Department of Germanic Studies

Kirkland A Fulk


Assistant ProfessorPh.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Assistant Professor; Faculty Undergraduate Advisor
Kirkland A Fulk

Contact

Interests


Contemporary German literature and film, Critical Theory, Utopias, Postcolonialism, Science Fiction

Biography


Fields of Study

Post-1945 West German Literature and Culture

Critical Theory

Literature and Economics

Post-colonialism

Kirkland (Alex) Fulk joined the Department of Germanic Studies as a lecturer in 2013 and since 2014 is an Assistant Professor of post-war German literature. His work centers on a wide array of intersections between literature, culture, and theory and has also moved into other forms of media. He has published for instance on photography and new literary ethnographic practices; post-colonialism and neoliberalism; the transnational connections of musical cultures, practices, and public spheres; and post-‘68 reevaluations of Marxism, futurology, and other science fictions.

Currently, he is working on a book project that explores economic crises in/and literature. Specifically this work explores the intellectual and cultural history of German Ordoliberalism as integral for not only understanding post-war German culture and society, but also for understanding the origins and intricacies of neoliberalism broadly conceived. This encompasses the realms of work and labor; economic subjects and subjectivities; risk, insurance, and possible futures; crisis, catastrophe, and history; and new realisms and creative practices.

Education

PhD – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2013

MA – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2008

Awards

Faculty Research Grant, Fall 2016

Summer Research Assignment, Summer 2015

Fulbright Fellow, Universität Kiel, 2011-2012

Courses


EUS 305 • Intro To European Studies

35805 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLM 5.120

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • understand the significance of "United Europe" as a historical necessity and a historical accident, and how various political entities and social problems work for or against that unification

  • frame arguments about Europe in terms of the needs and experiences of three post-war generations' politics and experiences

  • find and assess current event and scholarly sources pertaining to the study of contemporary Europe, justifying their pertinence and quality with references to today's research norms.

    COURSE DESCRIPTION
    Scholars often claim that "Europe does not exist." Yet the continent is there, home to a bewildering puzzle of

    many different histories, nations, cultures and languages, with more than 450 million people now living in the European Union -- a Union that argues whether it can stay together as part of the "Eurozone" or even expand eastward to include supposedly "non-Christian" countries like Turkey. As the political, social and economic relationships among the member states of that European Union shift on an official level, Europe and European identities have constantly to be (re)defined and renegotiated, and "average Europeans" seek to understand the relationships between official accounts of "their" situations, the histories they were taught in school and by their families, and their everyday experiences.

    What, then, does it mean to study a Europe that is in flux this way? This course cannot answer that question straightforwardly, because US scholars in the social sciences and humanities who claim allegiance to "European Studies" all use different disciplines' strategies for understanding "Europe."

    To resolve that problem in another way, this course will start by introducing several earlier attempts to make a more united, and presumably more peaceful and prosperous, "Europe" out of the nation-states on the continent. Each "imagined" Europe, as we shall see, was proposed to correct problems with the nation-states -- to change politics and everyday lives in particular ways.

    A recent history of post-World-War-II Europe by Tony Judt will anchor the class' original work on Europe and its member nations. Judt tells the continent's story from the point of view of the era's global power politics, and then situates individual European states within them. Judt's text, then, provides accounts of Europe from the top-down and points to moments when those official accounts diverge for particular states and when they place individuals and groups who do not fit the national stereotypes under pressure.

    The historical account of Europe as seen from the point of view of world politics is an interesting counterpoint to the evolution of European government since World War II, as realized in the Council of Europe and the European Union. The next part of the course will introduce the evolving structure of European governance as a precursor to discussion of case studies about what this "Europeanization" does to individuals, groups, and nation-states.

    In the transition from official Europe to Europe's culture, the class will present resources and desiderata for researching issues in the European Studies context. The largest section of the course is devoted to a workshop on issues in contemporary Europe. In each case, readings form official sources are juxtaposed with news sources, writings from think tanks, and academic writing. The purpose of using official sources is to give students a springboard for juxtapositions between the "European" points of view and national ones that they research as the semester goes on.

    Assignments in this course are designed to introduce students to the materials, research strategies, and forms of professional communication that they will encounter later in specific disciplines' versions of European studies. The assignments build on each other to help each learner acquire a body of skills and knowledge that will aid in their personal studies of Europe and in their major courses.

    This course is the introductory core course for a concentration or major in European Studies at UT, but it requires no prerequisites except for the willingness to work in collaboration with others and to engage in a discovery process rather than seeking "right" answers.

    ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING:

305 Course Description, 1

  • Chapter review = 10%

  • Webpage: 5 tasks (one in two parts) assigned in syllabus to situate your country = 10%

    (2 points each: one for submitting it on time, one for correctness)

  • Source Analysis Assignment = 10%

  • Three one-hour online tests @ 10% each = 30%

  • Policy Brief= 20%

  • Final Evaluative Book Review of Postwar = 20%

    READINGS: BOOK TO BUY

    Tony Judt. Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945. New York: The Penguin Press, 2005. ISBN 978-1-59420-065- 3. [[ORDERED AT COOP]]

    READINGS: PDFed materials on Class Canvas Site

    Michel de Certeau, Luce Giard, and Pierre Mayol. The Practice of Everyday Life, Vol. 2: Living and Cooking. Trans. Timothy J. Tomasik. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1998, plus two pages from Volume 1.

