The Department of French and Italian

Barbara E. Bullock


ProfessorPh.D., Linguistics, Delaware

Professor, French Linguistics
Barbara E. Bullock

Contact

Interests


Bilingualism and language contact, language variation and change, sociophonetics, computational and corpus linguistics

Biography


I am a linguist with a specialization in the effects of bilingualism and language contact on linguistic structure. With colleagues and students, I explore the power of corpus linguistics and natural language processing as effective tools in research on bilingual speech forms. In our BATs (Bilingual Annotation TaskS) research group, we are currently working to quantify and visualize language mixing and its intermittency to enable corpus comparison. 

My interests lie generally in exploring the Romance language diaspora in the Americas, particularly among rural populations who have little to no formal education in French or Spanish. Speech from these speakers are seldom represented in corpora; bilingual varieites in general present similar issues to NLP research as other low-resource varieties do.

Follow these links to see student work: Graduate Student | Undergraduate Student

Google Scholar page: http://tinyurl.com/zcsh8rn

 

 

 

 

Courses


FR 359 • French Through The Media

36299 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.102

FR359: French through the media 🎙

What do people talk about today in the French media and how do they talk about it? This upper division course examines how the French language is used today to discuss current and cultural topics. Students watch and discuss the journal télévisé daily, focusing on the topics of most interest to them, and they complete a range of activities that help them expand their French linguistic repertoires by adding contemporary vocabulary, turns of phrases, and pragmatic nuances to their discourse. This course aims to strengthen your oral fluency and increase your awareness of current events in the francophone world.

 Evaluation: assignments (20%), preparation and participation (35%), quizzes (20%), presentation (10%) final project  (15%)

 Final exam: none FRANCE 24

FR 324L • Practical Phonetics

36745 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.212

[lafonetik]!

This course has a dual emphasis on descriptive phonetics and on its practical application to improve your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French. By the end of the semester you should be able to:

  1. Read and correctly produce phonetic transcriptions of French.
  2. Transcribe written and oral French into IPA.
  3. Describe the relationship between spelling and pronunciation.
  4. Describe how French sounds are produced.
  5. Describe the basic intonation, rhythm and stress patterns of French.
  6. Discriminate between sounds that are difficult for Anglophones or Hispanophones to perceive.
  7. Perceive and produce liaison and enchaînement in obligatory contexts.
  8. Demonstrate a marked improvement in your listening skills and in your own pronunciation of French

If you want to improve your French pronunciation and make sense of how things are spelled in French, this is the course for you!

FR 359 • French Through The Media

36775 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.122

FR359: French through the media 🎙

What do people talk about today in the French media and how do they talk about it? This upper division course examines how the French language is used today to discuss current and cultural topics. Students watch and discuss the journal télévisé daily, focusing on the topics of most interest to them, and they complete a range of activities that help them expand their French linguistic repertoires by adding contemporary vocabulary, turns of phrases, and pragmatic nuances to their discourse. This course aims to strengthen your oral fluency and increase your awareness of current events in the francophone world.

 Evaluation: assignments (20%), preparation and participation (35%), quizzes (20%), presentation (10%) final project  (15%)

 Final exam: none 

FR 324L • Practical Phonetics

36595 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 2.124

[ap?ãd??lafonetikf?ãs?z]!

This course has a dual emphasis on descriptive phonetics and on its practical application to improve your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French. By the end of the semester you should be able to:

  1. Read and correctly produce phonetic transcriptions of French.
  2. Transcribe written and oral French into IPA.
  3. Describe the relationship between spelling and pronunciation.
  4. Describe how French sounds are produced.
  5. Describe the basic intonation, rhythm and stress patterns of French.
  6. Discriminate between sounds that are difficult for Anglophones or Hispanophones to perceive.
  7. Perceive and produce liaison and enchaînement in obligatory contexts.
  8. Demonstrate a marked improvement in your listening skills and in your own pronunciation of French

If you want to improve your French pronunciation and make sense of how things are spelled in French, this is the course for you!

