The Economics Department

ECO 301 • Introduction To Economics

34180 • Hickenbottom, Wayne
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM RLP 0.126
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This course will be a mixture of both Micro and Macro Economics.  Students who wish to be an Economics major MAY NOT use this course toward the major and should take ECO 304K and ECO 304L.

  • Students will learn how economists describe and measure the economy, in the aggregate, as well as specific markets such as the labor market, the housing market, financial markets, and international trade.  Concepts for measurement and data will be covered.
  • Students will learn how economists organize their analysis of economic choices by thinking about how individuals (i) respond to incentives, (ii) seek out exchange in markets, and (iii) form, and participate in, various economic institutions.
  • Students will learn how to think about strategic behavior (for example, markets with a small number of firms, or negotiating trade agreements among a small number of countries).
  • Students will learn about “externalities” and “public goods,” which, by conferring costs or benefits that are not appropriated by individuals or that are “non-rival” in nature (for example, once discovered, a technology can be used by many at the same time), provide reasons for government regulation, taxation, and government-provided goods and services.

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

34185 • Hickenbottom, Wayne
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM FAC 21
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ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.


ECO 304L • Introduction To Macroeconomics

34190 • Mostashari, Shalah
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GSB 2.124
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ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

 


ECO 304L • Introduction To Macroeconomics

34195 • Mostashari, Shalah
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WCP 1.402
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ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

 


ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

34255 • Sahin, Aysegul
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM WAG 201
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THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.


ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

34250 • Trinque, Brian
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM RLP 1.104
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THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.


ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

34260 • Boehm, Christoph
Meets MW 8:30AM-10:00AM RLP 0.128
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THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.


ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

34265 • Zervou, Anastasia
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM BUR 130
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THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.


ECO 321 • Public Economics

34270 • Schneider, Helen
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GAR 2.112
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STUDY OF APPROPRIATE ALLOCATIONS OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITY BETWEEN GOVERNMENT (FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL) AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR. THE WORKINGS OF SOCIAL SECURITY, WELFARE, EDUCATION, POLLUTION CONTROL, DEREGULATION, TAXATION; AND PROPOSALS FOR REFORM.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

 


ECO 321 • Public Economics

34275 • Schneider, Helen
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM SZB 330
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STUDY OF APPROPRIATE ALLOCATIONS OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITY BETWEEN GOVERNMENT (FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL) AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR. THE WORKINGS OF SOCIAL SECURITY, WELFARE, EDUCATION, POLLUTION CONTROL, DEREGULATION, TAXATION; AND PROPOSALS FOR REFORM.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

 


ECO 322 • Money And Banking

34300 • Trinque, Brian
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM SZB 416
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THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.


ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

34320 • Trinque, Brian
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM RLP 1.102
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THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.


ECO 329 • Economic Statistics

34325 • Bencivenga, Valerie
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM FAC 21
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METHODS OF STATISTICAL ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF QUANTITATIVE DATA IN THE FIELD OF ECONOMICS. REQUIRED OF ECONOMICS MAJORS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH, AND MATHEMATICS 408C AND 408D, OR MATHEMATICS 408K AND 408L, WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

Economics 329 is an introduction to Economic Statistics. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with methods of summarizing collections of measurements (data sets) of economic, political and business phenomena. Of particular concern will be an introduction to elementary probability theory and its use in the interpretation of summary statistics (inference) obtained from statistical data sets. A number of economic, political and business applications will be used to illustrate the methods. If more information is needed contact instructor.


ECO 330T • Econ Of The European Union

34345 • Bencivenga, Valerie
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 203
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OPEN TO NONMAJORS. TOPICS MAY INCLUDE ECONOMIC THEORY, APPLICATIONS, AND POLICY. ECONOMICS 330T AND 350K MAY NOT BOTH BE COUNTED UNLESS THE TOPICS VARY.
 

 

Behavioral Economics

This course is an introduction to behavioral economics: the attempt to incorporate insights from psychology into economics.  In the course, we will study how humans make decisions and choices, and compare this with the standard economic models of decision making.  Insights from psychology reveal that humans use heuristcs when making their decisions and these lead to biases in individual decision making and anomalies in the market place.  On the other hand, in a standard model, humans are assumed to be rational.  We will cover choice under uncertainty, intertemporal choice, choice in a strategic environment and behavioral finance.  Economics 330T Behavioral Economics and ECO 350K Behavioral Economics may not both be counted.

 


ECO 330T • Econ: Gender/Race/Ethnicity

34330 • Oettinger, Gerald
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 214
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OPEN TO NONMAJORS. TOPICS MAY INCLUDE ECONOMIC THEORY, APPLICATIONS, AND POLICY. ECONOMICS 330T AND 350K MAY NOT BOTH BE COUNTED UNLESS THE TOPICS VARY.
 