    Jonathan W. Garlough. "Weighing in on the Wine Wars." William and Mary Law Review 46/4 (2005): Article 13.
    Richard Goff, et al. The Twentieth Century and Beyond: A Global History. 7th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, 2008 (excerpts). Tony Judt, A Grand Illusion?: An Essay on Europe. New York: New York UP, 2011 [orig. 1996]. ISBN 978-0-8147-4358-4. Ruth Keeling. "The Bologna Process and the Lisbon Research Agenda: the European Commission’s expanding role in higher

    education discourse." European Journal of Education, Vol. 41, No. 2 (2006)
    Magdalini Kolokitha. “It’s the End of the ‘University’ as we know it.” Unpublished speech: First RESUP International

    Conference. Paris 1st, 2nd and 3rd February 2007."European Agenda for the Integration of Third-Country

    Nationals." N. P.: European Commission, 2011.
    "Migration and Integration in Europe: State of the Research." ESRC Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS).

    Oxford: Oxford University, 2008.

    WEB-BASED READINGS ON SYLLABUS

    Many readings are parts of websites. Generally, an excerpt from Wikipedia is present for its readibility, but WIkipedia is only usable as a point of comparison, not as "official" materials, which need to be found on official websites for governments and entities. The online archives of the various European Agencies, moreover, contain reference materials that are straightforwardly considered government documents. Use Wikipedia to steer you toward the right names and issues, especially in an area like European Studies, which present a dizzying array of names, dates, and quotations. Use websites that stem from the organizations themselves for quoting and for authoritative definitions in your written work; use scholarly literature for definitive work on your final projects.

    CLASS WEBSITE: Canvas Learning System
    BANDWIDTH: You will need enough bandwidth to post newslinks with commentary 5 times during the semester 

GER 331L • Adv Conversatn & Compos: Lit

37560 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GEA 114

Description:

This course has two central goals. The first is to introduce you to several core and controversial issues in contemporary Germany and the ways in which these topics are discussed there. To this end we will read and/or listen to a wide range of material (film, music, poetry, news reports, and print media) that relates to several major themes in post-wall German society, politics, and culture. The second goal of the course is to provide you the opportunity to improve your written and spoken German. Course assignments will help you to expand your active vocabulary, increase your grammatical accuracy in using basic structures, and use more advanced grammatical structures to increase the linguistic register at which you can produce German. We will practice these elements in writing and in informal interaction (dialogues, conversations, role-playing) before you use them in exams and formal presentations.

Objectives
:
By the end of this semester you should be able to:
• compose short written essays in German with a high degree of grammatical accuracy, a varied vocabulary, and in a formal register;
• participate in day-to-day verbal interactions in German using colloquial phrasing and in more complex discussions with fluency and sophistication;
• understand and comment on primary sources about contemporary Germany; and demonstrate a solid grasp of issues central to current events.

Texts/Readings:
All required material is available online or via Canvas. Students will be expected to print out most completed assignment sheets and bring them to class. The grammar book for GER 328 (Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik, any edition) is highly recommended.

Grading:
preparation, participation, quizzes,

and writing assignments                            15%

3 two-page essays (10% each)                30%

2 written tests (10% each)                         20%

oral presentation                                         10%

midterm oral test                                          10%

final oral test                                                 15%

GER 382M • Art, Money, And The Economy

38115 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 232

Description:

 

The development of post-war Germany cannot be thought apart from its economic development. From the founding myth of the Wirtschaftswunder to the recurring recessions and crises the economy has continually shaped and reshaped the West German political and cultural landscape. Through close examinations and discussions of current and contemporary literary and theoretical reflections this course explores the economic developments and upheavals of German “ordoliberalism” as key to understanding the rise and spread of neoliberalism as an economic, social, and cultural phenomenon. In this regard, although this course centers on Germany, it situates its economic and literary development within a larger transnational context.

 

GRADING

Preparation and Participation                                                                     25%

3-page (ca.) close reading and presentation                                                    15%

3-page (ca.) secondary literature review and presentation                                  15%

10-page conference paper                                                                           35%

Abstract and bibliography                                                                         10%

  

Readings/Films (Selected Bibliography):

Böll, Heinrich. “Es muss etwas geschehen.” 1954

Dath, Dietmar. “Contra Naturam.” 2007

Enzensberger, Hans Magnus. Immer das Geld! 2015

Kirchhoff, Bodo. Erinnerungen an meinen Porsche. 2008

Kluge, Alexander. Learning Processes with a Deadly Outcome. 1973 

P.M. Weltgeist Superstar. 1980

Zelter, Joachim. Schule der Arbeitslosen. 2006

 

Other media:

Block, Rene. Grafik des kapitalistischen Realismus. 1971

Kluge, Alexander. Die Artisten in der Zirkuskuppel: ratlos. 1968

Petzold, Christian. Yella. 2007

 

Secondary:

Beck, Ulrich. World at Risk. 2009

Beckert, Jens. Imagined Futures: Fictional Expectations and Capitalist Dynamics. 2016

Böhme, Gernot. “Contribution to the Critique of the Aesthetic Economy.” 2003

Boltanski, Luc and Eve Chiapello. The New Spirit of Capitalism. 2005

Dardot, Pierre and Christian Laval. The New Way of the World: On Neoliberal Society. 2013

Foucault, Michel. The Birth of Biopolitics: Lectures at the Collège de France 1978-

1979.