FR 392K • Sociophonetics

36660 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.122

 

Speakers constantly index aspects of their identity not only through the content of their utterances but through the form the utterance takes. Sociophonetic research examines the intersection between variation in phonetic/phonological form and social factors (such as a speaker’s region, age, group identity, ethnic background, sexual orientation, level of education, and the like.) It is concerned not only with the acoustic production of variation but also with the effects of sociophonetic variation on speech perception, on language change, and on language acquisition. This course is a practical introduction to this relatively young field with a focus on the sociolinguistic principles of linguistic variation. We will discuss the conceptual underpinnings of this interdisciplinary field and we will explore its analytical methods. This will be a “hands on” course; we will learn what type of phonetic/phonological variation to measure, how to measure it, and how to design and conduct experiments based.

Most of the extant work in sociophonetics so far has analyzed variation in English. This course give you the opportunity to consider how it has been and can be applied to variation in other languages. Knowledge of the sound patterns of the language that you wish to investigate is useful. 

Prerequisites: None; although you must have an understanding of basic descriptive linguistics

Required text:

Erik R. Thomas. 2011. Sociophonetics: An introduction. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Research articles available through Zotero, Canvas, or the library.

 

Evaluation:
Critical reviews of research articles: 45%
Pilot research project: 30%
Active class involvement and preparation: 25%

FR 322E • Advanced French II

35895 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 2.122

Ce cours de langue avancée a pour but principal d’améliorer vos compétences linguistiques en français (i.e., la compréhension auditive, l’expression orale, la lecture, et l’expression écrite) ainsi que votre connaissance de la grammaire et du lexique. Dans ce cours, vous aurez l’occasion de discuter des controverses sociales dans le monde francophone et aux Etats-Unis (e.g, la mondialistion, l’immigration, le système éducatif, etc.). A l’aide des textes contemporains, vous allez apprendre à mieux communiquer vos pensées en français en comparant les cultures francophones avec la nôtre. 

FR 324L • Practical Phonetics

35915 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM MEZ 1.208

[ap?ãd??lafonetikf?ãs?z]!

This course has a dual emphasis on descriptive phonetics and on its practical application to improve your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French. By the end of the semester you should be able to:

  1. Read and correctly produce phonetic transcriptions of French.
  2. Transcribe written and oral French into IPA.
  3. Describe the relationship between spelling and pronunciation.
  4. Describe how French sounds are produced.
  5. Describe the basic intonation, rhythm and stress patterns of French.
  6. Discriminate between sounds that are difficult for Anglophones or Hispanophones to perceive.
  7. Perceive and produce liaison and enchaînement in obligatory contexts.
  8. Demonstrate a marked improvement in your listening skills and in your own pronunciation of French

 

FR 324L • Practical Phonetics

35790 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 2.124

[ap?ãd??lafonetikf?ãs?z]!

This course has a dual emphasis on descriptive phonetics and on its practical application to improve your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French. By the end of the semester you should be able to:

  1. Read and correctly produce phonetic transcriptions of French.
  2. Transcribe written and oral French into IPA.
  3. Describe the relationship between spelling and pronunciation.
  4. Describe how French sounds are produced.
  5. Describe the basic intonation, rhythm and stress patterns of French.
  6. Discriminate between sounds that are difficult for Anglophones or Hispanophones to perceive.
  7. Perceive and produce liaison and enchaînement in obligatory contexts.
  8. Demonstrate a marked improvement in your listening skills and in your own pronunciation of French

 

FR 392K • French In Contact

35865 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM HRH 2.112

Let's unlearn French as it is currently taught...

This seminar is devoted to an examination of language variation in French in contact settings and, depending on your interests, in languages in contact with French. We will overview the general field of bilingualism/contact as applied to French from structural, psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic perspectives with an attempt to address the following questions (among others that arise organically from your interests):

  • Why are contact varieties viewed as products “de métissage, de dégénérescence et d’érosion”?
  • How do varying individual and social factors bring about different kinds of outcomes in language contact?
  • How can we distinguish language variation due to contact from internal variation?
  • Are there limits to the types of variation that contact can bring about? What are they?
  • At what point does a contact variety constitute a “new” linguistic form?
  • How and why do speakers construct congruence between the idioms they speak?

We will consider a wide variety of contact settings but the focus will be on contemporary contact. The phenomena to be considered include loan words, the potential of ethnolects, processes of borrowing ,calquing, and code-switching, identity/audience based accommodation, and convergence and divergence.

