The Department of Government
The Department of Government

GOV 310L • American Government

37435 • Albertson, Bethany
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM
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This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

37415
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM UTC 3.134
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

37420 • O'Brien, Shannon
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM JES A121A
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GOV 310L, American Govt

Closing limit: 310

MWF 2-3pm, JES A121A

 

Course Description:

This course is an introduction to American Government. It is designed to give you a basic idea of the functions, activities, and interactions of our federal system. Our government is a dynamic entity that has evolved over time and shaped by both internal and external forces. The goal of this class is to provide you with tools to understand American Institutions.  Through learning the duties, powers, and limitations of government, you can better appreciate the impact of current events upon America.  This course may be used to fulfill three hours of the American and Texas government component of the university core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.

Book:

American Politics Today, 6th Essentials Edition by William T. Bianco and David T. Canon  2019 W. W. Norton and Company. 

 

 

Grading Policy:

plus/minus will be used

Test 1: 30%

Test 2: 30%

Test 3: 30%

Paper 1:  5%

Paper 2: 5%

 


GOV 310L • American Government

37410 • McIver, John
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM JES A121A
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

37405
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 4.122
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

37400 • Epp, Derek
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 4.124
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

37430 • McDaniel, Eric
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM BUR 136
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government-Honors

37440 • Tulis, Jeffrey
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 305
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government-Wb

37444 • McDaniel, Eric
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 312L • Iss & Policies In Amer Gov-Wb

37480 • Moser, Robert
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Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37465
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM RLP 0.128
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37475
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM UTC 3.134
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37470
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GEA 105
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37455 • Stauffer, Dana
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM CAL 100
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GOV 312L 

Dana Stauffer

Fall 2019 

 

This course examines American democracy in its origins, its evolution, its strengths and weaknesses, and its enduring character. We will read primary texts from the American colonial period, the American Founding, the pre-Civil-war period, the Progressive era, and the late twentieth century. Much of the course will be devoted to Alexis de Tocqueville’s classic work Democracy in America, one of the most famous books ever written on American politics. Written in the 1830s, the work takes up questions and themes that continue to resonate almost two centuries later. Tocqueville was interested in analyzing American democracy from all angles and his work is a mix of sociology, history, and moral psychology, as well as political science. Key themes of our examination will be: the relationship between religion and politics, the relationship between American materialism (and America’s economic life more generally) to its politics, and the meaning of American equality. We will also take up Tocqueville’s wide-ranging observations on American intellectual life, family life, and the relations between the sexes, as they relate to the American political experiment. In the last third of the course, we will read authors who challenge Tocqueville’s key arguments, or take his assertions in a new direction, and we will consider how well his predictions have been borne out.

 

This course satisfies the second half of the legislative requirement in Government.

 

Grading and Requirements:

 

First Exam: 20%

Second Exam: 30%

Final Exam: 40%

Pop Quizzes: 10%

 

 

Attendance is required and four or more unexcused absences will causes a drop in one’s final grade.

 

Required Texts:

  1. A COURSE READER, available at Jenn’s Copying and Binding, 2518 Guadalupe St., at the corner of Guadalupe and Dean Keeton, tel. 482-0779.

 

  1. Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, Volume I. Translated by Arthur Goldhammer and edited by Olivier Zunz. Library of America. 2012.

 

  1. Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, Volume II. Translated by Arthur Goldhammer and edited by Olivier Zunz. Library of America. 2012.

 

  1. Online readings.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37450 • Budziszewski, J
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM CBA 4.324
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GOV 312L, Issues and Policies in American Government 

THE CONSTITUTIONAL DEBATES

    Professor J. Budziszewski

                                                       

 

Class meets:               MW 11:30am-1:00pm in CBA 4.324

Prof's office hours:   MW 10:00-11:30am

Prof’s email:              jbud@undergroundthomist.org

 

PREREQUISITES, FLAGS, AND FIELD

 

The course fulfills part of the basic education requirement in writing.  Because it carries a writing flag, it may also be used to fulfill three hours of the communication component of the university core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, teamwork, and personal responsibility.

 

DESCRIPTION

 

Americans are often said to be obsessed with their Constitution.  So be it; but then it behooves us to know something about it.  The approach taken in this course is to return to the early debates surrounding its writing and ratification.  We make no use at all of textbooks; rather we study the political thinking of the early Americans in their own words.

 

Another old saw is that history is written by the winners.  However, this is not be a course in winner-worship:  Equal attention and respect are given, on the one hand, to those who wrote the Constitution and argued for its ratification, and on the other, to those who argued against it or demanded sweeping changes in its content.  There are several good reasons for such evenhandedness.  One is that, for all we know, the losers might have been right.  Another is that they might have had some influence on the winners.  Still a third is that we can't fully understand the arguments by which the winners won unless we understand what they were arguing against.

 

Having spoken of politics and of history, I should now admit that this is not a political science or history course in the ordinary sense.  Rather it is a course in early American political thought -- in political theory and philosophy.  Another thing that you should understand is that this course puts heavy emphasis on the development of skills in interpretive reading, critical thinking, and analytical writing.  For instance, it doesn't matter that you can read what a writer has written and figure out what he believes.  What matters is whether you can learn to figure out why he believes it, and how it is logically related to other things he believes.  In other words, when you read you are expected to look for arguments, not just propositions.

 

 

REQUIREMENTS

 

Unit 1: Required analytical outline.

Unit 2:  Required take-home essay.  Extra credit for analytical outline.

Unit 3:  Required whole-course reflection journal.  Extra credit for analytical outline.

Thirteen short quizzes.

 

There will be opportunities to get feedback on your Unit 1 analytical outline and your Unit 2 essay before turning in the final drafts.

 

Final grades are calculated in four steps.  First, each student's TWO lowest quiz grades are dropped, and remaining quiz grades averaged.  Second, this average is "curved."  Third, the uncurved exam grades and the curved quiz average are weighted, as follows:

 

            Unit 1 analytical outlines                                                                    25%

            Unit 2 take-home exam (uncurved, counting extra credit points)      25%

            Unit 3 reflection journal (uncurved, counting extra credit points)     25%

            Curved quiz average                                                                           25%

 

Class participation and attendance modify grades.  Scholastic dishonesty results in a failing grade for the course.

 

See the “Other things my students may need” section at the bottom of the Teaching page at my personal website:  http://www.UndergroundThomist.org/teaching , especially the course policies in the FAQ, which I expect you to know.

 

TEXTS

 

The following required books have been ordered.  Each book must be purchased.  Always bring with you to class the books we are using at the moment.

 

  1. Ralph Ketcham, ed., The Anti-Federalist Papers and the Constitutional Convention Debates, excerpts.

 

  1. Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay, The Federalist, excerpts.

 

  1. Herbert J. Storing, ed., with Murray Dry, The Anti-Federalist, excerpts.

 


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37460 • Philpot, Tasha
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 0.102
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

37490 • Dempsey, Erik
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SZB 330
show description

Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.


GOV 314 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thought

36534 • Gregg, Benjamin
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 2.102
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INSTRUCTOR: Benjamin Gregg

COURSE: CTI 302 / GOV 314
SEMESTER: Fall 2019
UNIQUE:
MEETS: Tu/Th 3:30-5
VENUE: Mezes 2.102
TITLE: Classics of Social and Political Thought

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This seminar explores a range of responses to a fundamental question of political theory: What is human nature? (Indeed: Is there a human nature?) It examines the respective accounts of four of the greatest philosophical thinkers of Western civilization: from the classical era, we read Plato (Republic, ca. 380 BCE) and Augustine (City of God, ca. 400 CE); from the modern era, Hobbes (Leviathan, 1651) and Rousseau (Discourse on the Origin of Inequality, 1755). In its second half, the seminar studies two major contributions in evolutionary psychology. Steven Pinker (2002) articulates the major claims of contemporary evolutionary psychology: that human nature “was designed” by natural selection in the Pleistocene epoch (from 2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) and that our psychological adaptations “were designed” tens of thousands of years ago to solve problems faced by our hunter-gatherer ancestors. This approach implies a distinct vision for the organization of political community, informed as it is by a conception of human nature. David Buller (2005) claims by contrast that our minds are not adapted to the Pleistocene but, like the immune system, are continually adapting over both evolutionary time and individual lifetimes. His argument entails a very different vision for the organization of political community, informed by the rejection of the very idea of human nature. As we read our authors and compare and contrast them with each other, we are guided by a second question: What does each of these theories —— with its respective claims about human nature —— suggest as to how political community might best be organized and, in particular, how social, political and legal justice might best be conceived and pursued in liberal democratic polities, such as the United States, today?

