Department of Germanic Studies

Peter Hess


Associate ProfessorPh.D., German Literature, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Peter Hess

Contact

Interests


(1) Early modern German & European literary & cultural history (1450-1700), early modern globalization, poetics, rhetoric. (2) small countries in Europe, contemporary Switzerland.

Biography


Fields of Study

  • German literature and European cultural history, 1450-1700
  • Cultural responses to European discoveries and early modern globalization
  • Small countries in Europe; contemporary Switzerland.

Peter Hess’s main research area is early modern German literary and cultural studies (1450-1700). His earlier work focused on early modern rhetoric and poetics and generally on literary studies of the seventeenth century. More recently, his work developed a Cultural Studies focus, and he has worked on the interrelationship between spatial expansion, global networks, political visions and dystopias, challenges to the social order, and anxieties about a changing world.

His new book, Resisting Pluralization and Globalization in German Culture, 1490–1540: Visions of a Nation in Decline, was published by De Gruyter in October 2020. The basic hypothesis examined in this book is that the nativist German intellectual world rejected the pluralizing and secularizing trends of the time. The book argues that major literary writers, like Sebastian Brant, Hermann Bote, Ulrich von Hutten, and Hans Sachs, as well as a number of intellectuals like Martin Luther, Hartmann Schedel, and Sebastian Franck, developed a rhetoric that opposed the secularization and pluralization trends fostered by European Humanism. The book traces a nationalistic and nostalgic backlash in Germany between 1490 and 1540 against intellectual and epistemological disruptions triggered by spatial discoveries and new methods of visual and verbal representation of space as well as against rising global trade networks, related predatory trading practices, and perceived harmful foreign influences.

His next book project is an annotated and commented English translation of Nikolaus Federmann’s Jndianische Historia, written around 1532 but published only in 1557. Federmann described his incursion as military commander into the interior of Venezuela in 1530-31 as part of the attempt by the Welser Company of Augsburg to establish a colony. An extensive commentary locates the text within the tradition of Latin American conquest texts rather than in the travelogue genre. The book is under contract with the Pennsylvania State University Press and will be published in late 2021 as part of their Latin American Originals series.

He is tackling a new book project that examines three texts by German mercenaries who served in the Spanish colonization of the Americas, Nikolaus Federmann (1506–1542), Ulrich Schmidel (1510–1580/81), and Hans Staden (1525–1576). The study, with the working title German Conquistadors in Latin America in the First Half of the Sixteenth Century, explores the specific outsider perspective on the Spanish conquest and investigates the representation of central themes, such as the violent first contact, strategies of maintaining control, motivations by various actors, conflict among them, ethnographic descriptions of indigenous populations, anthropophagy, and relating the American other to a German audience.

Peter Hess is also editing a collection of essays with the working title Managing Pandemics in Early Modern Germany. It investigates how Germans in the early modern period (1450-1720) dealt with pandemics that recurred on a fairly regular basis. A proliferation of plague texts, written mostly by physicians and theologians and often sponsored or at least supported by communal governments, gave advice to citizens, discussed how authorities were fighting the pandemic, and offered religious consolation and ethical support. The essays in the volume address political, pragmatic, ethical, moral, religious, economic, and medical issues.

Courses


GER 343C • Contemporary Ger Civilizatn-Wb

38055 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
GC

Description:

This course follows the radical changes in German politics, society, culture, and literature during the twentieth century. Its goal is to improve your understanding of the interplay between the forces of modernization on the one hand and modernism in the arts on the other. In terms of politics and society we discuss the events leading up to World War I and its impact on Germany, including the Revolution of 1918 and political developments of the Weimar Republic. We consider the society and racial ideology of National Socialism and the origins and course of World War II followed by the post-war occupation of Germany, the development of two German states (the FRG and the GDR), and the process of German unification. Alongside this material we engage with the significant literary and cultural shifts that took place during this century including: fin-de-siècle literature, Expressionism, and Dadaism; cabaret and Neue Sachlichkeit of the 1920s; the emergence of German film; Nazi control of cultural production and works of political exile; and, finally, the impact of a divided nation on the cultural and literary output in the post-war era.

Materials for this class consist of readings and films. Assignments range from daily preparation and participation in class discussions (including organized debates) to quizzes, essay papers, and written exams. It presumes a sixth-semester language ability (i.e. completion of GER 328 and 331L) and is structured to build on the skills acquired in those classes in a systematic way to prepare students for more advanced work in German seminars. We will read texts that were written for native speakers of German and are not glossed or simplified. As a result we will need to work on comprehending complicated grammatical structures, such as indirect discourse (subjunctive I), passive voice, and extended modifiers. Students will be expected to acquire and use new vocabulary relevant to the course topics.

 

Course Objectives

By the end of this semester students should be able to:

  • define and explain key social and political issues and events of the 20th-century
  • analyze and compare literary works within their social, cultural, and historical context
  • orally present diverse perspectives regarding an historical problem or dilemma
  • compose interpretive essays in German with good organization, a high degree of grammatical accuracy, and a varied vocabulary.

 

Required texts:

Geschichtsbuch 4: Die Menschen und ihre Geschichte in Darstellungen und Dokumenten (Berlin: Cornelsen); ISBN 3-464-64204-6.

Bertolt Brecht, Mutter Courage und ihre Kinder (Berlin: Suhrkamp); ISBN 978-3-518-10049-3 

A course packet available at Jenn’s Copy Shop, 2518 Guadalupe St.

 

Grading:

Preparation, participation, quizzes = 10%

Essays (10%, 10%, 10%) = 30%

Debates (5%, 5%, 5%, 5%) = 20%                                             

Tests (20%, 20%) = 40%

GSD 311G • Luthers World-Wb

38185 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as EUS 306, HIS 304Q, R S 315M)

Luther was one of the seminal figures of the second millennium whose impact is still felt today. We will examine some of his writings and his activities, the conditions that led to his rise, and the impact he had on the world after him. Just as importantly, we will study the historical, cultural, and social context in which he lived and whose product he was. In a broader sense, this course focuses on the transformation of European culture (with special emphasis on Germany) from the late Middle Ages to the early modern age (1450-1600), roughly during Luther’s lifetime. Humanism and the Protestant Reformation will be the main focus of this course, but we will also discuss political, social, economic, scientific, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period. At the end, students will have a good understanding of German and European culture at this particular crossroads as well as of Martin Luther and his writings. This course also will relate the historical material to our own time; we will learn that history plays a cultural, social, political and ideological role in the present and that therefore historiography is work-in progress. 

Grading:

  • Attendance, Participation 10%
  • Reading Check Quizzes 10%
  • Homework 10%
  • Group Presentation 10%
  • Two Short Papers 20%
  • Two examinations 40%

GER 340C • Hist Backgrounds Of Ger Civ-Wb

36940 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
GC

Beginning with the development of medieval cities and concluding with the beginning of the modern era, this course focuses on the historical, cultural, and literary development of German-speaking Europe. Political, social, religious, economic, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period will be examined. History will not be discussed in terms of specific events but rather in terms of large-scale developments and factors that contributed to them; focus will be on cultural history. Most importantly, we will learn to understand how Germany's past helped shape the Germany we know today.

We will study a variety of source texts and artifacts that will give you insight into historical developments, cultural production, and everyday life. You will learn to read and interpret various artifacts as specific forms of human thought and expression in their times. You also will be encouraged to reflect upon your own life as a point of comparison: this will help you understand how your own life, just like that of Germans in the past, is determined by the respective historical moment and the norms established by the cultural context.

