Department of English

John Pipkin


LecturerPh.D., Rice University

Lecturer and Director of the Undergraduate Creative Writing Program
John Pipkin

Contact

Interests


Creative Writing, Historical Fiction, Climate Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Poetry, British Romanticism, Transcendentalism, Literary Theory, New Historicism, Marxism

Biography


John Pipkin is the author of two novels. Woodsburner (Nan A. Talese/Doubleday, 2009) won the New York Center for Fiction First Novel Prize, the Massachusetts Center for the Book Novel Prize, and the Texas Institute of Letters Stephen Turner Prize for First Novel. His second novel, The Blind Astronomer’s Daughter (Bloomsbury, 2016) was named Book of the Month by The London Times.  He has received fellowships from MacDowell, Yaddo, and Dobie-Paisano.

Courses


CRW 325 • Writing Climate Fiction-Wb

34110 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM
Internet
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CRW 325  l Writing Climate Fiction (Cli-Fi)

 

Instructor:  Pipkin, J

Unique #: 34110

Semester:  Fall 2020

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: C L 315, E 303D (or 603B), (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, or T C 303D (or 603B).

 

Description:  This is an entry-level course in writing fiction about climate change and its environmental effects, with a focus on the short story form.  Although it may seem like a recent literary trend, Climate Fiction, (sometimes referred to as “Cli-Fi”) has actually been around for a long time.  For generations, writers have been writing about detrimental changes in the environment and in the climate brought about by human activity.  This class will look at the tradition of climate fiction to identify recurring themes and issues, as well as stylistic and structural conventions characteristic of the genre.  We will also discuss strategies for writing fiction that engages with climate and environmental issues in a way that avoids didacticism and foregrounds storytelling in order to make a persuasive argument.  We will also identify clichés in recent climate fiction (such as the tendency to treat climate stories solely within the confines of an apocalyptic or Armageddon narrative), and instead we will explore techniques for representing the realistic consequences of climate change in daily life.

 

The first step in developing your writing craft is to learn how to read as a writer, so substantial emphasis will be placed on reading and discussing short stories.  You will be required to analyze the structure and craft of the short stories assigned.  Learning how to identify the fundamental elements and narrative techniques in these stories will help you to employ these techniques in your own work.  The class will focus on the fundamentals of narrative structure, point of view, character development, plotting, pacing, tension, setting, dialogue and revision.  Emphasis will be placed on making use of workshop feedback.  Class will consist of lectures, in-class writing, discussion, and workshop participation.  You should be prepared to read and discuss your work in class.  The main goal of the workshop sessions is to help you develop editing skills so that you can continue to grow as a writer beyond this class.  After your work is discussed in workshop, you should be prepared to use the ideas discussed in the critiques to improve the original draft.  Participation in workshop is an essential part of this class, so you must come prepared to discuss the works under consideration.

 

Texts:    Loosed Upon the World: The Saga Anthology of Climate Fiction, ed. by John Joseph Adams; additional handouts and short-stories will be provided in class.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Two writing assignments: 35% each; class participation, quizzes, workshop discussion: 30%.

No final exam.  Papers are due in hard copy, in class, on the dates indicated.  Late or electronic submissions will not be accepted.  Attendance is required.

CRW 325F • Fiction Writing-Wb

34115 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM
Internet
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CRW 325F  l Fiction Writing

 

Instructor:  Pipkin, J

Unique #:34115

Semester:  Fall 2020

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: C L 315, E 303D (or 603B), (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, or T C 303D (or 603B).

 

34115Description:  This is an entry-level course in the writing of narrative fiction, with a focus on realism and the short story form.  The first step in developing your writing craft is to learn how to read as a writer, so substantial emphasis will be placed on reading and discussing short stories.  Classes will consist of a combination of lecture, in-class writing, discussion, and workshop participation.  Students will be required to analyze the structure and craft of the short stories assigned.  Learning how to identify the fundamental elements and narrative techniques in these stories will help you to employ these techniques in your own work.  The first half of the semester will focus on the basic technical elements of narrative fiction, such as:  structure, narration, point of view, character development, motivation, plotting, pacing, tension, setting, and dialogue.  During the second half of the semester, we will workshop student writing, with emphasis on the writing process and strategies for effective revision.  The workshop sessions will also focus on how to write useful critiques for feedback, as well as how to develop editing skills so that you can continue to grow as a writer beyond this class.  After your work is discussed in workshop, you should be prepared to use the ideas discussed in the critiques to revise and improve the original draft.  Participation in workshop is an essential part of this class, so students must come prepared to discuss the works under consideration, and also be ready to read their own work in class.

 

Texts:  Handouts and short-stories will be provided in class.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Two writing assignments: 35% each; class participation, quizzes, workshop discussion: 30%.  No final exam.  Papers are due in hard copy, in class, on the dates indicated.  Late or electronic submissions will not be accepted.  Attendance is required.