Materials: All required readings will be posted on Canvas

Evaluation will be based on:

  • Discussion /participation
  • Oral presentation(s) and written critical review(s) of articles
  • Annotated bibliography (topic determined by student)
  • Research project proposal & pilot data/analysis
  • Abstract of research project for conference presentation

Written assignments can be done in either English or French. Students with good reading and listening knowledge of French are welcome. 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

36005 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM BEN 1.122

Ce cours de langue avancée a pour but principal d’améliorer vos compétences linguistiques en français (i.e., la compréhension auditive, l’expression orale, la lecture, et l’expression écrite) ainsi que votre connaissance de la grammaire et du lexique. Dans ce cours, vous aurez l’occasion de discuter des controverses sociales dans le monde francophone et aux Etats-Unis (e.g, la mondialistion, l’immigration, le système éducatif, etc.). A l’aide des textes contemporains, vous allez apprendre à mieux communiquer vos pensées en français en comparant les cultures francophones avec la nôtre. 

FR 324L • Practical Phonetics

36030 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM BEN 1.108

This course provides upper-division students with the tools and the practice to help you improve your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French.

By the end of the semester you should be able to:

  1. Read and correctly produce phonetic transcriptions of French.
  2. Transcribe written and oral French into IPA.
  3. Describe the relationship between spelling and pronunciation.
  4. Describe how French sounds are produced.
  5. Describe the basic intonation, rhythm and stress patterns of French.
  6. Discriminate between sounds that are difficult for Anglophones or Hispanophones to perceive.
  7. Perceive and produce liaison and enchaînement in obligatory contexts.
  8. Demonstrate a marked improvement in your listening skills and in your own pronunciation of French

 

FR 324L • Practical Phonetics

36960 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 2.124

This course has a dual emphasis on descriptive phonetics and on its practical application to improve your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French. By the end of the semester you should be able to:

  1. Read and correctly produce phonetic transcriptions of French.
  2. Transcribe written and oral French into IPA.
  3. Describe the relationship between spelling and pronunciation.
  4. Describe how French sounds are produced.
  5. Describe the basic intonation, rhythm and stress patterns of French.
  6. Discriminate between sounds that are difficult for Anglophones or Hispanophones to perceive.
  7. Perceive and produce liaison and enchaînement in obligatory contexts.
  8. Demonstrate a marked improvement in your listening skills and in your own pronunciation of French.

FR 392K • Sociophonetics

37035 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WEL 4.224

FR392K: Sociophonetics

Unique number: 37035

TTh 11-12:30

MEZ1.104

Speakers constantly index aspects of their identity not only through the content of their utterances but through the form the utterance takes. Sociophonetic research examines the intersection between variation in phonetic/phonological form and social factors (such as a speaker’s region, age, group identity, ethnic background, sexual orientation, level of education, and the like.) It is concerned not only with the acoustic production of variation but also with the effects of sociophonetic variation on speech perception, on language change, and on language acquisition. This course is a practical introduction to this relatively young field with a focus on the sociolinguistic principles of linguistic variation. We will discuss the conceptual underpinnings of this interdisciplinary field and we will explore its analytical methods. This will be a “hands on” course; we will learn what type of phonetic/phonological variation to measure, how to measure it, and how to design and conduct experiments based. Most of the extant work in sociophonetics so far has analyzed variation in English. Here, we will consider how it has been and can be applied to variation in other languages. Knowledge of the sound patterns of the language that you wish to investigate is useful.

Prerequisites:

None; although you must have an understanding of basic descriptive linguistics. Experience with PRAAT is extremely helpful.

Required text:

Erik R. Thomas. 2011. Sociophonetics: An introduction. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Research articles available through Zotero, Canvas, or the library.

Evaluation:
Critical reviews of research articles: 45%
Pilot research project: 30%
Active class involvement and preparation: 25%

 

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

37300 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 2.122

Ce cours de langue avancée a pour but principal d’améliorer vos compétences linguistiques en français (i.e., la compréhension auditive, l’expression orale, la lecture, et l’expression écrite) ainsi que votre connaissance de la grammaire et du lexique. Dans ce cours, vous aurez l’occasion de discuter des controverses sociales dans le monde francophone et aux Etats-Unis (e.g, la mondialistion, l’immigration, le système éducatif, etc.). A l’aide des textes contemporains, vous allez apprendre à mieux communiquer vos pensées en français en comparant la culture française avec la nôtre. 