You will be assigned daily readings and should expect to turn in at least one homework assignment per week. Some assignments will require group work (work in groups is generally encouraged). You also should expect one or two additional assignments that will require you to visit the Blanton Museum of Art and the HRC. You are expected to read the relevant pages in the textbook and/or the materials posted on Canvas in preparation for every class. One objective of this course is vocabulary building: you will receive lists with vocabulary taken from the reading assignment, and you are expected to be able to use that vocabulary in your homework and during exams. This course will be taught in German, but any motivated student with at least four semesters of college German can take this course.

This course is part of our thematic course cluster and builds on the introductory course sequence (506, 507, 612) and our transitional courses (328, 330C). As in all of our courses, language learning will be an important objective. In this course, we will primarily focus on reading skills and on vocabulary building.

GLOBAL CULTURES FLAG:

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

TEXTS:

(1)    Hans-Georg Hofacker and Thomas Schuler. Geschichtsbuch 2: Das Mittelalter und die frühe Neuzeit. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1994. [Required; ISBN 9783464642023]

(2)    Hilke Günther-Arndt and Jürgen Kocka. Geschichtsbuch 3: Vom Zeitalter des Absolutismus bis zum Ende des Ersten Weltkrieges. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1995. [Recommended; ISBN 9783464642030]

 

GRADING:

homework                                                                                                                                        10%

class participation (incl. in-class group work notes)                                                                                  10%

class presentation (in German)                                                                                                              15%

three short papers (2-3 pages)                                                                                                               15%

three hourly exams (15/15/20%)                                                                                                           50%

GSD 360 • Switzerland/Globalization-Wb

37080 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
GC (also listed as EUS 348, GOV 355M)

Our GSD courses are taught in English.

Course Description

This course investigates how this small European country positions itself in a globalized world and how it competes and thrives in it. A key question will be how globalization pressures impact a small, affluent country, how the economy copes with globalization, what defense mechanisms—both integrative and isolationist—they elicit, and what identity issues they provoke accentuate. A key factor of the Swiss strategy is a unique relationship with the European Union that highlights the themes of integration and integrative patterns versus isolation and the ideology of exceptionalism in a small European country.

The course starts with a brief survey of Swiss history, beginning with a defensive pact among three small alpine valleys in 1291, in order to better understand Swiss exceptionalism. We will closely examine the Swiss system of direct democracy, how it shapes the political country, but also how it inspires right-wing populists across the globe. We also will study how direct democracy has created unique patterns of conflict resolution and consensus building. Finally, we will take a look at Swiss responses to climate change.

We will study the following themes in weekly installments:

1. Swiss exceptionalism: founding myth and a heroic republican history

2. Switzerland and the US as sister republics: founding the modern state in 1848

3. Neutrality and political isolation: the meaning of neutrality (Sweden, Finland, Austria, Switzerland) before and after 1989

4. The power of small nations: specialization, multilateralism, humanitarianism

5. Swiss economic structure: how a high-wage country competes globally

6. Switzerland as a hub off the global offshore economy (bank secret, tax competition)

7. The institutions of direct democracy in Switzerland (as tools of identity formation)

8. Swiss consensus democracy: how institutions impact the political culture

9. Direct democracy in international comparison: tool for right-wing populism?

10. Switzerland’s four languages and cultures: model for other plurilingual states?

11. Switzerland and the European Union: resistance and integration

12. Switzerland and the EU: an alternative model for reluctant members (Brexit)

13. Right-wing populism in Switzerland: migration, integration and naturalization policies

14. Climate change: how does it impact Switzerland, and how is the country preparing for it?

 

Students will be assigned daily readings (listed on syllabus) and should expect to turn in one homework assignment per week; we also will work with video material. There will be short quizzes on the readings throughout the semester. Students will write a short paper (2 pp) and a research paper (8-10 pp). Students also will participate in one group presentation during the semester. Each group will focus on a topic that is an integral part of the syllabus and will present it to the class in a group presentation of 20-30 minutes.

GER 343C • Contemporary German Civilizatn

37463 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BIO 301
GC

This course follows the radical changes in German politics, society, culture, and literature during the twentieth century. Its goal is to improve your understanding of the interplay between the forces of modernization on the one hand and modernism in the arts on the other. In terms of politics and society we discuss the events leading up to World War I and its impact on Germany, including the Revolution of 1918 and political developments of the Weimar Republic. We consider the society and racial ideology of National Socialism and the origins and course of World War II followed by the post-war occupation of Germany, the development of two German states (the FRG and the GDR), and the process of German unification. Alongside this material we engage with the significant literary and cultural shifts that took place during this century including: fin-de-siècle literature, Expressionism, and Dadaism; cabaret and Neue Sachlichkeit of the 1920s; the emergence of German film; Nazi control of cultural production and works of political exile; and, finally, the impact of a divided nation on the cultural and literary output in the post-war era.

Materials for this class consist of readings and films. Assignments range from daily preparation and participation in class discussions (including organized debates) to quizzes, essay papers, and written exams. It presumes a sixth-semester language ability (i.e. completion of GER 328 and 331L) and is structured to build on the skills acquired in those classes in a systematic way to prepare students for more advanced work in German seminars. We will read texts that were written for native speakers of German and are not glossed or simplified. As a result we will need to work on comprehending complicated grammatical structures, such as indirect discourse (subjunctive I), passive voice, and extended modifiers. Students will be expected to acquire and use new vocabulary relevant to the course topics.

GSD 311G • Luthers World

37580 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 1
GC (also listed as EUS 306, HIS 304Q, R S 315M)

In Fall 2017 we observed the quincentennial of the beginning of the Protestant Reform initiated by Martin Luther’s (1483-1546) 95 theses. Luther was one of the seminal figures of the second millennium whose impact is felt today. We will examine his writings and his activities, the conditions that lead to his rise, and the impact he had on the world after him. Just as importantly, we will study the historical, cultural, and social context in which he lived and whose product he was.

In a broader sense, this course focuses on the transformation of European culture (with special emphasis on Germany) from the late Middle Ages to the early modern age (1450-1600), roughly during Luther’s life time. Humanism and the Protestant Reformation will be the main focus of this course, but we will also discuss political, social, economic, scientific, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period. At the end, students will have a good understanding of German and European culture at this particular crossroads.

We will break down the course into the following themes:

*          What is Humanism? Renaissance?

*          The printing press and the first information revolution

*          A new urban culture (literature, architecture, music)

*          Political power and social order

*          Heliocentrism and discoveries: America, Cape of Good Hope

*          Trade networks: the first age of Globalization

*          The Catholic church and monastic life before Luther

*          Luther’s life

*          Luther’s theology: his writings

*          The Protestant Reform: Luther, Zwingli, Calvin, and others

*          Catholic responses

*          Social and political impact of the Reformation

*          How Luther changed the world

   

Grading:

Attendance, Participation                             10%

Quizzes                                                           10%

Oral presentation                                          10%

Two short writing assignments                   20%

Two examinations                                         50%

GSD 301 • Intro Study Of Northern Eur

37140 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 304
GC (also listed as EUS 307)

OUR GSD  COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN ENGLISH.

Description:

If you walk into the cities of Northern Europe, ride trains across the region's landscapes or ferries across its waterways, visit its museums, read its news, walk through its forests or onto its mountains, or engage with it in any way, you will see living connections between today and deep and often conflicting layers of history.  