CRW 340F • Short Story Workshop

34755 • Spring 2020
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 310
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CRW 340F l Short Story Workshop

 

Instructor:  Pipkin, J

Unique #:  34755

Semester:  Spring 2020

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites: CRW 325F (or E 325F), or 325M.

 

Description: This is an intermediate course in fiction writing, designed for students who have already taken Fiction Writing (325F or 325M) and have a serious interest in writing fiction.  Since the class is primarily a workshop, we will discuss student work for the majority of the semester.  The workshops are intended to improve writing skills as well as reading and critiquing skills, so all students are expected to actively participate in the workshop discussions.  All work must be original, written for this class and not for another class taken earlier or concurrently.

 

Texts: This course will follow the workshop format, but we will also read some published stories for discussion of craft.  Additional stories and handouts will be provided in class or posted on Canvas.

 

Requirements & Grading: You are required to write two short stories (each 8-15 pages) that will be discussed in a workshop setting and later revised.  For all student work discussed in class, you will be responsible for writing detailed critiques (1-2 pages).

 

Grading:  1st story 30%; 2nd story 30%; in-class participation 20%; written critiques 20%.  Attendance is mandatory.  More than three absences will negatively affect the final grade.

CRW 370H • Honors Creative Writng Project

34785 • Spring 2020
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM CBA 4.342

CRW 370H l Honors Creative Writing Project

 

Instructor: John Pipkin

Unique #: 34785

Semester: Spring 2020

Cross-lists: n/a

 

Prerequisites: Consent of the honors advisor.

 

Description: The Honors Creative Writing Project is intended for advanced students in fiction, creative nonfiction playwriting, poetry, and screenwriting, those who have demonstrated a sustained commitment to writing and wish to work under supervision on a particular project to culminate in a final creative thesis.  In addition to providing an opportunity for creative concentration, the Creative Writing Honors Project allows students to further refine their analytical and critical capabilities through intensive peer review workshops.

 

Please note: Applicants must have completed or be enrolled in their third upper-division Creative Writing certificate course at the time of application. A University Grade Point Average of GPA of at least 3.33 and a grade point average of at least 3.66 in program courses are required for the Honors Creative Writing Certificate to be awarded.

 

Requirements and Grading: Grades will be based on the final thesis of original creative work (50%); thesis status reports (15%); class participation (25%); and a thesis reading (10%).

 

Attendance is mandatory.  More than three absences may negatively impact the final grade.

CRW 325F • Fiction Writing

34135 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 310
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CRW 325F  lFiction Writing

 

Instructor:  Pipkin, J

Unique #: 34135

Semester: Fall 2019

Cross-lists: n/a

 

Prerequisites: One of the following: C L 315, E 303D (or 603B), (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, or T C 303D (or 603B).

 

Description: This is an entry-level course in the writing of narrative fiction, with a focus on the short story form.  The first step in developing your writing craft is to learn how to read as a writer, so substantial emphasis will be placed on reading and discussing short stories.  You will be required to analyze the structure and craft of the short stories assigned.  Learning how to identify the fundamental elements and narrative techniques in these stories will help you to employ these techniques in your own work.  We will also read several selections from the textbook discussing the craft of fiction. You should come to class prepared for a short quiz on the content and terms used in the assigned readings.  The beginning of the semester will focus on structure, narration, point of view, character development, and motivation.  The second half of the semester will focus on plotting, pacing, tension, setting, dialogue and revision.  Emphasis will be placed on making use of workshop feedback.  Class will consist of lecture, in-class writing, discussion, and workshop participation.  You should be prepared to read and discuss your work in class.  The main goal of the workshop sessions is to help you develop editing skills so that you can continue to grow as a writer beyond this class.  After your work is discussed in workshop, you should be prepared to use the ideas discussed in the critiques to improve the original draft.  Participation in workshop is an essential part of this class, so you must come prepared to discuss the works under consideration.

 

Texts: Handouts and short-stories will be provided in class.

 

Requirements & Grading: Two writing assignments: 35% each; class participation, quizzes, workshop discussion: 30%.

No final exam.  Papers are due in hard copy, in class, on the dates indicated.  Late or electronic submissions will not be accepted.  Attendance is required.

CRW 340F • Short Story Workshop

34180 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.120
Wr

CRW 340F  l  Short Story Workshop

 

Instructor:  Pipkin, J

Unique #:  34180

Semester:  Fall 2019

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites: CRW 325F (or E 325F), or 325M.

 

Description: This is an intermediate course in fiction writing, designed for students who have already taken Fiction Writing (325F or 325M) and have a serious interest in writing fiction.  Since the class is primarily a workshop, we will discuss student work for the majority of the semester.  The workshops are intended to improve writing skills as well as reading and critiquing skills, so all students are expected to actively participate in the workshop discussions.  All work must be original, written for this class and not for another class taken earlier or concurrently.

 

Texts: This course will follow the workshop format, but we will also read some published stories for discussion of craft.  Additional stories and handouts will be provided in class or posted on Canvas.

 

Requirements & Grading: You are required to write two short stories (each 8-15 pages) that will be discussed in a workshop setting and later revised.  For all student work discussed in class, you will be responsible for writing detailed critiques (1-2 pages).