FR 324L • Practical Phonetics

37310 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM BEN 1.108

This course has a dual emphasis on descriptive phonetics and on its practical application to improve your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French. By the end of the semester you should be able to:

  1. Read and correctly produce phonetic transcriptions of French.
  2. Transcribe written and oral French into IPA.
  3. Describe the relationship between spelling and pronunciation.
  4. Describe how French sounds are produced.
  5. Describe the basic intonation, rhythm and stress patterns of French.
  6. Discriminate between sounds that are difficult for Anglophones or Hispanophones to perceive.
  7. Perceive and produce liaison and enchaînement in obligatory contexts.
  8. Demonstrate a marked improvement in your listening skills and in your own pronunciation of French.

FR 396K • Lab Approaches To Romance Phon

37215 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.104

Laboratory phonology is a methodological approach that allows researchers to explore the connections between phonetics and phonology. In general terms, this approach encourages the use of the empirical methods of phonetics to test the theoretical and descriptive claims of phonology and it has become a leading paradigm for research on linguistic sound systems. Laboratory approaches have also been fruitfully extended to explore related areas such as language variation and change and bilingual perception and production.

Goals: (1) to encourage you to explore the major descriptive and theoretical issues presented by the Romance languages and (2) to prepare you to conduct laboratory research on the sound systems of Romance languages.

Readings with cover three major areas and will be chosen “organically” (i.e., directed by your interests):

  • Segmental level issues: contrast, “quasi-contrast”, assimilation, co-articulation, sandhi processes, vowel reduction
  • Prosodic level issues: stress and pitch accent, syllable structure, phrasing, lengthening/shortening
  • Cross-dialectal or cross-linguistic production and perception

Materials:

All readings will be posted on the course delivery system.

You should have PRAAT pre-installed on your computer.

Evaluation:

Active class involvement and preparation:       25%

Critical reviews of research articles:       25%

Independent research project:       50%  

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

36825 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ B0.302

Ce cours de langue avancée a pour but principal d’améliorer vos compétences linguistiques en français (i.e., la compréhension auditive, l’expression orale, la lecture, et l’expression écrite) ainsi que votre connaissance de la grammaire et du lexique. Dans ce cours, vous aurez souvent l’occasion de discuter des controverses sociales dans le monde francophone et aux Etats-Unis (e.g, la mondialisation, l’immigration, la politique, le système éducatif, etc.). 

FR 324L • Practical Phonetics

36835 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM BEN 1.108

This course has a dual emphasis on descriptive phonetics and on its practical application to improve your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French. By the end of the semester you should be able to:

  1. Read and correctly produce phonetic transcriptions of French.
  2. Transcribe written and oral French into IPA.
  3. Describe the relationship between spelling and pronunciation.
  4. Describe how French sounds are produced.
  5. Describe the basic intonation, rhythm and stress patterns of French.
  6. Discriminate between sounds that are difficult for Anglophones or Hispanophones to perceive.
  7. Perceive and produce liaison and enchaînement in obligatory contexts.
  8. Demonstrate a marked improvement in your listening skills and in your own pronunciation of French.

FR 392K • French In Contact

36860 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 2.106C

This seminar is devoted to an examination of contact-­?induced language change in French and in languages in contact with French.

FR 322E • Advanced French II

36680 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ B0.302

Description of FR322E

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)

Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%


Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO

Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 392K • Sociophonetics

36725 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM HRH 2.112

Speakers constantly index aspects of their identity not only through the content of their utterances but through the form the utterance takes. Sociophonetic research examines the intersection between variation in phonetic/phonological form and social factors (such as a speaker’s region, age, group identity, ethnic background, sexual orientation, level of education, and the like.) It is concerned not only with the acoustic production of variation but also with the effects of sociophonetic variation on speech perception, on language change, and on language acquisition.

This course is both a theoretical and practical introduction to this relatively young field. We will discuss the theoretical underpinnings of this interdisciplinary field and we will explore its analytical methods. This will be a “hands on” course; we will learn what type of phonetic/phonological variation to measure, how to measure it, and how to design and conduct experiments.