Habermas, Jürgen. Legitimation Crisis. 1975

Harvey, David. “Neoliberalism as Creative Destruction.” 2007

Lukács, Georg. “Realism in the Balance.” 1938

McCloskey, Deirdre N. “Storytelling in Economics.” 1990

ORDO: Jahrbuch für die Ordnung von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft. 1950-present

Pollock, Friedrich. “State Capitalism: Its Possibilities and Limitations.” 1941 

Röpke, Wilhelm. Die deutsche Frage. 1945

Streeck, Wolfgang. Buying Time. 2014

Vogl, Joseph. The Specter of Capital. 2015

GSD 361J • Protest/Revolt In W Germany

38285 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLM 5.118
(also listed as EUS 346)

The social, cultural, and political development of post-war Germany can hardly be thought apart from the protests that erupted in the streets in the 1960s. What initially began as a demand for a reform of the university system quickly became an outright challenge to the West German government. Issues ranging from the Nazi past, the Vietnam War, and German rearmament, to criticisms of the media and the politicization of literature and film became central concerns for a generation that viewed itself as a revolutionary force capable of effecting significant change. As the sixties together with the large-scale protests that characterized the decade came to an end, however, other movements arose in their wake. The rise of feminism and terrorism in the 1970s as well as the anti-nuclear movement and the Green movement all, in some way, owe a great deal to this pivotal moment in West Germany.

Throughout this course we will engage a wide variety of materials (film, literature, theoretical texts, and the internet) in order to examine the influence of protest, revolt, and revolution on post-war West German society from the 1960s to the 1980s. To what extent is the “spirit of the sixties” still alive and to what end? What are the legacies, and perhaps myths, that coalesce around such movements in the contemporary imagination? How does this triumvirate continue to shape Germany today?

GER 348D • German Play: Student Productn

37990 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GEA 114

The Swiss dramatist Max Frisch’s play Biedermann und die Brandstifter (The Arsonists) is often considered one of the hallmarks of post-war theater. First performed in 1958, Frisch’s “Lehrstück ohne Lehre” (“didactic play without a lesson”) is an absurd, grotesque, and ultimately ambiguous investigation into the causes and consequences of blind faith and good intentions that is as relevant to its time as it is to our own. In this course, we will read the play, create our own adaptation, and perform this version for the university community. In order to accomplish this, we will look at adaptations and performances of Frisch’s play, explore German theater history as it pertains to Frisch’s work, and examine this play within its broader socio-cultural and historical perspective.

This class is open to all students who have completed the equivalent of one year of college German (i.e., GER 507 or 604). It is a full three-hour upper-division plus one credit extra German course (which means it will count toward a major or minor in German). There will be a variety of speaking parts of varying difficulty, and there will be additional opportunities for students with an interest in costume design, stage design/props, lighting, sound, and playbill/graphic design. The performances will be scheduled for the last week in April. The weeks leading up to the performance will require you to attend evening/weekend rehearsals.

 

 

EUS 305 • Intro To European Studies

35435 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 3.402

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • understand the significance of "United Europe" as a historical necessity and a historical accident, and how various political entities and social problems work for or against that unification

  • frame arguments about Europe in terms of the needs and experiences of three post-war generations' politics and experiences

  • find and assess current event and scholarly sources pertaining to the study of contemporary Europe, justifying their pertinence and quality with references to today's research norms.

    COURSE DESCRIPTION
    Scholars often claim that "Europe does not exist." Yet the continent is there, home to a bewildering puzzle of

    many different histories, nations, cultures and languages, with more than 450 million people now living in the European Union -- a Union that argues whether it can stay together as part of the "Eurozone" or even expand eastward to include supposedly "non-Christian" countries like Turkey. As the political, social and economic relationships among the member states of that European Union shift on an official level, Europe and European identities have constantly to be (re)defined and renegotiated, and "average Europeans" seek to understand the relationships between official accounts of "their" situations, the histories they were taught in school and by their families, and their everyday experiences.

    What, then, does it mean to study a Europe that is in flux this way? This course cannot answer that question straightforwardly, because US scholars in the social sciences and humanities who claim allegiance to "European Studies" all use different disciplines' strategies for understanding "Europe."

    To resolve that problem in another way, this course will start by introducing several earlier attempts to make a more united, and presumably more peaceful and prosperous, "Europe" out of the nation-states on the continent. Each "imagined" Europe, as we shall see, was proposed to correct problems with the nation-states -- to change politics and everyday lives in particular ways.