 

Grading: 1st story 30%; 2nd story 30%; in-class participation 20%; written critiques 20%.  Attendance is mandatory.  More than three absences will negatively affect the final grade.

E 328 • British Novel In 19th Century

35490 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 204
GCWr

E 328  l  The British Novel in the Nineteenth Century

 

Instructor:  MacKay, C

Unique #:  35490

Semester:  Spring 2019

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: Victorian novels intrigue us for both literary and cultural reasons.  We will be reading a wide range of these novels, including today's classics and yesterday's best sellers.  For each novel, we will entertain formal questions about the novel's structure and point of view, as well as how it fits into its cultural and social context.  Various themes will emerge--creeping industrialism, survival of the fittest, the decline of the hero, the imprisoned woman, the disappearance of God--all concerns that continue to dominate our thinking in the twentieth century.  And so, among other considerations, we will constantly be looking to the past to understand our present.

 

Texts: Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; Charles Dickens, Great Expectations; Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone; George Eliot (Mary Anne Evans), The Mill on the Floss; Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure.

 

Requirements & Grading: Two analytic papers (each 4-5 typewritten pages) as well as a take-home essay exam are required for the course.  The two papers should deal with one or two of the works discussed preceding the due date; topics will be provided but any significant changes or substitutions should be cleared with the professor.  The final will examine the range of required works in light of overall concerns and techniques illuminated by the course.

 

Each paper will be worth approximately 25% of the semester grade, with the final paper/exam (5-6 pp. typewritten) weighted about 35%.  Class participation, in-class writing, and attendance will account for the remaining percentage points.

E 349S • Charles Dickens

35570 • Spring 2019
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM PAR 304
GCWr

E 349S  l  13-Charles Dickens

 

Instructor:  MacKay, C

Unique #:  35570

Semester:  Spring 2019

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer instruction: No

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: This course will critically examine some of the key writings of Charles Dickens.  The popularity of Dickens and his novels worldwide, both in his own and in our time, is phenomenal: at the middle of the nineteenth century in Britain, he was considered "at the top of the tree," and his work continues to flourish in myriad translations and film adaptations today.  Early on, the tale of the beleaguered orphan child in a Dickens novel drew from sympathetic readers cries for reform in crowded urban environments and the workplace, whether or not the author stipulated a specific plan of action.  With each new novel, he gained new adherents, and his novels were regularly reprinted in America without any copyright payments to their author as well as freely adapted for the stage--sometimes even before they were finished (most of his work appeared in serial installments).  We will start with one of those orphan tales, namely Oliver Twist, from which Dickens performed the infamous oral reading of "Sikes and Nancy," and then proceed to one of his most challenging monthly serials, Bleak House.  Along the way, will read some of his shorter pieces, such as excerpts from his London scenes in Sketches by Boz, one or two of his Christmas books, and articles from the first journal he edited, Household Words.  But there is a darker side to the Dickens biography, both with respect to his own experience as a child laborer and his latter-day efforts to conceal the fact of having a mistress, and these elements reverberate in his most artistically-taut novel--Great Expectations--published in weekly "numbers" in his now-renamed journal, All the Year Round.  We will conclude the semester with a close study of his last--but incomplete--novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood.  Besides critical and biographical readings to contextualize our reading of Dickens's primary works, we will view the BBC mini-series of Bleak House and the award-winning post-World War II David Lean films of Oliver Twist and Great Expectations.  (Note: this course will satisfy the University Writing Flag requirements.)

 

Primary Texts (to purchase):  Oliver TwistBleak HouseGreat ExpectationsThe Mystery of Edwin Drood.

 

Requirements & Grading: 2 short papers (4-5 pp. apiece) Oral report Prospectus/bibliography Semester paper (8-10 pp.) Class participation/attendance.

CRW 325F • Fiction Writing

34837 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 302
Wr

CRW s325F  l Fiction Writing

 

Instructor:  Pipkin, J

Unique #: 34837

Semester:  Fall 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction: No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: C L 315, E 603B, (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, 316K, or T C 603B.

 

Description:  This is an entry-level course in the writing of narrative fiction, with a focus on the short story form.  The first step in developing your writing craft is to learn how to read as a writer, so substantial emphasis will be placed on reading and discussing short stories.  You will be required to analyze the structure and craft of the short stories assigned.  Learning how to identify the fundamental elements and narrative techniques in these stories will help you to employ these techniques in your own work.  We will also read several selections from the textbook discussing the craft of fiction.  You should come to class prepared for a short quiz on the content and terms used in the assigned readings.  The beginning of the semester will focus on structure, narration, point of view, character development, and motivation.  The second half of the semester will focus on plotting, pacing, tension, setting, dialogue and revision.  Emphasis will be placed on making use of workshop feedback.  Class will consist of lecture, in-class writing, discussion, and workshop participation.  You should be prepared to read and discuss your work in class.  The main goal of the workshop sessions is to help you develop editing skills so that you can continue to grow as a writer beyond this class.  After your work is discussed in workshop, you should be prepared to use the ideas discussed in the critiques to improve the original draft.  Participation in workshop is an essential part of this class, so you must come prepared to discuss the works under consideration.

