Department of Geography and the Environment

Paul F. Hudson


Affiliated FacultyPh.D., Louisiana State University

Associate Professor of Physical Geography, University of Leiden, Netherlands
Paul F. Hudson

Interests


Fluvial geomorphology,hydrology and water resources, environmental change, land degradation, coastal plain rivers

Biography


Hudson's main scholarly interests are within fluvial geomorphology and environmental change, particularly along large coastal plain rivers. His work addresses pure and applied problems related to channel adjustment, hydrology, sediment transport, floodplain sedimentology, and human impacts on watershed processes from late-Quaternary to modern time-scales. He primarily utilizes an empirical field based approach, frequently augmented with GIS and remote sensing technologies. Field sites are located along large coastal plain rivers within Mexico, Texas, the Lower Mississippi, and the lower Rhine (The Netherlands). Several recent and ongoing projects include flooding and sedimentation processes and connectivity of floodplain lakes along the lower Guadalupe River (Texas), environmental implications of geomorphic adjustment of the San Marcos River (Texas) to human disturbances, late Quaternary floodplain development of the Rio Panuco (eastern Mexico), response of the Lower Mississippi to flood management, anthropogenic floodplain sedimentation along the lower Rhine River in response to river management (The Netherlands), and anthropogenic driven valley sedimentation in Belgium. Funding has come from a variety of sources, including National Science Foundation, Texas Water Development Board, Texas Parks and Wildlife, US Fish and Wildlife Service, and a Fulbright Fellowship.

I teach a variety of courses at the graduate and undergraduate level, including The Natural Environment (introductory physical geography), Fluvial Geomorphology, Process Geomorphology, Environmental GIS, Issues in Geography, and Watershed Systems and Environmental Management.

Hudson received his BS in Geography (with honors) from Jacksonville University in 1991, an MS in Geography from the University of Florida in 1993, and in 1998 he received his PhD in Geography from Louisiana State University.

Selected Publications

Hudson, P.F, Heitmuller, F.T., and Leitch, M.B. 2012. Hydrologic connectivity of two oxbow lakes along the lower Guadalupe River, Texas: Geomorphic controls on the flood pulse concept. Journal of Hydrology 414-415, 174-183.

Hudson, P.F. and Inbar, M. (editors) 2012. Geodiversity and Land Degradation: Anthropogenic and Natural Drivers of Environmental Change. Land Degradation and Development 23 (4), 307-426.

Benito, G. and Hudson, P.F. 2010. Flood hazards: The context of fluvial geomorphology, Ch. 10. In, I. Alcántara-Ayala and A. Goudie (Eds.), Geomorphological Hazards and Disaster Prevention. Cambridge University Press, 111-128.

Hudson, P.F., Butzer, K.W., and Beach, T.P. 2008. Fluvial Deposits and Environmental History: Geoarchaeology, Paleohydrology, Adjustment to Environmental Change. 39th Annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium. Elsevier, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (also published by Geomorphology 101, 1-2), 412 pp. Find it on ScienceDirect

Hudson, P.F., Middelkoop, H., Stouthamer, E. 2008. Flood Management Along the Lower Mississippi and Rhine Rivers (The Netherlands) and the Continuum of Geomorphic Adjustment. Geomorphology 101 (1-2), 209-236. Find it on ScienceDirect

Hudson, P.F. and Alcantara-Ayala, I. 2006. Geomorphology and Land Degradation, Catena 65 (2).

Hudson, P.F., and Kesel, R.H. 2006. Spatial and temporal adjustment of the lower Mississippi River to major human impacts, Zeitschrift fur Geomorphologie, Supplementband 143, 17-33.

Hudson P.F., Colditz, R., Aguilar-Robledo, M. 2006. Spatial relations between floodplain environments and land use / land cover in a large lowland tropical river valley, Panuco basin, Mexico. Environmental Management 38, 487-503.

Hudson, P.F. 2004. The geomorphic context of prehistoric Huastec floodplain environments: Panuco basin, Mexico. Journal of Archaeological Science 31, 653-668.

Hudson, P.F. 2003 (Guest editor). Floodplains: Environment and Process. Geomorphology 56 (3/4).

Hudson, P.F. and Colditz, R. 2003. Flood delineation in a large and complex alluvial valley: The lower Pánuco basin, Mexico. Journal of Hydrology 280, 229-245.