    A recent history of post-World-War-II Europe by Tony Judt will anchor the class' original work on Europe and its member nations. Judt tells the continent's story from the point of view of the era's global power politics, and then situates individual European states within them. Judt's text, then, provides accounts of Europe from the top-down and points to moments when those official accounts diverge for particular states and when they place individuals and groups who do not fit the national stereotypes under pressure.

    The historical account of Europe as seen from the point of view of world politics is an interesting counterpoint to the evolution of European government since World War II, as realized in the Council of Europe and the European Union. The next part of the course will introduce the evolving structure of European governance as a precursor to discussion of case studies about what this "Europeanization" does to individuals, groups, and nation-states.

    In the transition from official Europe to Europe's culture, the class will present resources and desiderata for researching issues in the European Studies context. The largest section of the course is devoted to a workshop on issues in contemporary Europe. In each case, readings form official sources are juxtaposed with news sources, writings from think tanks, and academic writing. The purpose of using official sources is to give students a springboard for juxtapositions between the "European" points of view and national ones that they research as the semester goes on.

    Assignments in this course are designed to introduce students to the materials, research strategies, and forms of professional communication that they will encounter later in specific disciplines' versions of European studies. The assignments build on each other to help each learner acquire a body of skills and knowledge that will aid in their personal studies of Europe and in their major courses.

    This course is the introductory core course for a concentration or major in European Studies at UT, but it requires no prerequisites except for the willingness to work in collaboration with others and to engage in a discovery process rather than seeking "right" answers.

    ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING:

305 Course Description, 1

  • Chapter review = 10%

  • Webpage: 5 tasks (one in two parts) assigned in syllabus to situate your country = 10%

    (2 points each: one for submitting it on time, one for correctness)

  • Source Analysis Assignment = 10%

  • Three one-hour online tests @ 10% each = 30%

  • Policy Brief= 20%

  • Final Evaluative Book Review of Postwar = 20%

    READINGS: BOOK TO BUY

    Tony Judt. Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945. New York: The Penguin Press, 2005. ISBN 978-1-59420-065- 3. [[ORDERED AT COOP]]

    READINGS: PDFed materials on Class Canvas Site

    Michel de Certeau, Luce Giard, and Pierre Mayol. The Practice of Everyday Life, Vol. 2: Living and Cooking. Trans. Timothy J. Tomasik. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1998, plus two pages from Volume 1.

    Jonathan W. Garlough. "Weighing in on the Wine Wars." William and Mary Law Review 46/4 (2005): Article 13.
    Richard Goff, et al. The Twentieth Century and Beyond: A Global History. 7th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, 2008 (excerpts). Tony Judt, A Grand Illusion?: An Essay on Europe. New York: New York UP, 2011 [orig. 1996]. ISBN 978-0-8147-4358-4. Ruth Keeling. "The Bologna Process and the Lisbon Research Agenda: the European Commission’s expanding role in higher

    education discourse." European Journal of Education, Vol. 41, No. 2 (2006)
    Magdalini Kolokitha. “It’s the End of the ‘University’ as we know it.” Unpublished speech: First RESUP International

    Conference. Paris 1st, 2nd and 3rd February 2007."European Agenda for the Integration of Third-Country

    Nationals." N. P.: European Commission, 2011.
    "Migration and Integration in Europe: State of the Research." ESRC Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS).

    Oxford: Oxford University, 2008.

    WEB-BASED READINGS ON SYLLABUS

    Many readings are parts of websites. Generally, an excerpt from Wikipedia is present for its readibility, but WIkipedia is only usable as a point of comparison, not as "official" materials, which need to be found on official websites for governments and entities. The online archives of the various European Agencies, moreover, contain reference materials that are straightforwardly considered government documents. Use Wikipedia to steer you toward the right names and issues, especially in an area like European Studies, which present a dizzying array of names, dates, and quotations. Use websites that stem from the organizations themselves for quoting and for authoritative definitions in your written work; use scholarly literature for definitive work on your final projects.

    CLASS WEBSITE: Canvas Learning System
    BANDWIDTH: You will need enough bandwidth to post newslinks with commentary 5 times during the semester 

GER 346L • German Lit, Enlightmnt-Present

37205 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 0.120

Description:

A survey of German literature and culture from the mid-eighteenth century to the end of the nineteenth century. This course will cover the intellectual and literary movements of the Enlightenment, Classicism, Romanticism, the Pre-March era, Realism, and Naturalism. We will read and discuss texts from the main literary genres (prose, poetry, and drama) as well as some essays and look at artworks from each of the periods in question. We will also learn about some of the most important historical events of the time, including the French Revolution, Industrialization, the German Revolution of 1848, and the German Empire. Our discussions of the texts and artworks will follow the topics of Love and Nature and the ways each individual text and each time period have similar or different understandings of these concepts. Questions we will ask include: What do love and nature mean for each time period? Which person/group of persons is imagined as most ‘natural’ and most ‘lovable’? How do love and nature relate to political order or disorder? What happens when culture and love, or mankind and nature, clash? What can German literary history tell us about our contemporary understandings of love and nature?

In this course, you will learn to 1) read carefully and thoughtfully, 2) identify the significance of literary works and their relation to historical developments, 3) account for the variations in German writing over the century and a half, 4) compare notions of love and nature in different moments in time.

