Department of Germanic Studies

Matthias Warmuth


M.A. - German as a Foreign Language (DaF), University of Bamberg Staatsexamen - English and History, University of Würzburg,

Graduate Student, Assistant Instructor
Matthias Warmuth

Contact

Interests


Phonetics/Phonology, Sociolinguistics, Language Contact & Variation, Language and Identity, Language Attrition, Language Pedagogy & Online Instruction, Contrastive Linguistics

Biography


Matthias Warmuth is a PhD Candidate in Germanic Studies with an interest in Linguistics, SLA, and L2 pedagogy. His dissertation focuses on phonological convergence, attrition, and variation in Texas German. Other research explores the connection between heritage language speaker identity, memory, and language as well as L2 pronunciation. He holds an MA in German as a Foreign Language (Deutsch als Fremdsprache) from the University of Bamberg as well as a Staatsexamen Degree in English, History, and Education from the University of Würzburg.

 

Articles

  • Warmuth, Matthias. 2021: “Reading Texas German through the Lens of Transnationalism,” International Migration; 00:1–16. https://doi.org/10.1111/imig.12832
  • To Appear:  "Rhotics, /uː/, and diphthongization in New Braunfels German," Linguistics Vanguard.

Book Reviews

  • To Appear: Review of Wildfeuer, Alfred: Sprachkontakt, Mehrsprachigkeit und Sprachverlust: Deutschböhmisch-bairische Minderheitensprachen in den USA und in Neuseeland, in: Yearbook of German-American Studies 55.
  • Warmuth, Matthias. 2019. Review of Kautzsch, Alexander: The Attainment of an English Accent: British and American Features in Advanced German Learners, in: Yearbook of German-American Studies 53: 248–250.

Translation Services

  • Translation of academic work and correspondence by Erwin Rorschach for research project (Dr. Marvin W. Acklin, University of Hawaii) 

Project Affiliations

  • The Texas German Dialect Project (TGDP) / Researcher
  • Corpus for Improving the Teaching of World Languages (UT Austin)

 

Courses


GER 612 • Accel Sec-Yr: Read Mod Ger-Wb

38035 • Spring 2021
Meets MWF 1:00PM-3:00PM
Internet; Synchronous

Course Description

German 612 is an intensive intermediate German course that builds on language abilities acquired in German 506-507 (or equivalent). With a mostly content-based approach to language instruction, the course helps students not only to review and expand their German language abilities, but also to develop these within a meaningful context that supports the development of specific content knowledge.

The functional communicative approach to language learning that we take in this course focuses on learning to use German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts across both spoken and written genres. The course aims to develop students’ ability to interpret (not merely read or listen), communicate (not merely give and receive information), and perform (not merely write or speak) in German. In other words, the course will help students to become literate users of the German language. To this end, students of German 612 are expected to take on greater involvement in their own learning than they have in their beginning-level German language classes. Class activities (from class discussions to group projects) will require collaborative and cooperative learning on the part of all class members. 

Please note that this accelerated course requires that students commit approximately 60-120 minutes per weekday (not per class day) to homework and studying outside of class. Students not able to make this commitment over the entire span of the upcoming semester should consider taking German 612 during a semester that allows them to focus fully on the language. 

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories: 

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Daily homework (20%)

3      Short writing tasks (10%)

4      Chapter tests (40%)

5      Quizzes (10%)

6      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

GER 612 • Acld Sec-Yr Ger: Rd Mod Ger-Wb

36910 • Fall 2020
Meets MWF 9:00AM-11:00AM
Internet; Synchronous

Course Description

German 612 is an intensive intermediate German course that builds on language abilities acquired in German 506-507 (or equivalent). With a mostly content-based approach to language instruction, the course helps students not only to review and expand their German language abilities, but also to develop these within a meaningful context that supports the development of specific content knowledge.