Most of the extant work in sociophonetics so far has analyzed variation in English. Here, we will consider how it has been and can be applied to variation in the Romance languages, particularly in French and Spanish. If you have your own data, you will be encouraged to analyze it in this class.

Prerequisites: You must have an understanding of basic articulatory phonetics (i.e., how sounds are categorized.)

Required text:

Erik R. Thomas. 2011. Sociophonetics: An introduction. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Research articles posted on Blackboard.

Potentially required text:
Mariana Di Paolo & Malcah Yaeger-Dror. 2010. Sociophonetics: A student guide. NY: Routledge. 

Evaluation:

Presentations of exercises: 30%
Critical reviews of research articles: 30%
Pilot research project: 30%
Active class involvement and preparation: 10%

 

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

36410 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BEN 1.106

 Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C


Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%
Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


FR 322E • Advanced French II

36945 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM HRH 2.112

Attachment

FR 322E • Advanced French II

36950 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM HRH 2.112

Description of FR322E

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)

Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%


Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO

Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

Publications


  • The Cambridge handbook of linguistic code-switching. Co-editor with Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. Cambridge University Press. 456pgs. 2009.
  • Formal perspectives on Romance linguistics. Co-edited with J. Marc Authier and Lisa Reed. Amsterdam/New York: John Benjamins. 300p. 1999.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. and Almeida Jacqueline Toribio (2013) The Spanish in Texas Corpus Project. COERLL: The University of Texas at Austin.
  • Bullock, Barbara E., Jacqueline Serigos & Almedia Jacqueline Toribio (accepted) The use of loan translations and its consequences in an oral bilingual corpus. Journal of Language Contact.
  • Guzm ́an, Gualberto, Joseph Ricard, Jacqueline Serigos, Barbara E. Bullock, Almedia Jacqueline Toribio. 2017. Metrics for modeling code-switching across corpora. Interspeech 2017
  • Guzman, Gualberto, Joseph Ricard, Jacqueline Serigos, Barbara E. Bullock and Almeida Jacqueline Toribio (2017). Moving code-switching research toward more empirically grounded methods. CDH17, Corpora in the Digital Humanities. CEUR Vol 1786: 1-9 .
  • Dalola, Amanda & Barbara E. Bullock. 2016. On sociophonetic competence: Phrase final vowel devoicing in native and advanced L2 speakers of French Studies in Second Language Acquisition. Published on-line version. DOI
  • Bullock, Barbara E., Almeida Jacqueline Toribio, Jacqueline Serigos & Arthur Wendorf. The challenges and benefits of annotating a bilingual corpus: The Spanish in Texas Corpus Project. Language Variation (accepted)
  • Bullock, Barbara E., Almeida Jacqueline Toribio & Mark Amengual. 2014. The status of s in Dominican Spanish. Lingua 143: 20-35.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. & Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2014. From Trujillo to the terremoto: The effect of language ideologies on the language attitudes of the rural poor of the northern Dominican border. International Journal of the Sociology of Language 227: 83-100.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. & Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2009. Reconsidering Domin- ican Spanish: Data from the rural Cibao. Revista Internacional de Lingu ̈ ́ıstica Ibero-americana 2. 14: 46-74.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 2009. Prosody in contact in French: A case study from a heritage variety in the United States. International Journal of Bilingualism 13: 165-194.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. & Luke Eilderts. 2009. Prononcer mˆale ou prononcer mal: The perception of feminized speech in early modern France. The French Review 83.2: 282-295.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. & Chip Gerfen. 2005. The preservation of schwa in the converging phonological system of Frenchville French. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 8.2: 117-130.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. & Chip Gerfen. 2004. Frenchville French: A case study in phonological attrition. International Journal of Bilingualism 8.3: 303-320
