Department of Germanic Studies

Hannes Mandel


LecturerPh.D., Princeton University

Hannes Mandel

Contact

Interests


German literature since the long 19th century, Media Studies, History of Technology, Cultural Studies, Digital Humanities

Courses


GER 328 • Advanced German Grammar-Wb

36930 • Fall 2020
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM
Internet

Course Description:

German 328 provides students with the opportunity to develop their understanding of and ability to use German grammar. The course reviews basic grammatical structures in German that students likely encountered in earlier coursework (e.g., past tense forms, adjective endings), as well as introduces them to new grammatical concepts (e.g., extended attributes, nominalizations).

The course uses a content-based instructional approach to language learning. Through engaging with content material in German, students will be able to observe language in use and, importantly, have opportunities to practice grammatical structures in real, meaningful contexts. Three interconnected topics related to contemporary youth in German society (e.g., protest culture, military and civil service, and changes in the university structure) serve as the backdrop for class discussions and writing assignments. Additionally, students will have the chance to explore aspects of German grammar specific to their own individual interests and needs through a semester-long learning portfolio. 

The course prepares students for advanced coursework in German literature and culture, as well as study in a German-speaking country. With this goal in mind, students are expected to take greater initiative in actively participating in class discussions than at the beginning or intermediate levels of language instruction.

Prerequisites: Students must have completed second-year German at UT (GER 612) or have earned credit for second-year German through a placement exam, AP exam, or transfer credit in order to enroll in German 328.

 

Texts:

Rankins & Wells, Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik. Wiederholen und Anwenden, 6th edition (2016), available at the campus bookstore. Additional texts and handouts will be distributed in class or posted on the course management site.

 

Requirements & Assessment:

Class Participation (10%)              

Exploratory Practice Project (20%)

Daily Homework (20%)                

3 Writing Tasks (20%)

3 Tests (30%)

GSD 341S • German Media: Print To Tv-Wb

37075 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM
Internet
GCWr (also listed as RTF 352)

OUR GSD  COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN ENGLISH.

Course Description

Spanning from Gutenberg’s letterpress to the news of today, this interdisciplinary course will investigate the history of media technology and their cultural and political implications in the German (speaking) context. After an introduction to a few of the main concepts in Media Studies (such as ‘medium,’ ‘technology,’ and ‘communication’), we will learn about and discuss German media technology and formats in their particular historical contexts: e.g. Luther’s bible, Koenig’s steam-powered printing press, the illustrated magazines of the second half of the 19th century, the Skladanowsky brothers’ Bioskop, the film studios Babelsberg, photobooks of the Weimar period, the language of the Nazis, Konrad Zuse’s first computer, or Germany’s Next Top Model. While we will hear from both contemporary as well as scholarly voices throughout the semester, the course will conclude with an introduction to what more recently has come to be known as ‘German Media Theory.’ Underlying fundamental questions will be: Is it true that, as Friedrich Kittler argued, “media determine our situation”? If so, how, and to what extent? What, if anything, is German about the media we investigate, and how do they relate to those in other cultural regions, especially North America? And of course: What might our investigations teach us about the current technological, political, and cultural environment we live in?

Language

All readings will be in English. Movies and film clips will either be, or be subtitled, in English. Students with proficiency in German will have the opportunity to take on supplementary materials for their written assignments and/or class presentation

GER 612 • Accel Sec-Yr Ger: Read Mod Ger

37440 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 11:00AM-1:00PM JES A303A

Course Description

German 612 is an intensive intermediate German course that builds on language abilities acquired in German 506-507 (or equivalent). With a mostly content-based approach to language instruction, the course helps students not only to review and expand their German language abilities, but also to develop these within a meaningful context that supports the development of specific content knowledge.

The functional communicative approach to language learning that we take in this course focuses on learning to use German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts across both spoken and written genres. The course aims to develop students’ ability to interpret (not merely read or listen), communicate (not merely give and receive information), and perform (not merely write or speak) in German. In other words, the course will help students to become literate users of the German language. To this end, students of German 612 are expected to take on greater involvement in their own learning than they have in their beginning-level German language classes. Class activities (from class discussions to group projects) will require collaborative and cooperative learning on the part of all class members. 