EVALUATION: Course grade is the average of three essays, each three pages, adjusted for quality of class participation

REQUIRED BOOKS:

Plato: The Republic, tr. A. Bloom. Basic Books, ISBN 0465069347

Augustine: City of God. tr. H. Bettenson. Penguin Classics, ISBN 0140448942
Hobbes: Leviathan, ed. E. Curley. Hackett Publishing Company, ISBN 0872201775 Rousseau: First and Second Discourses, tr. R. Masters. St. Martin’s, ISBN 0312694407 Steven Pinker, The Blank State: The Modern Denial of Human Nature

David Buller, Adapting Minds: Evolutionary Psychology and the Persistent Quest for Human Nature


GOV 314E • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thought

37500 • Wensveen, Jonathan
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 208
(also listed as CTI 302)
show description

GOALS OF THE COURSE

This course will consist of a survey of the history of political philosophy, with an emphasis on human psychology, its bearing on politics, and vice-versa. We will proceed chronologically from classical to medieval to early modern and finally to late modern political philosophy, studying a key philosopher or theologian from each period—Plato, Augustine, Thomas Hobbes, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, respectively. We will conclude the semester by turning to the originator of evolutionary psychology, Charles Darwin. Throughout, our method will consist of careful readings and discussions of primary texts.

Despite the chronological structure of the course, our leading concern in turning to these long-dead thinkers is not historical. Our aim is to learn from them rather than about them. Our premises are that there are certain basic questions about how to live that confront all human beings in all times and places, that these thinkers offer powerful alternative answers to these questions, and that however much their circumstances may differ from our own, it is possible for them to teach us things of the highest import. In order that we might learn as much as we can from them, we will strive to understand them as they understood themselves, reading them sympathetically but not uncritically.

Questions to be addressed include: What is the best way of life for a human being? What do we most need or long for? What does happiness consist of? Can we attain happiness? How do morality, love, friendship, politics, and piety figure in a well lived human life? What is the character of the concerns that underlie these features of human life? What political arrangement best promotes the human good? What are the possibilities and limits of politics in promoting the human good?

The thinkers we will study are united in taking these questions seriously, but diverge widely in how they answer them. In discerning and beginning to evaluate their answers, on their own terms, and in comparison and contrast to one another, we will become more thoughtful human beings and citizens.

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIALS

ONLY the editions specified below are acceptable. Assure that you use them. • Plato, The Republic of Plato, trans. Allan Bloom (New York: Basic Books, 1968). ISBN 0465069347. • Plato, Plato’s “Symposium,” trans. Seth Benardete (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001). ISBN 0226042758. • Augustine, City of God, trans. Henry Bettenson (London: Penguin Classics, 2003). ISBN 0140448948. • Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan, ed. Edwin Curley (Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company, 1994). ISBN 0872201775. • Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Major Political Writings of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, trans. and ed. John T. Scott (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014). ISBN 0226151311. • Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man (London: Penguin Classics, 2004). ISBN 0140436316.


GOV 314E • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thought

37504 • Gregg, Benjamin
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 10
(also listed as CTI 302)
show description

INSTRUCTOR: Benjamin Gregg

COURSE: CTI 302 / GOV 314
SEMESTER: Fall 2019
UNIQUE:
MEETS: Tu/Th 3:30-5
VENUE: Mezes 2.102
TITLE: Classics of Social and Political Thought

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This seminar explores a range of responses to a fundamental question of political theory: What is human nature? (Indeed: Is there a human nature?) It examines the respective accounts of four of the greatest philosophical thinkers of Western civilization: from the classical era, we read Plato (Republic, ca. 380 BCE) and Augustine (City of God, ca. 400 CE); from the modern era, Hobbes (Leviathan, 1651) and Rousseau (Discourse on the Origin of Inequality, 1755). In its second half, the seminar studies two major contributions in evolutionary psychology. Steven Pinker (2002) articulates the major claims of contemporary evolutionary psychology: that human nature “was designed” by natural selection in the Pleistocene epoch (from 2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) and that our psychological adaptations “were designed” tens of thousands of years ago to solve problems faced by our hunter-gatherer ancestors. This approach implies a distinct vision for the organization of political community, informed as it is by a conception of human nature. David Buller (2005) claims by contrast that our minds are not adapted to the Pleistocene but, like the immune system, are continually adapting over both evolutionary time and individual lifetimes. His argument entails a very different vision for the organization of political community, informed by the rejection of the very idea of human nature. As we read our authors and compare and contrast them with each other, we are guided by a second question: What does each of these theories —— with its respective claims about human nature —— suggest as to how political community might best be organized and, in particular, how social, political and legal justice might best be conceived and pursued in liberal democratic polities, such as the United States, today?

EVALUATION: Course grade is the average of three essays, each three pages, adjusted for quality of class participation

REQUIRED BOOKS:

Plato: The Republic, tr. A. Bloom. Basic Books, ISBN 0465069347

Augustine: City of God. tr. H. Bettenson. Penguin Classics, ISBN 0140448942
Hobbes: Leviathan, ed. E. Curley. Hackett Publishing Company, ISBN 0872201775 Rousseau: First and Second Discourses, tr. R. Masters. St. Martin’s, ISBN 0312694407 Steven Pinker, The Blank State: The Modern Denial of Human Nature

David Buller, Adapting Minds: Evolutionary Psychology and the Persistent Quest for Human Nature


GOV 320N • US Const Development: Rights

37505 • Sager, Alan
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM RLP 0.112
show description

Course Overview

This course focuses on the development of American Constitutional law in the areas of civil rights and civil liberties, focusing mainly on the Bill of Rights and the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments.

Most of the assignments involve reading and analyzing edited judicial opinions in Supreme Court cases. These opinions not only reveal what the Constitution says about the issues at hand, they also reveal how justices think and reason. We will pay close attention to the theories of interpretation embedded, often to the point of being purposely hidden, in all of these opinions.

This course is intended to be valuable to participants who have many different reasons for studying civil rights and civil liberties.

1. As citizens, we all need to have a general idea of our rights and liberties and the role of Constitution in protecting them. We need to know and understand when a government is encroaching on our rights and as well as when we are encroaching on someone else’s rights.

2. As students of government, we need to know the role of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution in structuring American political, social and moral life.

3. As lifelong students, we need to keep expanding our reading, reasoning, and interpreting skills. We are moving from an industrial to a knowledge based society where these skills become ever more important.

4. For students who are intending to go to law school or thinking about law school, this course can give you a sense of what law school will be and help you get “a running start.” Among other things, we will focus on making powerful relevant logical arguments on all side of the issues we cover in class.

5. For students who are intending to teach, this course will help you in a myriad number of ways from being able to teach a better civics course to knowing something about your rights and responsibilities as a teacher as well as those of your students.

Course Goals

There are four major goals for this course:

1. To identify the major historical themes and controversies about our Constitution

2. To better understand Constitutionalism and our Constitution; what our Constitution is and is not and how it has changed and developed over the past 200 years.

3. To have students develop a high level of skill in reading, briefing and understanding Supreme Court opinions, with special attention on what questions to ask when reading an opinion Part of this skill includes being able to see and understand the point of view of the person writing an opinion.

