Department of Germanic Studies

Barbara Laubenthal


Associate ProfessorPhD, University of Giessen

DAAD Adjunct Associate Professor
Barbara Laubenthal

Contact

Interests


Immigration in Germany and Europe; reparation politics; memory studies

Biography


Barbara Laubenthal is DAAD associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin. Prior to coming to UT she was lecturer and interim professor of public administration in the Department of Politics and Public Administration at the University of Konstanz and visiting professor for migration and integration at the University of Tübingen. Her main research fields are immigration in Germany and Europe and international reparation politics. Her articles have appeared in Ethnic and Racial Studies, International Migration, Comparative Migration Studies and Memory Studies and she is the author of two monographs on German asylum policies and on protests by undocumented migrants in Europe. She has collaborated on a number of comparative European research projects on labor migration and she has been the director of the international research project Reparations for colonial soldiers in France, Great Britain and the United States. National movements and transnational dimensions, funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG).

Recent publications include:

Laubenthal, Barbara (2018): Spillover in der Migrationspolitik. Die Asylpolitik der dritten Merkel-Regierung und der Wandel Deutschlands zum Einwanderungsland, in: Zohlnhöfer, Reimut/Saalfeld, Thomas (Hg.): Zwischen Stillstand, Politikwandel und Krisenmanagement. Eine Bilanz der Regierung Merkel 2013-2017. Wiesbaden: Springer VS, forthcoming.

Laubenthal, Barbara/Schumacher, Daniel (2018): Colonial memories and transnational mobilizations: Asia's colonial veterans and their struggle for British citizenship, c. 1980-2015, Memory Studies, forthcoming.

Laubenthal, Barbara (2017): Labour migration in Europe: Changing policies - changing organizations - changing people (guest editor), special issue of International Migration, 55 (S1), December. 

 Laubenthal, B. (2016): Zwischen Ehre und Exil. Kolonialveteranen des Zweiten Weltkriegs in Frankreich und den USA, in: Zimmermann, Harm-Peer; Kruse, Andreas; Rentsch, Thomas (Ed.): Kulturen des Alterns: Plädoyers für ein gutes Leben bis ins hohe Alter. Campus, Frankfurt, 79-94.

 Laubenthal, Barbara (2016), Political Institutions and Asylum Policies – The Case of Germany, Psychosociological Issues in Human Resource Management 4(2): 122–144

Barbara is currently finishing a book manuscript with the title Give us justice before we die.’ Reparations for Second World War colonial veterans in the USA and in France. She is also working on a book project on US prisoners of war during the Second World War in the Pacific with the tentative title Food as a Weapon, Food as Hope. Starvation and Survival in Japanese Prisoner of War Camps during the Second World War.  

 Please feel free to contact her about funding opportunities for studying and researching in Germany.

 

 

 

Courses


GER 331L • Adv Conversatn & Compos: Lit

37675 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GEA 114

Description:

This course has two central goals. The first is to introduce you to several core and controversial issues in contemporary Germany and the ways in which these topics are discussed there. To this end we will read and/or listen to a wide range of material (film, music, poetry, news reports, and print media) that relates to several major themes in post-wall German society, politics, and culture. The second goal of the course is to provide you the opportunity to improve your written and spoken German. Course assignments will help you to expand your active vocabulary, increase your grammatical accuracy in using basic structures, and use more advanced grammatical structures to increase the linguistic register at which you can produce German. We will practice these elements in writing and in informal interaction (dialogues, conversations, role-playing) before you use them in exams and formal presentations.

Objectives
:
By the end of this semester you should be able to:
• compose short written essays in German with a high degree of grammatical accuracy, a varied vocabulary, and in a formal register;
• participate in day-to-day verbal interactions in German using colloquial phrasing and in more complex discussions with fluency and sophistication;
• understand and comment on primary sources about contemporary Germany; and demonstrate a solid grasp of issues central to current events.

Texts/Readings:
All required material is available online or via Canvas. Students will be expected to print out most completed assignment sheets and bring them to class. The grammar book for GER 328 (Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik, any edition) is highly recommended.