Hudson, P.F. and Heitmuller, F.T. 2003. Local and watershed-scale controls on the spatial variability of natural levee deposits in a large fine-grained floodplain: Lower Panuco basin, Mexico. Geomorphology 56, 255-269.

Hudson, P.F. 2003. Event sequence and sediment exhaustion in the Lower Panuco basin, eastern Mexico, Catena, 52, 57-76.

Courses


GRG 338C • Riv/Landscp: Fluvial Geomorph

37350 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM GRG 312

FLUVIAL GEOMORPHOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE

GRG 338-C / Unique #: 37350

Spring 2010, T/Th 8:00-9:20, GRG 312

Instructor: Paul F. Hudson, Ph.D.
Office: GRG 336, E-mail: pfh@austin.utexas.edu ,

Office hours: T 9.30–10:30, Th 11:00-12:00, and by appointment

Course web site: https://webspace.utexas.edu/hudsonpf/classes/grg338c/index.htm


Description
Fluvial geomorphology is a comprehensive science that examines the evolution, structure, function, and dynamics of river systems. Because of the many ways in which humans alter rivers and landscapes fluvial geomorphology has numerous environmental applications. This course exposes students to theoretical and applied approaches to the discipline. A fundamental course goal is for students to gain an appreciation for the practical value of possessing knowledge of fluvial geomorphology, particularly for understanding environmental change. Students should come away from the course with an appreciation for the breadth of fluvial geomorphology as an academic discipline and in the various ways in which it intersects with other disciplines, particularly geology, ecology, and engineering. Specific topics include watersheds, hillslope and stream hydrology, soil erosion and land degradation, river channel dynamics, sediment transport, flooding and flood management, floodplains, and deltas. The course utilizes both a process and Quaternary (historical) approach. Frequent examples are provided from rivers in Texas, Mexico, Lower Mississippi, and the Dutch Rhine to illustrate important concepts and environmental applications.

Prerequisites
Students should be of upper division undergraduate or graduate level standing. Students are not required to have had prior courses in fluvial geomorphology, but should have at a minimum some background in physical geography, geology, and/or natural sciences.

Labs
The course includes two laboratory assignments. We will review the materials and the methods for each lab, and I will either make the data available, or indicate where it may be obtained. Each lab will involve basic data analysis, and a short write-up of the results. Lab 1 involves analysis of US Geological Survey hydrologic data, while Lab 2 entails calculating bed load mobility and requires field work in an Austin river. Undergraduate students must work with a partner, while graduate students are expected to complete individual work.  

Exams

The course includes three exams, two semester exams and a final exam. Each exam will include a combination of short essay, multiple choice, and fill in the blank. The exams are weighted the same towards your final grade. The final exam is cumulative and is scheduled for May 14 from 2.00 to 5.00.

 

Research Experience

Students with a keen interest in the topic have the opportunity to participate on a research project in fluvial geomorphology. This may include field, laboratory, or GIS work. Students must notify Dr. Hudson by February 15th if interested.

 

Term Paper (graduate students only)

Graduate students will complete an in-depth term paper on an approved topic. If your thesis topic is not appropriate, please see Dr. Hudson for a list of potential topics. The paper is due Thursday April 15th. The paper must adhere to a journal format, and include appropriate references, tables, and figures. The paper should range between 3,000 to 5,000 total words. The paper should involve original research and data analysis, and must include one or a combination of fieldwork, archival, laboratory, and/or GIS analysis and research. Importantly, the paper must include an in-depth literature review as it relates to a specific problem in fluvial geomorphology.

 

Policies

  • Attendance: You are required to attend all classes and arrive on time.
  • Lateness: Late labs, exams, and papers will be assigned a 5% reduction per day.
  • The use of any electronic and/or computer media is not allowed in class (e.g., laptops, phones, etc…)

Text, Readings, and Lectures

All lectures will be in PowerPoint format, and each lecture will be made available to students via the course web site as a pdf. All class lectures will be in GRG 312, except for a possible meeting along Waller Creek (I’ll give you plenty of notice). Course readings will include the text, journal articles from the course web site, and brief readings and figures distributed in class. Students are expected to have read before class and will be held responsible for readings on examinations. Please do not share your class notes or PowerPoint lectures with anyone outside of the class.