4. To raise participants’ “cultural literacy” in Constitutional Law and American Constitutional Development such as knowing the Chief Justices and some of the important Associate Justices, knowing seminal cases in particular periods of American history and learning the language of civil rights and civil liberties.


GOV 324L • Govs & Polit Of Western Europe

37515 • Mosser, Michael
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.134
(also listed as EUS 350)
show description

GOV 324L/EUS 350: Government and Politics of Western Europe

Fall 2019

The University of Texas at Austin

Unique:

 

Dr. Michael Mosser

Course location: UTC 3.134

Office: Mezes 3.222

Course time: T/Th 11:00 – 12:30

Phone: 512.232.7280

Office hours: T, Th 9:00 – 11:00

Email: mosserm@austin.utexas.edu

(and by appointment)

 

Course concept

This course is a comparative study of select advanced industrialized countries (AICs) and newly emerging democracies of Europe. This seminar will emphasize what we as students of political science can gather from the examination of the political regimes of other states. It will challenge you to reconceptualize your views of American politics and international relations based on the knowledge you gain from the study of other states’ political systems, and will seek to highlight the similarities as well as the differences between state actions in international relations.

 

We will begin the course with a brief introduction to the study of comparative politics, followed by an examination of the United Kingdom, the first ‘modern’ state and arguably the world’s oldest democracy. From there, the course moves to an examination of France, the Continent’s oldest democracy and one with a particularly interesting history. Next is a study of Germany, one of the most dynamic states in Europe since its founding as a modern nation state in the late 1800s. We then look at Italy, a bifurcated state with a strongly developed North and a less-developed South, and Sweden, a Nordic social democracy with a strong economy and deep tradition of citizen participation. We then examine Russia and Poland as examples of newly democratizing (and potentially newly authoritarian) Europe, and conclude the course with a two-part brief look at the European Union.

 

Required readings:

The required text for this course is Hancock et al., Politics in Europe (7th ed.), CQ Press, 2018 [hereafter Hancock]. There will also be a considerable number of supplementary journal, magazine, and newspaper articles. Average reading load will be around 60 pages/week, with some lighter weeks and some heavier.

 

Finally, as part of the student participation grade, students will be required to find one contemporary online news article on the country we are studying at the time and post a short summary (and link) on the Canvas course site. Readings will not be vetted or approved by the instructor, but students are expected to use reputable and impartial news sources as the basis for the articles submitted and summarized.

 

Course requirements:

This course has two in-class mid-term exams and a take-home final exam. Each midterm exam will be worth 25% of your overall grade. Each midterm will be conducted via Canvas. This year, the midterms will be conducted using Proctorio.com. Information on how the exam will be conducted in conjunction with Proctorio.com will be forthcoming after the semester begins.

 

Attendance / Participation / Discussion Questions: 20%

 

Class discussion in a an upper-level seminar is more than expected; it is a given. Everyone has his or her own style of discussion, and I do not expect to turn those who prefer not to speak often in class into debate champions. Participation will be divided into two sections:  Discussion questions and in-class participation. Since not everyone enjoys speaking in class, discussion questions will count for more than in-class participation. Online discussion questions and in-class participation will each count for 5% of your course grade. 

 

Discussions:

 

Each week’s discussion questions will be due every Saturday at midnight; the discussion forum locks at that time and there is no chance to post to that week thereafter. Postings can be drawn from the readings; in this case, they should reflect any questions, comments, or cries of outrage you may have regarding the arguments set forth by the authors. They most definitely will help you get the most from the class. Postings may also be brief synopses of newsworthy events. In this case, you must post both the link to the news story and a brief (50-word) précis of what the article discusses. Finally, postings may be replies to others' questions or news stories, as long as they are informative replies and not merely agree/disagree posts. One post (or a thoughtful reply to a post) counts as your post for that week.

 

There are no discussion postings necessary for midterm week. The total number of discussion postings will be counted at the end of the semester, and also will be examined throughout the semester for evidence of consistent posting. Do not expect to “catch-up” post only at the end of the semester and receive full participation credit.

 

  • 12-15 postings: Full credit
  • 8-11 postings: 70% credit
  • 5-7 postings: 50% credit
  • Less than 5 postings: No credit

 

Attendance and participation:

 

There is also a distinction between attendance and participation. Attendance will be managed through Canvas and will take place at five random intervals throughout the semester. Each of these five attendance days will count for 2% of your course grade (for a total of 10%).

 

In-class participation will be graded as follows:

 

  • Attending every day, but not participating in class: 80/100
  • Attending every day, participating via question answering (from instructor): 90/100
  • Attending every day, participating via question answering and active learning (extending discussion, asking follow-up questions): 100/100

 

** A word on late or missed assignments. Over the course of the semester, it is inevitable that some event will cause a time management issue, which might lead to a missed assignment deadline. Though normally handled on a case-by-case basis, there are some baseline penalties for missed or delayed assignments, detailed here:

 

  • Late topic choices will receive a 1% deduction per day before
  • Late topic outline and list of references will receive a 2% deduction per day before
  • Late paper drafts will receive a 5% deduction per day before
  • Missed exams will receive a 5% deduction per day until made up.

 

Extra credit (up to 6 points):

 

Students who attend an academic lecture/event dealing with an international/global issue and hand in a typed, one-page summary may receive a three-point increase on an exam grade.  The maximum extra credit for the semester is two lectures/events (a total of 6 extra credit points).  Summaries must be turned in within seven days of the event.

Grading standards:

I will use the following grade standards. All grades will be converted to a 100-point scale.

 

  • 93 and higher: A
  • 90-92: A-
  • 87-89: B+
  • 80-86: B
  • 77-79 B-
  • 75-76 C+
  • 70-74 C
  • 67-69 C-
  • 60-66 D
  • lower than 60: F

 

Other important information

 

Plagiarism / academic misconduct:

 

Don’t do it. Minimum penalties for cheating are zeros on quizzes or exams where the cheating takes place, and a grade of F on a paper that has been plagiarized. Questions about what constitutes academic misconduct should be brought to my attention.

 

Undergraduate Writing Center: 

 

The Undergraduate Writing Center, PCL 2.330, 512.471.6222  http://www.uwc.utexas.edu/) offers free, individualized, expert help with writing for any UT undergraduate, by appointment or on a drop-in basis. Any undergraduate enrolled in a course at UT can visit the UWC for assistance with any writing project. They work with students from every department on campus, for both academic and non-academic writing. Their services are not just for writing with "problems." Getting feedback from an informed audience is a normal part of a successful writing project. Consultants help students develop strategies to improve their writing. The assistance they provide is intended to foster independence. Each student determines how to use the consultant's advice. The consultants are trained to help you work on your writing in ways that preserve the integrity of your work.

 

University of Texas Honor Code:

 

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.  Any student found guilty of scholastic dishonesty may receive an “F” in the course and be remanded to the appropriate University of Texas authorities for disciplinary action.  For more information, view Student Judicial Services at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs.

 

Religious Holidays:

 

According to UT-Austin policy, students must notify the instructor of an impending absence at least 14 days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If a student must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, the student will be given an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

 

Student Privacy: 

 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) requires that student privacy be preserved.  Thus the posting of grades, even by the last four digits of the social security number, is forbidden.  All communication will remain between the instructor and the student, and the instructor will not be able to share details of the student’s performance with parents, spouses, or any others.

 

Documented Disability Statement:

 

The University of Texas will make reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities. Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (Video Phone) as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining authorized accommodations.