The functional communicative approach to language learning that we take in this course focuses on learning to use German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts across both spoken and written genres. The course aims to develop students’ ability to interpret (not merely read or listen), communicate (not merely give and receive information), and perform (not merely write or speak) in German. In other words, the course will help students to become literate users of the German language. To this end, students of German 612 are expected to take on greater involvement in their own learning than they have in their beginning-level German language classes. Class activities (from class discussions to group projects) will require collaborative and cooperative learning on the part of all class members. 

Please note that this accelerated course requires that students commit approximately 60-120 minutes per weekday (not per class day) to homework and studying outside of class. Students not able to make this commitment over the entire span of the upcoming semester should consider taking German 612 during a semester that allows them to focus fully on the language. 

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories: 

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Daily homework (20%)

3      Short writing tasks (10%)

4      Chapter tests (40%)

5      Quizzes (10%)

6      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

GER 612 • Accel Sec-Yr Ger: Read Mod Ger

37445 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 1:00PM-3:00PM JES A215A

Course Description

German 612 is an intensive intermediate German course that builds on language abilities acquired in German 506-507 (or equivalent). With a mostly content-based approach to language instruction, the course helps students not only to review and expand their German language abilities, but also to develop these within a meaningful context that supports the development of specific content knowledge.

The functional communicative approach to language learning that we take in this course focuses on learning to use German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts across both spoken and written genres. The course aims to develop students’ ability to interpret (not merely read or listen), communicate (not merely give and receive information), and perform (not merely write or speak) in German. In other words, the course will help students to become literate users of the German language. To this end, students of German 612 are expected to take on greater involvement in their own learning than they have in their beginning-level German language classes. Class activities (from class discussions to group projects) will require collaborative and cooperative learning on the part of all class members. 

Please note that this accelerated course requires that students commit approximately 60-120 minutes per weekday (not per class day) to homework and studying outside of class. Students not able to make this commitment over the entire span of the upcoming semester should consider taking German 612 during a semester that allows them to focus fully on the language. 

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories: 

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Daily homework (20%)

3      Short writing tasks (10%)

4      Chapter tests (40%)

5      Quizzes (10%)

6      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

GER 507 • First-Year German II

36975 • Fall 2019
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM JES A307A

Course Description

German 507, a second-semester German course, continues instruction begun in German 506. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German and did not take GER 506, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) By the end of German 507, students will be familiar with most basic structures of the German language and will have developed basic cultural knowledge about the German-speaking world. As vocabulary and grammar sophistication grow, students will become increasingly proficient at expressing their thoughts, feelings, and opinions on a variety of subjects related to everyday life. To this aim, each lesson centers on linguistic, communicative and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class.

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Homework (20%)

3      Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)

4      Chapter tests (30%)

5      Regular quizzes (10%)

6      Reading journals (5%)

7      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

 

There are no incompletes given in German 507. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 612 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 507 • First-Year German II

37645 • Spring 2019
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM JES A307A

Course Description

German 507, a second-semester German course, continues instruction begun in German 506. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German and did not take GER 506, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) By the end of German 507, students will be familiar with most basic structures of the German language and will have developed basic cultural knowledge about the German-speaking world. As vocabulary and grammar sophistication grow, students will become increasingly proficient at expressing their thoughts, feelings, and opinions on a variety of subjects related to everyday life. To this aim, each lesson centers on linguistic, communicative and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class.

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Homework (20%)

3      Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)

4      Chapter tests (30%)

5      Regular quizzes (10%)

6      Reading journals (5%)

7      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

 

There are no incompletes given in German 507. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 612 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 506 • First-Year German I

37760 • Fall 2018
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM JES A305A

Course Description

German 506, a first semester German course, assumes no prior knowledge of German. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) German 506 introduces students to the language and culture of the modern German-speaking world. Every effort is made to present opportunities to use the language: for self-expression in everyday situations, for basic survival needs in German-speaking language communities, and for personal enjoyment. To this aim, lessons center on linguistic, communicative, and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class. 

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

1  Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2  Homework (15%)

3  Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)

4  Chapter tests (25%)

5  Structured reflections on learning experiences (5%)

6  Regular quizzes (10%)

7  Short collaborative video project (10%)

8  Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

 

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 507 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

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