The Department of French and Italian

Almeida Jacqueline Toribio


Ph.D., 1993, Linguistics, Cornell University

Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese
Almeida Jacqueline Toribio

Contact

Interests


Bilingualism and language contact, morphology, syntax, sociolinguistics, Caribbean studies, US Latino and border studies, Afro-Latin American and African studies

Courses


MAS 177 • Mellon Mays Program Seminar-Wb

40760 • Spring 2021
Internet

The MMUF Student Research Success for Academic Careers summer workshop will focus MMUF researchers on their summer projects. The course will feature units on methodology, understanding and constructing bibliographies, annotation, literature reviews, and writing skills, including emphasis on sharing writing with cohort peers.

SPN 368D • Contact Spanish In The Us-Wb

45785 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM
Internet
GC

This course presents an overview of the language situation of established and emerging Spanish-speaking communities in the United States. To that end, we address the historical presence of Spanish and the current demographic profiles of its speakers; we consider the diversity of varieties of U.S. Spanish in the domains of lexicon, phonology/phonetics, and morpho-syntax; and we examine the consequences of dialect and language contact via analyses of phenomena such as borrowing, calquing, code-switching, and convergence. Attention is also devoted to the social factors that modulate Spanish language usage in public domains. In particular, we explore cultural productions and representations of U.S. Spanish and its speakers, as manifested in and across media and artistic forms. The syllabus is organized into five parts: (1) the presence of Spanish in the U.S.; (2) Heritage Spanish; (3) Language contact and dialect contact; (4) The social sphere: identity and representation; (5) Research project.

FR 392K • Romance Syntax-Wb

35728 • Fall 2020
Meets M 9:00AM-12:00PM
Internet
(also listed as ILA 386, LIN 393)

Course Description

Romance Syntax is intended to provide an overview of the major grammatical structures across multiple modern Romance languages. The course covers a broad array of themes, including word order, clitics, pro-drop, and agreement, among other topics, beginning with traditional description and cross-linguistic comparisons. The course additionally presents seminal works from a range of scholars that highlight the importance of the Romance languages in the development of syntactic theories.

The course assumes no prior knowledge of syntactic theory.

Cross-listed with French

Grading

Assignments: 50%

Midterm: 25%

Paper: 25%

 

MAS 177 • Mellon Mays Program Seminar-Wb

39435 • Fall 2020
Internet

The MMUF Student Research Success for Academic Careers summer workshop will focus MMUF researchers on their summer projects. The course will feature units on methodology, understanding and constructing bibliographies, annotation, literature reviews, and writing skills, including emphasis on sharing writing with cohort peers.

MAS S177 • Mellon Mays Program Seminar

81325 • Summer 2020
Internet

Restricted to students accepted to the Mellon Mays Program. Seminar designed as an interdisciplinary primer to the exploration of research, writing, and professionalization in preparation for doctoral study. One lecture hour a week for one semester.
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.


MAS 177 • Mellon Mays Program Seminar

40100 • Spring 2020
Meets F 2:00PM-3:00PM BEN 1.118

The MMUF Student Research Success for Academic Careers summer workshop will focus MMUF researchers on their summer projects. The course will feature units on methodology, understanding and constructing bibliographies, annotation, literature reviews, and writing skills, including emphasis on sharing writing with cohort peers.

SPN 368C • Bilingualism

44805 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 305
GC

Investigates Spanish in contact with other languages and among different regional varieties in historical and contemporary settings.

ILA 386 • Rsrch In Spanish Linguistcs

43840 • Fall 2019
Meets M 9:00AM-12:00PM BEN 1.118

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

As scholars, we are called on to disseminate our research findings through publication. This course will guide graduate students in preparing a research paper for submission to an academic journal. Students should have a research project ready for the writing phase—i.e., an analyzed data set, an articulated argument or model— or a substantial course or exam paper ready for revision. Students from other departments are invited to participate.

Topics to be covered include: The structure and workflow of references: choosing and using a bibliographic management system; the structure and function of the Introduction; structuring a concise and relevant Background section; the structure of Methods; using effective Visualizations to explain findings; the hallmarks of Replicability; the text of Results; the structure of the Discussion (and how it differs from Results); the role of the Conclusion; effective titles and abstracts; following journal guidelines for format and submission; interpreting Revision recommendations.

TEXTS:

The core text for the course is: Writing your research article in 12 weeks: A guide to academic publishing success.

GRADING:

The grade for the course comprises participation (including peer review): 20%; assignments: 30%; final paper: 50%

 

MAS 177 • Mellon Mays Program Seminar

39675 • Fall 2019
Meets M 1:00PM-2:00PM GWB 4.112

The MMUF Student Research Success for Academic Careers summer workshop will focus MMUF researchers on their summer projects. The course will feature units on methodology, understanding and constructing bibliographies, annotation, literature reviews, and writing skills, including emphasis on sharing writing with cohort peers.

MAS S177 • Mellon Mays Program Seminar

82580 • Summer 2019
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-12:00PM GWB 1.130

Restricted to students accepted to the Mellon Mays Program. Seminar designed as an interdisciplinary primer to the exploration of research, writing, and professionalization in preparation for doctoral study. One lecture hour a week for one semester.
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.


ILA 386 • On So Called Spanglish

44595 • Spring 2019
Meets T 9:00AM-12:00PM CAL 21
(also listed as MAS 392)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course explores what is popularly labeled Spanglish in the cultural productions and representations of U.S. Spanish speakers. We address various themes surrounding Spanglish, including myths and ideologies about language, linguistic discrimination and profiling, and language and identity, and we examine Spanglish as manifested in the repertoires of individuals and communities and as a resource in print and broadcast media and in diverse artistic forms, such as film, literature, and music. 

MAS 177 • Mellon Mays Program Seminar

40455 • Spring 2019
Meets M 9:00AM-10:00AM BEN 3.150

The MMUF Student Research Success for Academic Careers summer workshop will focus MMUF researchers on their summer projects. The course will feature units on methodology, understanding and constructing bibliographies, annotation, literature reviews, and writing skills, including emphasis on sharing writing with cohort peers.

MAS 177 • Mellon Mays Program Seminar

40615 • Fall 2018
Meets M 1:00PM-2:00PM GWB 4.112

The MMUF Student Research Success for Academic Careers summer workshop will focus MMUF researchers on their summer projects. The course will feature units on methodology, understanding and constructing bibliographies, annotation, literature reviews, and writing skills, including emphasis on sharing writing with cohort peers.

SPN 368C • Contact Spanish In The U.S.

45780 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.208
GC

Investigates Spanish in contact with other languages and among different regional varieties in historical and contemporary settings.

MAS S177 • Mellon Mays Program Seminar

81685 • Summer 2018
Meets MTWTH 9:00AM-11:00AM GWB 4.112

Restricted to students accepted to the Mellon Mays Program. Seminar designed as an interdisciplinary primer to the exploration of research, writing, and professionalization in preparation for doctoral study. One lecture hour a week for one semester.
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.


FR 396K • Borrowing & Code-Switching

36335 • Spring 2018
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM BEN 1.118
(also listed as ILA 386)

The study of bilingualism presents a unique challenge within the discipline of linguistics since, without exception, the major linguistic theories are only equipped to deal with the study of language from a monolingual orientation.  However, no language is completely insulated from all others so there is invariably a bit of language contact in every monolingual grammar. In this course, we focus on the overt forms of language contact as manifested by the phenomenon of borrowing and code-switching. Our aim is to:

  1. provide a comprehensive overview of the social, psychological and linguistic issues posed by borrowing and code-switching;

  2. examine the theories that attempt to account for linguistic patterns of code-switching and borrowing;

  3. introduce new empirical approaches to borrowing and code-switching.

Course Materials:

All materials will be distributed on CANVAS

All readings through a shared library in Zotero

 

 

 

MAS 177 • Mellon Mays Program Seminar

35710 • Spring 2018

The MMUF Student Research Success for Academic Careers summer workshop will focus MMUF researchers on their summer projects. The course will feature units on methodology, understanding and constructing bibliographies, annotation, literature reviews, and writing skills, including emphasis on sharing writing with cohort peers.

MAS 177 • Mellon Mays Program Seminar

36230 • Fall 2017

The MMUF Student Research Success for Academic Careers summer workshop will focus MMUF researchers on their summer projects. The course will feature units on methodology, understanding and constructing bibliographies, annotation, literature reviews, and writing skills, including emphasis on sharing writing with cohort peers.