Please note that this accelerated course requires that students commit approximately 60-120 minutes per weekday (not per class day) to homework and studying outside of class. Students not able to make this commitment over the entire span of the upcoming semester should consider taking German 612 during a semester that allows them to focus fully on the language. 

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories: 

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Daily homework (20%)

3      Short writing tasks (10%)

4      Chapter tests (40%)

5      Quizzes (10%)

6      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

GSD 330 • German Media: Print To Tv

37590 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GEA 127
GCWr (also listed as RTF 352)

Spanning from Gutenberg’s letterpress to the news of today, this course will investigate the history of media technology and their cultural and political implications in the German (speaking) context. After an introduction to a few of the main concepts in Media Studies (such as ‘medium,’ ‘technology,’ and ‘communication’), we will learn about and discuss German media formats in their particular historical contexts: e.g. Luther’s bible, Friedrich Koenig’s Schnellpresse, the illustrated magazines of the second half of the 19th century, the Skladanowsky brothers’ Bioskop, the film studios Babelsberg, photobooks of the Weimar period, the language of the Nazis, Konrad Zuse’s first computer, and Germany’s Next Top Model. While we will hear (or rather read) from both contemporary as well as scholarly voices throughout the semester, the course will conclude with an introduction to what more recently has come to be known as ‘German Media Theory.’

Underlying fundamental questions will be: Is it true that, as Friedrich Kittler argued, “media determine our situation”? If so, how, and to what extent? What, if anything, is German about the media we investigate, and how do they relate to those in other cultural regions, especially North America? And of course: What might our investigations teach us about the current technological, political, and cultural environment we live in?

 At the end of the course you can expect to have gained a wider knowledge of German history and culture, an increased awareness of media environments and the effects of media on cultures, as well as improved discussion, presentation, and writing skills.

 Grading:

  • Participation: 20%
  • Class presentation: 25%
  • Mid-term paper: 20%
  • Final paper: 35%

GER 612 • Accel Sec-Yr Ger: Read Mod Ger

36985 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 9:00AM-11:00AM JES A303A

Course Description

German 612 is an intensive intermediate German course that builds on language abilities acquired in German 506-507 (or equivalent). With a mostly content-based approach to language instruction, the course helps students not only to review and expand their German language abilities, but also to develop these within a meaningful context that supports the development of specific content knowledge.

The functional communicative approach to language learning that we take in this course focuses on learning to use German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts across both spoken and written genres. The course aims to develop students’ ability to interpret (not merely read or listen), communicate (not merely give and receive information), and perform (not merely write or speak) in German. In other words, the course will help students to become literate users of the German language. To this end, students of German 612 are expected to take on greater involvement in their own learning than they have in their beginning-level German language classes. Class activities (from class discussions to group projects) will require collaborative and cooperative learning on the part of all class members. 

Please note that this accelerated course requires that students commit approximately 60-120 minutes per weekday (not per class day) to homework and studying outside of class. Students not able to make this commitment over the entire span of the upcoming semester should consider taking German 612 during a semester that allows them to focus fully on the language. 

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories: 

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Daily homework (20%)

3      Short writing tasks (10%)

4      Chapter tests (40%)

5      Quizzes (10%)

6      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

UGS 302 • Critical Thinking & The Media

60405 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 128
Wr ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

GER 612 • Accel Sec-Yr Ger: Read Mod Ger

37665 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 1:00PM-3:00PM JES A215A

Course Description

German 612 is an intensive intermediate German course that builds on language abilities acquired in German 506-507 (or equivalent). With a mostly content-based approach to language instruction, the course helps students not only to review and expand their German language abilities, but also to develop these within a meaningful context that supports the development of specific content knowledge.

