The Economics Department

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

33590 • Thompson, John
Meets MW 8:00AM-9:30AM UTC 2.112A
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ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.


ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

33600 • Hickenbottom, Wayne
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SAC 1.402
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ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.


ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

33595 • Schneider, Helen
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM UTC 2.112A
show description

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.


ECO 304L • Introduction To Macroeconomics

33605 • Sadler, Michael
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM JGB 2.324
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ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

 


ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

33655 • Coibion, Olivier
Meets MW 8:30AM-10:00AM GAR 0.102
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THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.


ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

33660 • Mueller, Andreas
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 201
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THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.


ECO 321 • Public Economics

33664 • Cabral, Marika
Meets MW 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 1
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STUDY OF APPROPRIATE ALLOCATIONS OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITY BETWEEN GOVERNMENT (FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL) AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR. THE WORKINGS OF SOCIAL SECURITY, WELFARE, EDUCATION, POLLUTION CONTROL, DEREGULATION, TAXATION; AND PROPOSALS FOR REFORM.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

 


ECO 322 • Money And Banking

33690 • Trinque, Brian
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM GDC 2.402
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THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.


ECO 322 • Money And Banking

33685
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THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.


ECO 323T • Hist Roots Of US Finance

33694 • Trinque, Brian
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM JES A218A
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Study of economic development, emphasizing more recent periods; causal factors, emerging problems, and major policy issues. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each.


ECO 324 • Intro To Labor Economics

33700 • Trejo, Stephen
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RLP 1.104
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STUDY OF LABOR IN INDUSTRIAL SOCIETIES, WITH EMPHASIS ON PRINCIPLES, INSTITUTIONS, AND POLICIES FOR UNDERSTANDING LABOR AND PERSONNEL PROBLEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

 


ECO 325K • Health Economics

33710 • Geruso, Michael
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM BUR 224
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This course provides real-world application of the economic theory concepts with which students are already familiar. You will learn how to evaluate issues in health and healthcare through the lens of economics. You will acquire the basic tools needed to analyze current health care policy debates. Topics include cost-benefit analysis, patients’ demand for health services, physician payment incentives, the functioning of private health insurance markets, public insurance programs, and the justification for government regulation of the US healthcare system. Current issues and policy applications will be discussed throughout the course.

The class will be reasonably difficult. You will be asked not just to solve numerical and graphical problems, but also to determine what economic models and graphical frameworks apply to the problem at hand.

Prerequisites: Intermediate Microeconomics (420K) is an essential prerequisite for this course.


ECO 325K • Health Economics

33715 • Geruso, Michael
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM BUR 224
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This course provides real-world application of the economic theory concepts with which students are already familiar. You will learn how to evaluate issues in health and healthcare through the lens of economics. You will acquire the basic tools needed to analyze current health care policy debates. Topics include cost-benefit analysis, patients’ demand for health services, physician payment incentives, the functioning of private health insurance markets, public insurance programs, and the justification for government regulation of the US healthcare system. Current issues and policy applications will be discussed throughout the course.

The class will be reasonably difficult. You will be asked not just to solve numerical and graphical problems, but also to determine what economic models and graphical frameworks apply to the problem at hand.

Prerequisites: Intermediate Microeconomics (420K) is an essential prerequisite for this course.


ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

33720 • Trinque, Brian
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM GDC 2.210
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THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.


ECO 328 • Industrial Organization

33725 • Sibley, David
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RLP 1.104
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THE ORGANIZATION OF INDUSTRIES AND MARKETS: COMPETITION, MONOPOLY, AND OLIGOPOLY; ANTITRUST POLICY AND ITS ALTERNATIVES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

Industrial Organization is the study of imperfectly competitive markets. In this course, we will analyze the behavior on economic agents (consumers and firms) in such settings, as well as policy issues that arise therein. Topics we will cover include monopoly, oligopoly, product differentiation, entry deterrence, and the role of asymmetric information. Calculus and game theory will be our primary analytical tools. The goal of the course is to develop your understanding of the forces at work in many kinds of market interactions, as well as to foster your ability to think critically.If more information is needed contact instructor.


ECO 328 • Industrial Organization

33730
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THE ORGANIZATION OF INDUSTRIES AND MARKETS: COMPETITION, MONOPOLY, AND OLIGOPOLY; ANTITRUST POLICY AND ITS ALTERNATIVES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

Industrial Organization is the study of imperfectly competitive markets. In this course, we will analyze the behavior on economic agents (consumers and firms) in such settings, as well as policy issues that arise therein. Topics we will cover include monopoly, oligopoly, product differentiation, entry deterrence, and the role of asymmetric information. Calculus and game theory will be our primary analytical tools. The goal of the course is to develop your understanding of the forces at work in many kinds of market interactions, as well as to foster your ability to think critically.If more information is needed contact instructor.