MAS S177 • Mellon Mays Program Seminar

82050 • Summer 2017
Meets TTH 11:30AM-1:00PM GWB 1.138

Restricted to students accepted to the Mellon Mays Program. Seminar designed as an interdisciplinary primer to the exploration of research, writing, and professionalization in preparation for doctoral study. One lecture hour a week for one semester.
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.


MAS 177 • Mellon Mays Program Seminar

36155 • Spring 2017
Meets W 2:00PM-3:00PM GWB 1.138

The MMUF Student Research Success for Academic Careers summer workshop will focus MMUF researchers on their summer projects. The course will feature units on methodology, understanding and constructing bibliographies, annotation, literature reviews, and writing skills, including emphasis on sharing writing with cohort peers.

SPN 330L • Intro Lang And Ling In Society

46530 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 303
GC

Examines the dynamics of language structure and use throughout the Spanish-speaking world, and covers topics such as sound systems, grammatical structures, historical developments, language learning and loss, and dialect differences and their social significance.

ILA 381 • Intro Theory & Rsrch Of Ling

45735 • Fall 2016
Meets T 8:00AM-11:00AM UTC 1.136

DESCRIPTION: This course presents the prevalent theories, discourses, and methods relevant to the study of the language forms and language practices of individuals and societies of the Spanish-speaking world. As such, it introduces students to the fields of phonetics/phonology, morphology, syntax, sociolinguistics, language contact and bilingualism, pragmatics, discourse, and second language acquisition, and prepares them to read and understand research in these areas. Course materials include overview readings that provide descriptive facts of the structure of Spanish, selected chapters that represent diverse theoretical and empirical approaches to its study, and research articles that reflect various methodological and interpretive orientations. The course seeks to assist students in developing an appreciation of the sub-disciplines of the field of Hispanic linguistics as well as initiate them into specialized reading and academic writing appropriate for the discipline.

COURSE OVERVIEW: The course is divided into five parts, each with a specific purpose and requirements.

           I.     The structure of Spanish [Weeks 1-4] Reinforces students’ knowledge of the core phonological, morphological, and syntactic properties of Spanish; knowledge will be further bolstered with exercises and activities and assessed with take-home exams.

          II.     Spanish in context [Weeks 5-7] Examines the regional and social variation presented by Spanish; students additionally explore the variation manifest in diverse contemporary contact settings; analytical capacities are assessed with quizzes and a research report.

        III.     Resources for research [Week 8]

        IV.     Approaches to the study of Spanish [Weeks 9-12] Exposes students to diverse areas of linguistic study, including major questions and methodological issues, modeled by the research agendas of guest faculty and doctoral candidates; students will enhance their appreciation of linguistic disciplines and develop their academic skills with critical review assignments and peer editing.

          V.     Pursuing and publishing your research [Weeks 13-14] Guides students through successful writing/revision of a research paper—from articulation of research questions, to review of relevant literature and selection of methodologies, to determination of the potential significance and larger benefits of the research—and identification of appropriate publication venues; the final product is to be submitted for publication.

The detailed syllabus will be delivered in segments, following the course outline.

GRADING: Several components of the course will be graded:

  • Exams (3): 30%
  • Quizzes (2): 10%
  • Research report: 15%
  • Critical reviews (2): 10%
  • Book review: 10%
  • Research paper and submission: 25%

MATERIALS: Course materials will be posted online or distributed in class. Readings are drawn from introductory textbooks, including Introducción de la lingüística hispánica (2009, Hualde et al. eds.), various handbooks, among these, The Handbook of Hispanic Linguistics (2012, Hualde et al., eds.) and The Handbook of Hispanic Sociolinguistics (2011, Díaz-Campos, ed.), and research articles drawn from professional journals and other compendia.

SPN 368C • Bilingualism

46525 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.124
GC

Investigates Spanish in contact with other languages and among different regional varieties in historical and contemporary settings.

SPC 320C • On So-Called Spanglish

45200 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.104
GC

Significant issues in Iberian or Latin American societies and cultures.

Topic 1: Jewish Voices from Latin America. An introduction to Jewish writers from Brazil and Latin America, with an emphasis on those whose works portray the situation of the Jewish communities in their respective cities and countries.

Topic 2: Mediascapes: Literature and Media in the Caribbean. Analyzes the relationship between literature and media technologies in contemporary Caribbean cultures.

SPN 368C • Contact Spanish In The U.S.

45695 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.102
GC

Investigates Spanish in contact with other languages and among different regional varieties in historical and contemporary settings.

ILA 381 • Intro Theory & Rsrch Of Ling

44915 • Fall 2015
Meets T 1:00PM-4:00PM BEN 2.116A

DESCRIPTION: This course presents the prevalent theories, discourses, and methods relevant to the study of the language forms and language practices of individuals and societies of the Spanish-speaking world. As such, it introduces students to the fields of phonetics/phonology, morphology, syntax, sociolinguistics, language contact and bilingualism, pragmatics, discourse, and second language acquisition, and prepares them to read and understand research in these areas. Course materials include overview readings that provide descriptive facts of the structure of Spanish, selected chapters that represent diverse theoretical and empirical approaches to its study, and research articles that reflect various methodological and interpretive orientations. The course seeks to assist students in developing an appreciation of the sub-disciplines of the field of Hispanic linguistics as well as initiate them into specialized reading and academic writing appropriate for the discipline.

COURSE OVERVIEW: The course is divided into five parts, each with a specific purpose and requirements.

           I.     The structure of Spanish [Weeks 1-4] Reinforces students’ knowledge of the core phonological, morphological, and syntactic properties of Spanish; knowledge will be further bolstered with exercises and activities and assessed with take-home exams.

          II.     Spanish in context [Weeks 5-7] Examines the regional and social variation presented by Spanish; students additionally explore the variation manifest in diverse contemporary contact settings; analytical capacities are assessed with quizzes and a research report.

        III.     Resources for research [Week 8]

        IV.     Approaches to the study of Spanish [Weeks 9-12] Exposes students to diverse areas of linguistic study, including major questions and methodological issues, modeled by the research agendas of guest faculty and doctoral candidates; students will enhance their appreciation of linguistic disciplines and develop their academic skills with critical review assignments and peer editing.

  • Bilingualism: Professor Barbara E. Bullock
  • Syntax: Joshua Frank and Adrian Riccelli
  • Language Contact: Jacqueline Larsen Serigos
  • Sociolinguistics: Brendan Regan and Robyn Wright

          V.     Pursuing and publishing your research [Weeks 13-14] Guides students through successful writing/revision of a research paper—from articulation of research questions, to review of relevant literature and selection of methodologies, to determination of the potential significance and larger benefits of the research—and identification of appropriate publication venues; the final product is to be submitted for publication.

The detailed syllabus will be delivered in segments, following the course outline.

GRADING: Several components of the course will be graded:

  • Exams (3): 30%
  • Quizzes (2): 10%
  • Research report: 15%
  • Critical reviews (2): 10%
  • Book review: 10%
  • Research paper and submission: 25%

MATERIALS: Course materials will be posted online or distributed in class. Readings are drawn from introductory textbooks, including Introducción de la lingüística hispánica (2009, Hualde et al. eds.), various handbooks, among these, The Handbook of Hispanic Linguistics (2012, Hualde et al., eds.) and The Handbook of Hispanic Sociolinguistics (2011, Díaz-Campos, ed.), and research articles drawn from professional journals and other compendia.

 

 

SPN 330L • Intro Lang And Ling In Society

45640 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.122
GC

Examines the dynamics of language structure and use throughout the Spanish-speaking world, and covers topics such as sound systems, grammatical structures, historical developments, language learning and loss, and dialect differences and their social significance.

ILA 386 • Bilingualism

45350 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CMA 3.108

COURSE TITLE: Bilingualism worldwide: conceptual and methodological considerations 

This graduate-level seminar is intended to present a comprehensive and critical treatment of the prevailing conceptual and empirical issues in the study of bilingualism worldwide. Particular attention will be focused on the empirical assessment of variability in bilingual speech forms as a function of individuals and the social contexts in which they are embedded. The course will highlight diverse approaches to the examination bilingual speech, to include field and laboratory methods as well as ‘big’ data methods of corpus linguistics. The course assumes some prior training in linguistics, and it will prove of relevance for students across specializations.