BOOKS:

Required:

Lessing: Emilia Galotti

Hoffmann: Der Sandmann

Hauptmann: Bahnwärter Thiel

Additional readings available in course packet and/or on Canvas.

GRADING:  

Preparation, Participation and Attendance      20%

3 Exams                                                           30%
3 Essays                                                           30%

1 Oral presentation                                          10%

Quizzes                                                           10%


PREREQUISITE:
Three semester hours of upper-division coursework in German with a grade of at least C.

GER 373 • German Science Fiction

37130 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.120

Description:

What is Science Fiction? What does Science Fiction do? Is it merely a flight of fantasy, an easy escape into another world or time? While until recently condoned as conformist, “Trivialliteratur” (popular or trashy fiction), science-fiction, in general, and German science-fiction, in particular, are especially adept at investigating questions of otherness and alterity. It contains as well a subversive quality (particularly in the GDR) that interrogates and critiques our world as much as other worlds. In this course we will explore the other worlds of science fiction by examining East and West German literature and film from both before and after reunification. Themes that we will cover over the course of the semester include encounters with aliens, distant planets and galaxies, technology and virtual worlds, alternative histories and timelines, utopia and dystopia. This course will also teach students to engage both primary and secondary materials in order to broaden their understanding of literary criticism and aid them in the writing of a final paper. Primary texts, class discussions, and assignments in German. Secondary readings in German and English.   

 

Readings and Films:

Wolfgang Jeschke: “Welt ohne Horizon,” “Die Anderen”

Perry Rhodan #1

Reinmar Cunis: Livesendung

Peter O. Chotjewitz: “Bericht über die Abschaffung der Folter auf Pollux”

Ronald M. Hahn: Ein dutzend H-Bomben

Alexander Kröger: Andere

Angela and Karlheinz Steinmüller: Der Traum vom großen roten Fleck

Christian Kracht: Ich werde hier sein im Sonnenschein und im Schatten

 

Willi Tobler und der Untergang der 6. Flotte, dir. Alexander Kluge

Welt am Draht, dir. Rainer Werner Fassbinder

Im Staub der Sterne, dir. Gottfried Kolditz

Alpha 0.7: Der Feind in Dir

 

Other readings will be available either on the course website or in the course packet. Film screenings are mandatory.

 

Grading:

Participation (including attendance and homework):              40%

2 Short papers (3 pages):                                                 20%

Final paper:                                                                    30%

Presentation:                                                                  10% 

GER 382M • German Literature 1945-Present

37160 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 232

This course focuses on the main themes and movements in German literature from 1945 to the present. As an introduction to the literature of this period, individual works will be analyzed within their cultural, political, and aesthetic contexts. Some of the main areas include the Gruppe 47, the Student Movement, New Subjectivity, Migrantenliteratur, East German Literature, Postmodernism, Pop, and Wendeliteratur.  We will discuss a variety of issues in post-45 German literature and culture such as attempts to come to terms with Germany’s past; feminism and the politics of gender; postcolonialism/anti-colonialism; and challenges to the German canon and identity from “outside” voices. In addition to literary works, this course will also examine the changing role of literature in Germany after 1945 by exploring the intellectual history and aesthetic theories that inform each period. Readings will be selected from authors including, but not limited to, Heinrich Böll, Günter Grass, Peter Weiss, Hans Magnus Enzensberger, Erika Runge, Alexander Kluge, Peter Schneider, Verena Stefan, Hubert Fichte, R.D. Brinkmann, Bodo Morschhäuser, Thomas Meineke, Ulrich Plenzdorf, Christa Wolf, zé do rock, Feridun Zaimoglu, Thomas Hettche, W.G. Sebald, etc.

The objective of this course is not only to trace the various threads of post-45 literature and intellectual history as they relate to their contemporaneous moments, but also to develop and hone the necessary professional skills in German Studies broadly speaking. To this end, fostering clear and effective modes of communication and presentation is as central to this course as analytical and methodological skills. In other words, how does one successfully convey information about a text/topic both orally and visually for a broader audience including undergraduates? Further, this course also serves as an introduction to post-45 scholarship. Students will examine recent secondary works and, moreover, be responsible for locating these by utilizing online databases as well as our institutional library.

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

1) identify the main trends and themes in post-war German literature through an analysis of primary (including theoretical works) and secondary materials

2) develop analytical and presentational skills necessary for discussing and teaching literature

3) navigate various resources (including the UT library) in order to carry out bibliographic research

 

Grading:

Preparation and Participation                                                           25%

3-page (ca.) close reading and presentation                                       15%

3-page (ca.) secondary literature review and presentation                   15%

10 page conference paper OR annotated teaching materials                  35%

Abstract and bibliography                                                               10%    

GER 343C • Contemporary German Civilizatn

37270 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CAL 323

Description:

This course follows the radical changes in German politics, society, culture, and literature during the twentieth century. Its goal is to improve your understanding of the interplay between the forces of modernization on the one hand and modernism in the arts on the other. In terms of politics and society we discuss the events leading up to World War I and its impact on Germany, including the Revolution of 1918 and political developments of the Weimar Republic. We consider the society and racial ideology of National Socialism and the origins and course of World War II followed by the post-war occupation of Germany, the development of two German states (the FRG and the GDR), and the process of German unification. Alongside this material we engage with the significant literary and cultural shifts that took place during this century including: fin-de-siècle literature, Expressionism, and Dadaism; cabaret and Neue Sachlichkeit of the 1920s; the emergence of German film; Nazi control of cultural production and works of political exile; and, finally, the impact of a divided nation on the cultural and literary output in the post-war era.