            This course will start from iconic moments, events, and images from Northern Europe (Austria, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland), and then it will unfold these icons back into history and culture.  Its goal is to help you see what the many-layered terrain of Northern Europe means to its inhabitants and its various interlocutors, while introducing you to the various ways in which the humanities and its scholarship helps us understand it. 

            In approximate order, the topics treated will be:

1.         The Local and the Global:  Countrysides, Landscapes, Maps, and Borders

2.         The Many Faces of Migration:  From the Migration Age through Today

3.         Countries, Castles, and Cities:  Reading Spaces

4.         Religions as Culture:  Churches, Synagogues, and Temples

5.         Memorials, Memories, and Museums:  The Public Face of History

6.         Circulation:  Showing, Telling, Writing, Communicating

 

Readings:

READINGS:

Ibsen, Doll's House

Kierkegard, selection from  Notes From Underground

Benjamin, selection from the Arcades Project

Kafka, Metamorphosis

Spinoza, selection from EthicsI and Tractatus Theologico-pPoliticus

Kant, What is Enlightenment?

Marx, Communist Manifesto

 

VIEWING (excerpts):

Hello, Lenin

The Girl with a Pearl Earring

Sisi (the musical)

Head-On

Elling

Festen

Magic Flute

The Ogre

 

Grading:

3 short projects (5-8 pp) % 10% each = 30%

annotated bibiography for final project = 10%

final project (split between draft and final) = 30%

thee short online tests = 30%

GSD 360 • Switzerland/Globalization

37174 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GEA 114
GC (also listed as EUS 348, GOV 365N)

Please check back for updates.

GER 340C • Hist Backgrounds Of German Civ

37680 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 234
GC

Beginning with the development of medieval cities and concluding with the beginning of the modern era, this course focuses on the historical, cultural, and literary development of German-speaking Europe. Political, social, religious, economic, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period will be examined. History will not be discussed in terms of specific events but rather in terms of large-scale developments and factors that contributed to them; focus will be on cultural history. Most importantly, we will learn to understand how Germany's past helped shape the Germany we know today.

We will study a variety of source texts and artifacts that will give you insight into historical developments, cultural production, and everyday life. You will learn to read and interpret various artifacts as specific forms of human thought and expression in their times. You also will be encouraged to reflect upon your own life as a point of comparison: this will help you understand how your own life, just like that of Germans in the past, is determined by the respective historical moment and the norms established by the cultural context.

You will be assigned daily readings and should expect to turn in at least one homework assignment per week. Some assignments will require group work (work in groups is generally encouraged). You also should expect one or two additional assignments that will require you to visit the Blanton Museum of Art and the HRC. You are expected to read the relevant pages in the textbook and/or the materials posted on Canvas in preparation for every class. One objective of this course is vocabulary building: you will receive lists with vocabulary taken from the reading assignment, and you are expected to be able to use that vocabulary in your homework and during exams. This course will be taught in German, but any motivated student with at least four semesters of college German can take this course.

This course is part of our thematic course cluster and builds on the introductory course sequence (506, 507, 612) and our transitional courses (328, 330C). As in all of our courses, language learning will be an important objective. In this course, we will primarily focus on reading skills and on vocabulary building.

GLOBAL CULTURES FLAG:

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

TEXTS:

(1)    Hans-Georg Hofacker and Thomas Schuler. Geschichtsbuch 2: Das Mittelalter und die frühe Neuzeit. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1994. [Required; ISBN 9783464642023]

(2)    Hilke Günther-Arndt and Jürgen Kocka. Geschichtsbuch 3: Vom Zeitalter des Absolutismus bis zum Ende des Ersten Weltkrieges. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1995. [Recommended; ISBN 9783464642030]

 

GRADING:

homework                                                                                                                                        10%

class participation (incl. in-class group work notes)                                                                                  10%

class presentation (in German)                                                                                                              15%

three short papers (2-3 pages)                                                                                                               15%

three hourly exams (15/15/20%)                                                                                                           50%

GSD 310 • Luther's World

37820 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GEA 114
GC (also listed as EUS 306, HIS 306N, R S 315)

Description:

In Fall 2017 we observed the quincentennial of the beginning of the Protestant Reform initiated by Martin Luther’s (1483-1546) 95 theses. Luther was one of the seminal figures of the second millennium whose impact is felt today. We will examine his writings and his activities, the conditions that lead to his rise, and the impact he had on the world after him. Just as importantly, we will study the historical, cultural, and social context in which he lived and whose product he was.

In a broader sense, this course focuses on the transformation of European culture (with special emphasis on Germany) from the late Middle Ages to the early modern age (1450-1600), roughly during Luther’s life time. Humanism and the Protestant Reformation will be the main focus of this course, but we will also discuss political, social, economic, scientific, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period. At the end, students will have a good understanding of German and European culture at this particular crossroads.

We will break down the course into the following themes:

*          What is Humanism? Renaissance?

*          The printing press and the first information revolution

*          A new urban culture (literature, architecture, music)

*          Political power and social order

*          Heliocentrism and discoveries: America, Cape of Good Hope

*          Trade networks: the first age of Globalization

*          The Catholic church and monastic life before Luther

*          Luther’s life

*          Luther’s theology: his writings

*          The Protestant Reform: Luther, Zwingli, Calvin, and others

*          Catholic responses

*          Social and political impact of the Reformation

*          How Luther changed the world

 

Readings:

*          Scott H. Hendrix. Martin Luther: A Very Short Introduction.

*          John Dillenberger (ed.). Martin Luther: Selections From His Writing.

*          R.C. Sproul and Stephen J. Nichols (eds.). The Legacy of Luther.

*          Jerry Brotton. The Renaissance: A Very Short Introduction.

*          Diarmaid MacCulloch, The Reformation: A History

*          other materials on Canvas

  

Grading:

Attendance, Participation                             10%

Quizzes                                                           10%

Oral presentation                                          10%

Two short writing assignments                   20%

Two examinations                                         50%

GSD 310 • Luther's World

38245 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GEA 114
GC (also listed as EUS 306, HIS 306N, R S 315)

Description:

In Fall 2017 we will observe the quincentennial of the beginning of the Protestant Reform initiated by Martin Luther’s (1483-1546) 95 theses. Luther was one of the seminal figures of the second millennium whose impact is felt today. We will examine his writings and his activities, the conditions that lead to his rise, and the impact he had on the world after him. Just as importantly, we will study the historical, cultural, and social context in which he lived and whose product he was.

In a broader sense, this course focuses on the transformation of European culture (with special emphasis on Germany) from the late Middle Ages to the early modern age (1450-1600), roughly during Luther’s life time. Humanism and the Protestant Reformation will be the main focus of this course, but we will also discuss political, social, economic, scientific, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period. At the end, students will have a good understanding of German and European culture at this particular crossroads.

We will break down the course into the following themes:

*          What is Humanism? Renaissance?

*          The printing press and the first information revolution

*          A new urban culture (literature, architecture, music)

*          Political power and social order

*          Heliocentrism and discoveries: America, Cape of Good Hope

*          Trade networks: the first age of Globalization

*          The Catholic church and monastic life before Luther

*          Luther’s life

*          Luther’s theology: his writings

*          The Protestant Reform: Luther, Zwingli, Calvin, and others

*          Catholic responses

*          Social and political impact of the Reformation

*          How Luther changed the world

 

Readings:

*          Scott H. Hendrix. Martin Luther: A Very Short Introduction.