Grading:
preparation, participation, quizzes,

and writing assignments                            15%

3 two-page essays (10% each)                30%

2 written tests (10% each)                         20%

oral presentation                                         10%

midterm oral test                                          10%

final oral test                                                 15%

GSD 360 • Germany And Immigration

37840 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GEA 114
(also listed as EUS 348, GOV 365N)

A massive influx of refugees, conflicts about cultural diversity and religion, debates on the lack of highly-skilled workers - immigration currently is at the top of the German public agenda. However, discussions on immigration are taking place in a political climate much different from twenty years ago. Until the year 2000, despite being a major destination for international migration, Germany defined itself as a non-immigration country and aimed at preventing permanent immigration. However, for some years now, the integration of migrants has become a central aim and in some fields the country even pursues a pro-active immigration policy. What factors have encouraged this change, and how has immigration changed German society and culture? These are the questions that the course will address. Applying a historical perspective and using central theories and concepts of contemporary migration research, we will analyze recent changes in the fields of labor migration, asylum and undocumented migration and the integration of migrants. We will ask how the changes that have taken place are reflected on a cultural level, looking at the (contested) incorporation of Islam in German society, the reflection of immigration in contemporary art, movies and novels, and regional and civil society initiatives to preserve the memory of immigration.

The course aims at providing students with a profound knowledge of the main characteristics of Germany as an immigration country and on the current central empirical research topics on immigration in Germany. It also aims at enabling students to understand and apply central theories and concepts of contemporary migration studies beyond the case of Germany. At the end of the course, students should also be able to understand and assess Germany’s profile as an immigration country in comparison to other immigration countries such as the United States.

Texts

  • Borkert, Maren/Bosswick, Wolfgang (2011): The Case of Germany, in: Zincone, Giovanna/Penninx, Rinus/Borkert Maren (eds.): Migration Policymaking in Europe. The Dynamics of Actors and Contexts in Past and Present, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 95-128.
  • Bretell, Caroline/Hollifield, James F. (2006): Migration Theory. Talking across Disciplines (2nd edition). London: Routledge.
  • Göktürk, Deniz/Gramling, David/Kaes, Anton (eds.) (2007): Germany in Transit. Nation and Migration, 1955-2005, Berkeley, CA: California University Press.
  • Green, Simon (2013): “Germany. A changing country of immigration,” German Politics, 22 (3), 333-351

Grading

  • 2 Writing Assignments (3 pages)   20 %
  • Participation and Homework          20 %
  • Oral Presentation                          20 %
  • Final Paper                                   40 %

EUS 305 • Intro To European Studies

36130 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 224

COURSE DESCRIPTION

            Europe is home to a bewildering puzzle of many different histories, nations, cultures and languages, with more than 450 million people now living in the European Union - a Union that argues whether it can stay together as part of the "Eurozone" or even expand eastward to include supposedly "non-Christian" countries like Turkey.

            This course will start by introducing several earlier attempts to make a more united, and presumably more peaceful and prosperous, "Europe" out of the nation-states on the continent.  Each "imagined" Europe, as we shall see, was proposed to correct problems with the nation-states - to change politics and everyday lives in particular ways.

            A recent history of post-World-War-II Europe by Tony Judt will anchor the class' original work on Europe and its member nations. Judt tells the continent's story from the point of view of the era's global power politics, and then situates individual European states within them.  Judt's text, then, provides accounts of Europe from the top-down and points to moments when those official accounts diverge for particular states and when they place individuals and groups who do not fit the national stereotypes under pressure. 

            The historical account of Europe as seen from the point of view of world politics is an interesting counterpoint to the evolution of European government since World War II, as realized in the Council of Europe and the European Union.  This part of the course will introduce the structure of European governance and its institutions and will outline its central features and challenges.

            The largest section of the course is devoted to a workshop on issues in contemporary Europe. The class will address current European political and cultural issues such as immigration, education, language policies, European politics of memory and Europe’s role in the world. Students will get an overview on these topics from a European perspective and will carry out some small research projects on a particular country.  