ECO 329 • Economic Statistics

33735 • Bencivenga, Valerie
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 106
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METHODS OF STATISTICAL ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF QUANTITATIVE DATA IN THE FIELD OF ECONOMICS. REQUIRED OF ECONOMICS MAJORS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH, AND MATHEMATICS 408C AND 408D, OR MATHEMATICS 408K AND 408L, WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

Economics 329 is an introduction to Economic Statistics. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with methods of summarizing collections of measurements (data sets) of economic, political and business phenomena. Of particular concern will be an introduction to elementary probability theory and its use in the interpretation of summary statistics (inference) obtained from statistical data sets. A number of economic, political and business applications will be used to illustrate the methods. If more information is needed contact instructor.


ECO 330T • Econ: Gender/Race/Ethnicity

33739 • Oettinger, Gerald
Meets MW 1:30PM-3:00PM WAG 214
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OPEN TO NONMAJORS. TOPICS MAY INCLUDE ECONOMIC THEORY, APPLICATIONS, AND POLICY. ECONOMICS 330T AND 350K MAY NOT BOTH BE COUNTED UNLESS THE TOPICS VARY.
 

 

Behavioral Economics

This course is an introduction to behavioral economics: the attempt to incorporate insights from psychology into economics.  In the course, we will study how humans make decisions and choices, and compare this with the standard economic models of decision making.  Insights from psychology reveal that humans use heuristcs when making their decisions and these lead to biases in individual decision making and anomalies in the market place.  On the other hand, in a standard model, humans are assumed to be rational.  We will cover choice under uncertainty, intertemporal choice, choice in a strategic environment and behavioral finance.  Economics 330T Behavioral Economics and ECO 350K Behavioral Economics may not both be counted.

 


ECO 333L • Development And Population

33740 • Spears, Dean
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:30PM GSB 2.122
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This course is an upper‐division course covering the microeconomics of development, population, and the environment. This course is about the ongoing transition from a world of high mortality and high fertility to a world of low mortality and low fertility, accompanied by dramatic increases in wealth, health, education, and social equality. The course argues that early-life health and wellbeing are critical to human development: children are an important “capital stock” of a population, and culture, norms, and social inequality all shape how children are treated and how they fare.


ECO 333L • Development And Population

33745 • Spears, Dean
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 203
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This course is an upper‐division course covering the microeconomics of development, population, and the environment. This course is about the ongoing transition from a world of high mortality and high fertility to a world of low mortality and low fertility, accompanied by dramatic increases in wealth, health, education, and social equality. The course argues that early-life health and wellbeing are critical to human development: children are an important “capital stock” of a population, and culture, norms, and social inequality all shape how children are treated and how they fare.


ECO 339K • Internatl Trade And Investment

33755 • Pandalai-Nayar, Nitya
Meets MW 8:30AM-10:00AM RLP 1.106
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INTERNATIONAL TRADE THEORY, BALANCE OF PAYMENTS, COMMODITY TRADE, INTERNATIONAL FINANCE AND FOREIGN EXCHANGE RATES, FOREIGN INVESTMENTS. ECONOMICS 339K AND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 350 MAY NOT BOTH BE COUNTED.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

This course will analyze the causes and consequences of international trade and investment, and provide an introduction to the models and data economists use to address these questions. We will investigate why nations trade, what they trade, and who gains from this trade. We will analyze the motives for governments to regulate international trade, and study the effects of such policies on economic welfare, international trade agreements, and some current trade policy disputes. We will then go to the "international investment" part of the course, and study how exchange rates, interest rates, and price levels are determined in an open economy, as well as possible causes of current account deficits and surpluses. We will study how international transactions are recorded in the Balance of Payment of a country. We will spend some time discussing aspects of the current debate on globalization, such as the effects of trade on wages, economic growth and income distribution; multinational firms, foreign direct investment, and outsourcing; the financial crises of the nineties; the use of international labor standards; the interactions between trade and environmental concerns. We will rely on formal economic modeling to help us understand past and current events in the world economy. We will therefore extensively use microeconomics tools that you have learned in previous courses. It is very important that you be familiar with these tools, and feel comfortable using and manipulating them. If you are taking this class, it will be assumed that this is the case. If more information is needed contact instructor.


ECO 350K • Advanced Macroeconomics

33791 • Eusepi, Stefano
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM RLP 0.106
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Please check back for updates.


ECO 350K • Economics Of Auctions

33785 • Balat, Jorge
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GEA 127
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There is a myriad of market mechanisms to allocate resources that can be classified as auctions. These are currently used in various markets ranging from art objects to fresh fish, from electricity to treasure bonds, from government procurement to internet ads.

This course has three main objectives. First, students will learn how these various market mechanisms work. We will discuss the theoretical foundations behind them as well as explore many real-world applications. We will use game theory to analyze bidders’ strategic interaction and characterize their behavior. Second, students will learn how the market rules can be modified to attain specific objectives and to derive policy recommendations. Finally, students will learn the recent empirical methods to analyze auction data needed to conduct research in auctions.

