Program in Comparative Literature

Amy Vidor


M.A in History and Literature (Columbia University), B.A.s in French, English (University of Southern California)

Doctoral Candidate, Mellon Engaged Scholar Fellow
Amy Vidor

Contact

Interests


Human rights; Memory, trauma, and gender studies; twentieth-century intellectual history; francophone and anglophone literature

Courses


FR 601C • Beginning French

36075 • Spring 2018
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BEN 1.108

Welcome to the French Intensive Language Program. French 601C is the first semester elementary French course at the University of Texas and assumes no previous knowledge of the language.  Français interactif is a unique beginning French program developed at the University of Texas. Français interactifhelps you explore the French language and culture by following the lives of real UT students who participated in the UT Summer Program in Lyon, France. The UT students will introduce you to their French host families, their French university, and their lives in France.  Keep in mind as you watch these students that they were in your position only a year ago--enrolled in beginning French at UT!  This program shows you that it IS possible to learn French well enough to communicate with native speakers.

In addition to following the exploits of these UT students, you will also watch videos of native French speakers as well as scenes of day-to-day interactions (e.g., vendors in the market, waiters at a café, children getting ready to go to school, etc.)  These video-based materials give Français interactif an authenticity and immediacy lacking in most commercially produced textbooks. 

As its name implies, Français interactif emphasizes interaction:
student/teacher, student/student, student/computer, and even
student/native-speaker.  The goal of these materials is in its title: interaction in French!  More specifically, the goal of this course is to improve your listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French.  This means that you will learn useful vocabulary, grammatical structures, and cultural information, which is embedded naturally in the videos and textbook content.  The classroom focus is on learner-centered group activities and language is naturally communicative.

FR 601C • Beginning French

36575 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM PAR 105

Welcome to the French Intensive Language Program. French 601C is the first semester elementary French course at the University of Texas and assumes no previous knowledge of the language.  Français interactif is a unique beginning French program developed at the University of Texas. Français interactifhelps you explore the French language and culture by following the lives of real UT students who participated in the UT Summer Program in Lyon, France. The UT students will introduce you to their French host families, their French university, and their lives in France.  Keep in mind as you watch these students that they were in your position only a year ago--enrolled in beginning French at UT!  This program shows you that it IS possible to learn French well enough to communicate with native speakers.

In addition to following the exploits of these UT students, you will also watch videos of native French speakers as well as scenes of day-to-day interactions (e.g., vendors in the market, waiters at a café, children getting ready to go to school, etc.)  These video-based materials give Français interactif an authenticity and immediacy lacking in most commercially produced textbooks. 

As its name implies, Français interactif emphasizes interaction:
student/teacher, student/student, student/computer, and even
student/native-speaker.  The goal of these materials is in its title: interaction in French!  More specifically, the goal of this course is to improve your listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French.  This means that you will learn useful vocabulary, grammatical structures, and cultural information, which is embedded naturally in the videos and textbook content.  The classroom focus is on learner-centered group activities and language is naturally communicative.

RHE 309K • Rhet Of Women In Dystopia

44100 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM FAC 10

“Reality, however utopian, is something from which people feel the need of taking pretty frequent holidays.”

Aldous HuxleyBrave New World

What do the Hunger Games’s Katniss Everdeen and Divergent’s Tris Prior have in common? These films and many other literary works have succeeded because of a winning combination of strong leading women placed in chaotic alternate realities. To understand the success of such dystopias, we’ll study the genre within the context of its literary history as well as contemporary politics. We'll discuss women’s roles in the genre and how they have been manipulated to address particular audiences.  In class, we’ll define the term “utopia,” while exploring its evolution as a literary genre beginning with the story of Adam and Eve in Genesis.  Next we will define “dystopia” and learn how this genre participates in and differentiates from the tradition of utopia.  For example, we may compare how women’s positions change from the utopianBook of the City of Ladies by Christine de Pizanto the dystopian film V for Vendetta

Because this course carries the Writing Flag, expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects in addition to short blog posts, and receive feedback from the instructor to help improve writing skills. We will also have the opportunity to revise major assignments, and will be asked to read and discuss their peers’ work.  Together, we will look at women’s roles in four categories: wife, mother/daughter, sexual object, and independent agent.  Throughout the course students will be asked to consider if dystopias empower women through close reading of different mediums such as novels and films.  Eventually, students will write their own film review of a contemporary dystopia while reflecting upon these questions.