The course will introduce students to the most important research materials for the study of Europe such as the central academic journals that focus on European issues, European survey tools, and research by European think tanks. The assignments of the course build on each other to help students acquire a body of skills and knowledge that will aid in their personal studies of Europe and in their major courses. This course is the introductory core course for a concentration or major in European Studies at UT, but it requires no prerequisites except for the willingness to work in collaboration with others and to engage in a discovery process rather than seeking "right" answers.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

By the end of this course,

  • You will have a profound knowledge of the main phases and events of Europe’s history after World War Two and of its central political project, the European Union.
  • You will know the relevant empirical research literature and its main findings on current political and cultural issues in Europe such as immigration, education, language policies, cultural heritage and memory, and Europe’s role in the world.
  • You will know the most important academic, policy-oriented and news sources for the study of European societies and politics.

  

ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING:

  • Chapter review = 20%
  • Collecting information on a Webpage on one of the EU member states: 5 tasks = 10%
  • Two one-hour online tests @ 10% each = 20%
  • Response paper = 30%
  • Final Evaluative Book Review of Postwar  = 20%

 

READINGS

Tony Judt.  Postwar:  A History of Europe Since 1945.  New York:  The Penguin Press, 2005.  

GER 382M • Immigration Ger/Us

37885 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 232

What characterizes immigration societies in the 21st century? What political, social and cultural questions does international mobility raise for both sending and receiving countries? And which new theories and concepts have been developed during the last years in order to understand new developments in the field of immigration? The course will address these questions by applying a comparative perspective and by focusing on Germany and the United States. During the last years, Germany has become the second most important immigration country after the US, and the two countries display some similarities regarding both their immigration policies and public debates about the “immigration problem”. However, they also differ in many historical, political and social aspects that have shaped their immigration models and the discourses surrounding them. In its first part, the course will address these issues on a theoretical level. We will look at approaches on how to conduct comparative research and we will analyze the concept of national research paradigms. We will then explore current theoretical debates in the field of immigration studies, putting a special emphasis on the second generation of immigration theories such as transnationalism, cumulative causation and network theories. The third part of the course will be devoted to an analysis of the most important current research fields such as highly-skilled migration, refugee migration, international retirement migration and the role of concepts of culture in today’s immigration societies. The course has a strong research component. After an introduction to qualitative methods and techniques of case study research each student will conduct an empirical case study using qualitative methodology.

GSD 360 • Politics Of Memory: Ger/Us

37780 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GEA 114
(also listed as AMS 321, EUS 348, GOV 365N)

What role do narratives of the past play in current politics and policies in Germany and the United States? This course addresses this question by engaging with key theoretical and empirical debates from the burgeoning research field of politics of the past. We will look at the role that memories play in German and US politics today from a comparative perspective, and with several case studies, we will ask questions such as:  how are transnational political events like the Second World War, the Cold War and historical immigration movements articulated and used in current political debates? How do narratives of the past reproduce or challenge contemporary power relations? To what extent do political actors and institutions construct particular historical narratives that serve their current interests? In answering these questions, the course will put a specific focus on the role of memory in German and US immigration politics.

The course aims to enable students to understand central theories and concepts of memory studies, and to apply them in an empirical case study. At the end of the course, students will have a thorough theoretical and empirical understanding on the ways in which memory and politics intersect both as research fields and as political practices in contemporary societies.

 

Readings

Assmann, Aleida/Conrad, Sebastian (eds.) (2010): Memory in a Global Age. Discourses, Practices and Trajectories. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Halbwachs, Maurice (1980): The Collective Memory. New York: Harper and Row.

Kleist, Olaf/Glynn, Irial (eds.) (2012): History, Memory and Migration. Perceptions of the Past and the Politics of Incorporation, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Nebow, Richard N./Kansteiner, Wulf/Fogu, Claudio (2006) (eds.): The Politics of Memory in Post-war Europe. Durham: Duke University Press.