  • Bullock, Barbara E. & Chip Gerfen. 2004. Phonological convergence in a con- tracting language variety. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 7.2: 95-104.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. & Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2004. Introduction: Conver- gence as an emergent property in bilingual speech. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 7.2: 91-93.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 2004. The phonological mediation of morphological com- plexity: Verb stem leveling in the history of French. Probus 16.1 (2004): 1-19.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 2001. The use of ils for elles: Gender syncretism in the history of French. The French Review 74:4: 700-711.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. & Denis Provencher. 2001. The linguistic representation of femininity and masculinity in Jean Genet’s Notre-Dame des Fleurs. French Cultural Studies 12: 43-58.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 2001. Double prosody and the Proto-Romance stress shift. Probus 13.2: 173-192.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 1997. Quantitative verse in a quantity-insensitive language: Ba ̈ıf’s vers mesur ́es. The Journal of French Language Studies, Vol. 7(1): 23-45.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 1996. Popular derivation and linguistic inquiry. The French Review Vol. 70,2: 180-191.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 1995. Prosodic constraints and morphological alignment in French Lingua: 96: 95-117.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 1995. Separating the root: On velarization in Romance. Cahiers Linguistiques d’Ottawa, Volume 23: 45-66.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 1995. The uneven trochee in French. Rivista di Linguistica Vol. 7,2 (1995): 1-20.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. & James P. Lantolf. 1987. Text genre and cloze testing in L2.Rassegna Italiana di Linguistica Applicata XIX, Vol. 1, (1987): 94-104.
  • Guzm ́an, Gualberto, Barbara E. Bullock & Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2017. Quantifying the effects of language contact. First Workshop on Multi-Language Processing in a Globalizing World, (MLP17), Dublin: ADAPT Center.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. and Jenna Nichols, 2017. Tracing a case of near merger: The status of [ø] and schwa in legacy data. LSRL44, pp. 227-244. John Benjamins
  • Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline and Barbara E. Bullock. 2016. A new look at Heritage Spanish and its speakers. In D. Pascual (ed.) Advances in Spanish as a Heritage language, pp. 27-50. John Benjamins.
  • Guzman, Gualberto, Barbara E. Bullock, Jacqueline Serigos & Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2016. Simple tools for exploring variation in code-switching for linguists. EMNLP2016: Second Workshop on Computational Approaches to Code Switching: 12-20. The Association for Computational Linguistics.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. and Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2015. An experimental approach to hypercorrection in Dominican Spanish. In R. Klassen, J.M. Liceras & E. Valenzeula (eds.), Hispanic Linguistic at the Crossroads: Theoretical linguistics, language acquisition and language contact. Proceedings of the Hispanic Linguistics Symposium, pp. 251-268. John Benjamins.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. and Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2010. Correcting the record on Dominican [s] hypercorrection. In S. Colina, A. Olarra, A. Carvalho (eds.). Romance Linguistics 2009, (Current Issues in Linguistic Theory 315), 15-25. John Benjamins.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. & Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2008. Kreyol incursions into Dominican Spanish: The perception of Haitianized Speech among Dominicans. In Mercedes Nin ̃o Murcia and Jason Rothman, Bilingualism and Identity: Spanish and the crossroads with other languages, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: Benjamins.
  • Bullock, Barbara E., Almeida Jacqueline Toribio, Ver ́onica Gonz ́alez, & Amanda Dalola. 2006. Language dominance and performance outcomes in bilingual pro- nunciation. In M.G. O’Brien, C. Shea, J. Archibald (eds.), Proceedings of the 8th Generative Approaches to Second Language Acquisition: The Banff Conference, 9-16, Somerville, MA: Cascadilla.
  • Bullock, Barbara E., Amanda Dalola & Chip Gerfen. 2006. Mapping the patterns of maintenance versus merger in bilingual phonology: The preservation of [a] vs. [A] in Frenchville French. In J-P Montreuil and C. Nishida (ed.), New Perspectives on Romance Linguistics, 15-30. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
  • Bullock, Barbara E., Almeida Jacqueline Toribio, Christopher G. Botero & K.Allen Davis. 2005. Preservative phonetic effects in bilingual code-switching. In Randall Gess and Edward Rubin (eds.), Theoretical and laboratory approaches to Romance linguistics, 291-206. Philadelphia: Benjamins.
