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Samantha Pinto


CWGS Affiliate Faculty

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Courses


E 316M • American Literature

34820-34875 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 2.102A
CD HU

E 316M  l  American Literature

 

Instructor:  Pinto, S

Unique #:  34820-34875

Semester:  Fall 2019

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  Made in America --

This course will trace the formation of American identity through the lens of fame and infamy.  From Founding Fathers to Hamilton, from witch-burning to Taylor Swift, how has American literature and culture negotiated itself through public reckonings with race, gender, sexuality, violence, politics, and other significant sites of meaning-making?  We will read Thomas Jefferson’s political writings alongside Native American political appeals; Puritan sermons alongside Harriet Jacobs’ narrative of enslavement; excerpts from Uncle Tom’s Cabinalongside Hamilton; Melville’s novella Benito Cerenoalongside episodes of Master of None; and other exciting pairings of poetry, drama, prose, music, film, and art that will ask us to learn the historical context for American literary history as well as the skills of critical thinking, critical writing, and close reading of the many forms and genres of America’s sensational past.

 

Texts: Provisional texts include The Coquette, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, and The Crucible, as well as a course packet, screenings of Carmen Jonesand Master of None, and the soundtrack to Hamilton.

 

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation including discussion section assignments and weekly “Lit Labs” in lecture; Exams that are a mix of ID, short answer, and essay questions; A small individual research assignment based on your own interests.

E 316M • American Literature

35235-35270 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.306
CD HU

E 316M  l  American Literature

 

Instructor:  Pinto, S

Unique #:  35235-35270

Semester:  Spring 2019

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction: No

 

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  Made in America -- 

This course will trace the formation of American identity through the lens of fame and infamy.  From Founding Fathers to Hamilton, from witch-burning to Taylor Swift, how has American literature and culture negotiated itself through public reckonings with race, gender, sexuality, violence, politics, and other significant sites of meaning-making?  We will read Thomas Jefferson’s political writings alongside founding Native American myths; Puritan sermons alongside Kate Chopin’s The Awakening; excerpts from Uncle Tom’s Cabinalongside Hamilton; Melville’s novella Benito Cerenoalongside Anna Deavere Smith’s performance piece Twilight: Los Angeles; and other exciting pairings of poetry, drama, prose, music, film, and art that will ask us to learn the historical context for American literary history as well as the skills of critical thinking, critical writing, and close reading of the many forms and genres of America’s sensational past.

 

Texts: Provisional texts include the Heath Anthology of American Literatureand select editions of other texts, along with a course packet.

 

Requirements & Grading: (no mention of discussion sections)  Attendance and participation including weekly assignments and clickers in class; Exams that are a mix of short answer and essay questions; A small individual research assignment based on your own interests.

WGS 301 • African Cultural Studies

46926 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 203
(also listed as AFR 317C)

African Cultural Studies:  Film, Literature, & Media in 20th and 21st Century Africa

This course will focus on introducing students to African Cultural Studies, incorporating the study of film, radio, literature, performance, new media, and cultural theory across the continent.  How might these cultural forms construct different narratives of Africa than other popular mediums, such as journalism or history?  How does the technology of culture (i.e. photography, publishing, distribution, online access) intersect with issues of colonialism, globalization, human rights, and nationalism?  To answer these questions, we will study cultural texts and their national and diasporic contexts, organized around several core, related sections.  These groupings aim to unsettle fixed notions of what constitutes African art and culture, particularly in the 20th and 21st centuries: 

  • “African Imagination/Imagining Africa,” where we will encounter now “classic” texts from the continent, such as Ousmane Sembene’s film Xala and Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, alongside of lesser known (in the West) texts and secondary material on cultural politics in and around Africa
  • “Constructing Gender and Sexuality,” which will focus on cultural texts that address the complicated relationship between race, gender, and sexuality in the burgeoning African film industry and beyond, such as the 1997 film Dakan and Mariama Ba’s novel So Long a Letter
  • “Envisioning Human Rights,” which will look at how competing political ideologies and strategies of development are represented in African culture, both in conventional (i.e. documentary) and more surprising generic formats (including materials in the archives at the Harry Ransom Center)
  • “Making Media/Making Modern Africa,” where we will explore technology and "new" media including radio, television, innovative film distribution networks, and internet innovations in African culture. 

Overall, this course will ask us to expand and complicate our vision of African culture and politics through intensive study of the continent’s wide-ranging cultural forms.

Curriculum Vitae


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