 

Texts:  Handouts and short-stories will be provided in class.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Two writing assignments: 35% each; class participation, quizzes, workshop discussion: 30%.

No final exam.  Papers are due in hard copy, in class, on the dates indicated.  Late or electronic submissions will not be accepted.  Attendance is required.

E 377M • American Novel After 1960

35895 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 105

E 377M  l  The American Novel after 1960

 

Instructor:  Adams, M

Unique #:  35895

Semester:  Fall 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  In this course, we will read ten contemporary American fiction writers whose narratives represent the contemporary American scene from roughly 1960 to the present.  We will focus on the cultural milieu from which the fiction came as well as the technical artistry of each author.  This will be mainly a reading course in which regular attendance is required.

 

The writers include Flannery O’Connor (The Violent Bear it Away), Ken Kesey (One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest), Juan Rulfo (The Burning Plain), Thomas Rivera (The Earth Did Not Devour Him), Denis Johnson (Jesus’s Son), Louise Erdrich (The Plague of the Doves), Don Delillo (White Noise), Nathanel West (Miss Lonelyhearts), Toni Morrison (Beloved), Marylyn Robinson (Gilead).

 

Requirements & Grading:  quizzes every class period (70%); One major presentation on one of the novels (20%); Participation (10%).

 

Attendance:  Required.  Ten points off final grade for each unexcused absence.

CRW 340F • Short Story Workshop

34145 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A303A
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CRW 340F  l  Short Story Workshop [Certificate]

 

Instructor:  Pipkin, J

Unique #:  34145

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  CRW 325F (or E 325F), or 325M.

 

Description:  This is an intermediate course in fiction writing, designed for students who have already taken Fiction Writing (325F or 325M) and have a serious interest in writing fiction.  Since the class is primarily a workshop, we will discuss student work for the majority of the semester.  The workshops are intended to improve writing skills as well as reading and critiquing skills, so all students are expected to actively participate in the workshop discussions.  All work must be original, written for this class and not for another class taken earlier or concurrently.

 

Texts:  This course will follow the workshop format, but we will also read some published stories for discussion of craft.  Additional stories and handouts will be provided in class or posted on Canvas.

 

Requirements & Grading:  You are required to write two short stories (each 8-15 pages) that will be discussed in a workshop setting and later revised.  For all student work discussed in class, you will be responsible for writing detailed critiques (1-2 pages).

 

Grading: 1st story 30%; 2nd story 30%; in-class participation 20%; written critiques 20%.  Attendance is mandatory.  More than three absences will negatively affect the final grade.

E 343P • Postmodern Literature

34975 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 103
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E 343P  l  Postmodern Literature

 

Instructor:  Pipkin, J

Unique #:  34975

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  The purpose of this class is to engage and discuss representative works of postmodern fiction, in order to address the simple question: what is postmodernism?  Do we define postmodernism in terms of identity (written by or about writers in the second-half of the 20th century?) or structure (a novel that challenges conventions of form and plotting: beginning, middle, end?) or subject matter (events with direct relevance to a postmodern setting?)  Or are there other characteristics that come into consideration when we speak of postmodernism?  What counts as postmodern—or postmodernism—remains notoriously difficult to define.  Throughout the semester, we will explore how postmodernism relates to a specific historical period, a selection of aesthetic concerns, and an effort to make sense of the world.  We will also question the circle of white male writers on which postmodernism often centers, and examine the genre’s relationship to issues of gender, race, and class.  Finally, we will consider the significance and circulation of postmodern literature in the present day.

 

Texts:  William Burroughs, Naked Lunch (1959); Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49 (1966); John Barth, Lost in the Funhouse (1968); Kathy Acker, Blood and Guts in High School (1984); David Foster Wallace, The Girl with Curious Hair (1989); Jeffrey Eugenides, The Virgin Suicides (1993); Zadie Smith, White Teeth (2000); Teju Cole, Open City (2012).

 

(Additional essays/articles may be handed out in class.)

 

Requirements & Grading:  The structure of this class will follow a discussion format, so that together we can work our way toward a deeper understanding of the texts we are reading.  You will be expected, above all, to keep up with the pace of the course and to contribute to class discussion.  Assigned reading should be completed by the date listed on the syllabus.  We may add, or subtract, or reorder some of the readings on the syllabus, based on the needs of our classroom discussions.  Assigned books must be brought to class for use in class discussion.  Students will receive instructor's written feedback on the Mid-Term Paper and will then revise it.  In addition to the mid-term paper, final exam, and final research paper, the final grade will also be based on class participation and attendance.  After two unexcused absences, your final grade will be reduced by one-half of a letter grade per absence.  In-class assignments cannot be made up.  Arriving more than 15 minutes late will count as an absence, and continual lateness will result in a grade reduction.  Plus and minus grades will be used.