*          John Dillenberger (ed.). Martin Luther: Selections From His Writing.

*          R.C. Sproul and Stephen J. Nichols (eds.). The Legacy of Luther.

*          Jerry Brotton. The Renaissance: A Very Short Introduction.

*          Diarmaid MacCulloch, The Reformation: A History

*          other materials on Canvas

  

Grading:

Attendance, Participation                             10%

Quizzes                                                           10%

Oral presentation                                          10%

Two short writing assignments                   20%

Two examinations                                         50%

GER 340C • Hist Backgrounds Of German Civ

37835 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BEN 1.122
GC

Beginning with the development of medieval cities and concluding with the beginning of the modern era, this course focuses on the historical, cultural, and literary development of German-speaking Europe. Political, social, religious, economic, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period will be examined. History will not be discussed in terms of specific events but rather in terms of large-scale developments and factors that contributed to them; focus will be on cultural history. Most importantly, we will learn to understand how Germany's past helped shape the Germany we know today.

We will study a variety of source texts and artifacts that will give you insight into historical developments, cultural production, and everyday life. You will learn to read and interpret various artifacts as specific forms of human thought and expression in their times. You also will be encouraged to reflect upon your own life as a point of comparison: this will help you understand how your own life, just like that of Germans in the past, is determined by the respective historical moment and the norms established by the cultural context.

You will be assigned daily readings and should expect to turn in at least one homework assignment per week. Some assignments will require group work (work in groups is generally encouraged). You also should expect one or two additional assignments that will require you to visit the Blanton Museum of Art and the HRC. You are expected to read the relevant pages in the textbook and/or the materials posted on Canvas in preparation for every class. One objective of this course is vocabulary building: you will receive lists with vocabulary taken from the reading assignment, and you are expected to be able to use that vocabulary in your homework and during exams. This course will be taught in German, but any motivated student with at least four semesters of college German can take this course.

This course is part of our thematic course cluster and builds on the introductory course sequence (506, 507, 612) and our transitional courses (328, 330C). As in all of our courses, language learning will be an important objective. In this course, we will primarily focus on reading skills and on vocabulary building.

GLOBAL CULTURES FLAG:

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

TEXTS:

(1)    Hans-Georg Hofacker and Thomas Schuler. Geschichtsbuch 2: Das Mittelalter und die frühe Neuzeit. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1994. [Required; ISBN 9783464642023]

(2)    Hilke Günther-Arndt and Jürgen Kocka. Geschichtsbuch 3: Vom Zeitalter des Absolutismus bis zum Ende des Ersten Weltkrieges. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1995. [Recommended; ISBN 9783464642030]

 

GRADING:

homework                                                                                                                                        10%

class participation (incl. in-class group work notes)                                                                                  10%

class presentation (in German)                                                                                                              15%

three short papers (2-3 pages)                                                                                                               15%

three hourly exams (15/15/20%)                                                                                                           50%

GER 340C • Hist Backgrounds Of German Civ

37105 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WEL 4.224
GC

Beginning with the development of medieval cities and concluding with the beginning of the modern era, this course focuses on the historical, cultural, and literary development of German-speaking Europe. Political, social, religious, economic, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period will be examined. History will not be discussed in terms of specific events but rather in terms of large-scale developments and factors that contributed to them; focus will be on cultural history. Most importantly, we will learn to understand how Germany's past helped shape the Germany we know today.

We will study a variety of source texts and artifacts that will give you insight into historical developments, cultural production, and everyday life. You will learn to read and interpret various artifacts as specific forms of human thought and expression in their times. You also will be encouraged to reflect upon your own life as a point of comparison: this will help you understand how your own life, just like that of Germans in the past, is determined by the respective historical moment and the norms established by the cultural context.

You will be assigned daily readings and should expect to turn in at least one homework assignment per week. Some assignments will require group work (work in groups is generally encouraged). You also should expect one or two additional assignments that will require you to visit the Blanton Museum of Art and the HRC. You are expected to read the relevant pages in the textbook and/or the materials posted on Canvas in preparation for every class. One objective of this course is vocabulary building: you will receive lists with vocabulary taken from the reading assignment, and you are expected to be able to use that vocabulary in your homework and during exams. This course will be taught in German, but any motivated student with at least four semesters of college German can take this course.

This course is part of our thematic course cluster and builds on the introductory course sequence (506, 507, 612) and our transitional courses (328, 330C). As in all of our courses, language learning will be an important objective. In this course, we will primarily focus on reading skills and on vocabulary building.

GLOBAL CULTURES FLAG:

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

TEXTS:

(1)    Hans-Georg Hofacker and Thomas Schuler. Geschichtsbuch 2: Das Mittelalter und die frühe Neuzeit. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1994. [Required; ISBN 9783464642023]

(2)    Hilke Günther-Arndt and Jürgen Kocka. Geschichtsbuch 3: Vom Zeitalter des Absolutismus bis zum Ende des Ersten Weltkrieges. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1995. [Recommended; ISBN 9783464642030]

 

GRADING:

homework                                                                                                                                        10%

class participation (incl. in-class group work notes)                                                                                  10%

class presentation (in German)                                                                                                              15%

three short papers (2-3 pages)                                                                                                               15%

three hourly exams (15/15/20%)                                                                                                           50%

GER 392 • Space, Travel, And Discovery

37355 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 232

Perhaps the most important innovation in Early Modern Europe was a fundamental change of conceptions of space and of the human relationship to it--the discovery of perspective by Leonardo da Vinci, which puts the observing individual into its center, being the most obvious example. The link between knowledge and space was famously established by Petrarch in his hike up Mont Ventoux in 1336. Francis Bacon made the connection in the frontispiece to his Novum Organum (1620), which demanded an end to the conventional deductive method: Bacon's quest for knowledge is represented spatially by a single ship sailing into the open Atlantic past the pillars of Hercules, which guarded the straits of Gibraltar--the earth had become an endless sphere.

 

The Scientific Revolution was significantly a revolution of space and its perception: with the help of the microscope and telescope, humans gained access to spatial universes which were inaccessible before, and European discoveries of unknown parts of the world had to be integrated into existing systems of knowledge which were hostile to new empirical evidence. The `discovery' of America disrupted the spatial order as well as the anthropological order: it brought into focus issues of alterity, cultural superiority, and basic definitions of humanity.

 

We will look at the evolution of travel literature which as a genre underwent fundamental changes during our period of investigation. In the late Middle Ages reports on pilgrimages, particularly to Palestine, still are the only form of travel literature. Travel through the physical world merely serves as allegory of the pilgrim's spiritual journey.

 

Scholarship in cultural history responded with the so-called spatial turn, that is an effort to examine the relationship between space and human culture and civilization and to integrate spatial discoveries into the system of knowledge. One outgrowth of the renewed interest in space is a growing preoccupation with conceptions of alterity as can be seen in the vivid discussions of Native Americans and encounters with the cultures of the Orient. The course also will consider the effects of the first age of globalization that was ushered in by the new sea routes to the Americas established by the Spaniards and to East Asia by the Portuguese.

 

This course takes an interest in the interaction between space and human culture and civilization and in the integration of spatial discoveries into the system of knowledge. It explores texts written from the late 15th century to the time of Goethe that deal with the human interaction with space, both in fictional and non-fictional narratives--the pre-

modern age does not make that formal distinction.