The functional communicative approach to language learning that we take in this course focuses on learning to use German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts across both spoken and written genres. The course aims to develop students’ ability to interpret (not merely read or listen), communicate (not merely give and receive information), and perform (not merely write or speak) in German. In other words, the course will help students to become literate users of the German language. To this end, students of German 612 are expected to take on greater involvement in their own learning than they have in their beginning-level German language classes. Class activities (from class discussions to group projects) will require collaborative and cooperative learning on the part of all class members. 

Please note that this accelerated course requires that students commit approximately 60-120 minutes per weekday (not per class day) to homework and studying outside of class. Students not able to make this commitment over the entire span of the upcoming semester should consider taking German 612 during a semester that allows them to focus fully on the language. 

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories: 

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Daily homework (20%)

3      Short writing tasks (10%)

4      Chapter tests (40%)

5      Quizzes (10%)

6      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

GER 612 • Accel Sec-Yr Ger: Read Mod Ger

37800 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 8:00AM-10:00AM JES A218A

Course Description

German 612 is an intensive intermediate German course that builds on language abilities acquired in German 506-507 (or equivalent). With a mostly content-based approach to language instruction, the course helps students not only to review and expand their German language abilities, but also to develop these within a meaningful context that supports the development of specific content knowledge.

The functional communicative approach to language learning that we take in this course focuses on learning to use German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts across both spoken and written genres. The course aims to develop students’ ability to interpret (not merely read or listen), communicate (not merely give and receive information), and perform (not merely write or speak) in German. In other words, the course will help students to become literate users of the German language. To this end, students of German 612 are expected to take on greater involvement in their own learning than they have in their beginning-level German language classes. Class activities (from class discussions to group projects) will require collaborative and cooperative learning on the part of all class members. 

Please note that this accelerated course requires that students commit approximately 60-120 minutes per weekday (not per class day) to homework and studying outside of class. Students not able to make this commitment over the entire span of the upcoming semester should consider taking German 612 during a semester that allows them to focus fully on the language. 

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories: 

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Daily homework (20%)

3      Short writing tasks (10%)

4      Chapter tests (40%)

5      Quizzes (10%)

6      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

UGS 302 • Critical Thinking & The Media

61995 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 128
Wr ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

GER 507 • First-Year German II

37520 • Spring 2018
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM JES A307A

Course Description

German 507, a second-semester German course, continues instruction begun in German 506. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German and did not take GER 506, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) By the end of German 507, students will be familiar with most basic structures of the German language and will have developed basic cultural knowledge about the German-speaking world. As vocabulary and grammar sophistication grow, students will become increasingly proficient at expressing their thoughts, feelings, and opinions on a variety of subjects related to everyday life. To this aim, each lesson centers on linguistic, communicative and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class.

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Homework (20%)

3      Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)

4      Chapter tests (30%)

5      Regular quizzes (10%)

6      Reading journals (5%)

7      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

 

There are no incompletes given in German 507. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 612 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 507 • First-Year German II

37525 • Spring 2018
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM JES A307A

Course Description

German 507, a second-semester German course, continues instruction begun in German 506. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German and did not take GER 506, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) By the end of German 507, students will be familiar with most basic structures of the German language and will have developed basic cultural knowledge about the German-speaking world. As vocabulary and grammar sophistication grow, students will become increasingly proficient at expressing their thoughts, feelings, and opinions on a variety of subjects related to everyday life. To this aim, each lesson centers on linguistic, communicative and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class.

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Homework (20%)

3      Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)

4      Chapter tests (30%)

5      Regular quizzes (10%)

6      Reading journals (5%)

7      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

 

There are no incompletes given in German 507. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 612 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 604 • Accelerated First-Year German

37970 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 8:00AM-10:00AM JES A307A

German 604, a first year, accelerated German course, is designed for students with: (a) no prior knowledge of German, (b) no more than one year of high school German, or (c) authorization from the Department of Germanic Studies based on your UT German Placement Test performance.

German 604 introduces students to the language and culture of the modern German-speaking world. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with most basic structures of the German language and will have developed basic cultural knowledge about the German-speaking world. As vocabulary and grammar sophistication grow, students will become increasingly proficient at expressing their thoughts, feelings, and opinions on a variety of subjects related to everyday life. To this aim, each lesson centers on linguistic, communicative and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities.