Students are expected to attend all class meetings and to engage in meaningful and constructive participation. In addition, students will take turns leading discussions and activities on selected readings. Students are also expected to complete several brief written assignments, among them, critical reviews of research articles and an analysis of a bilingual data set. The course culminates in the design and execution of a pilot project, to be developed and evaluated in stages throughout the term: proposal, annotated bibliography, presentation, and short written report.

SPN 330L • Intro Lang And Ling In Society

46125 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.120
GC

Examines the dynamics of language structure and use throughout the Spanish-speaking world, and covers topics such as sound systems, grammatical structures, historical developments, language learning and loss, and dialect differences and their social significance.

ILA 381 • Introduction To Linguistics

46575 • Fall 2014
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM BEN 1.118

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course is divided into four parts, each with a specific purpose and attendant requirements.

      I.     The structure of Spanish (Weeks 1-4) Reinforces students’ knowledge of the core phonological, morphological, and syntactic properties of Spanish; knowledge will be further bolstered with in-class exercises and assessed with in-class quizzes.

     II.     Spanish in context (Weeks 5-6) Examines the diachronic and synchronic variation presented by Spanish; students additionally explore the variation manifest in diverse contemporary contact settings through collaborative presentation of a selected reading.

   III.     Approaches to the study of Spanish (Weeks 7-10) Exposes students to diverse areas of linguistic study, including major questions and methodological issues, modeled by the research agendas of departmental faculty and advanced doctoral candidates; students will enhance their appreciation of linguistic disciplines and develop their academic skills with critical review assignments and peer editing.

  • Area: Sociolinguistics
  • Area: Language contact and bilingualism
  • Discourse-pragmatics
  • Second language acquisition theories and pedagogies

   IV.     Posing and pursuing research questions (Weeks 11-15) Guides students in developing a research proposal, from articulation of a research question, to review of relevant literature and selection of methodologies for language study, to determination of the potential significance and larger benefits of the research; students will elaborate the research proposal under the supervision of a chosen faculty member.

The detailed syllabus will be delivered in segments, following the course outline above.

GRADING: Several components of the course will be graded:

  • Quizzes (3): 30%
  • Presentation: 10%
  • Critical reviews (3): 30%
  • Paper Proposal: 30%

MATERIALS: Course materials will be posted on Blackboard or distributed in class. Readings are drawn from introductory textbooks, including Introducción de la lingüística hispánica (2009, Hualde et al. eds.), various recent handbooks, among these, The Handbook of Hispanic Linguistics (2012, Hualde et al., eds.) and The Handbook of Hispanic Sociolinguistics (2011, Díaz-Campos, ed.), and research articles drawn from professionals journals and other compendia.

 

SPN 345L • Intro To Hispanic Linguistics

47545 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 224

Introduction to the study of the Spanish language through different areas of linguistics such as phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, sociolinguistics, and second-language acquisition.

SPN 346 • Practical Phonetics

47555 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 201

Introduction to the study of Spanish phonetics and phonology, focusing on four aspects: mechanisms of sound production, representation of sounds and intonation, dialect variation, and comparison with English.

ILA 381 • Introduction To Linguistics

46540 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.108

COURSE OVERVIEW: The course is divided into four parts, each with a specific purpose and attendant requirements.

      I.     The structure of Spanish (Weeks 1-4) Reinforces students’ knowledge of the core phonological, morphological, and syntactic properties of Spanish; knowledge will be further bolstered with in-class exercises and assessed with in-class quizzes.

     II.     Spanish in context (Weeks 5-6) Examines the diachronic and synchronic variation presented by Spanish; students additionally explore the variation manifest in diverse contemporary contact settings through collaborative presentation of a selected reading.

   III.     Approaches to the study of Spanish (Weeks 7-10) Exposes students to diverse areas of linguistic study, including major questions and methodological issues, modeled by the research agendas of departmental faculty and advanced doctoral candidates; students will enhance their appreciation of linguistic disciplines and develop their academic skills with critical review assignments and peer editing.

  • Area: Sociolinguistics
  • Area: Language contact and bilingualism
  • Discourse-pragmatics
  • Second language acquisition theories and pedagogies

   IV.     Posing and pursuing research questions (Weeks 11-15) Guides students in developing a research proposal, from articulation of a research question, to review of relevant literature and selection of methodologies for language study, to determination of the potential significance and larger benefits of the research; students will elaborate the research proposal under the supervision of a chosen faculty member.

The detailed syllabus will be delivered in segments, following the course outline above.

GRADING: Several components of the course will be graded:

  • Quizzes (3): 30%
  • Presentation: 10%
  • Critical reviews (3): 30%
  • Paper Proposal: 30%

MATERIALS: Course materials will be posted on Blackboard or distributed in class. Readings are drawn from introductory textbooks, including Introducción de la lingüística hispánica (2009, Hualde et al. eds.), various recent handbooks, among these, The Handbook of Hispanic Linguistics (2012, Hualde et al., eds.) and The Handbook of Hispanic Sociolinguistics (2011, Díaz-Campos, ed.), and research articles drawn from professionals journals and other compendia.

 

SPN 345L • Intro To Hispanic Linguistics

47330 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 201

Introduction to the study of the Spanish language through different areas of linguistics such as phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, sociolinguistics, and second-language acquisition.

SPN 346 • Practical Phonetics

46840 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.112

Introduction to the study of Spanish phonetics and phonology, focusing on four aspects: mechanisms of sound production, representation of sounds and intonation, dialect variation, and comparison with English.

SPN 383M • Spanish In Texas

46945 • Spring 2013
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.120

Course Description

The seminar invites students to a careful consideration of Spanish, as it spoken in Texas, with attention to the individual, regional, and socio-cultural factors implicated in the variation it presents. The goal of the course is to understand the nature of language variation in order to provide information about local Spanish language varieties for scholarly, educational, and public interests. Thus, the course is focused as much on research as on outreach, addressing the empirical questions that local Spanish variation raises for researchers and the educational implications for students, educators, and the general public.

The course begins with a review various relevant literatures, including socio-historical treatments on the presence of Spanish in Texas and linguistic and sociolinguistic studies of Spanish focused on all levels of analysis.  The course then turns to the theoretical approaches and methods that will be relevant in the study of language variation and the application to naturally occurring data. The course culminates in the elaboration of a final paper, which may take one of two forms—a report of original empirical research or a lesson plan for educators; while the paper may address any Spanish language data set, students are encouraged to draw on the corpus of the Spanish in Texas Project.

The course will be largely organized as a seminar, consisting of lectures, presentations, guided discussion, and participation in group activities. There will also be several guest lectures from local faculty engaged in pertinent research, e.g., in history, sociology, and education.

Knowledge of Spanish is required. The course will be conducted in Spanish and/or English.

Materials

Readings, assignments, and Powerpoint slides will be posted on Blackboard.

Course Requirement and Grading

Several components of the course will be evaluated: participation in class, including familiarity with reading and collaboration in group tasks; an exam on the structure of Spanish; analysis and discussion of several Spanish language data sets; presentation and submission of the final paper.

10%: Participation

20%: Exam

20%: Linguistic analyses

10%: Presentation

40%: Final paper 

SPN 393T • Meths Of Study In Spanish Ling

46750 • Fall 2012
Meets W 4:00PM-7:00PM GEA 127

GRADUATE STUDIES I (HISPANIC LINGUISTICS)

DESCRIPTION

 This course is an introduction to the prevalent theories, discourses, and methods relevant to the study of the language forms and language practices of individuals and societies. As such, it introduces students to the fields of phonetics/phonology, morpho-syntax, pragmatics/discourse analysis, sociolinguistics, and second language acquisition, and prepares them to read and understand research in these areas. Course materials will include overview chapters that represent diverse frameworks, including theoretical and applied approaches, and research articles that reflect various methodological and interpretive orientations. The course seeks to assist students in developing an appreciation of fields of linguistic study as well as train them for specialized academic writing.

Students will dedicate the first weeks of the course to preparing written assignments based on the readings. In subsequent weeks, students prepare oral presentations, in English or Spanish, based on assigned readings. By the fourth week of the semester students will choose a faculty mentor in a selected area of specialization with whom they will develop a professional relationship and who will work with them in the development of a research paper. A draft of the research paper with an annotated bibliography will be completed by the end of the first semester; the paper will be completed in the second semester. Students will be graded on their analyses of theoretical readings, their writing, their oral presentations and their participation in class. Participation and attendance are required for all entering students.

 

UGS 303 • Language And Ethnic Identity

64345-64370 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 3.132

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

SPN 346 • Practical Phonetics

46560 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 208

Introduction to the study of Spanish phonetics and phonology, focusing on four aspects: mechanisms of sound production, representation of sounds and intonation, dialect variation, and comparison with English.

