The Department of French and Italian

Hervé Picherit


Associate ProfessorPhD, Stanford

Associate Professor, French Studies; Graduate Advisor, French Studies
Hervé Picherit

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-6874
  • Office: HRH 3.104B
  • Office Hours: T, TH 1-2:30 & by appt.
  • Campus Mail Code: B7600

Interests


20th century French literature, French cinema, the novel, the avant-garde, philosophies of fiction

Biography


I received my PhD in French Studies from Stanford University (2008) and have been a member of the Department of French at Italian at UT since 2012.  The questions framing my research interests are about individual and shared strategies of aesthetic self-fashioning, in particular those that individuals or groups adopt in the face of traumatic upheavals.  In pursuit of these questions, I have explored the fields of twentieth century French literature, the novel, film, and the avant-garde.  My book Le Livre des Écorchés: Proust, Céline et la Grande Guerre (CNRS Éditions, 2016) explores the very different approaches at self-fashioning and at the creation of collective identity that the novelists Marcel Proust and Louis-Ferdinand Céline deploy in reaction to the material and cultural devastation of the Great War.  I have also published articles on film — Chris Marker, Alfred Hitchcock, the actress Arletty, Louis Feuillade’s film serial Les Vampires — as well as avant-garde figures such as Alfred Jarry, André Breton and Georges Hugnet.

Courses


FR 390M • Resistance & Collaboration

36335 • Spring 2022
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM HRH 2.106C

Literature of Collaboration and Resistance (FR 390M)

Hervé Picherit

This course will examine through the lenses of collaboration and resistance the political, social, and ideological function of literature during the German Occupation of France (1940-1944).  The main focus of this course will be literature produced during the Occupation.  We will analyze the asymmetry between popular fascist texts — often bestsellers of the period —, and clandestine resistance texts created despite the material hardship of printers, the danger run by authors, and the difficulty of distributing illegal writings.  We will pay particular attention to the different ways in which writers of collaboration and resistance marshal the different genres, forms, and tropes that came to define each type of writing.  We will also interrogate texts written after the Occupation, during its fallout, which retroactively (re)defined this period and attempted to re-determine a compromised French identity.

 

 

Tentative Reading List:

 

Collaboration

Céline, Les beaux draps (passages)

Rebatet, Les décombres

Collective, Je suis partout: Anthologie (passages)

 

Resistance

Vercors, Le silence de la mer

Triolet, Le cheval blanc

Collective, Combat (passages)

Collective, Chroniques interdites

Collective, L’honneur des poètes

Vivarais, La haute fourche

Auxois, Contes d’Auxois

Daniel, Les amants d’Avignon

Gary, Éducation européenne

 

Retroactive Reactions

De Gaulle, Mémoires de guerre (passages)

Sartre, Réflexions sur la question juive

Paulhan, Lettre aux directeurs de la Résistance

Marcel Ophuls, Le chagrin et la pitié

Modiano, La Place de l'étoile

 

Optional Readings

Guilloux, Le jeu de patience

Aimot, Nos mitrailleuses n'ont pas tiré

Drieu la Rochelle, Gilles

Aymé, Travelingue

Degrelle, La Campagne de Russie, 1941-1945

Brasillach, Notre avant-guerre

 

Grade

  1. Class attendance, participation and daily work (throughout the semester)…….20%
  2. Resistance Text or Close Reading Analysis……….………………………………20%
  3. Final Presentation………………………………………….…………………………30%
  4. Final Paper……………………………………………………………………………30%

T C 302 • College Movie Goes To College

41665 • Spring 2022
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CRD 007A
Wr ID

Course Number: T C 302

Course Title: College Goes to the Movies

Semester/Year: Spring 2022

Instructor Name: Hervé Picherit

Description

How rebellious is a toga party, really? What’s truly at stake in being under “double secret probation?” Why would a seventh-year senior have secret wisdom beyond the reach of peers and professors? And does anyone go to class?

At once a popular theme and a genre unto itself, the college movie stands out for its claim of defining a highly formative life experience. Indeed, though this genre aims to enshrine the myth of college as a universal right of passage, all too often these films ignore the particular experiences of students who do not easily fit into the genre’s conventions. More often prescriptive than descriptive of university experiences, the college movie tends to uphold traditional values under the guise of youthful rebellion and generational angst.

In this course, we will critically examine representations of the university in college movies, paying particular attention to the ideologies these films implicitly embrace. Our study will include the “classics” that helped to establish the genre, films that uncritically recycle college movie conventions, as well as films that actively resist and redefine these movies’ tropes. To help us examine these films, we will preview a selection of theoretical approaches, each designed to illuminate a different aspect of the college movie genre. Among the theories we will consider are Marxism, psychoanalysis, structuralism, media studies, cultural studies, as well as critical theories of race and gender.