Materials for this class consist of readings and films. Assignments range from daily preparation and participation in class discussions (including organized debates) to quizzes, essay papers, and written exams. It presumes a sixth-semester language ability (i.e. completion of GER 328 and 331L) and is structured to build on the skills acquired in those classes in a systematic way to prepare students for more advanced work in German seminars. We will read texts that were written for native speakers of German and are not glossed or simplified. As a result we will need to work on comprehending complicated grammatical structures, such as indirect discourse (subjunctive I), passive voice, and extended modifiers. Students will be expected to acquire and use new vocabulary relevant to the course topics.

 

Course Objectives

By the end of this semester students should be able to:

  • define and explain key social and political issues and events of the 20th-century
  • analyze and compare literary works within their social, cultural, and historical context
  • orally present diverse perspectives regarding an historical problem or dilemma
  • compose interpretive essays in German with good organization, a high degree of grammatical accuracy, and a varied vocabulary.

 

Required texts:

Geschichtsbuch 4: Die Menschen und ihre Geschichte in Darstellungen und Dokumenten (Berlin: Cornelsen); ISBN 3-464-64204-6.

Bertolt Brecht, Mutter Courage und ihre Kinder (Berlin: Suhrkamp); ISBN 978-3-518-10049-3 

A course packet available at Jenn’s Copy Shop, 2518 Guadalupe St.

 

Grading:

Preparation, participation, quizzes = 10%

Essays (10%, 10%, 10%) = 30%

Debates (5%, 5%, 5%, 5%) = 20%                                             

Tests (20%, 20%) = 40%

GSD 360 • Protest/Revolt Postwar Germany

37490 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM JES A303A
(also listed as EUS 346)

Description:

The social, cultural, and political development of post-war Germany can hardly be thought apart from the protests that erupted in the streets in the 1960s. What initially began as a demand for a reform of the university system quickly became an outright challenge to the West German government. Issues ranging from the Nazi past, the Vietnam War, and German rearmament, to criticisms of the media and the politicization of literature and film became central concerns for a generation that viewed itself as a revolutionary force capable of effecting significant change. As the sixties together with the large-scale protests that characterized the decade came to an end, however, other movements arose in their wake. The rise of the Green movement, feminism, and terrorism in the 1970s as well as the anti-nuclear movement, anti-fascist (antifa) demonstrations, and the recent Occupy Germany movement all, in some way, owe a great deal to this pivotal moment in West Germany.

Throughout this course we will engage a wide variety of materials (film, literature, theoretical texts, and the internet) in order to examine the influence of protest, revolt, and revolution on post-war German society from the 1960s to the present. To what extent is the “spirit of the sixties” still alive and to what end? What are the legacies, and perhaps myths, that coalesce around such movements in the contemporary imagination? How does this triumvirate continue to shape Germany today?

Readings and class discussions in English. 

 

Readings and Films:

Michael (Bommi) Baumann: How it all began

Peter Schneider: Lenz

Verena Stefan: Shedding

Rudi Dutschke: The Students and the Revolution

Ulrike Meinhof: Everybody Talks about the Weather…We don’t

Herbert Marcuse: Repressive Tolerance, The One-Dimensional Man (excerpts)

Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer: “The Culture Industry”

Petra Kelly, Thinking Green! Essays on Environmentalism, Feminism, and Nonviolence

 

Artists under the Big Top: perplexed (Die Artisten in der Zirkuskuppel: ratlos)

dir. Alexander Kluge

Germany in Autumn (Deutschland im Herbst), dir. Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Alexander Kluge,

Volker Schlöndorff, et. al.

The Baader-Meinhof Complex, dir. Uli Edel

The Edukators (Die fetten Jahre sind vorbei), dir. Hans Weingartner

 

Primary and secondary sources will be available on the course website or in the course packet. Film screenings are mandatory.           

 

Grading:

Participation (including attendance and homework):                          30%

2 response papers (3 pages):                                                                          20%

Final paper:                                                                                                     40%

Presentation:                                                                                                   10%

GER 346L • German Lit, Enlightmnt-Present

38215 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM BUR 214

Description:

A survey of German literature and culture from the mid-eighteenth century to the end of the nineteenth century. This course will cover the intellectual and literary movements of the Enlightenment, Classicism, Romanticism, the Pre-March era, Realism, and Naturalism. We will read and discuss texts from the main literary genres (prose, poetry, and drama) as well as some essays and look at artworks from each of the periods in question. We will also learn about some of the most important historical events of the time, including the French Revolution, Industrialization, the German Revolution of 1848, and the German Empire. Our discussions of the texts and artworks will follow the topics of Love and Nature and the ways each individual text and each time period have similar or different understandings of these concepts. Questions we will ask include: What do love and nature mean for each time period? Which person/group of persons is imagined as most ‘natural’ and most ‘lovable’? How do love and nature relate to political order or disorder? What happens when culture and love, or mankind and nature, clash? What can German literary history tell us about our contemporary understandings of love and nature?