  • Bullock, Barbara E., Almeida Jacqueline Toribio, K. Allen Davis & Christopher G. Botero. 2005. Phonetic convergence in bilingual Puerto Rican Spanish. WCCFL 23: 113-125.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. & Gillian Lord. 2003. Analogy as a learning tool in the acquisition of L2 phonology. In Ana Teresa P ́erez Leroux & Yves Roberge, Romance Linguistics Theory and Acquisition, 281-298. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: Benjamins.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 2002. On constraining the vagaries of glide distribution. Caroline Wiltshire & Joaquim Camps (eds). Romance Phonology and Variation, 11-25. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
  • Authier, J.-Marc, Barbara E. Bullock & Lisa Reed. 1999. Introduction to Formal Perspectives on Romance Linguistics. Philadelphia: Benjamins.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 1998. The myth of equivalence: When two lights do not make a long. Selected Papers from the Linguistic Symposium on Romance Languages 26, Jose Lema, Esthela Trevino (eds.), Philadelphia: Benjamins.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 1994. Does the French syllable have weight? Issues and Theory in Romance Linguistics, Michael Mazzola (ed.), Georgetown: Georgetown University Press (1994): 3-19.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 1994. Mora-bearing consonants in coda position and related quantity effects. Certamen Phonologicum II, P.M. Bertinetto, M. Kenstowiscz, M. Loporcaro (eds.), Torino: Rosenberg & Sellier (1994): 105-121.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 1993. Syllable quantity and the cycle: Implications for prosodic licensing. Chicago Linguistic Society 28: Parasession on the Cycle in Linguistic Theory (Volume 2), C. Canakis, G. Chan, and J. Denton (eds.), (1993): 1-14.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 1991. V/C planar segregation and the CVC syllable in Sierra Miwok nonconcatenative morphology. Chicago Linguistic Society 26 : Parasession on the Syllable in Phonology and Phonetics (Volume 2), M. Ziolkowski, M. Noske, and K. Deaton (eds.), (1991): 17-33.
  • Bullock, Barbara and Daniel J. Olson. 2017. The Sociophonetics of Spanish?English Contact in the United States. In Mehmat Yavas, Margaret Kehoe, Walcir Cardosa (eds.), Romance-Germanic Bilingual Phonology p. 263-282. Equinox Publishing: United Kingdom.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. (accepted) Language contact in a rural community. In Wendy Ayres-Bennett & Janice Carruthers (eds.), Romance Sociolinguistics. deGruyter.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. and Almeida Jacqueline Toribio (in press) The sociolinguistics of bilingualism. In Jeannette Altarriba & Roberto Heredia (eds.), An Introduction to Bilingualism: Principles and Processes. Psychology Press.
  • Bullock, Barbara E., Jacqueline Serigos & Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2016. The stratification of English-language loanword and multiword material in Puerto Rican Spanish press outlets: A computational approach. In R. Guzzardo, C. M. Mazak, & M.C. Parafita Coutu (eds.), Code-switching in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean and its diaspora, pp 172-189. Amsterdam: Benjamins.
  • Bullock, Barbara E.; Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2014. Dominican Spanish. In Languages and dialects in the U.S.: Focus on Diversity and Linguistics, M. Di Paolo & A. Spears (eds.). Routledge.
  • Bullock, Barbara E., Lars Hinrichs, and Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2014 (on line). World Englishes, code-switching and convergence. The Handbook of World Englishes (ed. M. Fippula, J. Klemola, and D. Sharma), Oxford University Press.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. and Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2009. Themes in the study of code-switching. In The Handbook of Linguistic Code-switching, 1-17. Cambridge University Press.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 2009. The phonetic reflexes of code-switching. In The Handbook of Linguistic Code-switching, 163-181. Cambridge University Press.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. & Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2009. How to hit a moving target: On the sociophonetics of code-switching. In L. Isurin, D. Winford & K. de Bot (eds.), Interdisciplinary Approaches to Code-Switching, pp. 189-206. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. & Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2006. Intra-system variability and change in nominal and verbal morphology. In Deborah Arteaga & Randall Gess (eds.), Historical Romance Linguistics: Retrospectives and Perspectives, 305- 326. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
  • Bullock, Barbara E. 2000. Consonant gemination in Neapolitan. In Lori Repetti (ed.), Phonological theory and the dialects of Italy, 45-59. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