Required Texts (subject to some change)

Roland Barthes, Mythologies, passages

Walter Benjamin, “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction”

Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex, Chapter XI “Myth and Reality”

Pierre Bourdieu, Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste, “Introduction”

Laura Mulvey, “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema”

Stuart Hall, “Cultural Studies and Its Theoretical Legacies”

Claude Lévi-Stauss, “The Structural Study of Myth”

Audre Lorde, “The Master's Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master's House”

Eve Sedgwick, Between Men: English Literature and Homosocial Desire, passages

Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw, “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics"

William K. Wimsatt Jr. And Monroe C. Beardsley, “The Intentional Fallacy”

Films (subject to some change)

Nick Grinde, Good News (1930); Charles Walters, Good News (1947)

John Landis, National Lampoon’s Animal House (1978)

Spike Lee, School Daze (1988)

Hart Bochner, PCU (1994)

Alek Keshishian, With Honors (1994)

Rich Wilkes, Glory Daze (1995)

John Singleton, Higher Learning (1995)

Noah Baumbach, Kicking and Screaming (1995)

Judd Apatow, Undeclared (2001-2002)

Mike Newell, Mona Lisa Smile (2003)

Steve Pink, Accepted (2006)

Jason Moore, Pitch Perfect (2012)

Whit Stillman, Damsels in Distress (2012)

Justin Simien, Dear White People (2014)

Nicholas Stoller, Neighbors (2014)

Richard Linklater, Everybody Wants Some!! (2016)

Course Requirements

Attendance and participation: 10%

Scholarly “treasure hunt:” 10%

You will report on your hunt for a scholarly article about one of the course’s films. You report should detail the steps you took in your research, and provide a description of the theories and/or scholarly community your chosen article engages with. To be shared with the class on Canvas.

Theory and a movie presentation: 10%

You will give a 5-7 minute presentation outlining the ways in which a theoretical text sheds new light on a film from the course. Your talk should offer the class starting points for a broader discussion of the movie and of the theory.

“Honest” movie trailer: 15%

Using footage from one of the class’s college movies, you will edit a new, “honest” trailer for the film that brings to light the unspoken ideologies that underpin it. A successful trailer will be theoretically informed and critically insightful of the film, and of the college movie genre in general.

Final project proposal: 15%

Your proposal should address the college movies with which you will be in dialogue, the themes you plan on engaging, the theories that will inform your work, as well as the stakes of your film, script, or analysis.

Final project (choose one of the three): 40%

Creative:

1. Deleted scene: In a 10-15 minute film, you will write, direct, and edit a scene that you feel is missing from one the films in the class. Though a creative project, your “deleted scene” should embrace at least one of the class’s theories in order to illuminate an unspoken aspect of the original movie. A successful “deleted scene” project will be theoretically informed and critically insightful of the original film it completes.

2. Film treatment: In a 10-15 page summary, you will map out your own version of the college movie. Your “film treatment” should indicate key scenes or moments in your imagined movie. It should also embrace at least one of the theories we will have studied in class. A successful “film treatment” project will be theoretically informed and critically insightful of the college movie genre.

Critical:

3. Analysis of a scene: In a 10-15 page paper, you will formally, thematically, and ideologically analyze a key scene from a class film, or from a college movie of your choice (approved by the professor). Your analysis should have a strong thesis statement, and should embrace at least one of the course’s theories. A successful “analysis of a scene” project will be theoretically informed and critically insightful of the film you analyze.

Instructor Bio

Hervé Picherit earned his PhD in French Literature from Stanford in 2008. He specializes in 20th century French literature, French cinema, and the novel. His first book, Le Livre des Écorchés: Proust, Céline et la Grande Guerre was published in 2016 by CNRS Éditions. Currently he is writing a book on the literature of resistance and collaboration during the French Occupation.To break up his time working on serious topics, he takes any excuse he can to watch (bad) college films.

FR 358C • French Cinema And Memory-Wb

36905 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
II

There are three main goals for this course.  The first is the acquisition of the intellectual and interpretative tools specific to film comprehension, analysis and creation.  The second is the establishment of a sense of the history of cinema as an international medium, and of French cinema in particular as a national art form.  The third main goal for the course is the acquisition, in French, of the vocabulary related to cinema production, description and interpretation.  The course will also encourage students to establish links between the films shown in the class, but also with other media.  Most importantly, the class is designed to cultivate film literacy, allowing students both to engage critically and create with this medium.

FR 372 • Comparative Stylistics-Wb

36915 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

This advanced language course has as its main goal broadening your sense of the action and function of language beyond expression.  In other words, the subject of this course is not what language can say, but what it can do.  In particular, we will examine the grammatical, rhetorical and stylistic demands and assets of the French language in contrast with English.  This course is designed to train you to recognize and analyze these attributes.  More importantly, however, this course sets out to teach you how to produce these varied effects in written language, first through imitation and, ultimately, in the service of your own self-expression.

FR 371L • Adv Written And Oral Compos-Wb

35715 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

FLAGS:   Wr
DESCRIPTION:
The objective of this course is to hone advanced listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French.  The communicative tasks of the course are built around a semester-long “channel surfing” of French television designed to introduce the class to authentic topics, genres, vocabulary and levels of discourse.  Students will reprise these elements in their own production, which will consist mainly of writing scripts for various genres of programs, and recording short television shows, both scripted and spontaneous.  The goal of these exercises is to help students review, expand and combine individual language skills into a new relationship with French as a living and lively language.

FR 390M • The Sources Of Surrealism-Wb

35725 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM
Internet; Synchronous

Please check back for updates.

FR 372 • Comparative Stylistics

36315 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM HRH 2.112
Wr

This advanced language course has as its main goal broadening your sense of the action and function of language beyond expression. In other words, the subject of this course is not what language can say, but what it can do. In particular, we will examine the grammatical, rhetorical and stylistic demands and assets of the French language in contrast with English. This course is designed to train you to recognize and analyze these attributes. More importantly, however, this course sets out to teach you how to produce these varied effects in written language, ultimately, in the service of your own self-expression.

FR 390M • Memoir And Modernity

36329 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM HRH 2.106C

What happens to a text when its creator is also its subject?  It is from this recursive feature of autobiography — and of modern autobiography in particular — that emerge the tensions of a highly complex genre.  While promising an accurate, sincere — if not unmediated — representation of its subject, autobiography also owes a literary tithe to the conventions and traditions of an old, and highly codified literary genre.  