 

 

Evaluation

 

1) Research paper (15-20 pages):                              50%

2) Paper proposal (outline, abstract):                        5%

3) Three short oral presentations:                            15%

4) Long oral presentation (20 minutes):                 20%

4) Participation:                                                            10%

 

 

Texts (tentative)

*  Columbus-Letter (1492/93)

*  Sebastian Brant: Das Narrenschiff (1494; excerpts)

*  Albrecht Dürer: Tagebuch (excerpts)

*  Hans Staden: Wahrhafftige Historia vnd beschreibung eyner Landtschafft der

Wilden, Nacketen, Grimmigen Menschfresser Leuthen (1557)

*  Nicolaus Federmann: Indianische Historia (1557)

*  Bernhard von Breidenbach: Peregrinatio in Terram Sanctam (1486)

*  Sigmund Feyerabend: Reyssbuch dess Heyligen Landes (1584)

*  Johann Fischart: Das Glückhafft Schiff von Zürich (1577)

*  Grimmelshausen: Simplicissimus (1668; excerpts)

*  Johann Valentin Andreae: Christianopolis (1619)

*  Francis Bacon: New Atlantis (1627; excerpts)

*  Tommaso Campanella: Civitas Solis (1602/23)

*  Adam Olearius: Vermehrte Neue Beschreibung der Muscowitischen und Persischen

Reyse (1656; excerpts)

*  Johann Gottfried Schnabel: Insel Felsenburg (1731; excerpts)

*  Albrecht von Haller: Die Alpen (1724)

*  Maria Sibylla Merian: Metamorphosis insectorum Surinamensium (1705)

*  Georg Forster: Reise um die Welt (1780)

*  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: Italienische Reise (1816/17; excerpts)

GER 340C • Hist Backgrounds Of German Civ

38025 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GEA 114
GC (also listed as EUS 346)

Beginning with the development of medieval cities and concluding with the beginning of the modern era, this course focuses on the historical, cultural, and literary development of German-speaking Europe. Political, social, religious, economic, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period will be examined. History will not be discussed in terms of specific events but rather in terms of large-scale developments and factors that contributed to them; focus will be on cultural history. Most importantly, we will learn to understand how Germany's past helped shape the Germany we know today.

We will study a variety of source texts and artifacts that will give you insight into historical developments, cultural production, and everyday life. You will learn to read and interpret various artifacts as specific forms of human thought and expression in their times. You also will be encouraged to reflect upon your own life as a point of comparison: this will help you understand how your own life, just like that of Germans in the past, is determined by the respective historical moment and the norms established by the cultural context.

You will be assigned daily readings and should expect to turn in at least one homework assignment per week. Some assignments will require group work (work in groups is generally encouraged). You also should expect one or two additional assignments that will require you to visit the Blanton Museum of Art and the HRC. You are expected to read the relevant pages in the textbook and/or the materials posted on Canvas in preparation for every class. One objective of this course is vocabulary building: you will receive lists with vocabulary taken from the reading assignment, and you are expected to be able to use that vocabulary in your homework and during exams. This course will be taught in German, but any motivated student with at least four semesters of college German can take this course.

This course is part of our thematic course cluster and builds on the introductory course sequence (506, 507, 612) and our transitional courses (328, 330C). As in all of our courses, language learning will be an important objective. In this course, we will primarily focus on reading skills and on vocabulary building.

GLOBAL CULTURES FLAG:

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

TEXTS:

(1)    Hans-Georg Hofacker and Thomas Schuler. Geschichtsbuch 2: Das Mittelalter und die frühe Neuzeit. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1994. [Required; ISBN 9783464642023]

(2)    Hilke Günther-Arndt and Jürgen Kocka. Geschichtsbuch 3: Vom Zeitalter des Absolutismus bis zum Ende des Ersten Weltkrieges. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1995. [Recommended; ISBN 9783464642030]

 

GRADING:

homework                                                                                                                                        10%

class participation (incl. in-class group work notes)                                                                                  10%

class presentation (in German)                                                                                                              15%

three short papers (2-3 pages)                                                                                                               15%

three hourly exams (15/15/20%)                                                                                                           50%

GER 340C • Hist Backgrounds Of German Civ

38010 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GEA 114
GC (also listed as EUS 346)

Beginning with the development of medieval cities and concluding with the beginning of the modern era, this course focuses on the historical, cultural, and literary development of German-speaking Europe. Political, social, religious, economic, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period will be examined. History will not be discussed in terms of specific events but rather in terms of large-scale developments and factors that contributed to them; focus will be on cultural history. Most importantly, we will learn to understand how Germany's past helped shape the Germany we know today.

We will study a variety of source texts and artifacts that will give you insight into historical developments, cultural production, and everyday life. You will learn to read and interpret various artifacts as specific forms of human thought and expression in their times. You also will be encouraged to reflect upon your own life as a point of comparison: this will help you understand how your own life, just like that of Germans in the past, is determined by the respective historical moment and the norms established by the cultural context.

You will be assigned daily readings and should expect to turn in at least one homework assignment per week. Some assignments will require group work (work in groups is generally encouraged). You also should expect one or two additional assignments that will require you to visit the Blanton Museum of Art and the HRC. You are expected to read the relevant pages in the textbook and/or the materials posted on Canvas in preparation for every class. One objective of this course is vocabulary building: you will receive lists with vocabulary taken from the reading assignment, and you are expected to be able to use that vocabulary in your homework and during exams. This course will be taught in German, but any motivated student with at least four semesters of college German can take this course.

This course is part of our thematic course cluster and builds on the introductory course sequence (506, 507, 612) and our transitional courses (328, 330C). As in all of our courses, language learning will be an important objective. In this course, we will primarily focus on reading skills and on vocabulary building.

GLOBAL CULTURES FLAG:

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

TEXTS:

(1)    Hans-Georg Hofacker and Thomas Schuler. Geschichtsbuch 2: Das Mittelalter und die frühe Neuzeit. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1994. [Required; ISBN 9783464642023]

(2)    Hilke Günther-Arndt and Jürgen Kocka. Geschichtsbuch 3: Vom Zeitalter des Absolutismus bis zum Ende des Ersten Weltkrieges. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1995. [Recommended; ISBN 9783464642030]

 

GRADING:

homework                                                                                                                                        10%

class participation (incl. in-class group work notes)                                                                                  10%

class presentation (in German)                                                                                                              15%

three short papers (2-3 pages)                                                                                                               15%

three hourly exams (15/15/20%)                                                                                                           50%

GER 340C • Hist Backgrounds Of German Civ

37805 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PMA 5.112
GC

DESCRIPTION:
Beginning with the development of medieval cities and concluding with the French Revolution, this course focuses on the historical, cultural, and literary development of German-speaking Europe. Political, social, religious, economic, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period will be discussed. History will not be discussed in terms of specific events but rather in terms of large-scale developments and factors that contributed to them; focus will be on cultural history. Most importantly, we will learn to understand how Germany's past helped shape the Germany we know today.

You will be assigned daily readings and should expect to turn in at least one homework assignment per week. Some assignments will require group work (work in groups is generally encouraged). You also should expect one or two additional assignments that will require you to visit the Blanton Museum of Art and the HRC. You are expected to read the relevant pages in the textbook and/or the materials posted on Blackboard in preparation for every class. One objective of this course is vocabulary building: you will receive lists with vocabulary taken from the reading assignment, and you are expected to be able to use that vocabulary in your homework and during exams. This course will be taught in German, but any motivated student with at least four semesters of college German can take this course. More than two unexcused absences may result in a lower grade.