SPN 383M • Dominican Spanish

46595 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.118

Dominican and Contact Spanish 

Course description

This course presents an overview of the language situation of established monolingual Spanish communities and long-standing and emerging bilingual communities in the Caribbean and in the United States. We will address language and dialect convergence in the domains of phonology/phonetics and morpho-syntax through the analysis of phenomena such as borrowing, code-switching, leveling, accommodation, and attrition. Particular attention is devoted to the dynamics between the language-internal and language-external factors that constrain the mechanisms of language change and the outcomes of language change. We will draw on seminal readings and more recent empirical studies (as well as some overlooked, early work) that represent a broad array of research paradigms and interpretive frameworks.

Course requirements

• Attendance and active participation: careful preparation and discussion of required readings and completion of

(ungraded) in?class and out?of?class activities.

• Several components of the course will be graded, each described in turn.

40% Written assignments (4)

Each student will select four focus articles from the list of ‘additional readings’ for brief (750?1000

word) critical evaluation. The evaluation of the research presented should succinctly summarize the

work, highlight points of contrast/convergence with extant literature, post pertinent unanswered

questions, and, where possible, offer novel insights on some aspect of the topic under study (i.e.,

move beyond a simple summary). Guidelines for preparing critical reviews will be provided and due

dates are specified on the syllabus.

20% Presentations

Students will select a focus article for a twenty?minute individual or collaborative presentation; the

presentation should be accompanied by a visual aid (handout and/or Powerpoint). Research articles

will be drawn from those marked with an asterisk in ‘additional readings’ in Sections IV?VII (see

overview).

40% Research proposal

Each student will be required to present a written proposal for research on any aspect of U.S.

contact Spanish. The paper must include a literature review, a compelling purpose, a conceptual

framework, and a well?articulated methodology. It may be a replication of an extant study or a

novel proposal. (In the best case, the student would carry out the work in subsequent semesters.)

We will dedicate several class sessions to the development of the research proposal.

Research topic: due Monday, November 14

Annotated bibliography: due Monday, November 21

Presentation of project proposal: November 28 and 30

Written paper, due by December 12

Course materials

• Course readings, handouts, Powerpoint presentations, and assignments will be posted on Blackboard, the University

course management system; additional materials will be made available in class.

Course overview

 I. Introduction: Fictions and facts about U.S. Spanish and its speakers

II. Varieties of Spanish in the U.S.

III. Contact language and linguistics: conceptual issues

IV. Dialect contact and accommodation

V. Language contact: Borrowing and code?switching

VI. Congruence and convergence

VII. Variation in competence and style

VIII. Research project

Syllabus: Contact Spanish in the United States

 I. Introduction: Fictions and facts about U.S. Spanish and its speakers

Wednesday, August 24

Myths about U.S. Spanish and its speakers

Monday, August 29

A demographic portrait

US Census data and Pew Hispanic Center Reports

Wednesday, August 31

Hispanics and Spanish in Texas

[Monday, September 5: Holiday]

 II. Varieties of Spanish in the U.S.

Wednesday, September 7

Spanish in the Southwest: Mexican?American Spanish

? Required reading

?  Silva?Corval.n, C. 2004. Spanish in the Southwest. In Language in the USA: themes for the 21st century, E.

Finegan and J. Rickford (eds.), 205?229. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Monday, September 12

Spanish in the Northeast and Florida: Caribbean

? Required reading

?  Zentella, A.C. 2004. Spanish in the Northeast. In Language in the USA: themes for the 21st century, E.

Finegan and J. Rickford (eds.), 182?204. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

?  Otheguy, R., O. Garc.a, and A. Roca. 2000. Speaking in Cuban: the language of Cuban Americans. In New

immigrants in the United States, S. McKay and S. Wong (eds.), 165?188. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge

University Press.

Wednesday, September 14

Other varieties: Brule and Isle.o Spanish in Louisiana; Traditional Southwest Spanish in New Mexico

? Required reading

?  Holloway, C. 1997. Divergent twins: Isle.o and Brule Spanish in Louisiana. Southwest Journal of Linguistics

17: 55?72.

Varieties of Spanish in the U.S.: Additional readings

o Lipski, J. 2008. Varieties of Spanish in the United States. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.

o Bills, G. and N. Vigil. 2008. The Spanish language of New Mexico and southern Colorado: a linguistic atlas.

Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.

o Bills, G. 1997. New Mexican Spanish: Demise of the earliest European variety in the United States. American

Speech 72: 154?171.

o Zentella, A.C. 1997. Growing up bilingual: Puerto Rican children in New York. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

o Mendoza?Denton, N. 1999. Sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology of US Latinos. Annual Review of

Anthropology 28: 375?395.

o S.nchez, R. 1982. Our linguistic and social context. In Spanish in the United States: sociolinguistic

perspectives, J. Amastae and L. El.as?Olivares, 9?46. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

o Poplack, S. 1983. Bilingual competence: linguistic interference or grammatical integrity? In Spanish in the

U.S. setting: beyond the Southwest, L. El.as?Olivares (ed.), 107?129. Rosslyn, VA: National Clearinghouse for

Bilingual Education.

o Ornstein?Galicia, J. 1981. Varieties of Southwest Spanish: Some neglected basic constructions. In Latino

language and communicative behavior, R. Dur.n (ed.), 19?38. Norwood, NJ: ABLEX Publishing.

 III. Language contact and contact linguistics: conceptual issues

Monday, September 19

The field of contact linguistics

? Required reading

?  Winford, D. 2003. An introduction to contact linguistics. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. (Chapter 1)

Wednesday, September 21

The ‘failure of linguistic constraints’

? Required reading

?  Thomason, S. and T. Kaufman. 1988. Language contact, creolization, and genetic linguistics. Berkeley:

University of California Press. (Chapter 2: The failure of linguistic constraints on linguistic interference

Monday, September 26

New views on language change

? Required reading

?  Muysken, P. 2010. Scenarios for language contact. In The handbook of language contact, R. Hickey (ed.),

265?281. West?Sussex, UK: Wiley?Blackwell.

Language contact and linguistics: Additional reading

o Thomason, S. 2010. Contact explanations in linguistics. In The handbook of language contact, R. Hickey

(ed.), 31?47. West?Sussex, UK: Wiley?Blackwell.

o Labov, W. 2007. Transmission and diffusion. Language 83: 344?387.

o Sankoff, G. 2002. Linguistic outcomes of language contact. In The handbook of language variation and

change, J. K. Chambers, P. Trudgill and N. Schilling?Estes (eds.), 638?668. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing

o Muysken, P. 2004. Two linguistic systems in contact: Grammar, phonology and lexicon. In The handbook of

bilingualism, T. Bhatia and W. Ritchie (eds.), 147?167. Oxford, UK: Wiley?Blackwell.

o Hickey, R. 2010. Language contact: reconsideration and reassessment. In The handbook of language

contact, R. Hickey (ed.), 1?28. West?Sussex, UK: Wiley?Blackwell.

o Lüdi, G. 2006. Multilingual repertoires and the consequences for linguistic theory. In Beyond

misunderstanding: linguistic analyses of intercultural communication, K. Bührig and J. ten Thije (eds.),11?42.

Amsterdam: Benjamins.

 IV. Dialect contact and accommodation

Wednesday, September 28

Morphosyntax

? Required reading

?  Otheguy, R., A.C. Zentella, and D. Livert. 2007. Language and dialect contact in Spanish in New York:

toward the formation of a speech community. Language 83: 770?802.

Monday, October 3

Phonology

? Required reading

?  Aaron, J. and J.E. Hern.ndez. 2007. Quantitative evidence for contact?induced accommodation. In

Language in contact: policy, social and linguistic inquiries, K. Potowski and R. Cameron (eds.), 329?343.

Amsterdam: Johna Benjamins

*Critical Review #1 due

Dialect contact: Additional readings

o *Rivera?Mills, S. 2011. Use of voseo and Latino identity: an intergenerational study of Hondurans and

Salvadorans in the Western region of the U.S. In Selected proceedings of the 13th Hispanic Linguistics

Symposium, L. Ortiz?L.pez (ed.), 94?106. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Proceedings Project.

o *Bayley, R., N. C.rdenas, B. Trevi.o Schouten, and C. Martin V.lez. 2011. Spanish dialect contact in San

Antonio, Texas: An exploratory study. Paper presented at the 2010 Hispanic Linguistics Symposium.

o Potowski, K. 2011. Intrafamilial dialect contact. In M. D.az?Campos (ed.), The handbook of Hispanic

sociolinguistics, 579?597. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing.

o Zentella, A.C. 1990. Lexical leveling in four New York City Spanish dialects: Linguistic and social factors.