 

Emergency Evacuation Policy:

 

In the event of a fire or other emergency, it may be necessary to evacuate a building rapidly.  Upon the activation of a fire alarm or the announcement of an emergency in a university building, all occupants of the building are required to evacuate and assemble outside.  Once evacuated, no one may re-enter the building without instruction to do so from the Austin Fire Department, University of Texas at Austin Police Department, or Fire Prevention Services office.  Students should familiarize themselves with all the exit doors of each room and building they occupy at the university, and should remember that the nearest exit routes may not be the same as the way they typically enter buildings.  Students requiring assistance in evacuation shall inform their instructors in writing during the first week of class.  Information regarding emergency evacuation routes and emergency procedures can be found at http://www.utexas.edu/emergency.

 

 

 


GOV 330K • The American President

37525 • O'Brien, Shannon
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM MEZ B0.306
show description

GOV 330K, The American President

Closing limit: 40

MWF 3-4pm, JES A218A

 

 

Course Description:

The presidency has changed in many dramatic and significant ways since its inception.  If Donald Trump (with all his presidential powers) was suddenly dropped into 1789, the citizens of the day would be shocked at his amount of presidential power.  However, as citizens of the 21st century, most do not consider the size and scope of the presidency to be unreasonable.  In fact, though some people think he has too much power, many others would be willing to grant him greater authority.

In short, the office of the presidency acted and reacted to changes in politics and society.  The course will explore the presidency from its creation to its modern incarnation. It will start with George Washington and end with Donald Trump.  Changes in the presidency result from tumultuous events (e.g., Garfield’s assassination helped spur the creation of the civil service system in federal government) which lead to governmental growth.  This is not a history course where we will learn in detail about every administration.  However, we can use history to better understand why certain eras of presidency are forgettable and others unforgettable. I do not expect you to be well versed on American history because we are looking at how the presidency drives history.  The core point of most topics in this class will revolve around: How was the presidency changed?  How did the presidency change society?  How did the presidency increase or decrease in power? What helped create the presidency we have today?  What sorts of power and responsibilities does the modern presidency wield?

 

Book:

The American Presidency: Origins and Development, 1776–2018 Eighth Edition

Sidney Milkis and Michael Nelson

ISBN-13:978-1544323121

ISBN-10:1544323123

 

Grading Policy:

plus/minus will be used

Test 1: 25%

Test 2: 30%

Test 3: 30%

Paper:  15%


GOV 335R • Intel World Amer Founders

37530 • Budziszewski, J
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM CBA 4.344
show description

GOV 335R, The Intellectual World of the American Founders

WHAT THE FOUNDERS WERE READING

Professor J. Budziszewski

 

 

Class meets:               MW 1:00pm-2:30pm in CBA 4.344

Prof's office hours:   MW 10:00-11:30am

Prof’s email:              jbud@undergroundthomist.org

 

This was the object of the Declaration of Independence. Not to find out new principles, or new arguments, never before thought of, not merely to say things which had never been said before; but to place before mankind the common sense of the subject, in terms so plain and firm as to command their assent, and to justify ourselves in the independent stand we are compelled to take. – Thomas Jefferson

 

Course Description

 

Government field:  Political Theory.

 

We often read what the Founders of the country wrote.  But what were they reading themselves?  What were the intellectual influences on thinkers like Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, James Madison, and Alexander Hamilton?  The answers shed an unusual light on what they were trying to do when they initiated the American experiment in self-government. 

 

The readings for this course are selected mostly from James Madison's famous reading suggestions to the Continental Congress (the "Report on Books.")  I have also drawn from the favorites of John Witherspoon, "the schoolmaster of the republic," who was a university mentor to several of the Founders, as well as from political sermons which the Founders were known to admire.  These controversial readings about politics, history, economics, ethics, religion, and law provide an intriguing way to enter into the minds of the men who began the new nation.

 

Grading Policy

 

One short-answer quiz for each reading (25%).  One required set of analytical outlines, for Unit 1 (25%); after that, analytical outlines are for extra credit (up to 5 points per unit, added to exam grades).  Two take-home essays, for Units 2 and 3 respectively (25% each).  One whole-semester reflection journal.  There will be opportunities to get feedback on your Unit 1 analytical outline and your Unit 2 essay before turning in the final drafts.

 

Texts

 

Twelve of the readings are online.  Three will be in a short readings packet available from the UT Copy Center, McCombs 3.136, phone: 471-8281.  McCombs is the Business School building, right behind Mezes Hall, where my office is located.


GOV 350K • Statistical Anly In Polit Sci

37550 • Lin, Tse
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PHR 2.114
show description

Semester Fall 2019

GOV 350K – Statistical Analysis in Political Science

 

Quantitative Reasoning Flag

 

Unique           Days   Time                                       Bldg/Room     Instructor

                        MWF  1:00-2:00pm                            PHR 2.114      LIN

 

Course Description

 

This course introduces basic concepts and methods of statistics. Unlike the typical elementary statistical courses you may have taken, the emphasis here will be on applications in political science. The objective of this course is to help students acquire the literacy for understanding political science literatures based on the scientific approach, as well as to prepare interested students for more advanced methods courses.

 

Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, sampling, sampling distribution, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, contingency tables, and other statistical procedures. Computing will be an integral part of this course. You will use SPSS to analyze data from Gallup Survey, General Social Survey, and National Election Study in homework assignments. In particular, you will be asked to replicate results reported in journal articles and book chapters. You are also encouraged to develop and work out your own research problems.

 

Prerequisites

 

None

 

Grading Policy

 

Homework Assignments (6 sets): 30%

In-Class Midterm Exam: 30%

In-Class Final Exam: 30%

Instructor Discretion (Attendance, Participation, etc.): 10%

 

Required Texts

 

* T. H. Wonnacott and R. J. Wannacott. 1990. Introductory Statistics, 5th Ed. Wiley. (Or 4th Ed., Introductory Statistics for Buisness and Economics, 1990, which is the same as the 5th Ed.)

 

Optional Texts

 

* S. B. Green and N. J. Salkind, 2013. Using SPSS for Windows and Macintosh: Analyzing and Understanding Data, 7th  Ed. Prentice Hall.

 


GOV 350K • Statistical Anly In Polit Sci

37555 • Lin, Tse
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PHR 2.116
show description

Semester Fall 2019

GOV 350K – Statistical Analysis in Political Science

 

Quantitative Reasoning Flag

 

Unique           Days   Time                                       Bldg/Room     Instructor

                        TTH    2:00-3:30pm                            PHR 2.116      LIN

 

Course Description

 

This course introduces basic concepts and methods of statistics. Unlike the typical elementary statistical courses you may have taken, the emphasis here will be on applications in political science. The objective of this course is to help students acquire the literacy for understanding political science literatures based on the scientific approach, as well as to prepare interested students for more advanced methods courses.

 

Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, sampling, sampling distribution, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, contingency tables, and other statistical procedures. Computing will be an integral part of this course. You will use SPSS to analyze data from Gallup Survey, General Social Survey, and National Election Study in homework assignments. In particular, you will be asked to replicate results reported in journal articles and book chapters. You are also encouraged to develop and work out your own research problems.

 

Prerequisites

 

None

 

Grading Policy

 

Homework Assignments (6 sets): 30%

In-Class Midterm Exam: 30%

In-Class Final Exam: 30%

Instructor Discretion (Attendance, Participation, etc.): 10%

 

Required Texts

 

* T. H. Wonnacott and R. J. Wannacott. 1990. Introductory Statistics, 5th Ed. Wiley. (Or 4th Ed., Introductory Statistics for Buisness and Economics, 1990, which is the same as the 5th Ed.)

 

Optional Texts

 

* S. B. Green and N. J. Salkind, 2013. Using SPSS for Windows and Macintosh: Analyzing and Understanding Data, 7th  Ed. Prentice Hall.

 


GOV 351C • Classical Quest For Justice

37560 • Dempsey, Erik
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 0.132
(also listed as CTI 320)
show description
his version of Classical Quest for Justice will be taught in a unique way. Rather than trying to cover several different texts and perspectives, the course will cover only one book, Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. We will proceed through the book sequentially, and our class meetings will be focused discussions of portions of the text. 
 