TEXTS:
Hans-Georg Hofacker and Thomas Schuler. Geschichtsbuch 2: Das Mittelalter und die frühe Neuzeit. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1994. ISBN 3-464-64202-X

Hilke Günther-Arndt and Jürgen Kocka. Geschichtsbuch 3: Vom Zeitalter des Absolutismus bis zum Ende des Ersten Weltkrieges. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1995. ISBN 3-464-64203-8

GRADING:
homework    10%
class participation (incl. in-class group work notes)    10%
class presentation (in German)    15%
three short papers (2-3 pages)    15%
three hourly exams (15+15+20%)    50%

GER 386 • Ger Lit/Cul: Renais/Ref-Broq

38135 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 232


GER 340C • Hist Backgrounds Of German Civ

38415 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GEA 114
GC (also listed as EUS 346)

 

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DEPARTMENT OF GERMANIC STUDIES

 

 

Course Number:           GER 340C: German Culture, 1200-1800 (38415)

Crosslisting:                  EUS 346 (36455)

Semester:                     Fall 2009 (T/Th 1230-2:00), GEA 114

Instructor:                     Peter Hess (BUR 356; 232-6362; phess@mail.utexas.edu)

Office Hours:                T/Th 2-3:30, and by appointment

 

 

DESCRIPTION:

 

Beginning with the development of medieval cities and concluding with the French Revolution, this course focuses on the historical, cultural, and literary development of German-speaking Europe. Political, social, religious, economic, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period will be discussed. History will not be discussed in terms of specific events but rather in terms of large-scale developments and factors that contributed to them; focus will be on cultural history. Most importantly, we will learn to understand how Germany's past helped shape the Germany we know today.

 

You will be assigned daily readings and should expect to turn in at least one homework assignment per week. Some assignments will require group work (work in groups is generally encouraged). You also should expect one or two additional assignments that will require you to visit the Blanton Museum of Art and the HRC. You are expected to read the relevant pages in the textbook and/or the materials posted on Blackboard in preparation for every class. One objective of this course is vocabulary building: you will receive lists with vocabulary taken from the reading assignment, and you are expected to be able to use that vocabulary in your homework and during exams. This course will be taught in German, but any motivated student with at least four semesters of college German can take this course. More than two unexcused absences may result in a lower grade.

 

CLASS AND CLASSROOM POLICIES:

 

Cell phones must be turned off in class; computers may be used only for note-taking or to search course-related materials. If a student uses electronic devices for non-class related activities and creates a disturbance s/he will be asked to leave for the remainder of that class.

 

ACADEMIC ASSISTANCE:

 

Academic Assistance is provided by the UT Learning Center, in Jester Center, Room A332A. It offers help with college-level writing, reading, and learning strategies. It is free to all currently enrolled students. For requesting help you need in using the main library (PCL) or the Fine Arts Library (for films), see:

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/services/assistive/policy.html

 

 

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES:

 

The University of Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-6441 TTY. Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact the Service for Students with Disabilities as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining authorized accommodations. This letter must be given to your instructor to receive accommodations. See: http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/index.php

 

RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS AND OTHER ABSENCES:

 

Students can make up work missed because of a religious holiday as long as they provide the instructor with documentation at least one week before the holiday occurs. The same applies to official university obligations like Club or Varsity sports. Documentation from a physician is required for medical absence;  arrangements for work to be made up must be made promptly, and in no case should the work be completed more than two weeks after the absence. Other absences (e.g. family events) must be arranged for at least one week in advance and missed work must be turned in at the next class session after return.

 

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY:

 

Plagiarism and other forms of scholastic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Students. Cheating on tests or plagiarism on  papers is an F for the assignment, with no makeup possible.  If you engage in any form of scholastic dishonesty more than once, you will receive an automatic F for the course.

 

TEXTS:

 

Hans-Georg Hofacker and Thomas Schuler.

Geschichtsbuch 2: Das Mittelalter und die frühe Neuzeit. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1994.

ISBN 3-464-64202-X

 

Hilke Günther-Arndt and Jürgen Kocka.

Geschichtsbuch 3: Vom Zeitalter des Absolutismus bis zum Ende des Ersten Weltkrieges. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1995.

ISBN 3-464-64203-8

 

GRADING:

 

homework                                                                                10%

class participation (incl. in-class group work notes)                    10%

class presentation (in German)                                       15%

three short papers (2-3 pages)                                                  15%

three hourly exams (15+15+20%)                                             50%


GER 340C: German Culture, 1200-1800 (38415)

Fall 2009

 

 

LEHRPLAN

 

27.8.         Einführung (Thema, Lehrplan, Lesestrategie)

 

I. Kultur des Mittelalters

 

1.9.                "Hinweise zur Benutzung" (5)

Bauern und Adlige im Mittelalter

"Adel und Lehnswesen" (19)

"Die Welt der Ritter und Edelfrauen" (21-23)

"Die mittelalterliche Ständeordnung" (26-27)

Der Bauernhof (18)

H: Arbeitsblatt: Welt der Ritter

G: 26-27: Ständeordnung

 

3.9.           Höfische Kultur und Klosterkultur

     *   Walther von der Vogelweide: Ich saß auf einem Steine

                      *   Walther von der Vogelweide: Unter den Linden

                      *   Carmina Burana: "O fortuna"; "In taberna"

 

8.9.           Alltagsleben in der Stadt im Spätmittelalter

"Hinter den Stadtmauern" (33)

"Die Entstehung der Städte" (34-36)

"Arbeit und Handel in der Stadt" (37-38)

H: Arbeitsblatt: Entstehung der Städte

 

10.9.         Die soziale Gliederung der Stadt

"Gesellschaft und Herrschaft in der Stadt" (40-42)

"Zentren des Fernhandels in Europa" (45-47)

H: Arbeitsblatt: Herrschaft in der Stadt

G: Rollenspiel: der Kaiser besucht die Stadt (40-42)

 

15.9.         Kunst und Kultur im Mittelalter

"Stadtspiel" (51)

*   Oswald von Wolkenstein: "Ach senliches Leiden"

*   Oswald von Wolkenstein: "Nu huss"

R: Oswald von Wolkenstein

 

17.9.         Europa im Umbruch (1350-1450)

"Europa um 1500: Krise und Neubeginn" (125)

"Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft" (126-130)

"Aufbau einer Handelsgesellschaft um 1500 (131-132)

H: Arbeitsblatt: Berufsleben im 15. Jahrhundert

R: die Pest

G: 130 "Großunternehmen" pro/kontra; 131/1; 131/2a; 132/2b-c; 132/3

 

22.9.              "Der Staat zwischen Mittelalter und Neuzeit" (134-136)

"Vom Alltag des Volkes" (140-142)

G: Lebensabschnitte, Lebensentscheidungen (140-142)

 

24.9.         ERSTE PRÜFUNG

 

II. Humanismus und Renaissance

 

29.9.         Neues Weltbild von Humanismus und Renaissance

"Humanismus und Renaissance" (145-147)

"Bewusstsein von Zeit und Raum" (151-152)

H: Arbeitsblatt: Was ist Humanismus?

