becoming an economic superpower in the 1980s.  We will explore utopian/dystopian expression in Japanese sci-fi narratives of this era, and the complex interplay of gender and technology in the new posthuman societies these narratives envision.  We will also consider the significance of global fandom as we chart the rise of the American otaku, and its relevance to future Japanese-American relations.

Fulfills Global Cultures flag.

TEXTS:

Roland Kelts, JapanAmerica: How Japanese Pop Culture Has Invaded the US, 2007

Susan Napier, Anime from Akira to Howl’s Moving Castle, 2005

Hiroki Azuma, Otaku: Japan’s Database Animals, 2009

ANS 372 • Jpn Pop Cul:anime/Manga/Otaku

31765 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A209A
GCWr (also listed as AAS 320)

Since the late 1980s, interest in specific forms of Japanese media has increased dramatically around the world.  In the United States, manga and anime are now household words with substantial sections in book and video stores, while American remakes of films like Ringu (The Ring) and Ju-on (The Grudge) have introduced us to new forms of fear in the Japanese horror film.  In this course we will examine a wide variety of Japanese manga, anime, horror movies and video games, and discuss their relevance to contemporary Japanese and American society.  We will consider the transnational migration of Japanese popular media and its origins as Asian American hybrid by studying its historical development during the American occupation following World War II.  Our particular focus will be on the pop culture texts Japan has exported since becoming an economic superpower in the 1980s.  We will explore utopian/dystopian expression in Japanese sci-fi narratives of this era, and the complex interplay of gender and technology in the new posthuman societies these narratives envision.  We will also consider the significance of global fandom as we chart the rise of the American otaku, and its relevance to future Japanese-American relations.

 

TEXTS:

Roland Kelts, JapanAmerica: How Japanese Pop Culture Has Invaded the US, 2007

Susan Napier, Anime from Akira to Howl’s Moving Castle, 2005

Hiroki Azuma, Otaku: Japan’s Database Animals, 2009

Profile Pages