This is a demanding class. Though the readings will be short, it is crucial to prepare for every class meeting, and to think about the reading before coming to class. Attendance at class meetings is mandatory. It will also be writing intensive. There will be eight short writing assignments (1 page) throughout the semester, as well as a medium length (5-7 page) paper about 5 weeks into the course. 
 
The course will culminate in a term paper of 12-15 pages. Students will be responsible for formulating their own topic in consultation with the instructor, familiarizing themselves with relevant scholarly literature, and submitting an original interpretation of some part of the Ethics. They will submit a prospectus as one of their short papers, and will have a second medium length (5-7) paper that serves as a first version of the term paper, which they will then expand into their final term paper. 
 
Though there are no prerequisites, it is recommended that you have at least some background in political philosophy before taking the class. 
 
This class will carry flags in Independent Inquiry, Writing, and Ethics. 
 
Texts: Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics (you are required to use the Bartlett / Collins translation from the University of Chicago Press)
 
Grade:
50%: Term Paper
12%: First Paper
12%: Draft Term Paper
16%: Short writing assignments
10%: Class participation and quizzes

GOV 351D • Theor Foundtns Modern Politics

37565 • Stauffer, Devin
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.134
(also listed as CTI 321)
show description

GOV 351D (CTI 321)

 

The Theoretical Foundations of Modern Politics

 

Devin Stauffer

 

 

Course Description

 

This course examines the philosophic origins of modern politics and culture by looking at the works of several authors whose writings played decisive roles in the rise and development of modernity. In our study of Machiavelli’s Prince, Hobbes’ Leviathan, Locke’s Second Treatise of Government, and selected political writings of Rousseau and Nietzsche, we will consider how modern political thought broke with the past and offered a new set of political visions. We will consider the differing views of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Nietzsche on issues such as the aims and limits of politics, the role of morality in the harsh world of political necessity, the proper place of religion and reason in political life, and the nature and basis of justice, freedom, and equality. Throughout the course, we will reflect of the impact that the revolutionary doctrines of modern political philosophy have had on the political world in which we live.

 

Texts

 

Machiavelli, The Prince (University of Chicago)

Hobbes, Leviathan (Hackett)

Locke, Two Treatises of Government (Yale)

Rousseau, The First and Second Discourses (St. Martin’s Press)

Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Penguin)

 

Requirements and Grading

 

Paper: 20%

First exam: 25%

Second exam: 25%

Attendance: 10%

Participation: 10%

Quizzes: 10%

 

(Note:  These percentages are approximate, and the paper may be made optional.)

 

Prerequisites

 

Sophomore standing

 

 


GOV 351J • Might And Right Among Nations

37570 • Pangle, Thomas
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM RLP 0.112
(also listed as CTI 323)
show description

Might and Right Among Nations (Fall 2019)

GOV 351J AND CTI 323 (Unique numbers GOV 37750 and CTI 33080)

Lectures in RLP 0.112, MWF 1-2 (except for Fridays of weeks of discussion sections; see below)

 

Professor Thomas L. Pangle, Mezes Hall 3.154; office tel. 232 1529; tpangle@austin.utexas.edu

Office hours: TUES. 10-1 PM; or by appt

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

A study of major alternative approaches, elaborated by the greatest political theorists, to the question of the moral character of international relations.

                  The basic aim of the course is twofold: 1) to gain a better understanding of what kind of justice and law exists among nations; and 2) to gain a better understanding of what justice itself means, in human relations, as its nature is revAealed under the stress of the intensely competitive international arena, always overshadowed by the threat of war.

                  We will examine the original, foundational philosophic arguments for: the classical republican struggle for and against empire (Thucydides); Christian Just War theory (Aquinas and Vitoria); Islamic Jihad Theory (The Koran and Hadith; Shaybani, Alfarabi, Avicenna, Ibn Khaldun); the moral supremacy of independent national sovereignty (Hobbes); globalizing moral community achieved through commercialization (Montesquieu); and world legal order achieved through international legal organization (Kant).

                  We will try to uncover the hidden philosophic foundations of our contemporary ways of thinking, and confront our assumptions with challenges from earlier, alien ways of conceiving the world.

                  While we will not forget contemporary issues, we will try to transcend our passionate biases, and view our own immediate situation from a liberating distance, by taking as our primary empirical focus the philosophic historian Thucydides’s dramatic presentation of The Peloponnesian War—a moral as well as military struggle pitting the imperialism of one of history’s greatest democracies (Athens) against the anti-imperialism of one of the most conservative and pious aristocracies in history (Sparta).

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND BASIS OF GRADING: THERE ARE TWO OPTIONS, ONE OF WHICH YOU MUST CHOOSE BY FRI., SEPT. 6.

 

OPTION ONE—MID-TERM EXAM OPTION

40%—Final Exam, held in the final exam period; format will be questions selected at random from study questions handed out at the end of term covering material from the entire term.

30%—Mid-term closed book exam on Thucydides, administered in class, on questions chosen at random from study questions handed out two weeks before.

15%—Attendance (required) at all lectures; each absence after the second, not excused by a doctor’s note, will subtract 2% from the overall final grade. Attendance at lecture will be recorded by noting empty seats; each student must choose a permanent seat to occupy, by beginning of class Mon., Aug. 30.

15%—Answers to weekly quizzes on the readings (clues for which will be in the weekly study questions).

 

OPTION TWO—PAPER/DISCUSSION SECTION OPTION

35%—Final Exam, held in the final exam period; format will be questions selected at random from study questions handed out at the end of term covering material from the entire term.

30%—Two short analytical/interpretative essays (each about 1200-1500 words) on topics to be assigned.

10%—Attendance (required) at all lectures and discussion sections; each absence after the second, not excused by a doctor’s note, will subtract 1% from the overall final grade. Attendance at lecture will be recorded by noting empty seats; each student must choose a permanent seat to occupy, by beginning of class Fri. Sept. 4.

10%—Answers to weekly quizzes on the readings (clues for which will be in the weekly study questions).

15%—Attendance and participation in discussion sections, which will meet Fridays. Sept. 13, 27, Oct. 11, 25, Nov. 8, 29. Meeting Times and Places TBA.

 

REQUIRED TEXTS (be sure to get the correct editions and translations!)

—Some key passages from Thucydides, and major excerpts from Aquinas, Spinoza, Rousseau, and The Federalist as well as readings on the theory of jihad in photocopied booklet (purchase at Co-op).

The Landmark Thucydides, Simon & Schuster, ISBN 0684827905 The translation is not always accurate, and key passages will be found accurately translated in the booklet (see previous).

—Francisco de Vitoria, Political Writings, Cambridge, ISBN 052136714x

—Machiavelli, Discourses on Livy, U. of Chicago, Mansfield and Tarcov, eds. and trans. ISBN 978-0226500362

—Thomas Hobbes, On the Citizen, Cambridge, ISBN# 0521437806 Tuck and Silverthorne, eds.

—Montesquieu, The Spirit of the Laws, Cambridge, ISBN# 0521369746 Anne Cohler et al., eds. and trans.

—Immanuel Kant, Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, Harper, ISBN# 0061311596 H. J. Paton, ed. and trans.; and Political Writings,


GOV 357C • Constitutional Interpretatn

37580 • Perry Jr, H
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 4.122
(also listed as CTI 326C)
show description

General Description of the Course

Politics is often defined as "the authoritative allocation of values." In the American political system, the Constitution is an important source of authority, and it gives preference to certain values. The Constitution is a document of law, politics, and political theory. Determining what the Constitution means, determining how to determine what it means, and determining who should determine what it means are fundamental tasks for participants in the American political process and for students of it. This course may be of interest to those thinking about attending law school, but it is equally valuable to those who have no such interest. Given the nature of our society, understanding the Constitution and constitutional law is part of a liberal arts education. The course considers some, but not many, of the "civil liberties" provisions in the Constitution; those important subjects are considered in other courses.