G: 148/1a-c; 148/1d; 149/1e; 133/4a; 133/4b

R: Erasmus

R: Albrecht Dürer

 

1.10.         Kultur und Wissenschat von Renaissance und Humanismus

"Der Bergbau im 16. Jahrhundert" (133/129)

G: 148/1a-c; 148/1d; 149/1e; 133/4a; 133/4b

R: Kopernicus / Heliozentrismus

 

"Kunst und Technik" (148-150; 153)

"Sprichwörterrätsel" (155)

***      Blanton Hausaufgabe: Kunst der Renaissance

 

6.10.         Humanistische Literatur

*   Conrad Celtis: "An Apollo"

*   Hans Sachs: "Das Schlauraffen Landt"

*   Matthias Holtzwart: Emblematum tyrocinia (Auszug)

R: Conrad Celtis

R: Emblem                  

 

8.10               *   Hermann Bote: Dil Ulenspiegel

H: Arbeitsblatt: Botes Ulenspiegel

 

III. Reformation und Religionskriege

 

13.10.       Reformation und Glaubenskriege

"Reformation und Glaubenskriege" (157)

"Wie [...] die Glaubensspaltung entsteht" (158-160)

"Das Bild als Waffe" (161-162)

G: 161/1a; 161/1b; 161/1c; 161/1d (Fragen 162/2)

R: Martin Luther

***      HRC Hausaufgabe: Gutenberg-Bibel

 

15.10             *   Marin Luther: "Von der Freiheit eines Christenmenschen"

*   Wider die räuberischen und mörderischen Rotten der Bauern

"Ritteraufstand und Bauernkrieg" (169-171)

H: Arbeitsblatt: Luthers Thesen

 

20.10.            "Die Reformation und die Gesellschaft" (164-168)

"Die reformierte Lateinschule" (163)

H: Arbeitsblatt: Beteiligte an der Reformation

G: 169/2a; 170/2b; 170/2c; 171/3a; 171/3b

R: Kaiser Karl V.

 

22.10.       Gegenreformation und Konfessionalismus

"Calvinismus, Gegenreformation und Glaubensspaltung" (172-174)

"Frauen um 1600" (179-181)

R: Jean Calvin oder Ulrich Zwingli

 

27.10.       ZWEITE PRÜFUNG

 

IV. Barockkultur und Absolutismus

 

29.10.       Der Dreißigjährige Krieg (1618-1648)

"Die Niederlande" (177-178)

"Der Dreißigjährige Krieg" (182-187)

"Bilderrätsel" (189)

G: 185/2a; 186/2b-d: 186/3; 189

R: Andreas Gryphius

*   Andreas Gryphius: "Thränen deß Vaterlandes Anno 1636"

***      Blanton Hausaufgabe: Kunst des Barock

 

2.11.         Der absolutistische Staat: Frankreich

"Staaten und Gesellschaften" (19)

"Frankreich: Ein Modell für Europa" (20-23)

höfische Kultur: repräsentative Architektur

*   Grimmelshausen: Simplicissimus (Auszüge)

 

5.11.         Merkantilismus

"Die neue Wirtschaftsform: Merkantilismus" (24-27)

H: Arbeitsblatt: Definition des absolutistischen Staates

     G: 24/2; 25f/3-4; 26/5; 27/7; 27/8

R: Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber

10.11.       Kunst und Musik des Barock und Rokoko

R: Balthasar Neumann

R: Johann Sebastian Bach

*   Lieder der Renaissance und des Barock

 

12.11.       Barockliteratur

*   Andreas Gryphius: "Menschliches Elende"

*   Christian Hoffmann von Hoffmannswaldau: "Vergänglichkeit der Schönheit"

*   Paul Fleming: "Wie er wolle geküsset sein"; "Herrn Paul Flemingi der Med. Doct. Grabschrifft"

 

V. Aufklärung

 

17.11.       Philosophie der Aufklärung

*   Immanuel Kant: Was ist Aufklärung? (1784)

*   Johann Wolfgang Goethe: "Auf dem See"

 

19.11.       Der absolutistische Staat: Deutsches Reich

"Die preußischen Könige: vom despotischen zum aufgeklärtem Absolutismus" (28-32)

"Die Aufklärung und Friedrich II. von Preußen (33-35; 13)

G: 13/4; 33/1; 33/2; 34/3-5

R: König Friedrich II. von Preußen

 

24.11.            "Die Politik der europäischen Großmächte im 18. Jh." (36-38)

R: Joseph Haydn oder Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

R: Ludwig van Beethoven

R: Lieder von Franz Schubert

R: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

26.11.       THANKSGIVING

 

1.12.         Die Französische Revolution

"Bürgerliche Revolutionen 1776-1815" (51)

"Die Französische Revolution" (60-62)

"Die Auswirkungen der Französischen Revolution" (78-82)

"Agrarreform in Preußen" (83-85)

"Zeittafel" (86-87)

 

3.12.         DRITTE PRÜFUNG

GER 340C • Hist Backgrounds Of German Civ

38715 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A209A

Beginning with the development of medieval cities and concluding with the beginning of the modern era, this course focuses on the historical, cultural, and literary development of German-speaking Europe. Political, social, religious, economic, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period will be examined. History will not be discussed in terms of specific events but rather in terms of large-scale developments and factors that contributed to them; focus will be on cultural history. Most importantly, we will learn to understand how Germany's past helped shape the Germany we know today.

We will study a variety of source texts and artifacts that will give you insight into historical developments, cultural production, and everyday life. You will learn to read and interpret various artifacts as specific forms of human thought and expression in their times. You also will be encouraged to reflect upon your own life as a point of comparison: this will help you understand how your own life, just like that of Germans in the past, is determined by the respective historical moment and the norms established by the cultural context.

You will be assigned daily readings and should expect to turn in at least one homework assignment per week. Some assignments will require group work (work in groups is generally encouraged). You also should expect one or two additional assignments that will require you to visit the Blanton Museum of Art and the HRC. You are expected to read the relevant pages in the textbook and/or the materials posted on Canvas in preparation for every class. One objective of this course is vocabulary building: you will receive lists with vocabulary taken from the reading assignment, and you are expected to be able to use that vocabulary in your homework and during exams. This course will be taught in German, but any motivated student with at least four semesters of college German can take this course.

This course is part of our thematic course cluster and builds on the introductory course sequence (506, 507, 612) and our transitional courses (328, 330C). As in all of our courses, language learning will be an important objective. In this course, we will primarily focus on reading skills and on vocabulary building.

GLOBAL CULTURES FLAG:

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

TEXTS:

(1)    Hans-Georg Hofacker and Thomas Schuler. Geschichtsbuch 2: Das Mittelalter und die frühe Neuzeit. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1994. [Required; ISBN 9783464642023]

(2)    Hilke Günther-Arndt and Jürgen Kocka. Geschichtsbuch 3: Vom Zeitalter des Absolutismus bis zum Ende des Ersten Weltkrieges. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1995. [Recommended; ISBN 9783464642030]

 

GRADING:

homework                                                                                                                                        10%

class participation (incl. in-class group work notes)                                                                                  10%

class presentation (in German)                                                                                                              15%

three short papers (2-3 pages)                                                                                                               15%

three hourly exams (15/15/20%)                                                                                                           50%

GER 340C • Hist Backgrounds Of German Civ

38490 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM JES A303A

Beginning with the development of medieval cities and concluding with the beginning of the modern era, this course focuses on the historical, cultural, and literary development of German-speaking Europe. Political, social, religious, economic, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period will be examined. History will not be discussed in terms of specific events but rather in terms of large-scale developments and factors that contributed to them; focus will be on cultural history. Most importantly, we will learn to understand how Germany's past helped shape the Germany we know today.