Hispania 73: 1094?1105.

o Hern.ndez, J.E. 2009. Measuring rates of word?final nasal velarization: The effect of dialect contact on ingroup

and out?group exchanges. Journal of Sociolinguistics 13: 583?612.

o Amastae, J. and D. Satcher. 1993. Linguistic assimilation in two variables. Language Variation and Change 5:

77?90.

 V. Language contact: Borrowing and code?switching

Wednesday, October 5

Borrowing: Nouns

? Required reading

?  Otheguy, R. and N. Lapidus. 2003. An adaptive approach to noun gender in New York contact Spanish. In A

Romance perspective on language knowledge and use, R. Cameron, L. L.pez and R. N..ez?Cede.o (eds.),

209?229. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

?  Jenkins, D. 2003. Bilingual verb constructions in Southwestern Spanish. Bilingual Review/ La Revista

Bilingüe 27:195?204.

Monday, October 10

Borrowing: Discourse markers

? Required reading nouns

?  Torres, L. 2002. Bilingual discourse markers in Puerto Rican Spanish. Language in Society 31: 65?83.

Wednesday, October 12

Code?switching: overview

? Required reading

?  Bullock, B. and A.J. Toribio. 2009. Themes in the study of code?switching. In The Cambridge handbook of

linguistic code?switching, B. Bullock and A.J. Toribio (eds.), 1?17. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press

Monday, October 17

Code?switching: morpho?syntax

? Required reading

?  Poplack, S. 1980. Sometimes I’ll start in Spanish y termino en espa.ol: toward a typology of code?switching.

Linguistics 18: 581?618.

? Pfaff, C. 1979. Constraints on language mixing: code?switching and borrowing in Spanish/English, Language

55: 291?318.

Wednesday, October 19

Phonetics

? Required reading

?  Bullock, B.E. and A.J. Toribio 2009. Trying to hit a moving target: On the sociophonetics of code?switching.

In Multidisciplinary approaches to code switching, L. Isurin, D. Winford, and K. de Bot (eds.), 189?206.

Amsterdam: Benjamins.

*Critical Review #2 due

Code?switching: Additional readings

o *Montes?Alcal., C. and N. Lapidus Shin. 2011. Las keys versus el key: Feminine gender assignment in mixedlanguage

texts. Spanish in Context 8: 119?143.

o *Pletsch de Garc.a, K. 2002, .ALA! Linguistic innovations and the blending of cultures on the South Texas

border,” Southwest Journal of Linguistics 1: 1?15.

o *Callahan, L. 2002. The Matrix Language Frame model and Spanish/English codeswitching in fiction.

Language & Communication 22: 1?16.

o *Matus?Mendoza, M. 2002. The English lexical loan: a class marker. Journal of Hispanic Higher Education 1:

329?337.

o *Fairclough, M. 2009. Spanish/English interaction in US Hispanic heritage learners’ writing. In Globalization

and language in the Spanish speaking world: macro and micro perspectives, C. Mar?Molinero and M.

Stewart (eds.), 76?93. New York: Palgrave MacMillan.

o Muysken, P. 2000. Bilingual speech: a typology of code?mixing. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

o Bullock, B. and A.J. Toribio (eds.). 2009. The Cambridge handbook of linguistic code?switching. Cambridge,

UK: Cambridge University Press.

o MacSwan, J. 2008. Code switching and grammatical theory. In The handbook of bilingualism, T. Bhatia and

W. Ritchie (eds.), 283?311. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley?Blackwell.

o Belazi, H., E. Rubin, and A.J. Toribio. 1994. Code?switching and X?bar theory: The Functional Head

Constraint. Linguistic Inquiry 25: 221?237.

o Olson, D. and M. Ortega?Llebaria. 2010. The perceptual relevance of code switching and intonation in

creating narrow focus. In Selected proceedings of the 4th Conference on laboratory Approaches to Spanish

Phonology, M. Ortega?Llebaria (ed.), 57?68. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Proceedings Project.

o Shenk, P. 2006. The interactional and syntactic importance of prosody in Spanish?English bilingual

discourse. International Journal of Bilingualism 10, 179?205.

o Timm, L. 1975. Spanish?English code?switching: el por qu. y how?not?to. Romance Philology 28: 473?482.

o Otheguy, R. and N. Stern. 2011. On so?called Spanglish. International Journal of Bilingualism 15: 85?100.

o Sobin, N. 1982. Texas Spanish and lexical borrowing. In Spanish in the United States: sociolinguistic

perspectives, J. Amastae and L. El.as?Olivares, 166?181 Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

o Reyes, R. 1981. Independent convergence in Chicano and New York City Puerto Rican bilingualism. In Latino

language and communicative behavior, R. Dur.n (ed.), 39?48. Norwood, NJ: ABLEX Publishing.

o Barkin, F. 1981. The role of loanword assimilation in gender assignment. Bilingual Review 8: 1?13.

 VI. Congruence and convergence

Monday, October 24

Language contact and language change

? Required reading

?  Silva?Corval.n, C. 2008. The limits of convergence in language contact. Journal of Language Contact Thema

II: 212?225.

Wednesday, October 26

Contact and congruence: morpho?syntax

? Required reading

?  Lapidus, N. and R. Otheguy. 2005. Contact induced change? Overt nonspecific ellos in Spanish in New York.

In L. Sayahi and M. Westmoreland (eds.) Selected Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Spanish

Sociolinguistics 67?75. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Proceedings Project.

Monday, October 31

Contact and convergence

? Required reading

?  Bullock, B.E. and A.J. Toribio. 2004. Introduction: Convergence as an emergent property of bilingual

speech. Bilingualism: Language & Cognition 7: 91?93.

?  Toribio, A.J. 2004. Convergence as an optimization strategy in Spanish?English code?switching. Bilingualism:

Language and Cognition 7: 165?173.

*Critical Review #3 due

Congruence and convergence: Additional reading

o *Montrul, S. 2004. Subject and object expression in Spanish heritage speakers: A case of morphosyntactic

convergence. Bilingualism: Language & Cognition 7: 125?142.

o *Alvord, S. 2010. Variation in Miami Cuban Spanish interrogative intonation. Hispania 93: 235?255.

o *Brown, E. and D. Harper. 2009. Phonological evidence of interlingual exemplar connections. Studies in

Hispanic and Lusophone Linguistics 2, 257?274.

o Ra.a Risso, R. 2010. Subject pronoun placement as evidence of contact and leveling in Spanish in New York.

International Journal of the Sociology of Language 203: 101?114.

o Otheguy, R. 2011. Functional adaptation and conceptual convergence in the analysis of language contact in

the Spanish of bilingual communities in New York. In M. D.az?Campos (ed.), The handbook of Hispanic

sociolinguistics, 504?529. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing

o Lynch, A. 2008. A sociolinguistic analysis of final /s/ in Miami Cuban Spanish. Language Sciences 31: 766?

790.

o Lantolf, J. 1983. Toward a comparative dialectology of U.S. Spanish. In Spanish in the U.S. setting: beyond

the Southwest, L. El.as?Olivares (ed.), 3?20. Rosslyn, VA: National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education.

o Dvorak, T. 1983. Subject?object reversals in the use of gustar among New York Hispanics. In Spanish in the

U.S. setting: beyond the Southwest, L. El.as?Olivares (ed.), 21?36. Rosslyn, VA: National Clearinghouse for

Bilingual Education.

 VII. Variation in competence and style

Wednesday, November 2

Registers

? Required reading

 Vald.s, G. and M. Geoffrion?Vinci 1998. Chicano Spanish: The problem of the “underdeveloped” code in

bilingual repertoires,” The Modern Language Journal 82: 473?501.

Monday, November 7

Grammatical knowledge

? Required reading

 Polinsky, M. and O. Kagan. 2007. Heritage languages: in the ‘wild’ and in the classroom. Language and

Linguistics Compass 1: 368?395.