This class is designed for upperclassmen with a strong quantitative background. Since the work of Vickrey (1961), we can think of auctions as an application of games of incomplete information and, thus, this class is a complement to Game Theory. I will not assume any knowledge of Game Theory and will spend the first part of this course introducing all the necessary concepts of Game Theory. Even though we will discuss many real world applications, you can expect this class to be on the theoretical side.

After the introduction to Game Theory, we will examine the theoretical models behind the most commonly used auction formats: English, Dutch, first- and second-price. Students will learn the core theoretical results and will be exposed to recent empirical research in auctions. We will then spend some time discussing topics in auction design. Next, students will be introduced to the state-of-the-art empirical approaches to analyze auction data. Finally, we will discuss more advanced topics including multi-unit and internet auctions.


ECO 354K • Introductory Game Theory

33795 • Bhaskar, Venkataraman
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:30PM BRB 2.136
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INTRODUCTION TO THE FORMAL STUDY OF INTERDEPENDENT DECISION MAKING. APPLICATIONS OF GAME THEORY INCLUDE PRICING AND ADVERTISING STRATEGIES, LABOR-MANAGEMENT BARGAINING, AND TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 329 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

Contact professor for more information.


ECO 369F • Financial Economics

33805 • Boyarchenko, Svetlana
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM ART 1.110
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF THE OPERATION OF FINANCIAL MARKETS, INCLUDING ARBITRAGE THEORY, ASSET PRICING, AND CORPORATE FINANCE.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K, 320L, AND 329 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH; ECONOMICS 322 IS RECOMMENDED.

The course covers the general principles of financial economics and lays out the foundation for more specialized courses to be taken in the future. It is built around the foundations of financial economics? the time value of money, asset valuation and risk management. The course specifically deals with optimization over time, discounted cash flow analysis, asset valuation, futures markets, portfolio theory, options pricing, options strategies and capital structure. An emphasis is put on the application of these financial concepts to decisions faced by households and firms.


ECO 378H • Honors Tutorial Course I

33810
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SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL READING, RESEARCH, AND WRITING OF A SUBSTANTIAL PAPER ON A SPECIAL TOPIC IN THE FIELD OF ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: UPPER-DIVISION STANDING, ADMISSION TO THE ECONOMICS HONORS PROGRAM, AND CONSENT OF THE HONORS ADVISER.

MAY BE COUNTED TOWARD THE INDEPENDENT INQUIRY FLAG REQUIREMENT.

Hour(s) to be arranged. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.


ECO 379C • Individual Conference Course

33814
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SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL STUDY OF SELECTED PROBLEMS IN ECONOMICS. MAY NOT BE COUNTED TOWARD THE TWENTY-FOUR SEMESTER HOURS IN ECONOMICS REQUIRED FOR THE MAJOR IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: UPPER-DIVISION STANDING AND CONSENT OF INSTRUCTOR. STUDENTS SHOULD ORDINARILY HAVE COMPLETED SIX SEMESTER HOURS OF UPPER-DIVISION COURSEWORK IN ECONOMICS AND COURSEWORK WITH SUPERVISING INSTRUCTOR.

MAY BE COUNTED TOWARD THE INDEPENDENT INQUIRY FLAG REQUIREMENT.

HOUR(S) TO BE ARRANGED. RESTRICTED ENROLLMENT; CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT FOR PERMISSION TO REGISTER FOR THIS CLASS. MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT.


ECO 379H • Honors Tutorial Course II

33815
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SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL READING, RESEARCH, AND WRITING OF A SUBSTANTIAL PAPER ON A SPECIAL TOPIC IN THE FIELD OF ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 378H.

MAY BE COUNTED TOWARD THE INDEPENDENT INQUIRY FLAG REQUIREMENT.

CONTAINS A SUBSTANTIAL WRITING COMPONENT AND FULFILLS PART OF THE BASIC EDUCATION REQUIREMENT IN WRITING.


ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory

33630-33635 • Hickenbottom, Wayne
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM RLP 1.104
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A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each; Economics 329 with a grade of at least C; and Mathematics 408C and408D, or 408K and 408L, or 408N and 408S, with a grade of at least C- ineach.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.


ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory

33620-33625 • Oettinger, Gerald
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:30PM MEZ B0.306
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A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each; Economics 329 with a grade of at least C; and Mathematics 408C and408D, or 408K and 408L, or 408N and 408S, with a grade of at least C- ineach.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.


ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory

33610-33645 • Manoli, Dayanand
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 101
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A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each; Economics 329 with a grade of at least C; and Mathematics 408C and408D, or 408K and 408L, or 408N and 408S, with a grade of at least C- ineach.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.