 

Assignments

  • Paper 1 Draft (+ Peer Review)                                                     
  • Paper 1 Revision                  
  • Paper 2 Draft (+ Peer Review)                                            
  • Paper 2 Revision                                    
  • Paper 3 (+ Peer Review)        
  • Paper 3 Revision
  • Dystopia Assignment
  • Short writing assignments (a combination of in-class reading responses that involve text annotation utilizing Hypothesis and homework blog posts)

 

 Grades

In this course I will be employing the Learning Record. The following are the standard Learning Record expectations and grade breakdowns.

  • A—Represents outstanding participation in all course activities; all assigned work completed, with very high quality in all work produced for the course. Evidence of significant development across the six dimensions of learning. The Learning Record at this level demonstrates activity that goes significantly beyond the required course work in one or more course strands.
  • B—Represents excellent participation in all course activities; all assigned work completed, with consistently high quality in course work. Evidence of marked development across the six dimensions of learning.
  • C—Represents good participation in all course activities; all assigned work completed, with generally good quality overall in course work. Evidence of some development across the six dimensions of learning.
  • D—Represents uneven participation in course activities; some gaps in assigned work completed, with inconsistent quality in course work. Evidence of development across the six dimensions of learning is partial or unclear.
  • F—Represents minimal participation in course activities; serious gaps in assigned work completed, or very low quality in course work. Evidence of development is not available.

 

We will assess across six dimensions of learning:

  • Confidence and independence
  • Skills and strategies
  • Knowledge and understanding
  • Use of prior and emerging experience
  • Reflection
  • Collaboration

 

Required texts:

  • Rewriting: How To Do Things with Texts, Joseph Harris
  • The Little Longhorn Handbook. Norton, 2014.

RHE 309K • Rhet Of Women In Dystopia

43996 • Fall 2016
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 104

“Reality, however utopian, is something from which people feel the need of taking pretty frequent holidays.”

- Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

What do the Hunger Games’s Katniss Everdeen and Divergent’s Tris Prior have in common? These films and many other literary works have succeeded because of a winning combination of strong leading women placed in chaotic alternate realities. To understand the success of such dystopias, we’ll study the genre within the context of its literary history as well as contemporary politics. We'll discuss women’s roles in the genre and how they have been manipulated to address particular audiences.  In class, we’ll define the term “utopia,” while exploring its evolution as a literary genre beginning with the story of Adam and Eve in Genesis.  Next we will define “dystopia” and learn how this genre participates in and differentiates from the tradition of utopia.  For example, we may compare how women’s positions change from the utopian Book of the City of Ladies by Christine de Pizanto the dystopian film V for Vendetta

Because this course carries the Writing Flag, expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects in addition to short blog posts, and receive feedback from the instructor to help improve writing skills. We will also have the opportunity to revise major assignments, and will be asked to read and discuss their peers’ work.  Together, we will look at women’s roles in four categories: wife, mother/daughter, sexual object, and independent agent.  Throughout the course students will be asked to consider if dystopias empower women through close reading of different mediums such as novels and films.  Eventually, students will write their own film review of a contemporary dystopia while reflecting upon these questions.

 

Assignments

  • Paper 1 Draft (+ Peer Review)                                                     
  • Paper 1 Revision                  
  • Paper 2 Draft (+ Peer Review)                                            
  • Paper 2 Revision                                    
  • Paper 3 (+ Peer Review)        
  • Paper 3 Revision
  • Dystopia Assignment
  • Short writing assignments (a combination of in-class reading responses that involve text annotation utilizing Hypothesis and homework blog posts)

 

 Grades

In this course I will be employing the Learning Record. The following are the standard Learning Record expectations and grade breakdowns.

  • A—Represents outstanding participation in all course activities; all assigned work completed, with very high quality in all work produced for the course. Evidence of significant development across the six dimensions of learning. The Learning Record at this level demonstrates activity that goes significantly beyond the required course work in one or more course strands.
  • B—Represents excellent participation in all course activities; all assigned work completed, with consistently high quality in course work. Evidence of marked development across the six dimensions of learning.
  • C—Represents good participation in all course activities; all assigned work completed, with generally good quality overall in course work. Evidence of some development across the six dimensions of learning.
  • D—Represents uneven participation in course activities; some gaps in assigned work completed, with inconsistent quality in course work. Evidence of development across the six dimensions of learning is partial or unclear.
  • F—Represents minimal participation in course activities; serious gaps in assigned work completed, or very low quality in course work. Evidence of development is not available.

 

We will assess across six dimensions of learning:

  • Confidence and independence
  • Skills and strategies
  • Knowledge and understanding
  • Use of prior and emerging experience
  • Reflection
  • Collaboration

 

Required texts:

  • Rewriting: How To Do Things with Texts, Joseph Harris
  • The Little Longhorn Handbook. Norton, 2014. 

Curriculum Vitae


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