Please note that this accelerated course requires that students commit approximately 60-120 minutes per weekday (not per class day) to homework and studying outside of class. Students not able to make this commitment over the entire span of the upcoming semester should consider taking the two-semester first year sequence (German 506 and 507) or taking German 604 during a semester that allows them to focus fully on the language.

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

  1. Class participation assessed weekly (10%)
  2. Homework: online and paper-and-pencil (25%)
  3. Structured reflections in which students reflect on learning experiences (5%)
  4. Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)
  5. Six chapter tests assessing grammar and vocabulary (20%)
  6. Quizzes targeting vocabulary (15%)
  7. Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 604. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 612 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 612 • Accel Sec-Yr Ger: Read Mod Ger

38035 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 11:00AM-1:00PM JES A303A

Course Description

German 612 is an intensive intermediate German course that builds on language abilities acquired in German 506-507 (or equivalent). With a mostly content-based approach to language instruction, the course helps students not only to review and expand their German language abilities, but also to develop these within a meaningful context that supports the development of specific content knowledge.

The functional communicative approach to language learning that we take in this course focuses on learning to use German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts across both spoken and written genres. The course aims to develop students’ ability to interpret (not merely read or listen), communicate (not merely give and receive information), and perform (not merely write or speak) in German. In other words, the course will help students to become literate users of the German language. To this end, students of German 612 are expected to take on greater involvement in their own learning than they have in their beginning-level German language classes. Class activities (from class discussions to group projects) will require collaborative and cooperative learning on the part of all class members. 

Please note that this accelerated course requires that students commit approximately 60-120 minutes per weekday (not per class day) to homework and studying outside of class. Students not able to make this commitment over the entire span of the upcoming semester should consider taking German 612 during a semester that allows them to focus fully on the language. 

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories: 

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Daily homework (20%)

3      Short writing tasks (10%)

4      Chapter tests (40%)

5      Quizzes (10%)

6      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

GER 507 • First-Year German II

37950 • Spring 2017
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM JES A307A

Course Description

German 507, a second-semester German course, continues instruction begun in German 506. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German and did not take GER 506, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) By the end of German 507, students will be familiar with most basic structures of the German language and will have developed basic cultural knowledge about the German-speaking world. As vocabulary and grammar sophistication grow, students will become increasingly proficient at expressing their thoughts, feelings, and opinions on a variety of subjects related to everyday life. To this aim, each lesson centers on linguistic, communicative and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class.

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Homework (20%)

3      Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)

4      Chapter tests (30%)

5      Regular quizzes (10%)

6      Reading journals (5%)

7      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

 

There are no incompletes given in German 507. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 612 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 612 • Accel Sec-Yr Ger: Read Mod Ger

37970 • Spring 2017
Meets MWF 1:00PM-3:00PM JES A215A

Course Description

German 612 is an intensive intermediate German course that builds on language abilities acquired in German 506-507 (or equivalent). With a mostly content-based approach to language instruction, the course helps students not only to review and expand their German language abilities, but also to develop these within a meaningful context that supports the development of specific content knowledge.

The functional communicative approach to language learning that we take in this course focuses on learning to use German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts across both spoken and written genres. The course aims to develop students’ ability to interpret (not merely read or listen), communicate (not merely give and receive information), and perform (not merely write or speak) in German. In other words, the course will help students to become literate users of the German language. To this end, students of German 612 are expected to take on greater involvement in their own learning than they have in their beginning-level German language classes. Class activities (from class discussions to group projects) will require collaborative and cooperative learning on the part of all class members. 

Please note that this accelerated course requires that students commit approximately 60-120 minutes per weekday (not per class day) to homework and studying outside of class. Students not able to make this commitment over the entire span of the upcoming semester should consider taking German 612 during a semester that allows them to focus fully on the language. 