Olick, Jeffrey (2007): The Politics of Regret. On Collective Memory and Historical Responsibility. London/New York: Routledge.

Torpey, John. 2006. Making Whole What Has Been Smashed: On Reparations Politics. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press. 

Wittlinger, Ruth (2011): The Merkel’s Government Politics of the Past, German Politics and Society 26 (4), 9-27.

 

Grading

Participation (10 %)

Two response papers (30 %)

Oral presentation (30 %)

Final paper (30 %)

EUS 305 • Intro To European Studies

36325 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 301

COURSE DESCRIPTION

            Europe is home to a bewildering puzzle of many different histories, nations, cultures and languages, with more than 450 million people now living in the European Union - a Union that argues whether it can stay together as part of the "Eurozone" or even expand eastward to include supposedly "non-Christian" countries like Turkey.

            This course will start by introducing several earlier attempts to make a more united, and presumably more peaceful and prosperous, "Europe" out of the nation-states on the continent.  Each "imagined" Europe, as we shall see, was proposed to correct problems with the nation-states - to change politics and everyday lives in particular ways.

            A recent history of post-World-War-II Europe by Tony Judt will anchor the class' original work on Europe and its member nations. Judt tells the continent's story from the point of view of the era's global power politics, and then situates individual European states within them.  Judt's text, then, provides accounts of Europe from the top-down and points to moments when those official accounts diverge for particular states and when they place individuals and groups who do not fit the national stereotypes under pressure. 

            The historical account of Europe as seen from the point of view of world politics is an interesting counterpoint to the evolution of European government since World War II, as realized in the Council of Europe and the European Union.  This part of the course will introduce the structure of European governance and its institutions and will outline its central features and challenges.

            The largest section of the course is devoted to a workshop on issues in contemporary Europe. The class will address current European political and cultural issues such as immigration, education, language policies, European politics of memory and Europe’s role in the world. Students will get an overview on these topics from a European perspective and will carry out some small research projects on a particular country.  

The course will introduce students to the most important research materials for the study of Europe such as the central academic journals that focus on European issues, European survey tools, and research by European think tanks. The assignments of the course build on each other to help students acquire a body of skills and knowledge that will aid in their personal studies of Europe and in their major courses. This course is the introductory core course for a concentration or major in European Studies at UT, but it requires no prerequisites except for the willingness to work in collaboration with others and to engage in a discovery process rather than seeking "right" answers.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

By the end of this course,

  • You will have a profound knowledge of the main phases and events of Europe’s history after World War Two and of its central political project, the European Union.
  • You will know the relevant empirical research literature and its main findings on current political and cultural issues in Europe such as immigration, education, language policies, cultural heritage and memory, and Europe’s role in the world.
  • You will know the most important academic, policy-oriented and news sources for the study of European societies and politics.

  

ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING:

  • Chapter review = 20%
  • Collecting information on a Webpage on one of the EU member states: 5 tasks = 10%
  • Two one-hour online tests @ 10% each = 20%
  • Response paper = 30%
  • Final Evaluative Book Review of Postwar  = 20%

 

READINGS

Tony Judt.  Postwar:  A History of Europe Since 1945.  New York:  The Penguin Press, 2005.  

GSD 360 • Germany And Immigration

38265 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GEA 114
(also listed as EUS 348, GOV 365N)

A massive influx of refugees, conflicts about cultural diversity and religion, debates on the lack of highly-skilled workers - immigration currently is at the top of the German public agenda. However, discussions on immigration are taking place in a political climate much different from twenty years ago. Until the year 2000, despite being a major destination for international migration, Germany defined itself as a non-immigration country and aimed at preventing permanent immigration. However, for some years now, the integration of migrants has become a central aim and in some fields the country even pursues a pro-active immigration policy. What factors have encouraged this change, and how has immigration changed German society and culture? These are the questions that the course will address. Applying a historical perspective and using central theories and concepts of contemporary migration research, we will analyze recent changes in the fields of labor migration, asylum and undocumented migration and the integration of migrants. We will ask how the changes that have taken place are reflected on a cultural level, looking at the (contested) incorporation of Islam in German society, the reflection of immigration in contemporary art, movies and novels, and regional and civil society initiatives to preserve the memory of immigration.