                                   

  • Text: Ro Charlton, 2007.  Fundamentals of Fluvial Geomorphology, Routledge. ISBN: 978-0-415-33454-9
  • Reader: Saucier, 1994. Available at the Union copy shop.
  • Articles: download pdf files from the course web site. 

 

Grading

  • 3 Exams (includes Final Exam) @ 20% each: 60%
  • Laboratory exercises 2 @ 20% each: 40%
  • (Graduate students: term paper = 20%, 3 exams = 40%, labs = 40%)

 

Class Web Site and Blackboard

In this class I use my own course web site and Blackboard—a Web-based course management system with password-protected access at http://courses.utexas.edu —to distribute grades and other course materials.

 

University of Texas Honor Code

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

 

Academic Integrity

All students are expected to adhere to University policies concerning scholastic integrity. Any form of scholastic dishonesty will not be tolerated, and will be dealt with in an appropriate manner as outlined by the University. "Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, collusion, falsifying academic records, and any act designed to give unfair academic advantage to the student (such as, but not limited to, submission of essentially the same written assignment for two courses without the prior permission of the instructor, providing false or misleading information in an effort to receive a postponement or an extension on a test, quiz, or other assignment), or the attempt to commit such an act." Student's should refer to the University guidelines on Academic Dishonesty (section 11-802).

 

Documented Disability Statement

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with dis­abilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone) or http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd

 

Use of E-Mail for Official Correspondence to Students

E-mail is recognized as an official mode of university correspondence; therefore, you are responsible for reading your e-mail for university and course-related information and announcements. You are responsible to keep the university informed about chang­es to your e-mail address. You should check your e-mail regularly and frequently—I recommend daily, but at minimum twice a week—to stay current with university-related communications, some of which may be time-critical. You can find UT Austin’s poli­cies and instructions for updating your e-mail address at http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.php

 

Religious Holy Days

By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a reli­gious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

 

Behavior Concerns Advice Line (BCAL)

If you are worried about someone who is acting differently, you may use the Behavior Concerns Advice Line to discuss by phone your concerns about another individual’s behavior. This service is provided through a partnership among the Office of the Dean of Students, the Counseling and Mental Health Center (CMHC), the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), and The University of Texas Police Department (UTPD). Call 512-232-5050 or visit http://www.utexas.edu/safety/bcal

GRG 384C • Watershed Sys & Envir Managmnt

37530 • Spring 2010
Meets TH 4:00PM-7:00PM GRG 408

WATERSHED SYSTEMS AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
GRG 384-C (unique # 38120)

Semester Focus:

 Management of Lowland Fluvial Systems in a Changing Environment

 Fall 2008, T 4:00-7:00, GRG 312

Instructor: Paul F. Hudson, Ph.D.
Office: GRG 336, E-mail: pfh@austin.utexas.edu,

Office hours: T 9.30–10:30, Th 11:00-12:00, and by appointment

 Course web site: https://webspace.utexas.edu/hudsonpf/classes/watershed-management_spring_2010/grg384c_spring-2010.htm


Description                                                     

This graduate seminar examines the management of large lowland fluvial systems to environmental change. Large lowland fluvial systems are deceptively complex physical settings, constantly adjusting to various types of natural and human induced environmental change that occurs over local and global scales, including climate change, subsidence, sea level rise, neotectonics, and geomorphic (autogenic) adjustments. Despite the constraints imposed by the physical environment many of Earth’s large fluvial lowlands support high populations and include large cities. Effective management of these systems requires a comprehensive suite of coordinated planning and engineering activities, necessitating an understanding of geomorphic, sedimentologic, and hydrologic processes. Unfortunately many of the management options imposed by government agencies results in long lasting unintended geomorphic and ecological consequences, which in some instances increases human vulnerability to environmental change. The Lower Mississippi is an intensively modified and studied system that provides excellent opportunities to explore a myriad of topics related to management and environmental change of large lowland fluvial systems.


Format
The format is of a traditional graduate seminar, comprised of lectures, discussion, and critical analysis of selected readings.

Readings, Participation, and Discussion
Students are responsible for reading at least several articles each week. The literature will be made available via the class web site as a series of downloadable files (pdf format). All students are expected to attend seminars and engage in discussion.

 Food

Each discussant will bring in food for the entire seminar the week preceding their seminar.