Graduate Students


Graduate students I have supervised or co-supervised. 


Rozen Neupané is working on the language attitudes of anglophones in Québéc.

Josh Griffith was awarded the Chateaubriand Fellowship and will begin research in France in January 2018 on schwa deletion under the supervision of Professor Bernard Laks.

Adam McBride (PhD 2017) completed his PhD thesis on denasalization in French liaison in 2017 and is an Assistant Professor of French Linguistics at Brigham Young University.

Brendan Regan (PhD 2017) is an Assistant Professor of Hispanic Lingusitics at Texas Tech University after completing his PhD research on demerger in the Spanish of Andalusia.

Jacqueline Serigos (PhD 2017) is a founding member of BATs; she completed her thesis on a computational approach to borrowing. While in graduate school, Jacqueline became an expert in stats and in python and is now Assistant Professor of Hispanic Linguistics at George Mason University.

Anna Troyansky (PhD 2016) completed her PhD in 2016 on linguistic input and language use of 1st and 2nd generation beur women in France.

Megan Oprea (PhD 2014) surveyed speakers of Maghrebi origin in France for her thesis.

Amanda Dalola (PhD 2014) researches the sociophonetics of phrase final vowel devoicing in L1 and L2 French. She is as an Assistant Professor of French and Linguistics at the University of South Carolina. 

Mark Amengual (PhD 2013) works on phonetic transfer in the vowel systems of bilinguals. His dissertation research on the mid vowel contrast among Spanish–Catalan bilinguals was sponsored by an NSF DDRIG. He is an Assistant Professor of Applied Linguistics at UC-Santa Cruz.

Beki Post (PhD 2013): Beki wrote her dissertation in 2015 on Arabic-French code-switching among young adults in Morocco. Beki's research in Morocco was sponsored by an NSF DDRIG; she has presented and published widely on Arabic-French code-switching. She is a software developer.

 

 


  

 

Undergraduate Students


I have being working with some wonderful undergraduates: 


The founding members of BATs are:

Kelsey Ball, who graduated in 2017 with a degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering. Kelsey is continuing work on code-switching as a Fulbright Scholar in Hyderabad, India.

Gualberto (Wally) Guzman graduated in 2017 with degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering, Computer Science and Math. Wally was selected as one of the five scholars for the inaugural class of Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow at UT. He was awarded a prestigious NSF DRIG grant to pursue graduate work on computational approaches to code-switching and is working on his MA in Computer Science at UT.

Other members of BATS have included:

Jessica Paz, Computer Science and Linguistics 

Joseph Ricard, Mathematics

Ben Xu, Computer Science

Vivek Sharath, Math

Eric Nordstrom, Biochemistry

Dingyu Wang, Math

Hongzhe Zhoa, Math

Jesus Adolfo Hermosillo, Linguistics


Honors Students whom I have supervised:

Natalie Sullivan wrote her Plan II Honors thesis on Arabizi used by Lebanese Twitter posts. She graduated in 2017, was admitted to Graduate School in Applied Linguistics at Georgetown University and is a Fulbright Scholar in Morocco.

Mirna Reyna (BA, 2015, French & History): Mirna completed phonetic research with grad students, Jenna Nichols, and me on the effect of Texas English speakers' GOOSE vowel pronunciation (the vowel in the word "goose", "food", etc.) on the acquisition of similar vowels in French. Mirna was a teaching assistant in Bordeaux, France in 2015-2016. She is a graduate student in French Linguistics at UC-Davis.

Brooke Currie (BA, 2015, French & Linguistics): Brooke completed her thesis on the history of orthography in French. She was a teaching assistant in Clermont-Ferrand (the birthplace of the Michelin Man, Bibendum), France in 2015-2016. She is attending graduate school at Indiana University.

Maddie Oakley (BA, 2014, French & Linguistics): Maddie wrote her honors thesis entitled Le comportement des pronoms personnels dans le français parlé à Québec under my supervision with Carl Blyth as a second reader. Maddie graduated with honors in Spring 2014. Maddie is now a PhD student in Linguistics at Georgetown.

 

BATs Force: Bilingual Annotation Tasks Force


Along with Jacqueline Toribio, I co-direct the BATs Force, a research project where we are attempting to automate the processing and annotation of bilingual texts, using the tools of natural language processing. 

 Github page

 


  • Department of French and Italian

    University of Texas at Austin
    201 W 21st Street STOP B7600
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    Austin, TX 78712-1800
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