The course aims at providing students with a profound knowledge of the main characteristics of Germany as an immigration country and on the current central empirical research topics on immigration in Germany. It also aims at enabling students to understand and apply central theories and concepts of contemporary migration studies beyond the case of Germany. At the end of the course, students should also be able to understand and assess Germany’s profile as an immigration country in comparison to other immigration countries such as the United States.

Texts

  • Borkert, Maren/Bosswick, Wolfgang (2011): The Case of Germany, in: Zincone, Giovanna/Penninx, Rinus/Borkert Maren (eds.): Migration Policymaking in Europe. The Dynamics of Actors and Contexts in Past and Present, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 95-128.
  • Bretell, Caroline/Hollifield, James F. (2006): Migration Theory. Talking across Disciplines (2nd edition). London: Routledge.
  • Göktürk, Deniz/Gramling, David/Kaes, Anton (eds.) (2007): Germany in Transit. Nation and Migration, 1955-2005, Berkeley, CA: California University Press.
  • Green, Simon (2013): “Germany. A changing country of immigration,” German Politics, 22 (3), 333-351

Grading

  • 2 Writing Assignments (3 pages)   20 %
  • Participation and Homework          20 %
  • Oral Presentation                          20 %
  • Final Paper                                   40 %

GSD 360 • Sports/Politics In Germany

38275 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 337
(also listed as EUS 348)

Description:

Sport and other forms of physical culture have played important political roles in German history over the past two centuries. The gymnastics movement of the early 19th century promoted an intense German nationalism based on racial/ethnic identity. The late-19th century gymnastics movement was both politically conservative and engaged in an unsuccessful struggle with the foreign “sport” culture that eventually conquered the world in the form of the Olympic Games and global soccer. The 1936 Berlin (“Nazi”) Olympics promoted Hitler’s foreign policy objectives by serving as a propaganda platform that persuaded much of the world that Nazi Germany would not go to war. An anti-Nazi boycott effort in the United States did not succeed. The next German dictatorship to adopt sport as a political strategy was East Germany (1949-1989), which produced huge numbers of internationally successful athletes by creating a system of early recruitment, expert coaching, and a secret doping program that fed anabolic steroids to thousands of young men and women, including children: criminal medicine in the service of sportive nationalism. In recent decades, democratic Germany has pursued a very successful program to become a world soccer power. The 2006 World Cup competition in Germany marked a turning point by producing a politically acceptable form of German nationalism. The German victory at the 2014 World Cup in Brazil has confirmed traditional stereotypes about German efficiency that reflect well on Germany’s political system. The inclusion of players of non-German origin on the national team serves as a symbol of German multicultural policy in an era of troubled race relations across the face of Europe.

 

Selected Readings:

Léon Poliakov, “Arndt, Jahn and the Germanomanes,” in The History of Anti-Semitism: From Voltaire to Wagner (New York: The Vanguard Press, 1975): 380-391.

John Hoberman, “The Origins of Socialist Sport: Marxist Sport Culture in the Years of Innocence,” in Sport and Political Ideology (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1984): 170-189.

John Hoberman, “Fascism and the Sportive Temperament,” “Nietzsche and the Authority of the Body,” “Fascist Style and Sportive Manhood,” in Sport and Political Ideology (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1984): 83-109.

 John M. Hoberman, “”Nazi Sport Theory: Racial Heroism and the Critique of Sport,” in Sport and Political Ideology (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1984): 162-169.

 Marcel Reinold and John Hoberman, “The Myth of the Nazi Steroid,” The International Journal of the History of Sport  (2014).

Allen Guttmann, “’The Nazi Olympics’,” in The Games Must Go On: Avery Brundage and the Olympic Movement (New York: Columbia University Press, 1984): 62-82.