One objective of the course is for the student to become a constitutional interpreter who contributes intelligently to this ongoing process. Constitutional interpretation is a prerogative of the judiciary, but it is not its preserve. Judges have never been, nor should be, the only ones engaging in constitutional interpretation. Presidents, members of Congress, and many others engage in constitutional interpretation. A more complete course would examine their statements and actions in greater detail. Judges, however, play a very important role in constitutional interpretation. As such, it is important to learn what judges have said the Constitution means and to understand how they came to such conclusions. This necessitates learning how to read and analyze judicial opinions. The student should develop a sufficient comfort level with legal analysis so that she or he can evaluate intelligently important interpretations of the justices and ask the questions that a student of politics and law should ask. Prominent among such questions are those concerned with the proper role of courts and judges in the American political system. We read some scholarly commentary on interpretation and judicial behavior, but we concentrate on the primary material--the Constitution and cases--so that the student can begin to develop his or her own ideas.

Another objective of this course is to improve reasoning and communication skills. Engaging in constitutional reasoning can assist in developing intellectual precision and political persuasiveness. As in most courses, good writing is demanded; but it is also important to develop the capacity to think and speak on one's feet. Mastering the use of language, orally and in writing, increases the ability to think and communicate clearly. Moving toward such mastery is a vital part of education.

The course requires a substantial time commitment. The time required varies greatly over the course of the semester, and as described below, it is hard for the student to plan ahead.

Format of the Course

Constitutional interpretation lends itself to dialog between professor and student and among students. There are few lectures. I use a combination of the Socratic and case methods. This requires students to come to class prepared and to listen to one another. Too often, students do not benefit from this style of teaching because they ignore the comments of fellow students. The method assumes that, instead of lecturing, I am making points through discussion with students. When your colleagues are making important points, I do not have to. It is also an important skill to be able to learn to separate the wheat from the chaff.

Students are required to attend class and participate. The method of teaching presumes that students heard prior discussions. When a student did not hear earlier discussions and then participates, it generally wastes the time of others. I call on students and expect them to be wellprepared. Lack of preparation or repeated absences will hurt one’s grade. If a student is not prepared, he or she must put a note on the lectern before class. Being prepared means that one has read and thought about the material; it does not mean that one must fully understand the material or have the “right” answers. It is also in one's long-term interest to prepare thoroughly for each class because the material is cumulative, and the workload in this course increases dramatically as the semester proceeds. I encourage study groups.

Computers or other electronic devices may not be used in the classroom. Their use is not compatible with the teaching method. That includes glancing at your phone. Phones must be put away. Exceptions are rarely granted and must be approved by me in advance.

Prerequisites

Set by the Government Department: 6 hours lower division government courses.


GOV 357L • Judicial Process And Behavior

37585 • McIver, John
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 101
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the American legal system with a particular emphasis on the role of its key actors. The political nature of many legal disputes will be explored as will the legal aspects of many political disputes. This course will also examine the potential (as well as actual) impact of citizen participation at all levels of the legal system.


GOV 357M • Civil Liberties

37590 • Abramson, Jeffrey
Meets W 4:00PM-7:00PM RLP 0.104
show description

In this seminar, we will attempt to bring together the study of public law, American Government and political theory by exploring the legal and philosophical principles underlying court decisions on civil liberties. For 2016, topics to be covered include: (1) privacy, terrorism and surveillance; (2) the role of religion in public life; (3) freedom of speech and national security; (4) abortion; (5) sexual orientation; (6) racial and sex discrimination; and (7) affirmative action.


GOV 357M • Constitutional Design

37600 • Elkins, Zachary
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CAL 21
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 357M • Constitutnl Struct Of Power

37595 • Jacobsohn, Gary
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 201
show description

This is a course in political science concerned with law; it is not a course in law offered by a political science department. The focus of the course is one of the most vital aspects of politics: interpreting and applying the nation's fundamental rules. This interpretive activity is critical in regard to the Constitution for the simple reason that the document defines us as a people. Constitutional law is thus best viewed as an extended commentary on the meaning of America. As such it lies at the heart of a liberal arts education.

In this class we examine the structures of power in a constitutional democracy, exploring contests over authority from John Marshall and Thomas Jefferson to Donald Trump, the disputed election of 2000, the challenge of terrorism in the 21st century, and the Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare”). Among the topics to be considered: the powers of the federal and state governments, the executive’s emergency powers, and the Supreme Court’s authority to nullify the acts of other branches. Under these general headings are to be found such issues as the power to regulate firearms, recognize foreign governments, overturn a judicial decision through congressional action, deprive citizens of rights during wartime, regulate immigration, and protect voting rights.

Constitutional interpretation has largely become the prerogative of the judiciary. As we shall see early in the course, there are sound, perhaps compelling, reasons for other public officials to immerse themselves deeply into constitutional interpretation. But the plain fact is that they often do not, and, even when they do, they frequently defer to past and anticipated judicial rulings. Whether right or wrong, good or bad, a judicial quasi-monopoly in constitutional interpretation means that to give a realistic picture of what happens in the United States, a course on constitutional authority must concentrate on the judiciary. Thus, one of our objectives is to explore how courts and judges function within the American political process. A recurring question is the role of judicial review in a constitutional democracy, how one justifies the possession of this extraordinary power by an essentially undemocratic institution in a regime committed to accountability in policy-making.

Another feature of this course and its main text is its attention to the comparative dimension of the American constitutional experience. One of the consequences of having the world’s oldest written Constitution is that the United States has become a notable exporter of constitutional ideas. Other nations have borrowed freely from our arrangements for formally constituting power. But in recent years American judges and scholars have turned their attention to the ways in which foreign constitutional experience might contain lessons for how we operate in this country. So, while our focus in this course is on American constitutional configurations, we will occasionally cast our eyes abroad for insights that might help us better understand ourselves through the prism of the other.

The division of the immense field of constitutional law into two courses customarily involves a separation between institutions (part 1) and rights (part 2). That custom is followed here with one major caution: the distinction is largely artificial. By constitutional design institutions in the United States were constructed to ensure the protection of certain rights. Indeed, a bill of rights was not even part of the original Constitution; its eventual inclusion should be viewed as a supplement to the protections implicit in the original constitutional architecture. The adequacy of these protections -- substance and coverage -- is another matter, about which there has always been intense disagreement. By the end of the course students should have an informed judgment on these questions, which is to say, on the desirability of constitutional reform and renewal.


GOV 358 • Introduction To Public Policy

37605 • Epp, Derek
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 4.124
show description

This course will examine the politics and history of public policymaking in America. We will examine how policy is made, and whether LBJ’s dicta that “good policy is good politics” holds. We will study contemporary policy challenges, especially focusing on financial and budgetary challenges, and health care. We will also examine education, environment, and justice.

Since good policies can only come about with good information, properly interpreted, the course will emphasize the roles of ideas and information in the policy process: how elected and appointed political leaders use it to formulate and implement public policies.

Guiding Course Principle:

“Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.” --John Adams, Argument in Defense of the Soldiers in the Boston Massacre Trials, December 1770

Major Theme:

Using Evidence to Evaluate Policy Choices. Some policies are based on general goals that everybody recognizes. Others are based on values. All involve some sort of trade-offs. But some of these can be reduced if we recognize that even goals based in values can be subject to factual analyses.

Course Objectives

(1) Survey the approaches used by political scientists to understand the public policymaking process.

(2) Integrate current public affairs into our understanding of public policy.

(3) Survey the use, history, and success of the major tools used by governments in the US to address policy problems in several major issue areas.

(4) Further the development of analytical skills in policy analysis through brief exercises and a major paper employing library and web-based sources. Students will use the Policy Agendas Project's datasets located at the University of Texas to trace public policy activity across time.