 Discussant

Each student will serve as a discussant two times during the semester. Each discussant should present a synthesis of ideas, concepts, and a critical review of the literature. Each student is required to provide a copy of their outline and a bibliography for all classmates, and a digital version to Hudson (these will be assimilated and distributed back to the class at the end of the semester) in a specific format.

Quiz
We will have a quiz at the end of the physical processes section. This will ensure that all students have at least the same basic level of understanding of the physical processes before entering the management phase of the seminar.

Final Project (proposal, presentation, and term paper)

Each student will develop a research project on an approved topic on a lowland fluvial system. You will hand in a brief (3 pg) proposal, and present a 5 minute class presentation. Specific guidelines and format will be provided in class.

Prerequisites

Students should be of graduate level standing, or be exceptional undergraduates (with instructor consent). Students are not expected to have prior courses in fluvial geomorphology, but should have some prior training in natural sciences (physical geography, geology, or civil engineering). A typical seminar includes students from a range of departments and colleges, which creates an interdisciplinary perspective on the study of watershed systems and environmental management. Past students have come from the following UT departments: Geography, Geology, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Latin American Studies, LBJ School of Public Affairs, History, Integrative Biology, Archaeology, Marine Sciences, and Planning.

Policies

  • Attendance: You are required to attend all classes and arrive on time.
  • Lateness: Late labs, exams, and papers will be assigned a 5% reduction per day.
  • The use of any electronic and/or computer media is not allowed in class (e.g., laptops, phones, etc…)

Grading:

I employ a standard 100 point grading system (100 to 90 = A, 89.9 to 80 = B, 79.9 to 70 = C, etc…).

  • 1 Quiz: 20%
  • Topic presentation (discussant * 2): 30%
  • Final project (proposal, presentation, and term paper): 40%
  • Participation: 10%

 Class Web Site and Blackboard

In this class I use my own course web site and Blackboard—a Web-based course management system with password-protected access at http://courses.utexas.edu —to distribute grades and other course materials.

 University of Texas Honor Code

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

 Academic Integrity

All students are expected to adhere to University policies concerning scholastic integrity. Any form of scholastic dishonesty will not be tolerated, and will be dealt with in an appropriate manner as outlined by the University. "Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, collusion, falsifying academic records, and any act designed to give unfair academic advantage to the student (such as, but not limited to, submission of essentially the same written assignment for two courses without the prior permission of the instructor, providing false or misleading information in an effort to receive a postponement or an extension on a test, quiz, or other assignment), or the attempt to commit such an act." Student's should refer to the University guidelines on Academic Dishonesty (section 11-802).

 Documented Disability Statement

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with dis­abilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone) or http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd

 Use of E-Mail for Official Correspondence to Students

E-mail is recognized as an official mode of university correspondence; therefore, you are responsible for reading your e-mail for university and course-related information and announcements. You are responsible to keep the university informed about chang­es to your e-mail address. You should check your e-mail regularly and frequently—I recommend daily, but at minimum twice a week—to stay current with university-related communications, some of which may be time-critical. You can find UT Austin’s poli­cies and instructions for updating your e-mail address at http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.php

 Religious Holy Days

By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a reli­gious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

 

Behavior Concerns Advice Line (BCAL)

If you are worried about someone who is acting differently, you may use the Behavior Concerns Advice Line to discuss by phone your concerns about another individual’s behavior. This service is provided through a partnership among the Office of the Dean of Students, the Counseling and Mental Health Center (CMHC), the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), and The University of Texas Police Department (UTPD). Call 512-232-5050 or visit http://www.utexas.edu/safety/bcal

GRG 301C • The Natural Environment

37550-37595 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM JES A121A
SB

Geomorphic processes that shape the earth's surface; origin and evolution of landforms. Groundwater and water resources. Pedogenesis and soil properties. 

Designed to accommodate 100 or more students.

A one-day field trip to be arranged.

GRG 301C • The Natural Environment

36640-36675 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 0.102
SB

Geomorphic processes that shape the earth's surface; origin and evolution of landforms. Groundwater and water resources. Pedogenesis and soil properties. 

Designed to accommodate 100 or more students.

A one-day field trip to be arranged.

GRG 301C • The Natural Environment

36895-36945 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM FAC 21
SB

Geomorphic processes that shape the earth's surface; origin and evolution of landforms. Groundwater and water resources. Pedogenesis and soil properties. 

Designed to accommodate 100 or more students.