Richard Mandell, The Nazi Olympics (1971).

Alan Tomlinson, “FIFA and the Men Who Made It,” Soccer & Society 1 (2000): 55-71.

Werner Krauss, “Football, Nation and Identity: German Miracles in the Post-War Era,” in Dyck, Noel and Eduardo P. Archetti, eds., Sport, Dance and Embodied Identities (Oxford and New York: Berg, 2003): 197-216.

John Hoberman, “The Politics of Doping in Germany,” “The German Sports Medical Establishment,” in Mortal Engines: The Science of Performance and the Dehumanization of Sport (New York: Free Press, 1992): 237-252, 252-265.

John Hoberman. "The Reunification of German Sports Medicine, 1989-1992," Quest 45 (1993): 277-285.

Werner W. Franke and Brigitte Berendonk, “Hormonal doping and androgenization of athletes: a secret doping program of the German Democratic Republic government,” Clinical Chemistry 43 (1997): 1262-1279.

 

Grading:

Examination #1 (25%)

Examination #2 (25%)

Quizzes (5 worth 5% apiece)

Term paper (25%)

EUS 305 • Intro To European Studies

36245 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 1.106

COURSE DESCRIPTION

            Europe is home to a bewildering puzzle of many different histories, nations, cultures and languages, with more than 450 million people now living in the European Union - a Union that argues whether it can stay together as part of the "Eurozone" or even expand eastward to include supposedly "non-Christian" countries like Turkey.

            This course will start by introducing several earlier attempts to make a more united, and presumably more peaceful and prosperous, "Europe" out of the nation-states on the continent.  Each "imagined" Europe, as we shall see, was proposed to correct problems with the nation-states - to change politics and everyday lives in particular ways.

            A recent history of post-World-War-II Europe by Tony Judt will anchor the class' original work on Europe and its member nations. Judt tells the continent's story from the point of view of the era's global power politics, and then situates individual European states within them.  Judt's text, then, provides accounts of Europe from the top-down and points to moments when those official accounts diverge for particular states and when they place individuals and groups who do not fit the national stereotypes under pressure. 

            The historical account of Europe as seen from the point of view of world politics is an interesting counterpoint to the evolution of European government since World War II, as realized in the Council of Europe and the European Union.  This part of the course will introduce the structure of European governance and its institutions and will outline its central features and challenges.

            The largest section of the course is devoted to a workshop on issues in contemporary Europe. The class will address current European political and cultural issues such as immigration, education, language policies, European politics of memory and Europe’s role in the world. Students will get an overview on these topics from a European perspective and will carry out some small research projects on a particular country.  

The course will introduce students to the most important research materials for the study of Europe such as the central academic journals that focus on European issues, European survey tools, and research by European think tanks. The assignments of the course build on each other to help students acquire a body of skills and knowledge that will aid in their personal studies of Europe and in their major courses. This course is the introductory core course for a concentration or major in European Studies at UT, but it requires no prerequisites except for the willingness to work in collaboration with others and to engage in a discovery process rather than seeking "right" answers.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

By the end of this course,

  • You will have a profound knowledge of the main phases and events of Europe’s history after World War Two and of its central political project, the European Union.
  • You will know the relevant empirical research literature and its main findings on current political and cultural issues in Europe such as immigration, education, language policies, cultural heritage and memory, and Europe’s role in the world.
  • You will know the most important academic, policy-oriented and news sources for the study of European societies and politics.

  

ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING:

  • Chapter review = 20%
  • Collecting information on a Webpage on one of the EU member states: 5 tasks = 10%
  • Two one-hour online tests @ 10% each = 20%
  • Response paper = 30%
  • Final Evaluative Book Review of Postwar  = 20%

 

READINGS

Tony Judt.  Postwar:  A History of Europe Since 1945.  New York:  The Penguin Press, 2005.  

GSD 360 • Politics Of Memory: Ger/Us

38190 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GEA 114
(also listed as AMS 321, EUS 348, GOV 365N)

Please check back for updates.