E 360S • Literature Of Revolution

35069 • Spring 2018
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM JES A217A
GC

E 360S  l  Literature of Revolution

 

Instructor:  Shingavi, S

Unique #:  35069

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  The Communist Manifesto and its Literary Afterlives--

The twentieth century has been called the century of wars and revolutions: if it began with the convulsions of the first world war and the Russian Revolution, it ended with the 2001 invasion of Iraq and the Arab Spring.  Throughout the entirety of the century, people have contended with the social problems unleashed by war, plunder, inequality, and oppression and have sought to explore the ways that literature might be useful in developing our own understanding of these processes.  But literature was intimately tied in this period to the project of opposing war and making revolution.  In order to understand the history of “world literature” (itself a deeply contested term) we will compare the political and literary manifestos produced alongside some of the most important literary texts of the revolutionary movements of the world.

 

Texts (tentative):  Marx and Engels, Communist Manifesto; Progressive Writers Manifesto; Zaheer et al, Angaaray; Premchand, Short Stories; Rizal, Noli Me Tangere; Khalifeh, Wild Thorns; Cesaire, Discourse on Colonialism; Sembene, God’s Bits of Wood; Neruda, Collected Poem; Al-e-Ahmad, Occidentosis; Hikmet, Poems; Galvao, Industrial Park.

 

Requirements & Grading:  5 short 2-page response essays – 50%; Revisions of 4 those response essays into 3-4 page essays – 40%; Participation – 10%.

E 350R • Marxism And Literature

35620 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 1.108

E 350R  l  Marxism and Literature

 

Instructor:  Shingavi, S

Unique #:  35620

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  This class will consider the long arc of Marxist thinking about literary production.  We will be interested in examining how debates within the Marxist tradition inform our understanding of contemporary literary theory as well as arriving at an understanding of materialist theories of literature.

 

Texts:  Readings for the course will include: Marx’s notes on art; Lukacs on the European novel; Jameson on Postmodernism; Williams’ Marxism and Literature; Trotsky’s Literature and Revolution.

 

Requirements & Grading:  2 short essays (4-5 pages) – 50%; final paper (78 pages) – 30%; quizzes – 10%; participation – 10%.

CRW S325F • Fiction Writing

81526 • Summer 2017
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM CAL 200
Wr

CRW s325F  l Fiction Writing

 

Instructor:  Pipkin, J

Unique #: 81526

Semester:  Summer 2017, second session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction: No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: C L 315, E 603B, (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, 316K, or T C 603B.

 

Description:  This is an entry-level course in the writing of narrative fiction, with a focus on the short story form.  The first step in developing your writing craft is to learn how to read as a writer, so substantial emphasis will be placed on reading and discussing short stories.  You will be required to analyze the structure and craft of the short stories assigned.  Learning how to identify the fundamental elements and narrative techniques in these stories will help you to employ these techniques in your own work.  We will also read several selections from the textbook discussing the craft of fiction.  You should come to class prepared for a short quiz on the content and terms used in the assigned readings.  The beginning of the semester will focus on structure, narration, point of view, character development, and motivation.  The second half of the semester will focus on plotting, pacing, tension, setting, dialogue and revision.  Emphasis will be placed on making use of workshop feedback.  Class will consist of lecture, in-class writing, discussion, and workshop participation.  You should be prepared to read and discuss your work in class.  The main goal of the workshop sessions is to help you develop editing skills so that you can continue to grow as a writer beyond this class.  After your work is discussed in workshop, you should be prepared to use the ideas discussed in the critiques to improve the original draft.  Participation in workshop is an essential part of this class, so you must come prepared to discuss the works under consideration.

 

Texts:  Handouts and short-stories will be provided in class.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Two writing assignments: 35% each; class participation, quizzes, workshop discussion: 30%.

No final exam.  Papers are due in hard copy, in class, on the dates indicated.  Late or electronic submissions will not be accepted.  Attendance is required.

E 329R • The Romantic Period

35365 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 105

E 329R  l  The Romantic Period

 

Instructor:  Heinzelman, K

Unique #:  35365

Semester:  Spring 2017

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  My aim is to introduce students to most of the major poets of this period and one germinal prose writer.  This course will focus on roughly a forty-five-year period, from the American Revolution in 1776-82 to the death of Keats and Shelley (1821-22), a period that acts as a kind of "fertile crescent" in which modernity was spawned.  It was a time of dramatic cultural and economic upheaval, of great expectations for the improvement of society, and of equally great disappointment and political retrenchment.  Deliberately, at times even programmatically, the writers now called the Romantics set out not only to interpret the history of their times but also to change it.  They wanted to imagine an aesthetic philosophy that would account for man as a totality--as a being who endures psychological growth along with fixation and repression, who is both an individual and a social animal, and who lives in history but can imagine other histories that are possible, including transcendent or mythic ones.  Ironically, this search for a totalizing vision of "man" occurred simultaneously with a new self-consciousness that this term could be, and indeed had to be, separated into gendered categories.