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories: 

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Daily homework (20%)

3      Short writing tasks (10%)

4      Chapter tests (40%)

5      Quizzes (10%)

6      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

GER 604 • Accelerated First-Year German

37750 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 8:00AM-10:00AM JES A307A

German 604, a first year, accelerated German course, is designed for students with: (a) no prior knowledge of German, (b) no more than one year of high school German, or (c) authorization from the Department of Germanic Studies based on your UT German Placement Test performance.

German 604 introduces students to the language and culture of the modern German-speaking world. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with most basic structures of the German language and will have developed basic cultural knowledge about the German-speaking world. As vocabulary and grammar sophistication grow, students will become increasingly proficient at expressing their thoughts, feelings, and opinions on a variety of subjects related to everyday life. To this aim, each lesson centers on linguistic, communicative and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities.

Please note that this accelerated course requires that students commit approximately 60-120 minutes per weekday (not per class day) to homework and studying outside of class. Students not able to make this commitment over the entire span of the upcoming semester should consider taking the two-semester first year sequence (German 506 and 507) or taking German 604 during a semester that allows them to focus fully on the language.

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

  1. Class participation assessed weekly (10%)
  2. Homework: online and paper-and-pencil (25%)
  3. Structured reflections in which students reflect on learning experiences (5%)
  4. Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)
  5. Six chapter tests assessing grammar and vocabulary (20%)
  6. Quizzes targeting vocabulary (15%)
  7. Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 604. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 612 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 363K • Heimat: No Place Like Home

37860 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CMA 3.108

Description:

Saudade, fika, wabi-sabi. Probably every language has a few words that are claimed to be “untranslatable”. When it comes to German, you have likely heard of Schadenfreude (the pleasure derived from another person's misfortune), maybe of Waldeinsam­keit (the positive feeling of being alone in the woods), or Tor­schlusspanik (the feeling of stress when you realize you might be missing out on something in your life). Another strong candidate is Heimat, referring to a certain emotional attachment of a person to a parti­cular place or region of origin. “Homeland” probably comes closest to the word in English, but yet it does not quite have the same mean­ing, and comes nowhere close in cultural significance. In the cultural history of Germany the concept was so prevalent at times,that it even inspired its own genres: Heimat­kunst, Heimatliteratur (in particular the Heimat­roman), and most notably the Heimatfilm.

Using Heimat as a common thread, this course will travel both the cultural and political history of German speaking countries by means of a variety of media. We will investi­gate the roles Heimat played in the medical discovery of “nostalgia” (first dia­gnosed by a Swiss doctor in 1688), in the German Romantic period, in the rise of German natio­n­alism, in the post-war Ger­manies, and in the German environmentalist movement – as well as the role it continues to play in contempo­rary German society.

Visiting canonical, critical, and pop cultural sites of interest, we will not only learn much about Ger­many, Germans, and their Heimat, but also ask ourselves what Heimat means for each of us, and what it could mean, or could have meant, for Americans then and now.

The course and most of the readings will be in German. Periodically, however, we will read excerpts from scholar­ship in English, and all film material will be subtitled. The German texts will either be short or abridged, allowing us to read a number of renowned authors in the original while focusing on context, discussion, and lan­guage practice.

 

Sample readings:

  • Marc Crépon,“Heimat”, in: Cassin et al., Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon (2014)
  • Celia Applegate, A Nation of Provincials. The German Idea of Heimat (1990), selections
  • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Prometheus (1774)
  • Jacob & Wilhelm Grimm, Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache (1838–1961)
  • Friedrich Nietzsche, Der Freigeist (1884)
  • Franz Kafka, Heimkehr (1920)
  • Walter Benjamin, Ich packe meine Bibliothek aus (1931)

 

Sample films:

  • Leni Riefenstahl, Triumph des Willens (1935)
  • Werner Herzog, Stroszek (1977)
  • Wolfgang Becker, Good Bye, Lenin! (2004)

 

Grading:

  • Class participation 20%
  • Homework (reading, writing, and research assignments) 25%
  • In-class presentation 20%
  • Two quizzes 10%
  • Final paper 25%

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