A one-day field trip to be arranged.

GRG 339 • Process Geomorphology

38125 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GRG 312

Analysis of geomorphic processes and their effects on landform development. 

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and credit or registration for Geography 301C or Geological Sciences 401.

GRG 301C • The Natural Environment

35960-36010 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM FAC 21
SB

Geomorphic processes that shape the earth's surface; origin and evolution of landforms. Groundwater and water resources. Pedogenesis and soil properties. 

Designed to accommodate 100 or more students.

A one-day field trip to be arranged.

GRG 360G • Envir Geographic Info Systems

36165-36180 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GRG 102

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

GRG 301C • The Natural Environment

34510-34565 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM FAC 21
SB

Geomorphic processes that shape the earth's surface; origin and evolution of landforms. Groundwater and water resources. Pedogenesis and soil properties. 

Designed to accommodate 100 or more students.

A one-day field trip to be arranged.

GRG 301C • The Natural Environment

33245-33300 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM FAC 21
SB

Geomorphic processes that shape the earth's surface; origin and evolution of landforms. Groundwater and water resources. Pedogenesis and soil properties. 

Designed to accommodate 100 or more students.

A one-day field trip to be arranged.

GRG 339 • Process Geomorphology

33450 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM GRG 312

Analysis of geomorphic processes and their effects on landform development. 

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and credit or registration for Geography 301C or Geological Sciences 401.

GRG 360G • Envir Geographic Info Systems

33525-33535 • Spring 2004
Meets MW 8:30AM-10:00AM GRG 102

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

GRG 301C • The Natural Environment

32960-33000 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM FAC 21
SB

Geomorphic processes that shape the earth's surface; origin and evolution of landforms. Groundwater and water resources. Pedogenesis and soil properties. 

Designed to accommodate 100 or more students.

A one-day field trip to be arranged.

GRG 339 • Process Geomorphology

33830 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GRG 312

Analysis of geomorphic processes and their effects on landform development. 

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and credit or registration for Geography 301C or Geological Sciences 401.

GRG 360G • Geographic Information Systems

33885 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GRG 302

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

GRG 301C • The Natural Environment

32950-32977 • Spring 2002
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WEL 3.502
SB

Geomorphic processes that shape the earth's surface; origin and evolution of landforms. Groundwater and water resources. Pedogenesis and soil properties. 

Designed to accommodate 100 or more students.

A one-day field trip to be arranged.

GRG 301C • The Natural Environment

32975-33000 • Spring 2001
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM WEL 2.246
SB

Geomorphic processes that shape the earth's surface; origin and evolution of landforms. Groundwater and water resources. Pedogenesis and soil properties. 

Designed to accommodate 100 or more students.

A one-day field trip to be arranged.

GRG 360G • Geographic Information Systems

34020 • Fall 2000
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM GRG 302

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

GRG 301C • The Natural Environment

32775-32815 • Spring 2000
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WEL 1.308
SB

Geomorphic processes that shape the earth's surface; origin and evolution of landforms. Groundwater and water resources. Pedogenesis and soil properties. 

Designed to accommodate 100 or more students.

A one-day field trip to be arranged.

Teaching


Overveiw

I teach a variety of courses at the graduate and undergraduate level, including The Natural Environment, Fluvial Geomorphology and Environmental Change, Process Geomorphology, Environmental GIS, Issues in Geography, and Watershed Systems and Environmental Management.

Fluvial Geomorphology and Environmental Change (GRG 338-C)

Fluvial geomorphology is a comprehensive science that examines the evolution, structure, function, and dynamics of river systems. This course exposes students to theoretical and applied approaches to the discipline of fluvial geomorphology and utilizes a process and Quaternary (historical) approach. Because of the many ways in which humans alter rivers and landscapes fluvial geomorphology has numerous environmental applications. A fundamental course goal is for students to gain an appreciation for the practical value of possessing knowledge of fluvial geomorphology, particularly for understanding environmental change. Students should come away from the course with an appreciation for the breadth of fluvial geomorphology as an academic discipline and in the various ways in which it intersects with other disciplines, particularly geography, geology, ecology, planning, and engineering. Specific topics include watersheds, hillslope and stream hydrology, soil erosion and land degradation, river channel dynamics, sediment transport, flooding and flood management, floodplains, and deltas. Frequent examples are provided from rivers in Texas, Mexico, Lower Mississippi, and the Dutch Rhine to illustrate important concepts and environmental applications.