 

Text:  Longman Anthology of British Literature: The Romantics and Their Contemporaries, ed. Damrosch, Manning, and Wolfson—Fifth Edition.  Students will also need to acquire a copy of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (any edition).

 

Requirements & Grading:  Three quizzes, 1 short paper, 1 short research paper, 1 final exam (given on the last class day) = 80%; Class participation and preparation = 20%.

 

Attendance:  The reading for the class happens outside class.  But all the work of the class happens in class.  Therefore, class attendance is mandatory.  To receive a grade of C or higher, you may not have more than two unexcused absences.

 

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

CRW 325F • Fiction Writing

33634 • Fall 2015
Meets W 5:00PM-8:00PM CAL 419
Wr

CRW 325F  l Fiction Writing

Instructor:  Pipkin, J

Unique #:  33634

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists: n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer Instruction: No

Prerequisites: One of the following: C L 315, E 603B, (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: This course focuses on the writing of narrative fiction, with specific emphasis on the short story form. The first step in developing creative writing skills is to learn how to read as a writer, so substantial attention will be given to reading and discussing short stories. Students will be required to analyze the structure and craft of the short stories assigned. Learning how to identify the fundamental elements and narrative techniques in the assigned readings will help students recognize and employ these techniques in their own work. We will read selected stories and essays from the textbook, On Writing Short Fiction, by Tom Bailey, in order to facilitate class discussion on the craft of fiction writing. Students should come to class prepared for short quizzes on the content and terms used in the assigned readings. The beginning of the semester will focus on structure, narration, point of view, and plotting. The second half of the semester will focus on character development, motivation, pacing, tension, setting, dialogue and revision. Class meetings will consist of lecture, in-class writing assignments, and workshop participation. Students should be prepared to read and discuss their work in class, since a large amount of class time will be conducted in the workshop format. The main goal of the workshop sessions is to help students develop their skills in analyzing, revising and editing their work so that they can continue to grow as writers beyond this class. Participation in workshop is an essential part of this class, so you must come prepared to discuss the works under consideration.

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you will be required to read and discuss your peers’ work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work.

Texts: On Writing Short Stories, edited by Tom Bailey.  Oxford UP.  (Required)

Additional stories and handouts will be provided in class.

Students should also have a dedicated writing notebook.

Requirements & Grading: Two writing assignments: 35% each; Class participation, Quizzes, Workshop discussion: 30%.  No final exam.  Papers are due on the dates indicated.  Late submissions will not be accepted.  Attendance is required.

CRW F325F • Fiction Writing

82450 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 310
Wr

CRW f325F  l Fiction Writing

Instructor:  Pipkin, J

Unique #: 82540

Semester: summer 2015, first session

Cross-lists: n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction: No

Prerequisites: One of the following: C L 315, E 603B, (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: This is an entry-level course in the writing of narrative fiction, with a focus on the short story form. The first step in developing your writing craft is to learn how to read as a writer, so substantial emphasis will be placed on reading and discussing short stories. You will be required to analyze the structure and craft of the short stories assigned. Learning how to identify the fundamental elements and narrative techniques in these stories will help you to employ these techniques in your own work. We will also read several selections from the textbook discussing the craft of fiction. You should come to class prepared for a short quiz on the content and terms used in the assigned readings. The beginning of the semester will focus on structure, narration, point of view, character development, and motivation. The second half of the semester will focus on plotting, pacing, tension, setting, dialogue and revision. Emphasis will be placed on making use of workshop feedback. Class will consist of lecture, in-class writing, discussion, and workshop participation. You should be prepared to read and discuss your work in class. The main goal of the workshop sessions is to help you develop editing skills so that you can continue to grow as a writer beyond this class. After your work is discussed in workshop, you should be prepared to use the ideas discussed in the critiques to improve the original draft. Participation in workshop is an essential part of this class, so you must come prepared to discuss the works under consideration.

Texts: Handouts and short-stories will be provided in class.

Requirements & Grading: Two writing assignments: 35% each; class participation, quizzes, workshop discussion: 30%.

No final exam. Papers are due in hard copy, in class, on the dates indicated. Late or electronic submissions will not be accepted. Attendance is required.

Policies: Documented Disability Statement: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone), or visit http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd.

Honor Code: The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

Academic Integrity: Any work submitted by a student in this course for academic credit will be the student's own work. For additional information on Academic Integrity, see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acadint.php.