GOV 360N • Global Governance

37630 • Chapman, Terrence
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 214
show description

Course Overview:

This course examines the forces that shape global stability (and instability). Building on a basic framework outlining how and why actors interact in the international system, this course will explore how states design and agree to international agreements, what those agreements consist of, and how those agreements influence state behavior. The course will also expose students to studies of international law and organizations across several issues areas, including security, international trade, international finance, the environment, and human rights.


GOV 360N • International Security

37625 • Kessler, Alan
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 3.112
show description

Course Description

This course is designed to provide students with a broad introduction to the conditions and motivations behind the use of military force in contemporary world politics. Traditionally, the international security subfield in international relations has focused on how states use or threaten to use violence to preserve their sovereignty and resolve political conflicts with other states. We begin the course by examining how the structure of the international system constrains a state’s ability to meet these responsibilities. This discussion then leads into an examination of the origins of war between states and nuclear deterrence theory. After these sections, we examine how the task of protecting national security has changed in the post-Cold War and post-9/11 contexts.

There are three primary objectives of this course. The first is to introduce core concepts and contending theoretical approaches in the field of security studies. The second is to further develop critical thinking and analytical skills with which to analyze pressing national security priorities. The third is to draw on work by specialists in the field to examine and analyze a range of policy relevant questions, including: Why do states go to war? Does nuclear proliferation enhance or diminish international stability? Under what conditions do civil wars occur? Does terrorism pose a pressing challenge to sovereign states? Does globalization contribute to or detract from national security? What strategies should the United States adopt to cope with traditional and emerging threats to its political interests?

Course Requirements

There are three requirements for this course. First, you will be expected to attend class, keep up with the assigned readings, participate in class discussions, and write short response papers about specified readings. Second, you will take two in-class midterm examinations. Third, you will draft a policy analysis paper due by the last day of class. Your final grade will be assigned as follows:

Attendance, participation, and response papers 20%

Exam 1 25%

Exam 2 25%

Policy paper 30%


GOV 360N • Pol Of International Trade

37620 • Jensen, Nathan
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 108
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Please check back for updates.


GOV 360R • Civil Wars/Ethnic Violence

37640 • Findley, Michael
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM MEZ B0.306
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Course Overview, Format, and Objectives

Civil wars pose one of the greatest threats to international peace and security today. Recent conflicts in contexts as diverse as Rwanda, Libya, Russia, Syria, Colombia, and India demonstrate the devastating consequences of violent civil conflict. Indicative of this broader trend in the outbreak and continuation of civil violence is the fact that 90% of UN peacekeeping operations since 1989 have been deployed to disputes that have a significant internal conflict component. Despite the threat posed by such conflicts, recent advances toward peace in areas such as Namibia, El Salvador, Cambodia, and Mozambique as well as some of the Arab Spring cases o↵er encouragement about the prospects for averting or resolving long-standing civil conflicts.

This course is structured to consider various theoretical approaches in the study of civil wars and their management. Throughout, we will sample from numerous cases of civil war and violence paying close attention to the conflicts in South Africa, Rwanda, and the former Yugoslavia. The first segment of the course explores the basic dimensions of civil wars and ethnic violence. In particular, we examine the origins and development of ethnic and political identities and how they structure the parameters of conflict. Core questions include: What do we mean by “ethnicity”? Is a given identity inherent in individuals, or is it subject to change? If manipulable, do “instrumental” elites use ethnicity to their advantage? Is there an ethnic dimension to all civil violence?

The second section of the course is devoted to the process by which conflict among individuals and groups turns violent, with an emphasis on civil wars in Africa. Key questions include: What political incentives do leaders have to drum up support through violence? How do economic factors such as natural resources a↵ect a group’s opportunity or willingness to engage in violence? What causes internal violence to “spill over” into other countries or regions?

The third and final section addresses strategies of conflict management and resolution. We consider some of the following questions: Does a feasible set of preventive solutions to civil wars exist? What is successful conflict management? Which strategies employed by international actors are most successful, and why? What are the obstacles to implementing conflict resolution measures?

The course will enable students to develop an understanding of: the nature of various identities, how identity contributes (or not) to civil war, what other dimensions shape civil war, and how such wars are resolved. In addition to considering various theoretical approaches, three detailed case studies, and brief examinations of many other cases, by writing the research paper you will carry out research on civil wars of your choice and should develop a solid understanding of them. These activities and assignments should help you (1) gain a knowledge of countries and wars, theoretically and factually, (2) write professional research papers, (3) give oral presentations, and (4) think critically, analytically, and synthetically.

I hope that our sessions will be engaging, informative, and participatory. I eschew a strict lecture format. Instead, we will engage in a variety of activities including lectures, personal writing exercises, partner and group work, class discussions, video clips, demonstrations, problem-solving activities, and other critical thinking exercises. I value and will solicit your input on class activities both at the beginning of the semester as well as around midterm. I will make every reasonable e↵ort to incorporate these ideas in the classroom.


GOV 365D • Intl Rels Of E/Stheast Asia

37660 • Maclachlan, Patricia
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 136
(also listed as ANS 361)
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International Relations of East and Southeast Asia

GOV 365D/ANS 361

Global Cultures Flag

 

Fall 2019

 

Prof. Patricia L. Maclachlan

TTH 9:30-11:00, BUR 136

 

Course Description:

            This upper division undergraduate course introduces students to some of the major theories and themes in the post-Cold War—and particularly contemporary—international relations of East and Southeast Asia: “Great Power” (China, Japan, and the United States) contributions and challenges to the military and economic security of the region, the objectives and processes of economic globalization and institutional integration in the Asia-Pacific, the domestic political determinants of international relations, and the future of the liberal institutional order in the region.  Along the way, we will explore the ongoing North Korean nuclear threat, tensions between China and Taiwan, territorial disputes in the East and South China seas, and the fate of the United States’ so-called Asia Pivot.

 

 

Prerequisites:

            6 semester hours of lower-division Government courses.  Graduate students may take this course for graduate credit.

 

 

Assignments/Grading Policy:

  1.  3 in-class midterm exams (20% + 25% + 25%):                                70%   
  2. Short (approx. 3 pages each) writing assignments (2 x 15%):          30%

 

 

Texts:

  1. Sheila A. Smith, Japan Rearmed: The Politics of Military Power. Harvard University Press, 2019.
  2. David Shambaugh, China’s Future. Polity, 2016.
  3. Victor Cha, The Impossible State: North Korea, Past and Future. Ecco, 2013.

 

Additional readings will be provided to students via Canvas at the beginning of the semester.


GOV 365E • Political Economy Of Asia

37669 • Maclachlan, Patricia
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.120
(also listed as ANS 361)
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Political Economy of Asia

GOV 365E/ANS 361 (Writing Flag)

Prof. Patricia L Maclachlan

TTH 12:30-2:00, MEZ 1.120

 

 

This intensive reading and writing course explores key topics in the political-economic development of modern Japan, China, and North and South Korea: the sources of the region’s “miraculous” economic growth rates; the “Developmental State” and the impact of industrial policy on economic growth; the significance of East Asia’s distinctive corporations (chaebol, keiretsu, Chinese State-Owned Enterprises); the impact of globalization on the region and the processes of economic reform; the social consequences of East Asian growth models; and North Korea’s failure to develop. We examine these and related topics with reference to both political science theories and other regions of the world.  

 

In keeping with the “writing flag,” this course prioritizes the development of advanced research and writing skills.  

 

Prerequisites:

 

6 semester hours of lower-division Government courses. Some knowledge of East Asia and or comparative politics/political economy is recommended but not required.

 

 

Assignments/ Grading Policy: 

  1. Quizzes on assigned readings (approx. 6):                         10%
  2. Class participation: 10%
  3. Two short take-home essay assignments on required readings: 15%
  4. Research paper proposal: 10%
  5. Research paper (approx. 3,000 words) in 2 drafts:             40%    
  6. In-class research paper presentation:                         10%

 

 

Texts

There are no required texts for this course. All readings will be posted on Canvas.