What hope is there of conveying an authentic vision of oneself within a prescriptive mode of writing?  What happens when an author’s life experience does not fit the codes of the autobiographical genre?  What are we to make of autobiographies that become a reflection of an author’s writing, rather than of his or her life?  What is the status of false autobiographies?  Of autobiographical texts that adopt the fictional mode?  Or of autobiographies that are about someone other than the author?

In this course, we will examine texts that challenge or rewrite the narrative code of self-writing throughout the 20th century; we will consider the memoir’s role in representing gender and gender identity; we will analyze the literary phenomena of “auto-fiction,” ”exofiction,” as well as the autobiographical novel; and we will study literary theories that seek to define autobiography.

FR 372 • Comparative Stylistics

36415 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 2.112
Wr

This advanced language course has as its main goal broadening your sense of the action and function of language beyond expression. In other words, the subject of this course is not what language can say, but what it can do. In particular, we will examine the grammatical, rhetorical and stylistic demands and assets of the French language in contrast with English. This course is designed to train you to recognize and analyze these attributes. More importantly, however, this course sets out to teach you how to produce these varied effects in written language, ultimately, in the service of your own self-expression.

FR 390M • Resistance & Collaboration

36435 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.104

Please check back for updates.

FR 351C • Images Of Women/Fr Cinema

36547 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.108
GC (also listed as FR 390K)

The main goal for this course is the acquisition of the intellectual and interpretative tools specific to analyzing the unique ways in which film portrays women and, more generally, questions of gender and gender identity.  In what ways does cinema uphold traditional gender structures?  In what ways does film undermine it?  How and why might films do both at the same time?  This course aims to convey the complexities of representing gender through visual media, and is designed to help students engage with these images critically. The final goal for the course is the acquisition, in French, of the vocabulary related to cinema production, description and interpretation. The course will encourage students to establish links between the films shown in the class, but also with representations of women in other media. Most importantly, the class is designed to cultivate film literacy, allowing students both to engage critically and create with this medium.

 

The weekly film showings will serve as the framework for the course, providing the major topics of discussion for the class. To encourage rich and pertinent discussions, we will use the textbook Film Studies as well as supplemental materials such as articles, film clips and internet resources about women in film. The book Le vocabulaire du cinéma will serve as a reference for the class to prepare for the film exam, film review and film project.

 

There will be frequent in-class assignments based on the film viewings and the readings, as well as a mid-semester exam. Students will be expected to write 8 short film responses, to write a film review, to take a film exam, complete a film project and to write their reflections on the final film project. The film responses are short reflections (250-300 words) on the course’s films. The film review is a longer written assignment (1250-1500 words) where you will present an organized analysis of a film. The film exam will test your knowledge of film techniques. The final film project is the production of a short film (10 to 20 minutes) that engages with the course theme of cinema and memory. The reflections on the final film project (1250-1500 words) is a personal contemplation on your work creating a film and on your peers’ films.

FR 371L • Adv Written And Oral Compos

36555 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BEN 1.106
Wr

Course description:

The objective of this course is to hone advanced listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French.  In addition to the textbook, this course will have us study authentic French television, radio and print publications.  Students will reprise elements from these media in their own production, which will consist of scripting and recording various genres of television and radio programs.  Students will also write articles for different types of print publications.  In particular, we will explore stylistic conventions appropriate to descriptions, critical essays, argumentative essays, narrative style and literary style.  The goal of these exercises is to help students review, expand and combine individual language skills into a new relationship with French as a living and lively language.  Finally, because of our use of authentic material, the course will also introduce you to many aspects of French and Francophone culture.

 

Texts:

A vous d'écrire: Atelier de français (Student Edition)

Workbook to accompany A vous d'écrire: Atelier de français

Contrastes: Grammaire du français courant (2nd Edition)

 

Additional readings and clips will be available on Blackboard

FR 372 • Comparative Stylistics

36300 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GDC 2.410
Wr

This advanced language course has as its main goal broadening your sense of the action and function of language beyond expression.  In other words, the subject of this course is not what language can say, but what it can do.  In particular, we will examine the grammatical, rhetorical and stylistic demands and assets of the French language in contrast with English.  This course is designed to train you to recognize and analyze these attributes.  More importantly, however, this course sets out to teach you how to produce these varied effects in written language, first through imitation and, ultimately, in the service of your own self-expression.

FR 390M • French New Wave

36810 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM HRH 2.106C

Please check back for updates.

FR 358 • French Cinema And Memory

36770 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 2.102
II

DESCRIPTION:

This course will examine film’s capacity to create, transform or even falsify memory. In particular, we will examine how this apparently “objective” medium complicates the very notion of recollection and, as such, disrupts our sense of identity.

The class is designed to help students engage critically with visual culture. We will draw attention to the fact that film is a highly constructed medium, and that even the most “objective” images are the result of conscious or unconscious choices by its producers. This aspect of film cuts across genre from comedy to suspense, from popular movies to art house film. The theme of memory brings to the fore film’s capacity to influence, if not manipulate, the viewer. What’s more, this course situates contemporary cinematic trends in the larger context of film history. In short, this course offers students a critical gaze onto the contemporary world—one that is more and more defined by visual media.