Religious Holy Days: By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of a pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

E S325F • Fiction Writing

83390 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM CAL 200
Wr

Instructor:  Pipkin, J

Unique #: 83390

Semester: summer 2014, second session

Cross-lists: n/a

Computer Instruction: No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Course Description: This is an entry-level course in the writing of narrative fiction, with a focus on the short story form. The first step in developing your writing craft is to learn how to read as a writer, so substantial emphasis will be placed on reading and discussing short stories.  You will be required to analyze the structure and craft of the short stories assigned.  Learning how to identify the fundamental elements and narrative techniques in these stories will help you to employ these techniques in your own work.  We will also read several selections from the textbook discussing the craft of fiction.  You should come to class prepared for a short quiz on the content and terms used in the assigned readings.  The beginning of the semester will focus on structure, narration, point of view, character development, and motivation.  The second half of the semester will focus on plotting, pacing, tension, setting, dialogue and revision.   Emphasis will be placed on making use of workshop feedback.  Class will consist of lecture, in-class writing, discussion, and workshop participation.  You should be prepared to read and discuss your work in class.  The main goal of the workshop sessions is to help you develop editing skills so that you can continue to grow as a writer beyond this class.  After your work is discussed in workshop, you should be prepared to use the ideas discussed in the critiques to improve the original draft.  Participation in workshop is an essential part of this class, so you must come prepared to discuss the works under consideration.

Texts:             Handouts and short-stories will be provided in class.

Requirements & Grading: Two writing assignments: 35% each; class participation, quizzes, workshop discussion: 30%.

No final exam.  Papers are due in hard copy, in class, on the dates indicated.  Late or electronic submissions will not be accepted.   Attendance is required.  

Policies: Documented Disability Statement:  The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone), or visit http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd.

Honor Code:  The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

Academic Integrity:  Any work submitted by a student in this course for academic credit will be the student's own work. For additional information on Academic Integrity, see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acadint.php.

Religious Holy Days:  By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of a pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

SCHEDULE:

7/14: Intro   

7/15: Structure  

7/16: Point of View    

7/17: Narration

7/18: Character Development 

7/21: Character Development 

7/22: Character Development 

7/23: Preparing the First Draft   

7/24: Workshop

7/25: Workshop

7/28: Workshop

7/29: Workshop

7/30: Story 1 DUE     

7/31: Plot/Conflict   

8/1: Plot/Conflict  

8/4: Plot/Conflict   

8/5: Plot/Conflict    

8/6: Setting   

8/7: Dialogue

8/8: Dialogue   

8/11: Workshop

8/12: Workshop 

8/13: Workshop

8/14: Workshop

8/15: Story 2 DUE

No Final Exam

E F325F • Fiction Writing

83530 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM UTC 4.120
Wr

Instructor:  Pipkin, J            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  83530            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Summer 2013, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: This is an entry-level course in the writing of narrative fiction, with a focus on the short story form. The first step in developing your writing craft is to learn how to read as a writer, so substantial emphasis will be placed on reading and discussing short stories. You will be required to analyze the structure and craft of the short stories assigned. Learning how to identify the fundamental elements and narrative techniques in these stories will help you to employ these techniques in your own work. We will also read several selections from the textbook discussing the craft of fiction. You should come to class prepared for a short quiz on the content and terms used in the assigned readings. The beginning of the semester will focus on structure, narration, point of view, character development, and motivation. The second half of the semester will focus on plotting, pacing, tension, setting, dialogue and revision. Emphasis will be placed on making use of workshop feedback. Class will consist of lecture, in-class writing, discussion, and workshop participation. You should be prepared to read and discuss your work in class. The main goal of the workshop sessions is to help you develop editing skills so that you can continue to grow as a writer beyond this class. After your work is discussed in workshop, you should be prepared to use the ideas discussed in the critiques to improve the original draft. Participation in workshop is an essential part of this class, so you must come prepared to discuss the works under consideration.

Texts: Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft (7th Edition) Janet Burroway and Elizabeth Stuckey-French; Various stories/articles provided in class; Reference: The Elements of Style, Strunk & White (Recommended but not required).

Requirements & Grading: Two writing assignments: 35% each; class participation, quizzes, workshop discussion: 30%. No final exam. Papers are due in hard copy, in class, on the dates indicated. Late or electronic submissions will not be accepted. Attendance is required. All assignments are from Writing Fiction.

SCHEDULE:

6/6: Intro  (Handout)

6/7: Structure  (Handout)

6/10: Point of View  “Call Me Ishmael” 296-311  “Orientation” 311-315

6/11: Narration  “Seeing is Believing” p.25-39  “Big Me” p.39-53

6/12: Character Development  “Building Character” p.80-86

6/13: Character Development  “The Flesh Made Word” p.137-154

6/14: Character Development  “Rock Springs” p.120-135

6/17: Preparing the First Draft  “Whatever Works” p.2-14

6/18: Workshop

6/19: Workshop

6/20: Workshop

6/21: Workshop

6/24: Story 1 DUE  (Handout)

6/25: Plot/Conflict  “The Tower and the Net” 259-277  “Happy Endings” 279-282

6/26: Plot/Conflict  “The Use of Force” p.277-279

6/27: Plot/Conflict  “Everything that Rises Must Converge” 282-292

6/28: Plot/Conflict  (Handout)

7/1: Setting  “Far Far Away” 173-188  “The English Pupil” 188-195

7/2: Dialogue  “Dialogue” p. 86-99

7/3: Dialogue  (Handout)