 

Behavioral Economics

This course is an introduction to behavioral economics: the attempt to incorporate insights from psychology into economics.  In the course, we will study how humans make decisions and choices, and compare this with the standard economic models of decision making.  Insights from psychology reveal that humans use heuristcs when making their decisions and these lead to biases in individual decision making and anomalies in the market place.  On the other hand, in a standard model, humans are assumed to be rational.  We will cover choice under uncertainty, intertemporal choice, choice in a strategic environment and behavioral finance.  Economics 330T Behavioral Economics and ECO 350K Behavioral Economics may not both be counted.

 


ECO 330T • Socl Eco: Eco Outside The Mkt

34335 • Wiseman, Thomas
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JGB 2.324
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OPEN TO NONMAJORS. TOPICS MAY INCLUDE ECONOMIC THEORY, APPLICATIONS, AND POLICY. ECONOMICS 330T AND 350K MAY NOT BOTH BE COUNTED UNLESS THE TOPICS VARY.
 

 

Behavioral Economics

This course is an introduction to behavioral economics: the attempt to incorporate insights from psychology into economics.  In the course, we will study how humans make decisions and choices, and compare this with the standard economic models of decision making.  Insights from psychology reveal that humans use heuristcs when making their decisions and these lead to biases in individual decision making and anomalies in the market place.  On the other hand, in a standard model, humans are assumed to be rational.  We will cover choice under uncertainty, intertemporal choice, choice in a strategic environment and behavioral finance.  Economics 330T Behavioral Economics and ECO 350K Behavioral Economics may not both be counted.

 


ECO 333K • Development Economics

34350 • Linden, Leigh
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM CMA 3.114
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INTRODUCTION TO THEORIES OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT; DISCUSSION OF LEADING ISSUES. ASIAN STUDIES 361 (TOPIC 21: DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS) AND ECONOMICS 333K MAY NOT BOTH BE COUNTED.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

Development economics focuses on the economic aspects of the developing world. The big question for development economics and this course is: What economic polices can bring about an improvement in the lives of the world's poor? This is a very complex question. Economics gives us a framework to think about these issues analytically. The first part of the course will cover macroeconomic growth theories, where we focus on identifying the major determinants of growth. The second part will focus on development and asks the question why might these factors of growth be different across countries? The topics covered will include the effects of investment, education, population, credit markets and technological change. The goal of this course is to equip you with the tools to think about issues related to growth and development analytically


ECO 333K • Development Economics

34355 • Linden, Leigh
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM CMA 3.114
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INTRODUCTION TO THEORIES OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT; DISCUSSION OF LEADING ISSUES. ASIAN STUDIES 361 (TOPIC 21: DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS) AND ECONOMICS 333K MAY NOT BOTH BE COUNTED.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

Development economics focuses on the economic aspects of the developing world. The big question for development economics and this course is: What economic polices can bring about an improvement in the lives of the world's poor? This is a very complex question. Economics gives us a framework to think about these issues analytically. The first part of the course will cover macroeconomic growth theories, where we focus on identifying the major determinants of growth. The second part will focus on development and asks the question why might these factors of growth be different across countries? The topics covered will include the effects of investment, education, population, credit markets and technological change. The goal of this course is to equip you with the tools to think about issues related to growth and development analytically


ECO 334K • Urban Economics

34360 • Ikizler, Devrim
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 112
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF URBAN AREAS; EMPHASIS ON THE NATURE OF CURRENT URBAN PROBLEMS--SLUMS, TRANSPORTATION, FINANCE--AND AN EVALUATION OF CURRENT POLICY.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

SAME AS URB 351 (TOPIC 2).

This course is focused o the internal workings of cities and the role of cities in the larger economy.  Using micro economic theory, the class will be examining questions like: Why do so many students live in the Riverside area, 4 miles from campus? Why do high income individuals live in central Paris, but low income individuals live in central Detroit? Is Segregation 'good' or 'bad'? What affect has the automobile and public transportation had on our urban economy? Why might developed economy systems of cities look different than those of less developed economies?