Wednesday, November 9

Establishing a baseline for U.S. Spanish

? Required reading

? TBA

*Critical Review #4 due

Variation in competence and style: Additional readings

o *MacSwan, J. 2000. The threshold hypothesis, semilingualism, and other contributions to a deficit view of

linguistic minorities. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 22: 3?45.

o *Montrul, S. 2009. Knowledge of tense?aspect and mood in Spanish heritage speakers. International Journal

of Linguistics 3: 239?269.

o Vald.s, G. 2001. Heritage language students: profiles and possibilities. . In Heritage languages in America:

Preserving a national resource, J. Peyton, D. Ranard, and S. McGinnis (eds.), 37?77. McHenry, IL : Center for

Applied Linguistics

o Montrul, S. 2010. Current issues in heritage language acquisition. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics 30: 3?

23.

 VIII. Research projects

Monday, November 14: Research tutorial

*Due: Research topic

Wednesday, November 16: Articulating a research question and selecting appropriate methods

Monday, November 21: Writing a research proposal/report

*Due: Annotated bibliography

Wednesday, November 23: Holiday

Monday, November 28: Presentations of research proposal

Wednesday, November 30: Presentations of research proposal

*Written research paper, due by December 12

UGS 303 • Language And Ethnic Identity

64525-64550 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 4.110

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

SPN 353 • Intro To Hispanic Socioling

46662 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM MEZ 1.216

Explores the interrelationship of language and society, with reference to the Spanish-speaking world. Studies how socioeconomic, political, and anthropological factors like race, social class, gender, age, and identity influence linguistics forms.

UGS 303 • Language And Ethnic Identity

64000-64010 • Fall 2010
Meets WF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 1

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

SPN 345L • Intro To Hispanic Linguistics

47795 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM MEZ 2.124

Introduction to the study of the Spanish language through different areas of linguistics such as phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, sociolinguistics, and second-language acquisition.

SPN 345L • Intro To Hispanic Linguistics

48150 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 2.124

Introduction to the study of the Spanish language through different areas of linguistics such as phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, sociolinguistics, and second-language acquisition.

Graduate Students


  1. Aris Clemons, dissertation in progress. Speaking race: A raciolinguistic analysis of linguistic profiling and Dominican(-American) ethno-racial development. The University of Texas at Austin.
  2. Thomas Leslie, dissertation in progress, The University of Texas at Austin. Palatal /j/ fortition in the Spanish of Medellín, Columbia: The sociophonetics of a change in progress.
  3. Joshua Frank, dissertation in progress, The representation and comprehension of multiple complementizers in Cuban Spanish.
  4. Steven Alcorn, Ph.D. 2018. The University of Texas at Austin; The role of L2 experience in L1 phonotactic restructuring in sequential bilinguals.
  5. Adriano Trovato, Ph.D. 2017, The University of Texas at Austin; A sociophonological analysis of contact Spanish in the United States: Labiodentialization and labial consonantes variation.
  6. Brendan Regan, Ph.D. 2017. The University of Texas at Austin; The demerger of ceceo in urban and rural Huelva, Spain.
  7. Jacqueline Larsen Serigos, Ph.D. 2017. The University of Texas at Austin; Applying corpus and computational methods to loanword research.
  8. Robyn Wright, Ph.D. 2017, The University of Texas at Austin; A transmedial third wave sociolinguistic approach to examining the social meaning of nonstandard /s/ in Madrid.
  9. David Huenlich,Ph.D. 2016, The University of Texas at Austin; The roots of multiethnolects among German youth.
  10. Brandon Baird, Ph.D. 2014, The University of Texas at Austin; An acoustic analysis of Spanish-K’ichee’ (Mayan) bilingual intonation.
  11. Jennifer Lang-Rigal, Ph.D. 2014, The University of Texas at Austin; A perceptual and experimental phonetic approach to dialect stereotypes: The tonada cordobesa of Argentina.
  12. Mark Amengual, Ph.D. 2013, The University of Texas at Austin; An experimental approach to phonetic transfer in the production and perception of early Spanish-Catalan bilinguals.
  13. Cristina Martínez, Ph.D. 2013, The University of Texas at Austin; Negation in vernacular Brazilian Portuguese.
  14. Daniel Olson, Ph.D. 2012, The University of Texas at Austin; Bilingual language contexts: Variable language switching costs and phonetic production.
  15. Aaron Roggia, Ph.D. 2011, The Pennsylvania State University; Unaccusativity and word order in Mexican Spanish: An examination of syntactic interfaces and the split intransitivity hierarchy
  16. Ana de Prada Pérez, Ph.D. 2009, The Pennsylvania State University; Subject expression in Minorcan Spanish: Consequences of contact with Catalan.
  17. Eva María Suárez-Budenbender, Ph.D. 2009, The Pennsylvania State University; Perceptions of Spanish and Dominican self-perception in the Puerto Rico diaspora
  18. Hilary Barnes, Ph.D. 2009, The Pennsylvania State University; A sociolinguistic study of sustained Veneto-Spanish bilingualism in Chipilo, Mexico
  19. Verónica González, Ph.D. 2008, The Pennsylvania State U.niversity; Spanish clitic climbing
  20. Tyler Anderson, Ph.D. 2006, The Pennsylvania State University; Spanish-English bilinguals’ attitudes toward code-switching: Proficiency, grammaticality and familiarity.
  21. Jason Duncan, Ph.D. 2004, The Pennsylvania State University; The syntax of headed restrictive relative clauses with special reference to Spanish.
  22. Lisa Noetzel, Ph.D. 2001, The Pennsylvania State University; The gerund: Its evolution from Latin to Old Spanish.
  23. Tamara Hertel, Ph.D. 2000, The Pennsylvania State University; The second language acquisition of Spanish word order: Lexical and discourse factors.
  24. Francisco Zabaleta, Ph.D. 1996, The University of California, Santa Barbara; Los verbos sicológicos del español y la teoría-theta.