7/4: HOLIDAY

7/5: Revision and Rewriting  “Play it Again, Sam” p.388-398

7/8: Workshop

7/9: Workshop

7/10: Workshop

7/11: Story 2 DUE

No Final Exam

E F325F • Fiction Writing

83625 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 204
Wr

Instructor:  Pipkin, J            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  83625            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Summer 2012, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 325 (Topic 1: Creative Writing: Fiction) and 325F may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: This is an entry-level course in the writing of narrative fiction, with a focus on the short story form. The first step in developing your writing craft is to learn how to read as a writer, so substantial emphasis will be placed on reading and discussing short stories. You will be required to analyze the structure and craft of the short stories assigned. Learning how to identify the fundamental elements and narrative techniques in these stories will help you to employ these techniques in your own work. We will also read several selections from the textbook discussing the craft of fiction. You should come to class prepared for a short quiz on the content and terms used in the assigned readings. The beginning of the semester will focus on structure, narration, point of view, character development, and motivation. The second half of the semester will focus on plotting, pacing, tension, setting, dialogue and revision. Emphasis will be placed on making use of workshop feedback throughout the semester. Class will consist of lecture, in-class writing, discussion, and workshop participation. You should be prepared to read and discuss your work in class. The main goal of the workshop sessions is to help you develop editing skills so that you can continue to grow as a writer beyond this class. After your work is discussed in workshop, you should be prepared to use the ideas discussed in the critiques to improve the original draft. Participation in workshop is an essential part of this class, so you must come prepared to discuss the works under consideration.

Texts:

Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft (7th Edition) Janet Burroway and Elizabeth Stuckey-French, Pearson/Longman

Various stories/articles provided in class.

Reference: The Elements of Style, Strunk & White (Recommended but not required).

Requirements & Grading: Two writing assignments: 35% each; class participation, quizzes, workshop discussion: 30%. No final exam. Papers are due in hard copy, in class, on the dates indicated. Late or electronic submissions will not be accepted. Attendance is required.

Schedule:

5/31: Intro

6/1: Structure

6/4: Point of View

6/5: Narration

6/6: Character Development

6/7: Character Development

6/8: Character Development

6/11: Preparing the First Draft

6/12: Workshop

6/13: Workshop

6/14: Workshop

6/15: Workshop

6/18: Story 1 DUE

6/19: Plot/Conflict

6/20: Plot/Conflict

6/21: Plot/Conflict

6/22: Setting

6/25: Dialogue

6/26: Revision and Rewriting

6/27: Revision and Rewriting

6/28: Revision and Rewriting

6/29: Workshop

7/2: Workshop

7/3: Workshop

7/4: Workshop

7/5: Story 2 DUE

No Final Exam

E 325 • Creative Writing: Fiction-W

34713 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM PAR 308
C2

 

Semester: Spring 2010
E 325 - Creative Writing: Fiction-W


Unique 

Days 

Time 

Bldg/Room

Instructor

 34713

TTH

8:00 PM- 9:30 PM

PAR 308

PIPKIN

Class Objectives:

The purpose of this class is to introduce students to basic techniques and strategies for writing fiction. The structure of prose fiction will be closely examine—with a focus on the short story—so that students will understand the component parts of the genre.  We will examine effective uses of language for creating convincing characters, plots and settings, and we will discuss basic story details such as grammar, sentence structure, and paragraph composition, as well as larger issues, such as inspiration, theme, style, voice, and story structure.  Special attention will be given to the development of character and the careful use of language.   We will also look at common mistakes and pitfalls to avoid, and we will work on establishing good writing practices and habits.

Class structure:

There are essentially only two ways to learn how to write: by reading, and by writing.  Therefore, we will do a number of short writing assignments in class, and we will read a selection of short stories and novel excerpts during the semester in order to examine how other authors practice their craft.  Since we will be discussing and dissecting these stories as writers, class attendance is absolutely mandatory.  Students must be prepared to discuss reading assignments and any challenges or issues they are dealing with in their own writing.  It is essential that everyone in class treat each other with respect and with trust so that we can foster an environment where everyone is comfortable and willing to share thoughts and ideas.

Requirements: 

We will be doing a challenging amount of reading and writing (both in and out of class.) Remember that this is a writing class, so when there is no specific “homework” assigned, you should be working on the short stories due throughout the semester.  (Don’t wait until the last minute and try to write an entire short story the night before it is due!)  Attendance is mandatory.  After four absences, your grade will be lowered by one-third of a letter grade per absence.  In-class assignments cannot be made up.  Assigned reading should be completed by the date listed on the syllabus and papers must be turned in on the date listed on the syllabus.  Late work will not be accepted.

Cellphones, Blackberrys, etc.:  

Cell phones must be turned off and hidden far, far away during class.  Texting is absolutely prohibited.

Grading:

Four writing assignments: 80% total
          2 short assignments (2-5 opening pages) 10% each;
          2 stories (10-15pp)  30% each 
Attendance, in-class writing, and class participation: 20%
No final exam. Attendance is required

Required Text:

R. V. Cassill, ed., The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction


For more information, please download the full syllabus.

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