In this course, you will learn to 1) read carefully and thoughtfully, 2) identify the significance of literary works and their relation to historical developments, 3) account for the variations in German writing over the century and a half, 4) compare notions of love and nature in different moments in time.

BOOKS:

Required:

Lessing: Emilia Galotti

Hoffmann: Der Sandmann

Hauptmann: Bahnwärter Thiel

Additional readings available in course packet and/or on Canvas.

GRADING:  

Preparation, Participation and Attendance      20%

3 Exams                                                           30%
3 Essays                                                           30%

1 Oral presentation                                          10%

Quizzes                                                           10%


PREREQUISITE:
Three semester hours of upper-division coursework in German with a grade of at least C.

GER 331L • Adv Conversatn & Compos: Lit

38395 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.120

Description:

This course has two central goals. The first is to introduce you to several core and controversial issues in contemporary Germany and the ways in which these topics are discussed there. To this end we will read and/or listen to a wide range of material (film, music, poetry, news reports, and print media) that relates to several major themes in post-wall German society, politics, and culture. The second goal of the course is to provide you the opportunity to improve your written and spoken German. Course assignments will help you to expand your active vocabulary, increase your grammatical accuracy in using basic structures, and use more advanced grammatical structures to increase the linguistic register at which you can produce German. We will practice these elements in writing and in informal interaction (dialogues, conversations, role-playing) before you use them in exams and formal presentations.

Objectives
:
By the end of this semester you should be able to:
• compose short written essays in German with a high degree of grammatical accuracy, a varied vocabulary, and in a formal register;
• participate in day-to-day verbal interactions in German using colloquial phrasing and in more complex discussions with fluency and sophistication;
• understand and comment on primary sources about contemporary Germany; and demonstrate a solid grasp of issues central to current events.

Texts/Readings:
All required material is available online or via Canvas. Students will be expected to print out most completed assignment sheets and bring them to class. The grammar book for GER 328 (Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik, any edition) is highly recommended.

Grading:
preparation, participation, quizzes,

and writing assignments                            15%

3 two-page essays (10% each)                30%

2 written tests (10% each)                         20%

oral presentation                                         10%

midterm oral test                                          10%

final oral test                                                 15%

GER 373 • German Science Fiction

38430 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.120

Description:

What is Science Fiction? What does Science Fiction do? Is it merely a flight of fantasy, an easy escape into another world or time? While until recently condoned as conformist, “Trivialliteratur” (popular or trashy fiction), science-fiction, in general, and German science-fiction, in particular, are especially adept at investigating questions of otherness and alterity. It contains as well a subversive quality (particularly in the GDR) that interrogates and critiques our world as much as other worlds. In this course we will explore the other worlds of science fiction by examining East and West German literature and film from both before and after reunification. Themes that we will cover over the course of the semester include encounters with aliens, distant planets and galaxies, technology and virtual worlds, alternative histories and timelines, utopia and dystopia. This course will also teach students to engage both primary and secondary materials in order to broaden their understanding of literary criticism and aid them in the writing of a final paper. Primary texts, class discussions, and assignments in German. Secondary readings in German and English.   

 

Readings and Films:

Wolfgang Jeschke: “Welt ohne Horizon,” “Die Anderen”

Perry Rhodan #1

Reinmar Cunis: Livesendung

Peter O. Chotjewitz: “Bericht über die Abschaffung der Folter auf Pollux”

Ronald M. Hahn: Ein dutzend H-Bomben

Alexander Kröger: Andere

Angela and Karlheinz Steinmüller: Der Traum vom großen roten Fleck

Christian Kracht: Ich werde hier sein im Sonnenschein und im Schatten

 

Willi Tobler und der Untergang der 6. Flotte, dir. Alexander Kluge

Welt am Draht, dir. Rainer Werner Fassbinder

Im Staub der Sterne, dir. Gottfried Kolditz

Alpha 0.7: Der Feind in Dir

 

Other readings will be available either on the course website or in the course packet. Film screenings are mandatory.

 

Grading:

Participation (including attendance and homework):              40%

2 Short papers (3 pages):                                                        20%

Final paper:                                                                             30%

Presentation:                                                                           10% 

GRC 360E • Protest/Revolt Postwar Germany

38614 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 234
(also listed as EUS 346)

WRITING FLAG COURSE

Description:

The social, cultural, and political development of post-war Germany can hardly be thought apart from the protests that erupted in the streets in the 1960s. What initially began as a demand for a reform of the university system quickly became an outright challenge to the West German government. Issues ranging from the Nazi past, the Vietnam War, and German rearmament, to criticisms of the media and the politicization of literature and film became central concerns for a generation that viewed itself as a revolutionary force capable of effecting significant change. As the sixties together with the large-scale protests that characterized the decade came to an end, however, other movements arose in their wake. The rise of the Green movement, feminism, and terrorism in the 1970s as well as the anti-nuclear movement, anti-fascist (antifa) demonstrations, and the recent Occupy Germany movement all, in some way, owe a great deal to this pivotal moment in West Germany.