 

TEXT:

Le vocabulaire du cinéma by Marie-Thérèse Journot

Précis d’analyse filmique by Anne Goliot-Lété and Francis Vanoye

Film Art: An Introduction, Ninth Edition by David Bordwell and Kristen Thompson

Tentative film list:

1. Early Lumière brother films; early Méliès films; early Dadaist films (1895-1920's)

2. J'accuse by Abel Gance (1919)

3. L'année dernière à Marienbad by Alain Resnais (1961); Toute la mémoire du monde by Resnais and Marker (1956)

4. La Jetée by Chris Marker (1962); Sans soleil by Chris Marker (1983)

5. Le mépris by Jean-Luc Godard (1963)

6. Le chagrin et la pitié by Marcel Ophuls (1969)

7. Le dernier métro by François Truffaut (1980)

8. Les cent et une nuits de Simon Cinéma by Agnès Varda (1995)

9. Se souvenir des belles choses by Zabou Breitman (2001)

10. The Dreamers by Bernardo Bertolucci (2003)

11. Caché by Michael Haneke (2005)

12. Le scaphandre et le papillon by Julian Schnabel (2007)

13. Persopolis by Marjane Satrapi & Vincent Paronnaud (2007)

14. Les plages d'Agnès by Agnès Varda (2008)

15. L’illusionniste by Sylvain Chomet (2010)

                      

GRADING:

Prospectus                                                               5%

Kick-off Talks                                                           10%

Scene Analysis 1                                                      15%

Scene Analysis 2                                                      15%

Class Attendance, participation and daily work           15%

Midterm Exam                                                         15%

Final Paper                                                              25%

FR 372 • Comparative Stylistics

36780 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 2.102
Wr

This advanced language course has as its main goal broadening your sense of the action and function of language beyond expression.  In other words, the subject of this course is not what language can say, but what it can do.  In particular, we will examine the grammatical, rhetorical and stylistic demands and assets of the French language in contrast with English.  This course is designed to train you to recognize and analyze these attributes.  More importantly, however, this course sets out to teach you how to produce these varied effects in written language, first through imitation and, ultimately, in the service of your own self-expression.

The course is organized around five main units (le mot, la phrase, le paragraphe, le message, l’action).  I will provide the main readings, as well as additional materials, including texts, videos and audio recordings.  The mains readings will be passages from the writings of Madame de Lafayette, Gustave Flaubert, Marcel Proust, Louis-Ferdinand Céline, Marguerite Duras and Julien Gracq.  These readings will provide us with “material” with which we will work in class.  The supplemental materials are designed to help you develop your language skills and, as such, are just as important as the main readings.  You will be responsible for the homework as presented on the syllabus, including the readings and viewings.  Keeping up with this work will helps us use the classroom as it should be, as our practice and workspace where we will hone your language skills. Since this course is designed to help you master a set of skills, it is geared towards helping you practice those skills.  As such, you will have various forms of in-class work, ranging from targeted exercises to practice essays.  Outside of class, your main work will be reading and writing, but you should expect and be ready for other exercises including group work.  In short, this advanced language course requires regular and sustained practice throughout the semester.

 

The course grade will be based on the following elements:

1.  Exercices de style….….……………………………………….….….…………….30%

2.  Final writing project…..……………………………………………………………25%

3.  Rhetoric and grammar exam.....………………………………………….…………20%

4.  Daily work………........………………………………………….….……………...15%

5.  In-class participation…………………………..……………………….…………...15%

FR 371L • Adv Written And Oral Compos

36630 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 2.122
Wr

Course description:

The objective of this course is to hone advanced listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French.  In addition to the textbook, this course will have us study authentic French television, radio and print publications.  Students will reprise elements from these media in their own production, which will consist of scripting and recording various genres of television and radio programs.  Students will also write articles for different types of print publications.  In particular, we will explore stylistic conventions appropriate to descriptions, critical essays, argumentative essays, narrative style and literary style.  The goal of these exercises is to help students review, expand and combine individual language skills into a new relationship with French as a living and lively language.  Finally, because of our use of authentic material, the course will also introduce you to many aspects of French and Francophone culture.

 

Texts:

A vous d'écrire: Atelier de français (Student Edition)

Workbook to accompany A vous d'écrire: Atelier de français

Contrastes: Grammaire du français courant (2nd Edition)

 

Additional readings and clips will be available on Blackboard

FR 390M • French Avant-Garde Film/Lit

36650 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM HRH 2.106C

Description:

This course will examine the function and form of the French avant-garde as it translates into different media.  We will consider whether the avant-garde forms a unified movement across media, and how strongly medium influences experimental artistic production.  We will pay particular attention to cinema’s influence—as an entirely new medium—on the avant-garde.  Along with providing a survey of the major movements, the class will interrogate the political, aesthetic, narrative and social functions of the avant-garde.

 

Readings:

Jarry, Ubu roi;

Rachilde, Alfred Jarry ou le surmâle de lettres

Séverine, Sac à tout: mémoires d’un petit chien

Georges Darien, Le voleur;

Jean Vigo, Zéro de conduite (film)

Apollinaire, « L’esprit nouveau et le poètes »; Les mamelles de Tirésias et sélection de poèmes

Dada : manifestes, sélection de poèmes et de court-métrages ;

Germain Bonnet, L’affaire Barrès. Première avant-garde : Écrits choisis de Louis Delluc ;

René Clair, Paris qui dort (film) ;

Germaine Dulac, La fête espagnole (film) ;

Musidora, Soleil et ombre (film) ;

Abel Gance, La roue (film) ;

Jean Epstein, La glace à trois faces (film). Surréalisme : manifestes et sélection de poèmes ;

Buñel & Dali, Un chien andalou ;

Hugnet & d’Ursel, La Perle (film). Deuxième avant-garde (cinéma pur):  Germaine Dulac, La coquille et le clergyman (film) ;

articles du Cahier du mois (1925) ;

René Clair, Entr’acte (film) ;

Fernand Léger, Le ballet mécanique (film) ;

Henri Chomette, Cinq minutes de cinéma pur (film) ;

Marcel Duchamp, Anemic cinema (film) ;

Man Ray, Emak Bakia (film) Antonin Artaud, Le théâtre et son double ;

Jean Genet, Les bonnes Lettrisme : Isidore Isou, Manifeste de la poésie lettriste ;

Isidore Isou, Traité de bave et d'éternité (film)

Situationnisme : Guy Debord, Rapport sur la construction des situations suivi de, Les situationnistes et les nouvelles formes d'action dans la politique ou l'art ; La société du spectacle

Hurlements en faveur de Sade (film) Le nouveau roman : Robbe-Grillet, Pour un nouveau roman;

Duras, L’amant ;  Le nouveau cinéma : Resnais, L’année dernière à Marienbad (film) ;

Chris Marker, La jetée (film);

Georges Franju, Le sang des bêtes (film) ;

Agnes Varda, Cléo de 5 à 7 Oulipo : Queneau, Abrégé de littérature potentielle ;

G. Perec, La vie : mode d’emploie 

Theory readings drawn from :  Poggioli, The Theory of the Avant-garde Bürger, Theory of the Avant-garde

 

Grading:

The course grade will be based on the following elements:  1.  Final conference presentation and hard copy (5-7)

FR 372 • Comparative Stylistics

35955 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 2.102
Wr

This advanced language course has as its main goal broadening your sense of the action and function of language beyond expression.  In other words, the subject of this course is not what language can say, but what it can do.  In particular, we will examine the grammatical, rhetorical and stylistic demands and assets of the French language in contrast with English.  This course is designed to train you to recognize and analyze these attributes.  More importantly, however, this course sets out to teach you how to produce these varied effects in written language, first through imitation and, ultimately, in the service of your own self-expression.

The course is organized around five main units (le mot, la phrase, le paragraphe, le message, l’action).  I will provide the main readings, as well as additional materials, including texts, videos and audio recordings.  The mains readings will be passages from the writings of Madame de Lafayette, Gustave Flaubert, Marcel Proust, Louis-Ferdinand Céline, Marguerite Duras and Julien Gracq.  These readings will provide us with “material” with which we will work in class.  The supplemental materials are designed to help you develop your language skills and, as such, are just as important as the main readings.  You will be responsible for the homework as presented on the syllabus, including the readings and viewings.  Keeping up with this work will helps us use the classroom as it should be, as our practice and workspace where we will hone your language skills. Since this course is designed to help you master a set of skills, it is geared towards helping you practice those skills.  As such, you will have various forms of in-class work, ranging from targeted exercises to practice essays.  Outside of class, your main work will be reading and writing, but you should expect and be ready for other exercises including group work.  In short, this advanced language course requires regular and sustained practice throughout the semester.

 

The course grade will be based on the following elements:

1.  Exercices de style….….……………………………………….….….…………….30%

2.  Final writing project…..……………………………………………………………25%

3.  Rhetoric and grammar exam.....………………………………………….…………20%

4.  Daily work………........………………………………………….….……………...15%

5.  In-class participation…………………………..……………………….…………...15%

FR 381M • Critical Approaches To Lit

35970 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 2.106C

FREN 381 M: Critical Approaches to Lit

 

Course Description:

This course is an introductory survey of the major critical approaches to literature and culture.  In this class, we will consider the fluid boundary between literature, culture, society and criticism; theory as an intellectual and emotional means of understanding the past and present; as well as theory’s capacity to present and unveil different “ways of being in the world”.  In particular, the goal of this course is to cultivate our sense of theory as a means of developing one’s own scholarly perspective.  In this light, we will begin the semester with each student presenting a “statement of critical identity” to the class.  The purpose of this exercise is to have you imagine yourself beyond your role as a student, and instead as a reader—in the most profound sense of this word—of culture.  Though this statement is not the final word on you as a scholar—indeed, this course should help you refine, if not revise it—, it will be a starting-point from which we can better understand what is at stake for us in our work.  Indeed, I encourage each student to consider the theoretical texts from the perspective of these “stakes”, with the goal of creating together a more complete picture of how different critical approaches illuminate and interact with different issues and texts.  It is in this spirit that the course is designed to provide students with a basic theoretical “tool kit” to build upon and personalize.  Finally, this survey aims to provide students with the means of engaging at a high level of critical sophistication with other scholars.

 

Course Texts:

Selections from The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism

Selections posted on Blackboard

 

Course Grade:

Theory responses: 10%

1 Short paper: 15%

Participation:  15%

3 presentations: 20%

1 final paper: 40%

F C 349 • French New Wave

35975 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM HRH 2.112
GC (also listed as EUS 347)

DESCRIPTION:

There are three main goals for this course.  The first is the acquisition of the intellectual and interpretative tools specific to film comprehension, analysis and creation.  The second is the establishment of a sense of the French New Wave movement and its influence on subsequent artistic and commercial films.  The third main goal for the course is the acquisition of the vocabulary related to cinema production, description and interpretation.  The course will also encourage students to establish links between the films shown in the class, but also with other media.  Most importantly, the class is designed to cultivate film literacy, allowing students both to engage critically and create with this medium.  Assignments will include short, online film responses, one written movie review, a film exam, the creation of a student film, and written reflections on the film project.

 

TEXT:

Film Art, 10th edition by David Bordwell & Kristin Thompson

Cinema Studies: The Key Concepts by Susan Hayward

Films :

Les 400 coups

Tirez sur le pianiste

À bout de souffle

Pierrot le fou

Cléo de 5 à 7

La pointe courte

La jetée

Le joli mai

Hiroshima mon amour

L’année dernière à Marienbad

Ma nuit chez Maude

Les bonnes femmes

           

GRADING:

1.  Class attendance, participation and daily work (throughout the semester)……..15%

2.  8 Short film responses………………………………….………...…………...…15%

3.  Written Movie Review…….……………………….……………………...........15%

4.  Film exam ……..…...…………………………..…………………………….....20%

5.  Final film project ……..……………………..……………………………….....20%

6.  Reflections on the final film project ……….…………………………………...15%

FR 371L • Adv Written And Oral Compos

35830 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 2.122
Wr

Course description:

The objective of this course is to hone advanced listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French.  In addition to the textbook, this course will have us study authentic French television, radio and print publications.  Students will reprise elements from these media in their own production, which will consist of scripting and recording various genres of television and radio programs.  Students will also write articles for different types of print publications.  In particular, we will explore stylistic conventions appropriate to descriptions, critical essays, argumentative essays, narrative style and literary style.  The goal of these exercises is to help students review, expand and combine individual language skills into a new relationship with French as a living and lively language.  Finally, because of our use of authentic material, the course will also introduce you to many aspects of French and Francophone culture.

 

Texts:

A vous d'écrire: Atelier de français (Student Edition)

Workbook to accompany A vous d'écrire: Atelier de français

Contrastes: Grammaire du français courant (2nd Edition)

 

Additional readings and clips will be available on Blackboard

FR 372 • Comparative Stylistics

36070 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WEL 4.224
Wr

This advanced language course has as its main goal broadening your sense of the action and function of language beyond expression.  In other words, the subject of this course is not what language can say, but what it can do.  In particular, we will examine the grammatical, rhetorical and stylistic demands and assets of the French language in contrast with English.  This course is designed to train you to recognize and analyze these attributes.  More importantly, however, this course sets out to teach you how to produce these varied effects in written language, first through imitation and, ultimately, in the service of your own self-expression.

The course is organized around five main units (le mot, la phrase, le paragraphe, le message, l’action).  I will provide the main readings, as well as additional materials, including texts, videos and audio recordings.  The mains readings will be passages from the writings of Madame de Lafayette, Gustave Flaubert, Marcel Proust, Louis-Ferdinand Céline, Marguerite Duras and Julien Gracq.  These readings will provide us with “material” with which we will work in class.  The supplemental materials are designed to help you develop your language skills and, as such, are just as important as the main readings.  You will be responsible for the homework as presented on the syllabus, including the readings and viewings.  Keeping up with this work will helps us use the classroom as it should be, as our practice and workspace where we will hone your language skills. Since this course is designed to help you master a set of skills, it is geared towards helping you practice those skills.  As such, you will have various forms of in-class work, ranging from targeted exercises to practice essays.  Outside of class, your main work will be reading and writing, but you should expect and be ready for other exercises including group work.  In short, this advanced language course requires regular and sustained practice throughout the semester.

 

The course grade will be based on the following elements:

1.  Exercices de style….….……………………………………….….….…………….30%

2.  Final writing project…..……………………………………………………………25%

3.  Rhetoric and grammar exam.....………………………………………….…………20%

4.  Daily work………........………………………………………….….……………...15%

5.  In-class participation…………………………..……………………….…………...15%

FR 390M • Modernism: 100 Years After Wwi

36105 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 214

In “Modernism: 100 Years After World War I”, we will consider the shifting conceptions of selfhood, family and community caused by the social and cultural upheaval of the Great War as this catastrophe is represented in French poetry, novels, essays and film.  In particular, we will consider how these works contribute to the construction of an affective chronology that separates historical, political and memorial time into a “Before” and an “After”.  As we trace the development and persistence of this mythical break in time—echoed by equally drastic breaks in form and tradition—, we will consider critically how it influences our reading and representation of the Great War.

 

Grading :

30% Final conference presentation with hard copy

20% Attendance and participation

20% Two in-class presentations

20% Annotated bibliography

10 % Prospectus

 

Readings and viewings:

1. Le grand Meaulnes, Alain-Fournier (1913)

2. Du côté de chez Swann, Proust (1913)

3. Les vampires, Musidora and Mathé (1915-1916) ; short Dadaist films

4. Thomas l’imposteur, Cocteau (1923)

5. Les faux monnayeurs, Gide (1925)

6. Nadja, Breton (1928)

7. Voyage au bout de la nuit, Céline (1932)

8. J’accuse, Gance (1919) & Un long dimanche de fiançailles, Jeunet (2004)

9. Critical readings provided on Canvas

 

FR 358 • French Cinema And Memory

37335 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 105

French Cinema and Memory 

This course will examine film’s capacity to create, transform or even falsify memory.  In particular, we will examine how this apparently “objective” medium complicates the very notion of recollection and, as such, disrupts our sense of identity.

The class is designed to help students engage critically with visual culture.  We will draw attention to the fact that film is a highly constructed medium, and that even the most “objective” images are the result of conscious or unconscious choices by its producers.  This aspect of film cuts across genre from comedy to suspense, from popular movies to art house film.  The theme of memory brings to the fore film’s capacity to influence, if not manipulate, the viewer.  What’s more, this course situates contemporary cinematic trends in the larger context of film history.  In short, this course offers students a critical gaze onto the contemporary world—one that is more and more defined by visual media.