Course web site: https://webspace.utexas.edu/hudsonpf/classes/grg338c/index.htm

Watershed Systems and Environmental Management (GRG 384-C)

Spring 2010 focus: Management of Large Lowland Fluvial systems in a Changing Environment.

This graduate seminar examines the management of large lowland fluvial systems to environmental change. Large lowland fluvial systems are deceptively complex physical settings, constantly adjusting to various types of natural and human induced environmental change that occurs over local and global scales, including climate change, subsidence, sea level rise, neotectonics, and geomorphic (autogenic) adjustments. Despite the constraints imposed by the physical environment many of Earth’s large fluvial lowlands support high populations and include large cities. Effective management of these systems requires a comprehensive suite of coordinated planning and engineering activities, necessitating an understanding of geomorphic, sedimentologic, and hydrologic processes. Unfortunately many of the various management options imposed by government agencies results in long lasting unintended geomorphic and ecological consequences, which in some instances increases human vulnerability to environmental change. The Lower Mississippi is an intensively modified and studied system that provides excellent opportunities to explore a myriad of topics related to management and environmental change of large lowland fluvial systems.

Course web site: https://webspace.utexas.edu/hudsonpf/classes/watershed-management_spring_2010/grg384c_spring-2010.htm

The Natural Environment (GRG 301-C)

Physical geography is the science that examines the Earth's natural environment, with an emphasis on understanding the spatial distribution and underlying processes. This course traverses a range of environments and emphasizes the interrelationships between different physical settings and processes. Specific topics include: Earth's general circulation; rocks and minerals; plate tectonics and vulcanism; physical and chemical weathering; karst topography, including sinkhole and cave formation; mass wasting, such as landslides and mudflows; watershed hydrology; river channels and floodplains; deltas; coastal forms and processes; glaciers; aeolian landforms; soil formation and soil erosion; and biomes. Throughout the course students will be exposed to important concepts in physical geography, such as equilibrium, systems theory, thresholds, and feedbacks, which are useful for understanding environmental change.

https://webspace.utexas.edu/hudsonpf/classes/natural_environment/index.htm

Issues in Geography (GRG 390-K)

The goal of "Issues in Geography" (390-K) is to situate incoming geography graduate students (masters and PhD) within the academic discipline of "geography". The course reviews geography as a pluralistic discipline within the history of thought and experience about the Earth's surface as the human home, introduces the subfields of geography (ontology), and explores the challenges of defining significant actors and drivers in geographical space. The course is the first of a required two-course sequence for all incoming geography graduate students (masters and PhD), providing a basis for "Research in Geography" (390-L), which focuses on epistemology, research design, and the philosophy of science from the standpoint of defining a specific research project.

Environmental GIS (GRG 360-G)

Advances in geographical sciences and the proliferation of environmental databases make Geographers well poised to conduct sophisticated environmental analysis on an array of topics. The purpose of this course is to introduce Geographers to the practice and theory of utilizing Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as a method for analysis of environmental problems. To this end, the class utilizes a lecture and lab format. Lectures will emphasize general principles and theory in GIS, and the nature of spatial data systems. Labs will be oriented towards concepts discussed in class by employing ArcGIS to the display and analysis of spatial data, particularly environmental data. At the end of the semester students should feel comfortable applying GIS to a range of environmental issues, and have a solid understanding of the procedures and data necessary to conduct the appropriate geographical analysis.

http://www.utexas.edu/depts/grg/hudson/grg360g/EGIS/E_grg360g_05.htm

Process Geomorphology (GRG 339)

The Earth's landscapes are a mosaic of individual landforms created by distinct geomorphic processes. This course examines the processes that shape the earth's landforms. We will consider the major components of geomorphology, including fluvial, glacial, aeolian, slope, karst, coastal, and weathering processes. Students will be exposed to fundamental concepts in geomorphology, as well as analytical skills for conducting geomorphic analysis. Particular attention is given to understanding the variability of geomorphic process and form to anthropogenic and climatic controls. A major goal of the course is for students to understand the practical value of possessing a knowledge of geomorphology, especially for understanding environmental change.


  • Department of Geography and the Environment

    The University of Texas at Austin
    305 E. 23rd Street, A3100
    RLP 3.306
    Austin, TX 78712
    512-471-5116