The Economics Department

Devrim Ikizler


Affiliated FacultyPh.D., University of Texas at Austin

Lecturer (Part-time)
Devrim Ikizler

Contact

  • Phone: 512-293-5246
  • Office: BRB 2.138
  • Office Hours: Spring 2019 | T, TH after lecture in the classroom
  • Campus Mail Code: C3100

Biography


Dr. Ikizler obtained his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Texas at Austin in 2011. His dissertation was on the lending behavior differences between large and small banks and related consequences on the growth pattern of banks. His primary areas of expertise are Industrial Organization, Antitrust Economics, and Computational Economics.

He has been teaching Industrial Organization, Urban Economics and Microeconomic Theory as a part-time lecturer since 2011. He is the founder and CEO of Intelligent Analytics and Modeling (www.iamecon.com), undertaking large-scale complex applied problems, providing financial and economic consulting on predictive modeling and business damages, antitrust and market structure analysis, intellectual property, trade secrets, employment and contract disputes.

Courses


ECO 334K • Urban Economics

34295 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CBA 4.330

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF URBAN AREAS; EMPHASIS ON THE NATURE OF CURRENT URBAN PROBLEMS--SLUMS, TRANSPORTATION, FINANCE--AND AN EVALUATION OF CURRENT POLICY.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

SAME AS URB 351 (TOPIC 2).

This course is focused o the internal workings of cities and the role of cities in the larger economy.  Using micro economic theory, the class will be examining questions like: Why do so many students live in the Riverside area, 4 miles from campus? Why do high income individuals live in central Paris, but low income individuals live in central Detroit? Is Segregation 'good' or 'bad'? What affect has the automobile and public transportation had on our urban economy? Why might developed economy systems of cities look different than those of less developed economies?

ECO 334K • Urban Economics

33729 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 1.104

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF URBAN AREAS; EMPHASIS ON THE NATURE OF CURRENT URBAN PROBLEMS--SLUMS, TRANSPORTATION, FINANCE--AND AN EVALUATION OF CURRENT POLICY.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

SAME AS URB 351 (TOPIC 2).

This course is focused o the internal workings of cities and the role of cities in the larger economy.  Using micro economic theory, the class will be examining questions like: Why do so many students live in the Riverside area, 4 miles from campus? Why do high income individuals live in central Paris, but low income individuals live in central Detroit? Is Segregation 'good' or 'bad'? What affect has the automobile and public transportation had on our urban economy? Why might developed economy systems of cities look different than those of less developed economies?

ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory

34007-34008 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 3.110

A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each; Economics 329 with a grade of at least C; and Mathematics 408C and408D, or 408K and 408L, or 408N and 408S, with a grade of at least C- ineach.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.

ECO 334K • Urban Economics

34079 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 1.146

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF URBAN AREAS; EMPHASIS ON THE NATURE OF CURRENT URBAN PROBLEMS--SLUMS, TRANSPORTATION, FINANCE--AND AN EVALUATION OF CURRENT POLICY.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

SAME AS URB 351 (TOPIC 2).

This course is focused o the internal workings of cities and the role of cities in the larger economy.  Using micro economic theory, the class will be examining questions like: Why do so many students live in the Riverside area, 4 miles from campus? Why do high income individuals live in central Paris, but low income individuals live in central Detroit? Is Segregation 'good' or 'bad'? What affect has the automobile and public transportation had on our urban economy? Why might developed economy systems of cities look different than those of less developed economies?

ECO 334K • Urban Economics

33377 • Spring 2016
Meets MW 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 3.124

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF URBAN AREAS; EMPHASIS ON THE NATURE OF CURRENT URBAN PROBLEMS--SLUMS, TRANSPORTATION, FINANCE--AND AN EVALUATION OF CURRENT POLICY.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

SAME AS URB 351 (TOPIC 2).

This course is focused o the internal workings of cities and the role of cities in the larger economy.  Using micro economic theory, the class will be examining questions like: Why do so many students live in the Riverside area, 4 miles from campus? Why do high income individuals live in central Paris, but low income individuals live in central Detroit? Is Segregation 'good' or 'bad'? What affect has the automobile and public transportation had on our urban economy? Why might developed economy systems of cities look different than those of less developed economies?

ECO 334K • Urban Economics

33361 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BRB 2.136

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF URBAN AREAS; EMPHASIS ON THE NATURE OF CURRENT URBAN PROBLEMS--SLUMS, TRANSPORTATION, FINANCE--AND AN EVALUATION OF CURRENT POLICY.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

SAME AS URB 351 (TOPIC 2).

This course is focused o the internal workings of cities and the role of cities in the larger economy.  Using micro economic theory, the class will be examining questions like: Why do so many students live in the Riverside area, 4 miles from campus? Why do high income individuals live in central Paris, but low income individuals live in central Detroit? Is Segregation 'good' or 'bad'? What affect has the automobile and public transportation had on our urban economy? Why might developed economy systems of cities look different than those of less developed economies?

ECO 328 • Industrial Organization

34160 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BRB 2.136

THE ORGANIZATION OF INDUSTRIES AND MARKETS: COMPETITION, MONOPOLY, AND OLIGOPOLY; ANTITRUST POLICY AND ITS ALTERNATIVES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

Industrial Organization is the study of imperfectly competitive markets. In this course, we will analyze the behavior on economic agents (consumers and firms) in such settings, as well as policy issues that arise therein. Topics we will cover include monopoly, oligopoly, product differentiation, entry deterrence, and the role of asymmetric information. Calculus and game theory will be our primary analytical tools. The goal of the course is to develop your understanding of the forces at work in many kinds of market interactions, as well as to foster your ability to think critically.If more information is needed contact instructor.

Curriculum Vitae


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