EUS 305 • Intro To European Studies

36160 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.104

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • understand the significance of "United Europe" as a historical necessity and a historical accident, and how various political entities and social problems work for or against that unification

  • frame arguments about Europe in terms of the needs and experiences of three post-war generations' politics and experiences

  • find and assess current event and scholarly sources pertaining to the study of contemporary Europe, justifying their pertinence and quality with references to today's research norms.

    COURSE DESCRIPTION
    Scholars often claim that "Europe does not exist." Yet the continent is there, home to a bewildering puzzle of

    many different histories, nations, cultures and languages, with more than 450 million people now living in the European Union -- a Union that argues whether it can stay together as part of the "Eurozone" or even expand eastward to include supposedly "non-Christian" countries like Turkey. As the political, social and economic relationships among the member states of that European Union shift on an official level, Europe and European identities have constantly to be (re)defined and renegotiated, and "average Europeans" seek to understand the relationships between official accounts of "their" situations, the histories they were taught in school and by their families, and their everyday experiences.

    What, then, does it mean to study a Europe that is in flux this way? This course cannot answer that question straightforwardly, because US scholars in the social sciences and humanities who claim allegiance to "European Studies" all use different disciplines' strategies for understanding "Europe."

    To resolve that problem in another way, this course will start by introducing several earlier attempts to make a more united, and presumably more peaceful and prosperous, "Europe" out of the nation-states on the continent. Each "imagined" Europe, as we shall see, was proposed to correct problems with the nation-states -- to change politics and everyday lives in particular ways.

    A recent history of post-World-War-II Europe by Tony Judt will anchor the class' original work on Europe and its member nations. Judt tells the continent's story from the point of view of the era's global power politics, and then situates individual European states within them. Judt's text, then, provides accounts of Europe from the top-down and points to moments when those official accounts diverge for particular states and when they place individuals and groups who do not fit the national stereotypes under pressure.

    The historical account of Europe as seen from the point of view of world politics is an interesting counterpoint to the evolution of European government since World War II, as realized in the Council of Europe and the European Union. The next part of the course will introduce the evolving structure of European governance as a precursor to discussion of case studies about what this "Europeanization" does to individuals, groups, and nation-states.

    In the transition from official Europe to Europe's culture, the class will present resources and desiderata for researching issues in the European Studies context. The largest section of the course is devoted to a workshop on issues in contemporary Europe. In each case, readings form official sources are juxtaposed with news sources, writings from think tanks, and academic writing. The purpose of using official sources is to give students a springboard for juxtapositions between the "European" points of view and national ones that they research as the semester goes on.

    Assignments in this course are designed to introduce students to the materials, research strategies, and forms of professional communication that they will encounter later in specific disciplines' versions of European studies. The assignments build on each other to help each learner acquire a body of skills and knowledge that will aid in their personal studies of Europe and in their major courses.

    This course is the introductory core course for a concentration or major in European Studies at UT, but it requires no prerequisites except for the willingness to work in collaboration with others and to engage in a discovery process rather than seeking "right" answers.

    ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING:

305 Course Description, 1

  • Chapter review = 10%

  • Webpage: 5 tasks (one in two parts) assigned in syllabus to situate your country = 10%

    (2 points each: one for submitting it on time, one for correctness)

  • Source Analysis Assignment = 10%

  • Three one-hour online tests @ 10% each = 30%

  • Policy Brief= 20%

  • Final Evaluative Book Review of Postwar = 20%

    READINGS: BOOK TO BUY

    Tony Judt. Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945. New York: The Penguin Press, 2005. ISBN 978-1-59420-065- 3. [[ORDERED AT COOP]]

    READINGS: PDFed materials on Class Canvas Site

    Michel de Certeau, Luce Giard, and Pierre Mayol. The Practice of Everyday Life, Vol. 2: Living and Cooking. Trans. Timothy J. Tomasik. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1998, plus two pages from Volume 1.