Readings: 

Le vocabulaire du cinéma by Marie-Thérèse Journot

Précis d’analyse filmique by Anne Goliot-Lété and Francis Vanoye

Film Art: An Introduction, Ninth Edition by David Bordwell and Kristen Thompson

 

Tentative film list:

 

1.  Early Lumière brother films; early Méliès films; early Dadaist films (1895-1920's)

 

2.  J'accuse by Abel Gance (1919)

 

3.  L'année dernière à Marienbad by Alain Resnais (1961); Toute la mémoire du monde by Resnais and Marker (1956)

 

4.  La Jetée by Chris Marker (1962); Sans soleil by Chris Marker (1983)

 

5.  Le mépris by Jean-Luc Godard (1963)

 

6.  Le chagrin et la pitié by Marcel Ophuls (1969)

 

7.  Le dernier métro by François Truffaut (1980)

 

8.  Les cent et une nuits de Simon Cinéma by Agnès Varda (1995)

 

9.  Se souvenir des belles choses by Zabou Breitman (2001)

 

10.  The Dreamers by Bernardo Bertolucci (2003)

 

11.  Caché by Michael Haneke (2005)

 

12.  Le scaphandre et le papillon by Julian Schnabel (2007)

 

13.  Persopolis by Marjane Satrapi & Vincent Paronnaud (2007)

 

14.  Les plages d'Agnès by Agnès Varda (2008)

 

15.  L’illusionniste by Sylvain Chomet (2010)

 

The course grade will be based on the following elements:

1. Prospectus……………………………………………………………….....….5%

2. Kick-off Talks……………………………………………................10%

3. Class attendance, participation and daily work……….….15%

4. Midterm exam…………………………………………………………......15%

5. Scene Analysis 1…………………………………………………………..15%

6. Scene Analysis 2…………………………………………………………..15%

7. Final paper………………………………………………………………......25%

FR 372 • Comparative Stylistics

37355 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.108
Wr

This advanced language course has as its main goal broadening your sense of the action and function of language beyond expression.  In other words, the subject of this course is not what language can say, but what it can do.  In particular, we will examine the grammatical, rhetorical and stylistic demands and assets of the French language in contrast with English.  This course is designed to train you to recognize and analyze these attributes.  More importantly, however, this course sets out to teach you how to produce these varied effects in written language, first through imitation and, ultimately, in the service of your own self-expression.

The course is organized around five main units (le motla phrasele paragraphele messagel’action).  I will provide the main readings, as well as additional materials, including texts, videos and audio recordings.  The mains readings will be passages from the writings of Madame de Lafayette, Gustave Flaubert, Marcel Proust, Louis-Ferdinand Céline, Marguerite Duras and Julien Gracq.  These readings will provide us with “material” with which we will work in class.  The supplemental materials are designed to help you develop your language skills and, as such, are just as important as the main readings.  You will be responsible for the homework as presented on the syllabus, including the readings and viewings.  Keeping up with this work will helps us use the classroom as it should be, as our practice and workspace where we will hone your language skills. Since this course is designed to help you master a set of skills, it is geared towards helping you practice those skills.  As such, you will have various forms of in-class work, ranging from targeted exercises to practice essays.  Outside of class, your main work will be reading and writing, but you should expect and be ready for other exercises including group work.  In short, this advanced language course requires regular and sustained practice throughout the semester.

 

The course grade will be based on the following elements:

1.  Exercices de style….….……………………………………….….….…………….30%

2.  Final writing project…..……………………………………………………………25%

3.  Rhetoric and grammar exam.....………………………………………….…………20%

4.  Daily work………........………………………………………….….……………...15%

5.  In-class participation…………………………..……………………….…………...15%

FR 371L • Adv Written And Oral Compos

37170 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM JES A205A
Wr

Course description:

The objective of this course is to hone advanced listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French.  In addition to the textbook, this course will have us study authentic French television, radio and print publications.  Students will reprise elements from these media in their own production, which will consist of scripting and recording various genres of television and radio programs.  Students will also write articles for different types of print publications.  In particular, we will explore stylistic conventions appropriate to descriptions, critical essays, argumentative essays, narrative style and literary style.  The goal of these exercises is to help students review, expand and combine individual language skills into a new relationship with French as a living and lively language.  Finally, because of our use of authentic material, the course will also introduce you to many aspects of French and Francophone culture.

 

Texts:

A vous d'écrire: Atelier de français (Student Edition)

Workbook to accompany A vous d'écrire: Atelier de français

Contrastes: Grammaire du français courant (2nd Edition)

 

Additional readings and clips will be available on Blackboard

FR 381M • Critical Approaches To Lit

37195 • Fall 2013
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM BEN 1.108

FREN 381 M: Critical Approaches to Lit

 

Course Description:

This course is an introductory survey of the major critical approaches to literature and culture.  In this class, we will consider the fluid boundary between literature, culture, society and criticism; theory as an intellectual and emotional means of understanding the past and present; as well as theory’s capacity to present and unveil different “ways of being in the world”.  In particular, the goal of this course is to cultivate our sense of theory as a means of developing one’s own scholarly perspective.  In this light, we will begin the semester with each student presenting a “statement of critical identity” to the class.  The purpose of this exercise is to have you imagine yourself beyond your role as a student, and instead as a reader—in the most profound sense of this word—of culture.  Though this statement is not the final word on you as a scholar—indeed, this course should help you refine, if not revise it—, it will be a starting-point from which we can better understand what is at stake for us in our work.  Indeed, I encourage each student to consider the theoretical texts from the perspective of these “stakes”, with the goal of creating together a more complete picture of how different critical approaches illuminate and interact with different issues and texts.  It is in this spirit that the course is designed to provide students with a basic theoretical “tool kit” to build upon and personalize.  Finally, this survey aims to provide students with the means of engaging at a high level of critical sophistication with other scholars.

 

Course Texts:

Selections from The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism

Selections posted on Blackboard

 

Course Grade:

Theory responses: 10%

1 Short paper: 15%

Participation:  15%

3 presentations: 20%

1 final paper: 40% 

FR 357 • The Worlds Out Of This World

36865 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.108

In this course, we will explore the relationship between fiction and reality, as well as the rules that govern each of these realms.  In particular, we will examine the status of fiction as an imaginary space governed by laws very different from those in the real world.  Indeed, how do we navigate this imaginary realm that both should, and should not influence our behavior in reality?  Why is it that we can be moved to tears at the death of a favorite character, but we do not storm the stage to stop a murder at the theater?  The readings and films for this course will challenge, cross or redraw the boundary between the real and the fictional.  We will consider each of our readings in light of Thomas Pavel’s Univers de la fiction in order to develop shared critical language.

 

Tentative Readings and Films:

Univers de la fiction, T. Pavel

Le manuscrit trouvé à Saragosse, J. Potocki

Locus solus, R. Roussel

Le passe-muraille, M. Aymé 

La vie: mode d’emploi, G. Perec 

Sans soleil, C. Marker

L’année dernière à Marienbad, A. Resnais

FR 372 • Comparative Stylistics

36890 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.108
Wr

This advanced language course has as its main goal broadening your sense of the action and function of language beyond expression.  In other words, the subject of this course is not what language can say, but what it can do.  In particular, we will examine the grammatical, rhetorical and stylistic demands and assets of the French language in contrast with English.  This course is designed to train you to recognize and analyze these attributes.  More importantly, however, this course sets out to teach you how to produce these varied effects in written language, first through imitation and, ultimately, in the service of your own self-expression.

The course is organized around five main units (le mot, la phrase, le paragraphe, le message, l’action).  I will provide the main readings, as well as additional materials, including texts, videos and audio recordings.  The mains readings will be passages from the writings of Madame de Lafayette, Gustave Flaubert, Marcel Proust, Louis-Ferdinand Céline, Marguerite Duras and Julien Gracq.  These readings will provide us with “material” with which we will work in class.  The supplemental materials are designed to help you develop your language skills and, as such, are just as important as the main readings.  You will be responsible for the homework as presented on the syllabus, including the readings and viewings.  Keeping up with this work will helps us use the classroom as it should be, as our practice and workspace where we will hone your language skills. Since this course is designed to help you master a set of skills, it is geared towards helping you practice those skills.  As such, you will have various forms of in-class work, ranging from targeted exercises to practice essays.  Outside of class, your main work will be reading and writing, but you should expect and be ready for other exercises including group work.  In short, this advanced language course requires regular and sustained practice throughout the semester.

 

The course grade will be based on the following elements:

1.  Exercices de style….….……………………………………….….….…………….30%

2.  Final writing project…..……………………………………………………………25%

3.  Rhetoric and grammar exam.....………………………………………….…………20%

4.  Daily work………........………………………………………….….……………...15%

5.  In-class participation…………………………..……………………….…………...15%

FR 320E • Advanced French I

36740 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 1.102

FR 320E • Advanced French I

Prerequisites

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%

Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 390M • 20th-Century French Novel

36855 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 2.112

Avant-garde et arrière-garde : The Social Body in 20th-Century France

In this course, we will examine the relationship between 20th-century texts and their influence on the French social body.  In our readings of texts that attack (avant-garde) or protect (arrière-garde) the social imaginary, we will examine the role literature plays in the “life” of the emotional and symbolic organism that binds individuals into a Nous.  In particular, we will consider the ways in which literary texts canchallenge and reimagine ways of “being in the world” in reaction to the catastrophes of the 20th-century.

Alfred Jarry, Ubu roi

Edmond Rostand, Cyrano de Bergerac  

André Breton, L’affaire Barrès

Roger Vitrac, Victor ou les enfants au pouvoir

Marcel Proust, Le temps retrouvé

Louis-Ferdinand Céline, Voyage au bout de la nuit

Simone de Beauvoir, Mémoires d’une fille rangée

Charles de Gaulle, L’appel

Camus, Le premier homme

Julien Gracq, Le rivage des Syrtes

Nathalie Sarraute, Vous les entendez ?

Georges Perec, W ou le souvenir d’enfance

 

Cours packet readings :

Didier Anzieu, Le moi-peau (excerpts)

Jean-Marie Apostolidès, Héroïsme et victimisation (excerpts)

Cornelius Castoriadis, L’institution imaginaire de la société (excerpts)

Martin Heidegger, « L’origine de l’œuvre d’art »

Maurice Barrès, selected political writings

Miguel Almeryda, selected political writings

Selected dadaist writings from Littérature and DADA

Selected surrealist writings

Marcel Proust, « La mort des cathédrales »

Louis-Ferdinand Céline, Bagatelles pour un massacre (excerpts)

Curriculum Vitae


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  • Department of French and Italian

    University of Texas at Austin
    201 W 21st Street STOP B7600
    HRH 2.114A
    Austin, TX 78712-1800
    512-471-5531