Publications


publications

  1. Bullock, Barbara E.; Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline; Guzmán, Gualberto & Serigos, Jacqueline. Accepted. Processing multilingual data. Routledge Handbook of Language Contact, E. Adamou & Y. Matras (eds.)
  2. Bullock, Barbara E.; Larsen Serigos, Jacqueline & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. Accepted. Exploring a loan translation and its consequences in an oral bilingual corpus. Journal of Language Contact, Special issue, A. Backus & N. Kharkimov (eds.)
  3. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline & Clemons, Aris. 2020. Se comen la [s] y a veces son muy fisnos: Observations on elision, retention, and insertion in popular Dominican(-American) Spanish. Dialects from Tropical Islands: Research on Caribbean Spanish in the United States, W. Valentín-Márquez & Melvin González (eds.), Routledge, pp. 71-87.
  4. Bullock, Barbra E.; Guzmán, Gualberto; & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2019. The limits of Spanglish? Proceedings of the 3rd Joint SIGHUM Workshop on Computational Linguistics for Cultural Heritage, Social Sciences, Humanities and Literature, pp. 115–121. Association for Computational Linguistics.
  5. Bullock, Barbra E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2019. Theoretical and practical arguments for a language feature: Evidence from language mixing. Contributions of Romance Languages to Linguistic Theory, D. Arteaga (ed.), pp. 93-113. Cham, Switzerland: Springer.
  6. Bullock, Barbara E.; Serigos, Jacqueline Larsen; Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline & Wendorf, Arthur. 2018. The challenges and benefits of annotating oral bilingual corpora: The Spanish in Texas Corpus Project. Linguistic Variation, Special issue: Romance Parsed Corpora, C. Tortora, B. Santorini, & F. Blanchette (eds.), 100-119.
  7. Bullock, Barbara E.; Guzmán, Gualberto; Serigos, Jacqueline; & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. Should code-switching models be asymmetric. Interspeech 2018, 2534-2538.
  8. Bullock, Barbara E.; Guzmán, Gualberto; Sharath, Vivek; Serigos, Jacqueline; & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. Predicting the presence of a Matrix Language in code-switching. Proceedings of the Third Workshop on Computational Approaches to Linguistic Code-switching.  Association for Computational Linguistics 2018, 68-75.
  9. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2018. The future of code-switching research. Code-switching: theoretical questions, experimental answers. A festschrift presented to Kay González-Vilbazo presented by his colleagues and students, L. López (ed.), 257-267. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  10. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline (2018). National and diasporic Spanish varieties as evidence of ethnic affiliations. Cambridge Handbook of Spanish Linguistics, K. Geeslin (ed.), 563-581. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  11. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline & Durán, Leah. 2018. Understanding and leveraging Spanish heritage speakers’ bilingual practices. Handbook of Spanish as a Minority/Heritage Language, K. Potowski (ed.), 284-298. New York: Routledge Press.
  12. Bullock, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2018. The sociolinguistics of bilingualism. An Introduction to Bilingualism: Principles and Processes (2nd edition), J. Altarriba & R. Heredia (eds.), 300-316. New York: Routledge Press.
  13. Guzmán, Gualberto; Ricard, Joseph; Serigos, Jacqueline; Bullock, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2017. Moving code-switching research toward more empirically grounded methods. CDH 2017 Corpora in the Digital Humanities, 1-9.
  14. Guzmán, Gualberto; Ricard, Joseph; Serigos, Jacqueline; Bullock, Barbara E.; & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2017. Metrics for modeling code-switching across corpora. Interspeech 2017,67-71.
  15. Frank, Joshua & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2017. Multiple-que constructions in Cuban Spanish: Towards a theory of performance. Cuban Spanish Dialectology: Variation, Contact and Change, A. Cuza (ed.), 119-134. Georgetown University Press.
  16. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2017. Structural approaches to code-switching: Research then and now. Romance Languages and Linguistic Theory 12: Selected papers from the 45th Linguistic Symposium on Romance Languages, Campinas, Brazil, R. Lopes, J. Ornelas de Avelar & S. Cyrino (eds.),213-233. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  17. Guzmán, Gualberto; Bullock, Barbara; & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2017. Quantifying the effects of language contact. Proceedings of the MLP 2017 The First Workshop on Multi-Language Processing in a Globalising World, 15-20. ADAPT Centre, Dublin City University. Dublin City University.
  18. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline & Bullock, Barbara E. 2016. A new look at heritage Spanish and its speakers. In Advances in Spanish as a Heritage Language, D. Pascual y Cabo (ed.), 27-50. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  19. Guzmán, Gualberto; Serigos, Jacqueline; Bullock, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2016. Simple tools for exploring variation in code-switching for linguists. EMNLP (Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing 2016 Second Workshop on Computational Approaches to Code-switching: Proceedings of the Workshop, 12-20, Association for Computational Linguistics.
  20. Bullock, Barbara E.; Larsen Serigos, Jacqueline & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2016. The stratification of English-language lone-word and multi-word material in Puerto Rican Spanish-language press outlets: A computational approach. Code-switching in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean and its diaspora, Mazak, M. Parafita Cuoto & R. Guzzardo (eds.), 172-189. New York: John Benjamins.
  21. Bullock, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2015. An experimental approach to hypercorrection in Dominican Spanish. Hispanic Linguistics at the Crossroads. Theoretical linguistics, language acquisition and language contact. Proceedings of the Hispanic Linguistics Symposium 2013, R. Klassen, J. Liceras & E. Valenzuela (eds.), 251-268. New York: John Benjamins.
  22. Bullock, Barbara E.; Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline & Hinrichs, Lars. 2014. World Englishes, code-switching, and convergence. The Oxford Handbook of World Englishes, M. Filppula, J. Klemola, & D. Sharma (eds.), 211-231. Oxford University Press.
  23. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline & González-Vilbazo, Kay. 2014. Operator movement in English-Spanish and German-Spanish codeswitching. Grammatical theory and bilingual codeswitching, J. MacSwan (ed.), 87-119. MIT Press.
  24. Bullock, Barbara E.; Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2014. Dominican Spanish. In Languages and dialects in the U.S.: Focus on Diversity and Linguistics, Di Paolo & A. Spears (eds.). Routledge.
  25. Bullock, Barbara E.; Amengual, Mark & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2014. The status of s in Dominican Spanish. Lingua 143:20-35.
  26. Bullock, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2014. From Trujillo to the terremoto: The effects of language ideologies on the language attitudes of the rural poor of the northern Dominican border. International Journal of the Sociology of Language 227: 83-100.
  27. Bullock, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2012. The Spanish in Texas Corpus Project. COERLL, The University of Texas at Austin. http://www.spanishintexas.org.
  28. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2012. Contact varieties of language: Spanglish, Chinglish, Finglish. The Encyclopedia of Diversity in Education, J. Banks (ed.), 448-451. Sage Publications.
  29. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2011. Code-switching among U.S. Latinos. In Handbook of Hispanic Sociolinguistics, M. Diaz-Campos (ed.), 530-552. Oxford: Blackwell-Wiley.
  30. Bullock, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2010. Correcting the record on Dominican [s]-hypercorrection. In Romance Linguistics 2009, S. Colina, A. Olarrea, & A. Carvalho (eds.), 15-24. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  31. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2010. Introduction. Ethnicity and language: Identity issues in the U.S. Southwest. In Spanish of the U.S. Southwest: A language in transition, S. Rivera-Mills & D. Villa (eds.), 255-264. Madrid: Vervuert.
  32. Bullock, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2009. Reconsidering Dominican Spanish: Data from the rural Cibao. Revista Internacional de Lingüística Iberoamericana 14:49-73.
  33. Bullock, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2009. How to hit a moving target: On the sociophonetics of code-switching. In Multidisciplinary approaches to code switching, L. Isurin, D. Winford, & K. de Bot (eds.), 189-206. Amsterdam: Benjamins.
  34. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2009. Language attitudes and linguistic outcomes in Reading, PA. In Language allegiances and bilingualism in the U.S., M. R. Salaberry (ed.), 24-41. Multilingual Matters.
  35. Bullock, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2009. Themes in the study of code-switching. In The Handbook of Linguistic Code-switching, B. Bullock & A.J. Toribio (eds.), 1-17. Cambridge University Press.
  36. Bullock, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline (eds.). 2009. The Cambridge Handbook of Linguistic Code-switching. Cambridge University Press.
  37. Bullock, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2008. Kreyol incursions into Dominican Spanish: The percept of Haitianized speech among Dominicans. In Linguistic identity and bilingualism, M. Niño-Murcia & J. Rothman (eds.), 175-198. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  38. Anderson, Tyler & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2007. Attitudes towards borrowing versus code-switching. Spanish in Context 4: 217-240.
  39. Bullock, Barbara E.; Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline; González, Verónica & Dalola, Amanda. 2006. Language Dominance and Performance Outcomes in Bilingual Pronunciation. In Proceedings of the 8th Generative Approaches to Second Language Acquisition Conference, M. Grantham O’Brien, C. Shea, & J. Archibald (eds.), 9-16. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.
  40. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2006. Spanish/English Contact. In The Praeger handbook of Latino education in the U.S., L. Díaz Soto (ed.), 405-413. New York: Praeger.
  41. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2006. Linguistic displays of identity among Dominicans in national and diasporic settlements. In English and Ethnicity, C. Davies & J. Brutt-Griffler (eds.), 131-155. New York: Palgrave.
  42. Bullock, Barbara E. and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2006. Intra-system variability and change in nominal and verbal morphology. In & Romance Linguistics: Retrospective and Perspectives, R. Gess & D. Arteaga (eds.), 305-325. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  43. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline & Nye, Carlos. 2006. Restructuring of reverse psychological predicate in bilingual Spanish. In New Perspectives in Romance Linguistics. J. Montreuil & C. Nishida (eds.), 263-277. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  44. Jensen, Leif; Cohen, Jeffrey H.; Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline; DeJong, Gordon F. & Rodríguez, Leila. 2006. Ethnic identities, language and economic outcomes among Dominicans in a new destination. Social Science Quarterly 87: 1088-1099.
  45. Zapata, Gabriela; Sánchez, Liliana & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2005. Contact and contracting Spanish. International Journal of Bilingualism 3-4: 377-395.
  46. Bullock, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2004. Convergence as an emergent property in bilingual speech. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 7: 91-93.
  47. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2004. Convergence as an optimization strategy of bilingual speech: Evidence from code-switching. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 7: 165-173.
  48. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2004. Spanish-English speech practices: Bringing chaos to order. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism 7, 133-154.
  49. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline, Bullock, Barbara E., Botero, Christopher G. & Davis, Kristopher Allen. 2004. Perseverative effects in bilingual code-switching. In Experimental and Theoretical Approaches to Romance Linguistics, R. Gess & E. Rubin (eds.), 291-306. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  50. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2004. Spanish/English speech practices: Bringing chaos to order. In Bilingualism and Language Pedagogy, J. Brutt-Griffler & M. Varghese (eds.), 41-62. Multilingual Matters. (Book version of special issue of the International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism).
  51. Bullock, Barbara E.; Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline; Davis, Kristopher A. & Botero, Christopher. 2004. Phonetic convergence in bilingual Puerto Rican Spanish. In WCCFL 23: Proceedings of the 23rd West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics, V. Chand, A. Kelleher, A. Rodríguez, & B. Schmeiser (eds.), 113-125. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.
  52. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2003. The social significance of language loyalty among Black and White Dominicans in New York. The Bilingual Review/La Revista Bilingüe 27: 3-11.
  53. Sánchez, Liliana & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2003. Current Issues in the Generative Study of Spanish Second Language Syntax. In Studies in Spanish Second Language Acquisition: The State of the Science, B. Lafford & R. Salaberry (eds.), 189-232. Georgetown University Press.
  54. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2003. Minority perspectives on language: Mexican and Mexican-American attitudes towards Spanish and English. In Mi lengua: Spanish as a heritage language in the United States, Roca and C. Colombi (eds.), 154-169. Georgetown University Press.
  55. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2002. Focus on clefts in Dominican Spanish. In Structure, Meaning, and Acquisition in Spanish, J. Lee, K. Geeslin, and J.C. Clements (eds.), 130-146. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.
  56. Hammer, Carol; Miccio, Adele & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2002. Linguistics and speech-language pathology: Combining research efforts towards improved language interventions for bilingual children. In Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics 2000: Linguistics, language, and the professions, J. Alatis, H. Hamilton, & A.-H. Tan (eds.), 234-250. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.
  57. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2002. Spanish-English code-switching among US Latinos. International Journal of the Sociology of Language 158: 89-119.
  58. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2001. Accessing Spanish-English code-switching competence. International Journal of Bilingualism 5: 403-436.
  59. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2001. On the emergence of code-switching competence. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 4: 203-231.
  60. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2001. Minimalist ideas on parametric variation. In North East Linguistics Society 30, Hirotani, A. Coetzle, & N. Hall, J.-Y. Kim (eds.), 627-638. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts.
  61. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2001. On Spanish language decline. In Proceedings of the 25 Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development, A. H.-J. Do, L. Domínguez and A. Johansen (eds.), 768-779. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.
  62. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. Code-switching and minority language attrition. In Spanish Applied Linguistics at the turn of the Millennium, R. Leow & C. Sanz (eds.), 174-193. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.
  63. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. Once upon a time en un lugar muy lejano…Spanish-English code-switching patterns across narratives. In Spanish in the United States: Linguistic Issues and Challenges, A. Roca (ed.), 184-203. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.
  64. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. Nosotros somos dominicanos: Language and social differentiation among Dominicans. In Spanish in the United States: Linguistic Issues and Challenges, A. Roca (ed.), 252-270. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.
  65. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. Spanglish?! Bite your tongue! Spanish-English code-switching among Latinos. Reflexiones 1999, R. Flores (ed.), 115-147. Austin, TX: Center for Mexican American Studies.
  66. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. Language variation and the linguistic enactment of identity among Dominicans. Linguistics: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the Language Sciences 38: 1133-1159.
  67. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. Setting parametric limits on dialectal variation in Spanish. Lingua 110: 315-341.
  68. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. Positional licensing of subjects. In Proceedings of the Fifteenth Eastern States Conference on Linguistics, R. Daly and A. Riehl (eds.), 237-248. Ithaca, NY: Cornell Linguistics Circle.
  69. Zabaleta, Francisco &Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1999. The influence of first language phonology in the development of first and second language orthography. Tinta 3, 65-82.
  70. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1999. Spanish-English code-switching as rule-governed bilingual behavior. In 1998 Mid-America Conference Papers, N. Lutz and R. Schaefer (eds.), 280-290. Lawrence: University of Kansas.
  71. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1999. Code-switching and second language acquisition. In 1998 Mid-America Conference Papers, N. Lutz and R. Schaefer (eds.), 113-125. Lawrence: University of Kansas.
  72. Gumperz, John & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1999. Codeswitching. In The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences, F. Keil and R. Wilson (eds.), 118-119. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  73. Rubin, Edward J. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1996. Code-switching in Generative Grammar. In Spanish in Contact, J. Jensen and A. Roca (eds.), 203-226. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.
  74. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1996. Dialectal variation in the licensing of null referential and expletive pronouns. In Aspects of Romance Linguistics, C. Parodi, C. Quicoli, M. Saltarelli, & M.L. Zubizarreta (eds.), 409-432. Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press.
  75. Rubin, Edward J. and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1996. The role of functional categories in bilingual children’s language mixing and differentiation. World Englishes 15: 385-39.
  76. Rubin, Edward J. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1995. Feature-checking and the syntax of language contact. In J. Amastae, G. Goodall, M. Montalbetti and M. Phinney, eds. Contemporary Research in Romance Linguistics, 177-185. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  77. Brown, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1995. Language contact and differentiation in child bilingualism: A syntactic analysis. In Proceedings of the 19th Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development, D. MacLaughlin and S. McEwen (eds.), 629-642. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.
  78. Belazi, Hedi, Rubin, Edward J. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1994. Code-switching and X-bar Theory. Linguistic Inquiry 25: 221-237.
  79. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1993. Parametric variation in the licensing of nominals. Doctoral dissertation, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.
  80. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1993. Lexical Subjects in Finite and Non-finite Clauses. Cornell Working Papers in Linguistics 11: 149‑178.
  81. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1992. Proper Government in Spanish Subject Relativization. Probus 4: 291-304.
  82. Harbert, Wayne E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1991. Nominative Objects. Cornell Working Papers in Linguistics 9, 127-191.
  83. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1990. A-bar Movement in Spanish: Wh-questions, Focalization and Relative Clauses. In Proceedings of the Seventh Eastern States Conference on Linguistics, No and M. Libucha (eds.), 286-294. Columbus, OH: Ohio State University.
  84. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1989. Specifier-head Agreement in Japanese. In West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics 8: 535-548.
  85. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1988. Subject-Auxiliary Inversion in English: Licensing Operators. MIT Working Papers in Linguistics 10: 240-256.