Throughout this course we will engage a wide variety of materials (film, literature, theoretical texts, and the internet) in order to examine the influence of protest, revolt, and revolution on post-war German society from the 1960s to the present. To what extent is the “spirit of the sixties” still alive and to what end? What are the legacies, and perhaps myths, that coalesce around such movements in the contemporary imagination? How does this triumvirate continue to shape Germany today?

Readings and class discussions in English. 

 

Readings and Films:

Michael (Bommi) Baumann: How it all began

Peter Schneider: Lenz

Verena Stefan: Shedding

Rudi Dutschke: The Students and the Revolution

Ulrike Meinhof: Everybody Talks about the Weather…We don’t

Herbert Marcuse: Repressive Tolerance, The One-Dimensional Man (excerpts)

Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer: “The Culture Industry”

Petra Kelly, Thinking Green! Essays on Environmentalism, Feminism, and Nonviolence

 

Artists under the Big Top: perplexed (Die Artisten in der Zirkuskuppel: ratlos)

dir. Alexander Kluge

Germany in Autumn (Deutschland im Herbst), dir. Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Alexander Kluge,

Volker Schlöndorff, et. al.

The Baader-Meinhof Complex, dir. Uli Edel

The Edukators (Die fetten Jahre sind vorbei), dir. Hans Weingartner

 

Primary and secondary sources will be available on the course website or in the course packet. Film screenings are mandatory.           

 

Grading:

Participation (including attendance and homework):                          30%

2 response papers (3 pages):                                                        20%

Final paper:                                                                                40%

Presentation:                                                                              10%

GER 604 • Accelerated First-Year German

38395 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 8:00AM-10:00AM JES A307A

Course Description

German 604 is first year, accelerated course for students with a) no prior knowledge of German, or b) no more than one year of high school German, or c) authorization from the German Department based on your UT German Placement Test performance. See your instructor if you are in this course for any other reason. In this course you will begin to learn to comprehend and speak German with good accuracy provided you prepare thoroughly outside of class and take an active part in class. In class you will learn to use German to ask and answer questions; name and describe persons, things, places, and events; deal with a variety of situations; narrate orally and in writing; write letters and postcards; fill out forms; and comprehend a variety of texts. The pace will be intense, and you will need dedication and motivation to succeed.

Grading Policy

a) 4 fifty-minute chapter exams = 40%. Each exam focuses on two or more chapters but will reiterate material from prior ones as well. Each exam tests writing, reading, listening comprehension & grammatical accuracy. There is no final exam during the final exam period in GER 604 because all tests that you take are cumulative. b) 1 oral examination = 10%. The oral exam, worth 10%, will be conducted after Kapitel 10. Your instructor will administer the exams outside of class time. The best preparation for this test is regular and active participation in class. c) Brief quizzes = 15%. Quizzes can be announced or unannounced. You may not make up missed quizzes but I will drop your two lowest quiz scores. d) Class participation = 15%. This portion of your grade will be based on your daily preparation and performance (i.e., speaking German in class). e) Written homework = 20%. Homework is due on the assigned date; any assignments turned in a day late will be accepted with a penalty. No homework can be turned in for credit after that.

Texts

Robert Di Donato, Monica Clyde, Jacqueline Vensant: Deutsch: Na klar! An Introductory German Course (Student Edition). 6th Edition. McGraw-Hill.

GER 331L • Adv Conversatn & Compos: Lit

38480 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 1

Description:

This course has two central goals. The first is to introduce you to several core and controversial issues in contemporary Germany and the ways in which these topics are discussed there. To this end we will read and/or listen to a wide range of material (film, music, poetry, news reports, and print media) that relates to several major themes in post-wall German society, politics, and culture. The second goal of the course is to provide you the opportunity to improve your written and spoken German. Course assignments will help you to expand your active vocabulary, increase your grammatical accuracy in using basic structures, and use more advanced grammatical structures to increase the linguistic register at which you can produce German. We will practice these elements in writing and in informal interaction (dialogues, conversations, role-playing) before you use them in exams and formal presentations.

Objectives
:
By the end of this semester you should be able to:
• compose short written essays in German with a high degree of grammatical accuracy, a varied vocabulary, and in a formal register;
• participate in day-to-day verbal interactions in German using colloquial phrasing and in more complex discussions with fluency and sophistication;
• understand and comment on primary sources about contemporary Germany; and demonstrate a solid grasp of issues central to current events.

Texts/Readings:
All required material is available online or via Canvas. Students will be expected to print out most completed assignment sheets and bring them to class. The grammar book for GER 328 (Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik, any edition) is highly recommended.

Grading:
preparation, participation, quizzes,

and writing assignments                            15%

3 two-page essays (10% each)                30%

2 written tests (10% each)                         20%

oral presentation                                         10%

midterm oral test                                          10%

final oral test                                                 15%

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