ECO 339L • International Finance

34370 • Bhattarai, Saroj
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 2.112
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HOW FOREIGN EXCHANGE RATES ARE DETERMINED, WHY NATIONAL INTEREST RATES DIFFER, WHY RISK IS INHERENT WHEN TRADING IN INTERNATIONAL FINANCE MARKETS, AND THE ROLE OF INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS SUCH AS THE INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND IN CRISIS MANAGEMENT.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

The typical questions addressed in this class are: Why do countries engage (increasingly) in trade? What factors affect trade flows? Is trade always good for everybody? Should we manage trade flows and if so, do quotas, subsidies and tariffs make sense? What is a balance-of-payments crisis and what happened in 1971-73? How are exchange rates determined, anyways? Who and what factors determine the exchange rate? What role does the Federal Reserve and capital markets play? What are the main characteristics of international capital / financial markets? The class covers the two aspects of trade: real (physical flows, 1/3 of the class) and monetary (exchange rate, money, institutions, policies, 2/3 of the class). We concentrate on theories (normative, long run) as well as on policies (positive, short run). Numerous real-world examples are taken and current policy debates are explored; the illustrations include trade with China, the repercussions of the ongoing world crisis, the value of the dollar… you name it. The objective of the class is to enrich your mind in two ways. First you will learn new definitions, tools, models and the accompanying illustrations. Second you will use those tools to think analytically and critically about the economic situations and issues that surround us. Given the topic and news, class participation and critical thinking are encouraged.


ECO 349K • Economics Of Entrepreneurship

34385 • Ackerberg, Daniel
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RLP 1.104
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Economics of Entrepreneurship

This course applies insights from economic theory to the practice of starting a new business or expanding a current business.  The course combines elements of strategy, marketing, and entrepreneurial finance courses as typically taught in a business school and an industrial organization course as taught in an economics department.  We start by examining general issues regarding entrepreneurship, in particular the search for markets that can support entrepreneurial profits.  Then, we turn to specific strategic decisions that entrepreneurs make:  pricing, advertising, product location, entry deterrence, etc.  Finally, we examine practical issues in entrepreneurship, including finding capital, business plans, patent protection, negotiation, employee compensation, and auctions as a transactional mechanism.

 

The Economics of Ethics and Social Justice:

 

This course delves into the history of thought on questions relating to ethics, morality, and social justice. We will identify how, in the history of philosophical and economic thought, these terms are related and how they translate into the practice of law and public policy in the United States. Using the tools of economics, we will scrutinize the different theories of social justice used to justify standards for policy on ethical and moral grounds. We will identify and analyze procedures that can and have been used to ensure that the social welfare maximizing outcome coincides with the “just,” “moral,” and “ethical" outcome. We will apply competing theories to our reading of controversial court opinions, regulations, and legislation.  

 

Law and Economics:

In this course we will discuss economic analysis of laws, legal systems, and court rulings, as well as the theory and practice of the common law system. Students will read and respond to case law and prominent authors in the field. Students will analyze and present a case to the class. While no prior knowledge of the law is required, nor knowledge of Game Theory, the course will cover recent applications of law from the game theoretic perspective. 


ECO 350K • Fed Income Taxation In U S

34390 • Manoli, Dayanand
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM UTC 1.116
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Please check back for updates.


ECO 354K • Introductory Game Theory

34415 • Thomas, Caroline
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM BRB 2.136
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INTRODUCTION TO THE FORMAL STUDY OF INTERDEPENDENT DECISION MAKING. APPLICATIONS OF GAME THEORY INCLUDE PRICING AND ADVERTISING STRATEGIES, LABOR-MANAGEMENT BARGAINING, AND TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 329 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

Contact professor for more information.


ECO 378H • Honors Tutorial Course I

34418
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SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL READING, RESEARCH, AND WRITING OF A SUBSTANTIAL PAPER ON A SPECIAL TOPIC IN THE FIELD OF ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: UPPER-DIVISION STANDING, ADMISSION TO THE ECONOMICS HONORS PROGRAM, AND CONSENT OF THE HONORS ADVISER.

MAY BE COUNTED TOWARD THE INDEPENDENT INQUIRY FLAG REQUIREMENT.

Hour(s) to be arranged. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.


ECO 379H • Honors Tutorial Course II

34420
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SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL READING, RESEARCH, AND WRITING OF A SUBSTANTIAL PAPER ON A SPECIAL TOPIC IN THE FIELD OF ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 378H.

MAY BE COUNTED TOWARD THE INDEPENDENT INQUIRY FLAG REQUIREMENT.

CONTAINS A SUBSTANTIAL WRITING COMPONENT AND FULFILLS PART OF THE BASIC EDUCATION REQUIREMENT IN WRITING.


ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory

34210-34225 • Thompson, John
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.134
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A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each; Economics 329 with a grade of at least C; and Mathematics 408C and408D, or 408K and 408L, or 408N and 408S, with a grade of at least C- ineach.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.


ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory

34200-34205 • Stinchcombe, Maxwell
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM UTC 3.124
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A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each; Economics 329 with a grade of at least C; and Mathematics 408C and408D, or 408K and 408L, or 408N and 408S, with a grade of at least C- ineach.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.


ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory

34230-34245 • Boyarchenko, Svetlana
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM WAG 101
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A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each; Economics 329 with a grade of at least C; and Mathematics 408C and408D, or 408K and 408L, or 408N and 408S, with a grade of at least C- ineach.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.