 

Manuscripts in progress

  1. Bullock, Barbara E.; Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline, Amengual, Mark. & Thomas Leslie. In progress. Posttonic vowel reduction via raising: a socio-phonetic marker?
  2. Bullock, Barbara E & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. In progress. Are there multiple [s]’s in Dominican Spanish?
  3. Lawrence, Anna & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. In progress. Spanglish in Latinx Children's Literature.
  4. Leal, Rubinia & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. In progress. Spanglish in Latinx Media.
  5. Bailey, Mackenzie & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. In progress. (Mock) Spanglish in Latinx Adult Literature.

 

Editorship

  1. Bullock, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline (eds.). 2009. The Cambridge Handbook of Linguistic Code-switching. Cambridge University Press.
  2. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline (Guest ed.) 2008. Lingua. Special issue: Formal approaches to code-switching.
  3. Bullock, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline (Guest eds.). 2004. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition2. Special issue: Bilingualism and linguistic convergence.
  4. Sagarra, Nuria & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline (eds.). 2006. Selected Proceedings of the 9th Hispanic Linguistics Symposium. Cascadilla Proceedings Project.
  5. Harbert, Wayne & Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline (eds.). 1993. Cornell Working Papers in Linguistics 9. Cornell Linguistics Circle. Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.

 

Review Articles and Book Notices

  1. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2013. Review of Handbook of Hispanic Linguistics, J.I. Hualde, A. Olarrea and E. O’Rourke (eds.), Language 89: 370-372.
  2. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2006. Review of Contact linguistics: Bilingual encounters and grammatical outcomes, C. Myers-Scotton (2002), Journal of Pidgin and Creole Languages 21: 411-414.
  3. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2002. Review of Bilingual speech: A typology of codemixing (P. Muysken), International Journal of Bilingualism 6: 91-94.
  4. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. Book notice of Literacy development in a multilingual context, A.Y. Durgunoglu & L. Verhoeven (eds.) (1998), Language 77: 413-414.
  5. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. Review of Slips of the tongue: Speech errors in first and second language production, N. Poulisse (1999), Journal of Linguistics 37: 439-444.
  6. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. Review of Handbook of second language acquisition, W. Ritchie & T. Bhatia (eds.) (1996), World Englishes 19: 251-254.
  7. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1994. Review of Verb Movement, Lightfoot & N. Hornstein (eds.) (1994) Journal of Linguistics 30: 356-561.
  8. Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1992. Book Notice of Grewendorf and Sternefeld, eds., Scrambling and Barriers (1990). Language 68: 659-660.


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