Department of Classics

Naomi Campa


PhD 2014, University of Washington

Assistant Professor
Naomi Campa

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Courses


AHC 325 • Alexander/Hellenist World-Wb

33800-33810 • Spring 2021
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
GCWr

Please check back for updates.

GK 365 • Athenian Oratory And Law-Wb

34075 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
IIWr (also listed as GK 385)

One of the most robust sources we have from classical Athens is a collection of over 100 court speeches. These forensic speeches deal with a range of charges from minor crimes and contract disputes to murder and treason. In addition to including matters of law and procedure, they reveal elements of social, political, and cultural history. In some cases, a speech is our best or only source for subjects as diverse as the details of a religious rite or attitudes toward types of sex workers. Speeches had to appeal to a cross-section of the citizen body, not only to elites. Accordingly, Attic oratory is also an excellent source for democratic ideology and Athenian values in general. Prejudices abound, as do references to literature, history, and daily life. Our readings will touch on legal and historical topics such as legal procedure, crime and punishment, democratic institutions, citizenship, immigration, sex work, gender identity, and sexual norms.

The daily work of this course will be translating Greek. It will hone your vocabulary and root recognition, fluency in syntax, and sensitivity to the range of translation possibilities (and impossibilities!). You will also learn legal terminology. You should expect to read, discuss, and write about the text. For students of 365, the broader goal of this course is to improve your ability to analyze primary and secondary texts through close reading and to create your own scholarly argument in a final paper. Students of 385 should expect additional reading assignments in lieu of a final paper.

AHC 325 • Archaic/Classical Greece-Wb

32785-32795 • Fall 2020
Internet; Synchronous
GCWr (also listed as CTI 375)
The Greek world between 3000 and 338 BCE witnessed the first philosophers of the west, the birth of the genre history, the creation of the Olympics, the invention of democracy, and the construction of stunning monuments such as the Parthenon. At the same time, the Greeks were responsible for razing the cities of other Greeks, sentencing Socrates to death on a charge of corrupting the youth, and enslaving human beings. However much ancient Greeks might seem like us, they must be viewed as a foreign people, removed in both time and culture. Using a variety of original sources, including ancient texts, inscriptions, and archaeological remains, this course will survey the development of Greek political and social history from prehistory to Phillip II’s conquest of Greece. Special attention will be paid to political and cultural events in Athens in the 6th through 4th centuries.
 
The format of this course is a mix of lecture and discussion. This means that by enrolling, you are agreeing to take an active role in your education: classes are what you make them!  Being prepared is essential to a successful semester. My lectures are designed to supplement the assigned reading by exploring aspects of it in greater depth or by bringing in additional material and context. They will not simply be summaries of the readings. You are responsible for material in lectures as well as in the readings. Lectures will be punctuated with question/answer sections, which you should be prepared to answer.

HIS 354E • Archaic/Classical Greece-Wb

38245-38255 • Fall 2020
Internet; Synchronous
GCWr
The Greek world between 3000 and 338 BCE witnessed the first philosophers of the west, the birth of the genre history, the creation of the Olympics, the invention of democracy, and the construction of stunning monuments such as the Parthenon. At the same time, the Greeks were responsible for razing the cities of other Greeks, sentencing Socrates to death on a charge of corrupting the youth, and enslaving human beings. However much ancient Greeks might seem like us, they must be viewed as a foreign people, removed in both time and culture. Using a variety of original sources, including ancient texts, inscriptions, and archaeological remains, this course will survey the development of Greek political and social history from prehistory to Phillip II’s conquest of Greece. Special attention will be paid to political and cultural events in Athens in the 6th through 4th centuries.
 
The format of this course is a mix of lecture and discussion. This means that by enrolling, you are agreeing to take an active role in your education: classes are what you make them!  Being prepared is essential to a successful semester. My lectures are designed to supplement the assigned reading by exploring aspects of it in greater depth or by bringing in additional material and context. They will not simply be summaries of the readings. You are responsible for material in lectures as well as in the readings. Lectures will be punctuated with question/answer sections, which you should be prepared to answer.

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