We will study a variety of source texts and artifacts that will give you insight into historical developments, cultural production, and everyday life. You will learn to read and interpret various artifacts as specific forms of human thought and expression in their times. You also will be encouraged to reflect upon your own life as a point of comparison: this will help you understand how your own life, just like that of Germans in the past, is determined by the respective historical moment and the norms established by the cultural context.

You will be assigned daily readings and should expect to turn in at least one homework assignment per week. Some assignments will require group work (work in groups is generally encouraged). You also should expect one or two additional assignments that will require you to visit the Blanton Museum of Art and the HRC. You are expected to read the relevant pages in the textbook and/or the materials posted on Canvas in preparation for every class. One objective of this course is vocabulary building: you will receive lists with vocabulary taken from the reading assignment, and you are expected to be able to use that vocabulary in your homework and during exams. This course will be taught in German, but any motivated student with at least four semesters of college German can take this course.

This course is part of our thematic course cluster and builds on the introductory course sequence (506, 507, 612) and our transitional courses (328, 330C). As in all of our courses, language learning will be an important objective. In this course, we will primarily focus on reading skills and on vocabulary building.

GLOBAL CULTURES FLAG:

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

TEXTS:

(1)    Hans-Georg Hofacker and Thomas Schuler. Geschichtsbuch 2: Das Mittelalter und die frühe Neuzeit. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1994. [Required; ISBN 9783464642023]

(2)    Hilke Günther-Arndt and Jürgen Kocka. Geschichtsbuch 3: Vom Zeitalter des Absolutismus bis zum Ende des Ersten Weltkrieges. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1995. [Recommended; ISBN 9783464642030]

 

GRADING:

homework                                                                                                                                        10%

class participation (incl. in-class group work notes)                                                                                  10%

class presentation (in German)                                                                                                              15%

three short papers (2-3 pages)                                                                                                               15%

three hourly exams (15/15/20%)                                                                                                           50%

GER 340C • Hist Backgrounds Of German Civ

37900 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RAS 313B

Beginning with the development of medieval cities and concluding with the beginning of the modern era, this course focuses on the historical, cultural, and literary development of German-speaking Europe. Political, social, religious, economic, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period will be examined. History will not be discussed in terms of specific events but rather in terms of large-scale developments and factors that contributed to them; focus will be on cultural history. Most importantly, we will learn to understand how Germany's past helped shape the Germany we know today.

We will study a variety of source texts and artifacts that will give you insight into historical developments, cultural production, and everyday life. You will learn to read and interpret various artifacts as specific forms of human thought and expression in their times. You also will be encouraged to reflect upon your own life as a point of comparison: this will help you understand how your own life, just like that of Germans in the past, is determined by the respective historical moment and the norms established by the cultural context.

You will be assigned daily readings and should expect to turn in at least one homework assignment per week. Some assignments will require group work (work in groups is generally encouraged). You also should expect one or two additional assignments that will require you to visit the Blanton Museum of Art and the HRC. You are expected to read the relevant pages in the textbook and/or the materials posted on Canvas in preparation for every class. One objective of this course is vocabulary building: you will receive lists with vocabulary taken from the reading assignment, and you are expected to be able to use that vocabulary in your homework and during exams. This course will be taught in German, but any motivated student with at least four semesters of college German can take this course.

This course is part of our thematic course cluster and builds on the introductory course sequence (506, 507, 612) and our transitional courses (328, 330C). As in all of our courses, language learning will be an important objective. In this course, we will primarily focus on reading skills and on vocabulary building.

GLOBAL CULTURES FLAG:

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

TEXTS:

(1)    Hans-Georg Hofacker and Thomas Schuler. Geschichtsbuch 2: Das Mittelalter und die frühe Neuzeit. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1994. [Required; ISBN 9783464642023]

(2)    Hilke Günther-Arndt and Jürgen Kocka. Geschichtsbuch 3: Vom Zeitalter des Absolutismus bis zum Ende des Ersten Weltkrieges. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1995. [Recommended; ISBN 9783464642030]

 

GRADING:

homework                                                                                                                                        10%

class participation (incl. in-class group work notes)                                                                                  10%

class presentation (in German)                                                                                                              15%

three short papers (2-3 pages)                                                                                                               15%

three hourly exams (15/15/20%)                                                                                                           50%

GER 340C • Hist Backgrounds Of German Civ

38895 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RAS 211B

Beginning with the development of medieval cities and concluding with the beginning of the modern era, this course focuses on the historical, cultural, and literary development of German-speaking Europe. Political, social, religious, economic, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period will be examined. History will not be discussed in terms of specific events but rather in terms of large-scale developments and factors that contributed to them; focus will be on cultural history. Most importantly, we will learn to understand how Germany's past helped shape the Germany we know today.

We will study a variety of source texts and artifacts that will give you insight into historical developments, cultural production, and everyday life. You will learn to read and interpret various artifacts as specific forms of human thought and expression in their times. You also will be encouraged to reflect upon your own life as a point of comparison: this will help you understand how your own life, just like that of Germans in the past, is determined by the respective historical moment and the norms established by the cultural context.

You will be assigned daily readings and should expect to turn in at least one homework assignment per week. Some assignments will require group work (work in groups is generally encouraged). You also should expect one or two additional assignments that will require you to visit the Blanton Museum of Art and the HRC. You are expected to read the relevant pages in the textbook and/or the materials posted on Canvas in preparation for every class. One objective of this course is vocabulary building: you will receive lists with vocabulary taken from the reading assignment, and you are expected to be able to use that vocabulary in your homework and during exams. This course will be taught in German, but any motivated student with at least four semesters of college German can take this course.

This course is part of our thematic course cluster and builds on the introductory course sequence (506, 507, 612) and our transitional courses (328, 330C). As in all of our courses, language learning will be an important objective. In this course, we will primarily focus on reading skills and on vocabulary building.

GLOBAL CULTURES FLAG:

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

TEXTS:

(1)    Hans-Georg Hofacker and Thomas Schuler. Geschichtsbuch 2: Das Mittelalter und die frühe Neuzeit. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1994. [Required; ISBN 9783464642023]

(2)    Hilke Günther-Arndt and Jürgen Kocka. Geschichtsbuch 3: Vom Zeitalter des Absolutismus bis zum Ende des Ersten Weltkrieges. Berlin: Cornelsen, 1995. [Recommended; ISBN 9783464642030]

 

GRADING:

homework                                                                                                                                        10%

class participation (incl. in-class group work notes)                                                                                  10%

class presentation (in German)                                                                                                              15%

three short papers (2-3 pages)                                                                                                               15%

three hourly exams (15/15/20%)                                                                                                           50%

GER 363K • Contemporary Germany

38925 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RAS 211B

Please check back for updates.

GOV 365N • Switz/Eur: Integ Or Isolatn?-W

37960 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RAS 313A
C2

Please check back for updates.

GOV 365N • Switz/Eur: Integ Or Isolatn?-W

37435 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RAS 211A
C2

Please check back for updates.

GER 382N • Nature In Early Modern Thought

33775 • Spring 2001
Meets M 4:00PM-7:00PM EPS 4.102A

An interdisciplinary investiation of the significance of ideological structures of thought in historical contexts. Emphasis is on the genealogy, interpretative power, and critical reception of ideas that inform the ends and methods of German studies as a discpline. Three lecture hours a weekfor one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

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