    Jonathan W. Garlough. "Weighing in on the Wine Wars." William and Mary Law Review 46/4 (2005): Article 13.
    Richard Goff, et al. The Twentieth Century and Beyond: A Global History. 7th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, 2008 (excerpts). Tony Judt, A Grand Illusion?: An Essay on Europe. New York: New York UP, 2011 [orig. 1996]. ISBN 978-0-8147-4358-4. Ruth Keeling. "The Bologna Process and the Lisbon Research Agenda: the European Commission’s expanding role in higher

    education discourse." European Journal of Education, Vol. 41, No. 2 (2006)
    Magdalini Kolokitha. “It’s the End of the ‘University’ as we know it.” Unpublished speech: First RESUP International

    Conference. Paris 1st, 2nd and 3rd February 2007."European Agenda for the Integration of Third-Country

    Nationals." N. P.: European Commission, 2011.
    "Migration and Integration in Europe: State of the Research." ESRC Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS).

    Oxford: Oxford University, 2008.

    WEB-BASED READINGS ON SYLLABUS

    Many readings are parts of websites. Generally, an excerpt from Wikipedia is present for its readibility, but WIkipedia is only usable as a point of comparison, not as "official" materials, which need to be found on official websites for governments and entities. The online archives of the various European Agencies, moreover, contain reference materials that are straightforwardly considered government documents. Use Wikipedia to steer you toward the right names and issues, especially in an area like European Studies, which present a dizzying array of names, dates, and quotations. Use websites that stem from the organizations themselves for quoting and for authoritative definitions in your written work; use scholarly literature for definitive work on your final projects.

    CLASS WEBSITE: Canvas Learning System
    BANDWIDTH: You will need enough bandwidth to post newslinks with commentary 5 times during the semester 

GSD 360 • Germany And Immigration

38053 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 337
(also listed as EUS 348, GOV 365N)

A massive influx of refugees, conflicts about cultural diversity and religion, debates on the lack of highly-skilled workers - immigration currently is at the top of the German public agenda. However, discussions on immigration are taking place in a political climate much different from twenty years ago. Until the year 2000, despite being a major destination for international migration, Germany defined itself as a non-immigration country and aimed at preventing permanent immigration. However, for some years now, the integration of migrants has become a central aim and in some fields the country even pursues a pro-active immigration policy. What factors have encouraged this change, and how has immigration changed German society and culture? These are the questions that the course will address. Applying a historical perspective and using central theories and concepts of contemporary migration research, we will analyze recent changes in the fields of labor migration, asylum and undocumented migration and the integration of migrants. We will ask how the changes that have taken place are reflected on a cultural level, looking at the (contested) incorporation of Islam in German society, the reflection of immigration in contemporary art, movies and novels, and regional and civil society initiatives to preserve the memory of immigration.

The course aims at providing students with a profound knowledge of the main characteristics of Germany as an immigration country and on the current central empirical research topics on immigration in Germany. It also aims at enabling students to understand and apply central theories and concepts of contemporary migration studies beyond the case of Germany. At the end of the course, students should also be able to understand and assess Germany’s profile as an immigration country in comparison to other immigration countries such as the United States.

Texts

  • Borkert, Maren/Bosswick, Wolfgang (2011): The Case of Germany, in: Zincone, Giovanna/Penninx, Rinus/Borkert Maren (eds.): Migration Policymaking in Europe. The Dynamics of Actors and Contexts in Past and Present, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 95-128.
  • Bretell, Caroline/Hollifield, James F. (2006): Migration Theory. Talking across Disciplines (2nd edition). London: Routledge.
  • Göktürk, Deniz/Gramling, David/Kaes, Anton (eds.) (2007): Germany in Transit. Nation and Migration, 1955-2005, Berkeley, CA: California University Press.
  • Green, Simon (2013): “Germany. A changing country of immigration,” German Politics, 22 (3), 333-351

Grading

  • 2 Writing Assignments (3 pages)   20 %
  • Participation and Homework          20 %
  • Oral Presentation                          20 %
  • Final Paper                                   40 %

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages