The Economics Department

ECO 301 • Introduction To Economics

34605 • Hickenbottom, Wayne
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM BUR 106 • Hybrid/Blended
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This course will be a mixture of both Micro and Macro Economics.  Students who wish to be an Economics major MAY NOT use this course toward the major and should take ECO 304K and ECO 304L.

  • Students will learn how economists describe and measure the economy, in the aggregate, as well as specific markets such as the labor market, the housing market, financial markets, and international trade.  Concepts for measurement and data will be covered.
  • Students will learn how economists organize their analysis of economic choices by thinking about how individuals (i) respond to incentives, (ii) seek out exchange in markets, and (iii) form, and participate in, various economic institutions.
  • Students will learn how to think about strategic behavior (for example, markets with a small number of firms, or negotiating trade agreements among a small number of countries).
  • Students will learn about “externalities” and “public goods,” which, by conferring costs or benefits that are not appropriated by individuals or that are “non-rival” in nature (for example, once discovered, a technology can be used by many at the same time), provide reasons for government regulation, taxation, and government-provided goods and services.

ECO 301 • Introduction To Economics-Wb

34610 • Hickenbottom, Wayne
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
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This course will be a mixture of both Micro and Macro Economics.  Students who wish to be an Economics major MAY NOT use this course toward the major and should take ECO 304K and ECO 304L.

  • Students will learn how economists describe and measure the economy, in the aggregate, as well as specific markets such as the labor market, the housing market, financial markets, and international trade.  Concepts for measurement and data will be covered.
  • Students will learn how economists organize their analysis of economic choices by thinking about how individuals (i) respond to incentives, (ii) seek out exchange in markets, and (iii) form, and participate in, various economic institutions.
  • Students will learn how to think about strategic behavior (for example, markets with a small number of firms, or negotiating trade agreements among a small number of countries).
  • Students will learn about “externalities” and “public goods,” which, by conferring costs or benefits that are not appropriated by individuals or that are “non-rival” in nature (for example, once discovered, a technology can be used by many at the same time), provide reasons for government regulation, taxation, and government-provided goods and services.

ECO 304K • Intro To Microeconomics-Wb

34615 • Mateer, George • Internet; Asynchronous
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ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.


ECO 304L • Intro To Macroeconomics-Wb

34620 • Mostashari, Shalah
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
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ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

 


ECO 304L • Intro To Macroeconomics-Wb

34625 • Acchiardo, Charity
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
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ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

 


ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory-Wb

34660 • Trinque, Brian
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM • Internet; Synchronous
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THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.


ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory-Wb

34670 • Mueller, Andreas
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
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THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.


ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory-Wb

34665 • Boehm, Christoph
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
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THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.


ECO 321 • Public Economics

34675 • Schneider, Helen
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM BEL 328 • Hybrid/Blended
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In this course students will learn to apply microeconomic analysis to study the role of the public sector in the economy.  Topics covered include public goods and externalities, education, income redistribution, the workings of social security, welfare, political economy, cost-benefit analysis, and taxation.  

 

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

 


ECO 321 • Public Economics-Wb

34680 • Schneider, Helen
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
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In this course students will learn to apply microeconomic analysis to study the role of the public sector in the economy.  Topics covered include public goods and externalities, education, income redistribution, the workings of social security, welfare, political economy, cost-benefit analysis, and taxation.  

 

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

 


ECO 322 • Money And Banking-Wb

34685 • Trinque, Brian
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
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THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.


ECO 324 • Intro To Labor Economics

34690 • Trejo, Stephen
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEL 328 • Hybrid/Blended
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This course provides an introduction to the economic analysis of labor markets, with an emphasis on public policy.  Students will learn theoretical frameworks for understanding the determinants of wages, employment, and work hours, and they will learn to assess relevant empirical evidence.  In addition, students will use these tools to evaluate policy issues such as income transfer programs, job displacement, education, inequality, immigration, and labor market disparities by gender and race. 

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

 


ECO 324 • Intro To Labor Economics-Wb

34695 • Trejo, Stephen
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
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This course provides an introduction to the economic analysis of labor markets, with an emphasis on public policy.  Students will learn theoretical frameworks for understanding the determinants of wages, employment, and work hours, and they will learn to assess relevant empirical evidence.  In addition, students will use these tools to evaluate policy issues such as income transfer programs, job displacement, education, inequality, immigration, and labor market disparities by gender and race. 

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

 


ECO 326L • Economics Of Education-Wb

34700 • Murphy, Richard
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
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Prerequisites: Economics 420K or 421K with a grade of at least C-.

Applications of economic principles and empirical methods to education, including the concept of human capital, economic returns to education, the determinants and measurement of teacher impact, the roles of school inputs and factors outside of school, and the market for higher education. Methodology for evaluating education policy.


ECO 327 • Comparative Econ Systems-Wb

34705 • Trinque, Brian
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
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THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.


ECO 328 • Industrial Organization

34710 • Miravete, Eugenio
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WCH 1.120 • Hybrid/Blended
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THE ORGANIZATION OF INDUSTRIES AND MARKETS: COMPETITION, MONOPOLY, AND OLIGOPOLY; ANTITRUST POLICY AND ITS ALTERNATIVES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

Industrial Organization is the study of imperfectly competitive markets. In this course, we will analyze the behavior on economic agents (consumers and firms) in such settings, as well as policy issues that arise therein. Topics we will cover include monopoly, oligopoly, product differentiation, entry deterrence, and the role of asymmetric information. Calculus and game theory will be our primary analytical tools. The goal of the course is to develop your understanding of the forces at work in many kinds of market interactions, as well as to foster your ability to think critically.If more information is needed contact instructor.


ECO 328 • Industrial Organization-Wb

34715 • Miravete, Eugenio
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
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THE ORGANIZATION OF INDUSTRIES AND MARKETS: COMPETITION, MONOPOLY, AND OLIGOPOLY; ANTITRUST POLICY AND ITS ALTERNATIVES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

Industrial Organization is the study of imperfectly competitive markets. In this course, we will analyze the behavior on economic agents (consumers and firms) in such settings, as well as policy issues that arise therein. Topics we will cover include monopoly, oligopoly, product differentiation, entry deterrence, and the role of asymmetric information. Calculus and game theory will be our primary analytical tools. The goal of the course is to develop your understanding of the forces at work in many kinds of market interactions, as well as to foster your ability to think critically.If more information is needed contact instructor.


ECO 329 • Economic Statistics-Wb

34720 • Bencivenga, Valerie • Internet; Asynchronous
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METHODS OF STATISTICAL ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF QUANTITATIVE DATA IN THE FIELD OF ECONOMICS. REQUIRED OF ECONOMICS MAJORS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH, AND MATHEMATICS 408C AND 408D, OR MATHEMATICS 408K AND 408L, WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

Economics 329 is an introduction to Economic Statistics. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with methods of summarizing collections of measurements (data sets) of economic, political and business phenomena. Of particular concern will be an introduction to elementary probability theory and its use in the interpretation of summary statistics (inference) obtained from statistical data sets. A number of economic, political and business applications will be used to illustrate the methods. If more information is needed contact instructor.


ECO 330T • Econ Of The European Union-Wb

34725 • Bencivenga, Valerie • Internet; Asynchronous
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OPEN TO NONMAJORS. TOPICS MAY INCLUDE ECONOMIC THEORY, APPLICATIONS, AND POLICY. ECONOMICS 330T AND 350K MAY NOT BOTH BE COUNTED UNLESS THE TOPICS VARY.
 

 

 


ECO 330T • Econ: Gender/Race/Ethnicity-Wb

34730 • Oettinger, Gerald
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
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The objective of this course is to describe and to understand the causes of the large and persistent differences in economic outcomes between the genders and the major race/ethnicity groups (whites, blacks, Hispanics, and Asians) in the United States.  Methodologically, the course applies the basic tools and logic of economic analysis.  In particular, the course assumes that individuals have well-defined objectives and that observed economic outcomes are the (equilibrium) result of all agents pursuing their objectives.  Examining the nature, origin, and durability of individuals’ preferences regarding gender roles and between-race interactions will be an important part of the course.


ECO 330T • Economics Of Sports

34735 • Hickenbottom, Wayne
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM SZB 104 • Hybrid/Blended
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Topics for the course would include but not necessarily be limited to (1)the Industrial organization of sports markets, including their market power and use of anti-trust exemptions. (2) The unique relationship between sports franchises and their work force including, but not limited to the model of bilateral monopoly and bargaining strategies. (3) The role of sports in the public sphere including economic arguments for subsidizing private sports franchises and funding large scale events. (4) The role intercollegiate sports plays in funding institutions of higher learning and the impact that has on various decisions with regard to higher education.

 


ECO 330T • Economics Of Sports-Wb

34740 • Hickenbottom, Wayne
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
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Topics for the course would include but not necessarily be limited to (1)the Industrial organization of sports markets, including their market power and use of anti-trust exemptions. (2) The unique relationship between sports franchises and their work force including, but not limited to the model of bilateral monopoly and bargaining strategies. (3) The role of sports in the public sphere including economic arguments for subsidizing private sports franchises and funding large scale events. (4) The role intercollegiate sports plays in funding institutions of higher learning and the impact that has on various decisions with regard to higher education.

 


ECO 330T • Experimental Economics-Wb

34744 • Acchiardo, Charity
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
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OPEN TO NONMAJORS. TOPICS MAY INCLUDE ECONOMIC THEORY, APPLICATIONS, AND POLICY. ECONOMICS 330T AND 350K MAY NOT BOTH BE COUNTED UNLESS THE TOPICS VARY.
 

 

 


ECO 333K • Development Economics-Wb

34745 • Linden, Leigh
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
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INTRODUCTION TO THEORIES OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT; DISCUSSION OF LEADING ISSUES. ASIAN STUDIES 361 (TOPIC 21: DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS) AND ECONOMICS 333K MAY NOT BOTH BE COUNTED.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

Development economics focuses on the economic aspects of the developing world. The big question for development economics and this course is: What economic polices can bring about an improvement in the lives of the world's poor? This is a very complex question. Economics gives us a framework to think about these issues analytically. The first part of the course will cover macroeconomic growth theories, where we focus on identifying the major determinants of growth. The second part will focus on development and asks the question why might these factors of growth be different across countries? The topics covered will include the effects of investment, education, population, credit markets and technological change. The goal of this course is to equip you with the tools to think about issues related to growth and development analytically


ECO 334K • Urban Economics-Wb

34750 • Ikizler, Devrim
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF URBAN AREAS; EMPHASIS ON THE NATURE OF CURRENT URBAN PROBLEMS--SLUMS, TRANSPORTATION, FINANCE--AND AN EVALUATION OF CURRENT POLICY.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

SAME AS URB 351 (TOPIC 2).

This course is focused o the internal workings of cities and the role of cities in the larger economy.  Using micro economic theory, the class will be examining questions like: Why do so many students live in the Riverside area, 4 miles from campus? Why do high income individuals live in central Paris, but low income individuals live in central Detroit? Is Segregation 'good' or 'bad'? What affect has the automobile and public transportation had on our urban economy? Why might developed economy systems of cities look different than those of less developed economies?


ECO 334M • Migration Economics/Policy-Wb

34755 • Angelucci, Manuela
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
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Prerequisites: The following with a grade of at least C-: Economics 420K or 421K, and 341K or 441K.

Immigration policy of the United States compared to that of other countries. Determinants of migration. Characteristics of migrants. Effects of migration on the country of origin and the receiving country. Unauthorized immigration to the United States.


ECO 339L • International Finance-Wb

34765 • Bhattarai, Saroj
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
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HOW FOREIGN EXCHANGE RATES ARE DETERMINED, WHY NATIONAL INTEREST RATES DIFFER, WHY RISK IS INHERENT WHEN TRADING IN INTERNATIONAL FINANCE MARKETS, AND THE ROLE OF INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS SUCH AS THE INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND IN CRISIS MANAGEMENT.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

The typical questions addressed in this class are: Why do countries engage (increasingly) in trade? What factors affect trade flows? Is trade always good for everybody? Should we manage trade flows and if so, do quotas, subsidies and tariffs make sense? What is a balance-of-payments crisis and what happened in 1971-73? How are exchange rates determined, anyways? Who and what factors determine the exchange rate? What role does the Federal Reserve and capital markets play? What are the main characteristics of international capital / financial markets? The class covers the two aspects of trade: real (physical flows, 1/3 of the class) and monetary (exchange rate, money, institutions, policies, 2/3 of the class). We concentrate on theories (normative, long run) as well as on policies (positive, short run). Numerous real-world examples are taken and current policy debates are explored; the illustrations include trade with China, the repercussions of the ongoing world crisis, the value of the dollar… you name it. The objective of the class is to enrich your mind in two ways. First you will learn new definitions, tools, models and the accompanying illustrations. Second you will use those tools to think analytically and critically about the economic situations and issues that surround us. Given the topic and news, class participation and critical thinking are encouraged.


ECO 350K • Optimization Theory

34774 • Stinchcombe, Maxwell
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM PAI 3.02 • Hybrid/Blended
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Prerequisites: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C-; additional prerequisites may vary with the topic.

Linear and non-linear optimization theory, queueing theory with management and Economics applications.


ECO 351N • Econ Prncpls Mgrl Decisions-Wb

34780 • Hatfield, John
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
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The goal of this course is to help you use economic principles to think strategically about business decisions. The course is structured in two parts. The first part shall focus solely on understanding microeconomic ideas (such as the principal-agent problem) and using this understanding to make better managerial decisions. Readings will detail each concept; a case elucidating the application of that concept will then be considered. Topics will include adverse selection, game theory, price discrimination, strategic commitment, barriers to entry, and network effects.

The second part of the course considers effective strategic responses to challenges posed by the legal environment. Readings will provide background on various fields of law, such as antitrust and international trade, as well as strategic options available to managers in dealing with challenges in these areas. Cases will emphasize applying knowledge of the legal environment as well as sound business practices to successfully and ethically deal with the challenges posed. Topics will include regulation, antitrust, intellectual property, fiduciary duty, and liability.

Prerequisites: Economics 420K or 421K with a grade of at least C-.


ECO 351N • Econ Prncpls Mgrl Decisions-Wb

34775 • Hatfield, John
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
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The goal of this course is to help you use economic principles to think strategically about business decisions. The course is structured in two parts. The first part shall focus solely on understanding microeconomic ideas (such as the principal-agent problem) and using this understanding to make better managerial decisions. Readings will detail each concept; a case elucidating the application of that concept will then be considered. Topics will include adverse selection, game theory, price discrimination, strategic commitment, barriers to entry, and network effects.

The second part of the course considers effective strategic responses to challenges posed by the legal environment. Readings will provide background on various fields of law, such as antitrust and international trade, as well as strategic options available to managers in dealing with challenges in these areas. Cases will emphasize applying knowledge of the legal environment as well as sound business practices to successfully and ethically deal with the challenges posed. Topics will include regulation, antitrust, intellectual property, fiduciary duty, and liability.

Prerequisites: Economics 420K or 421K with a grade of at least C-.


ECO 352K • Business Strategy-Wb

34785 • Sibley, David
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
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This course covers the basic elements of business strategy. Topics include: Porter's Five Forces, competitor identification, pricing, mergers, manufacturer-distributor issues, and strategic focus.


ECO 353M • Empirical Public Economics

34790 • Sibley, David
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM ART 1.102 • Hybrid/Blended
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Use of data to evaluate public policy issues. Issues considered include the effect of having health insurance on health outcomes; the relationship between earning power and the type of college attended; charter schools and educational outcomes; the effect of an increase in the minimum wage on employment; and the welfare effects of bank bailouts.


ECO 354K • Introductory Game Theory-Wb

34795 • Bhaskar, Venkataraman
Meets MW 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
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INTRODUCTION TO THE FORMAL STUDY OF INTERDEPENDENT DECISION MAKING. APPLICATIONS OF GAME THEORY INCLUDE PRICING AND ADVERTISING STRATEGIES, LABOR-MANAGEMENT BARGAINING, AND TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 329 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

Contact professor for more information.


ECO 371M • Socl Econ: Outside The Mrkt-Wb

34799 • Wiseman, Thomas
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM • Internet; Synchronous
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This course considers whether maximizing total surplus is the right way of thinking about what is “good” for society and how one should evaluate a policy that is good for some members of society and bad for others.  For the many social interactions that take place outside of market environments, the course considers whether economic analysis can still be used to understand behavior in those settings and to design rules that will lead to better outcomes.

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing and Economics 304K with a grade of at least C-.


ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory

34630-34635 • Stinchcombe, Maxwell
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM WEL 2.224 • Hybrid/Blended
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A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each; Economics 329 with a grade of at least C; and Mathematics 408C and408D, or 408K and 408L, or 408N and 408S, with a grade of at least C- ineach.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.


ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory-Wb

34655 • Stinchcombe, Maxwell
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM • Internet; Synchronous
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A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each; Economics 329 with a grade of at least C; and Mathematics 408C and408D, or 408K and 408L, or 408N and 408S, with a grade of at least C- ineach.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.


ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory-Wb

34640 • Boyarchenko, Svetlana
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
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A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each; Economics 329 with a grade of at least C; and Mathematics 408C and408D, or 408K and 408L, or 408N and 408S, with a grade of at least C- ineach.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.


ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory-Wb

34645 • Slesnick, Daniel
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
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A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each; Economics 329 with a grade of at least C; and Mathematics 408C and408D, or 408K and 408L, or 408N and 408S, with a grade of at least C- ineach.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.


ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory-Wb

34650 • Hickenbottom, Wayne
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
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A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each; Economics 329 with a grade of at least C; and Mathematics 408C and408D, or 408K and 408L, or 408N and 408S, with a grade of at least C- ineach.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.


ECO 441K • Intro To Econometrics-Wb

34770 • Kline, Brendan • Internet; Asynchronous
IIQRWr
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INTRODUCES THE STUDENT TO STANDARD REGRESSION PROCEDURES OF PARAMETER ESTIMATION AND HYPOTHESIS TESTING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- AND ONE OF THE FOLLOWING WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-: BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING 335, CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 253K, ECONOMICS 329, ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 351K, MATHEMATICS 358K, 378K, MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 335, OR STATISTICS AND DATA SCIENCES 378.

Econometrics is an application of statistical methods to the estimation of economic relationships. Students are expected to have an understanding of both statistics and economic theory. This course reveals how relationships among economic variables are discerned from data. The primary focus of this course is on estimation methodology. If more information is needed contact instructor.