GOV 365J • Australian Society/Politics

37670 • Evans, Rhonda
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM SZB 278
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COURSE DESCRIPTION

Australia is the principal democratic, economic, and military power in the Southwest Pacific. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples inhabited the continent and its surrounding islands for some 50,000 years before Europeans arrived. In 1788, British colonization began with establishment a penal colony near present-day Sydney. Six distinct colonies federated voluntarily in 1901 to form the Commonwealth of Australia. Today, the country boasts a multi-ethnic population of 24.1 million (Texas has 27.9 million), dispersed unevenly across a landmass nearly the size of the lower 48 US states. It has served as a key US ally since World War II. While Australia retains special ties to Britain and the US, it has become an important economic and political actor in the Asia-Pacific region, with strong trading links to China, Japan, Indonesia, Malaysia, South Korea, the Philippines, and, increasingly, India. This course will (1) provide an overview of Australia’s history and constitutional development; (2) examine the country’s political institutions and party politics; and (3) consider distinct opportunities and challenges that Australia faces across a range of domestic and foreign policy areas.


GOV 365N • Authoritarianism

37678 • Brownlee, Jason
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 1.134
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Please check back for updates.


GOV 365N • Comparative Legal Systems

36704 • Brinks, Daniel
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ B0.306
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Please check back for updates.


GOV 365N • Ethics Of Foreign Intervention

37679 • Brownlee, Jason
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 3.116
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Please check back for updates.


GOV 365N • Intl Dev And Global Justice

37680 • Gerring, John
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CAL 21
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International Development and Global Justice

 

Gov 365N (Unique:  TBA)

Fall 2019

TTH 12:30-2pm, CAL 21

Closing limit: 18

 

 

John Gerring

Professor

jgerring@austin.utexas.edu

Office: BAT 3.136,  512-232-7254

Office hours: TTh 2-3:30

 

 

This course examines the question of global development. The key questions may be summarized as follows:

  • What is global development? How should it be defined and measured?
  • What patterns of development can be discerned across countries, within countries, and through time?
  • What explains variation in development? Is it geography, colonialism, macroeconomic policy and international political economy, agricultural policy, demography, health policy, human capital and education policy, political institutions, culture, some admixture of the above, or something else entirely?
  • What is the impact of development? Does it make people happier, more fulfilled?
  • What is our responsibility vis-à-vis those who are less privileged?

 

            These are not easy questions and they do not suggest quick answers. One could easily spend a lifetime exploring a single facet of a single question. Through readings, lecture, and discussion we shall try to summarize the current state of research. But the purpose of this course is not to arrive at authoritative conclusions. It is, rather, to introduce students to these important topics and to underline their inter-relationships. Arguably, it is difficult to answer any single question without having a sense of how it relates to other questions. It is hard, for instance, to understand the role of education in structuring the achievement of individuals and societies without grappling with problems of health and infrastructure. It is hard, similarly, to understand the role of nation-states without also grappling with the international system within which states are situated. It is hard, finally, to understand present-day problems without understanding their history. In development, everything is connected to everything else.

            It follows that in understanding the topic of global development one must incorporate the work of many disciplines. This includes philosophy, economics, sociology, psychology, history, anthropology, archeology, and political science. All are represented on this syllabus, to varying degrees.

Grades

Grades will be based on the following components: (a) class attendance and participation (10%); (b) midterm exam (25%); (c) final exam (25%), and (d) presentation and research paper (40%).

You should be aware that this class will require a good deal of time and effort on your part. If you are unable to make this time-commitment you may be happier in a different course.

Protocol

Please arrive on time. Attendance at lectures and in discussion sections will factor into the final grade. If you arrive after attendance has been taken, your attendance will not be counted for that class. Do not read, sleep, or chat with your neighbors. Put your cell phones away. If you need to use your laptop to access readings or to take notes do not surf the web or use email. Be respectful of others in your comments. Do not leave until class is dismissed.

Academic conduct

Each student in the course is expected to abide by the University of Texas Honor Code:

“As a student of The University of Texas at Austin, I shall abide by the core values of the University and uphold academic integrity.”

This means that work you produce on assignments, tests and exams is all your own work, unless it is assigned as group work. The instructor will make it clear for each test, exam or assignment whether collaboration is encouraged or not. Always cite your sources. If you use words or ideas that are not your own (or that you have used in previous class), you must make that clear otherwise you will be guilty of plagiarism and subject to academic disciplinary action, including failure of the course. You are responsible for understanding UT’s Academic Honesty Policy:  http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acint_student.php

Absences, extensions

Students are expected to take exams and complete written work at their scheduled times. By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, you will be given an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

Participation

I expect active participation from students. Do not think of participation simply as a matter of “saying something.” What you say must be pertinent to the question at hand. Be especially judicious in the use of anecdotes drawn from your personal life. Sometimes, they are relevant to the subject matter; sometimes, not.

            Let me say a word about my responses to your comments. You should realize that any instructor who incorporates discussion into classroom activity is in a somewhat awkward position. I want to encourage open and frank discussion but I must also be sure to correct any misperceptions that arise from such discussion. If a comment is factually or logically wrong I will call attention to it. The purpose is not to embarrass but simply to clarify the point – for that person and for everyone else, many of whom may share the confusion. Making mistakes is part of the learning experience. If you do not allow yourself to make mistakes you are preventing yourself from learning. I make mistakes all the time. There is nothing wrong with a wrong answer. Oftentimes, the most productive sort of answer or question is one that reveals what is not clear in people’s minds. It is problematic, however, if your answer reveals that you have not done the assigned reading or that you have not been paying attention to previous class discussion.

            Please be attentive to standard rules of decorum: avoid dogmatism, respect others’ views, and try to move class discussion forward (pay attention to what others say and respond to the previous point). Use the locution “like” only when comparing things – not, like, when pausing in the middle of a sentence.


GOV 365N • Nazi Culture And Politics

37684 • Hake, Sabine
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 134
(also listed as EUS 348, GSD 360, HIS 362G)
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The Nazi party was the first in modern history to rely heavily on culture to establish and sustain its regimes of power and terror. During the Third Reich, the art of propaganda played a key role in mobilizing mass support for the party and its policies. But the Nazis went even further, creating an aestheticized vision of nation, folk, and community. Architects build or planned monumental roads and cities to the Führer. Artists and writers celebrated the beauty of the Aryan man and the strength of the racial community. Filmmakers created compelling mass spectacles and diversions. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, we will study the relationship between culture and power during the Third Reich through its main proponents (Joseph Goebbels, Leni Riefenstahl) and events (Degenerate Art Exhibit). We will discuss the new ministries of “enlightenment and propaganda” and the changed conditions of cultural life, study the systematic suppression of oppositional voices and modernist sensibilities, and analyze the characteristics of fascist aesthetics and official Nazi art. Examples will be taken from art, architecture, literature, music, and film; also considered will be the so-called inner emigration and the activities of the exiles in the United States and elsewhere.  

 By providing an overview of culture and politics in the Third Reich, the course also addresses more fundamental questions about the unique role of culture in modern democracies and dictatorships—questions about the relationship between political propaganda and modern entertainment, mass media and authoritarianism, political aesthetics and ideology, and the dynamics of oppression, resistance, and consent. The question of fascist aesthetics and its later manifestations and interpretations will be a major theme throughout the course


GOV 365N • Politics Of Memory: Ger/US

37685 • Laubenthal, Barbara
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.102
(also listed as AMS 321, EUS 348, GSD 360)
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What role do narratives of the past play in current politics and policies in Germany and the United States? This course addresses this question by engaging with key theoretical and empirical debates from the burgeoning research field of politics of the past. We will look at the role that memories play in German and US politics today from a comparative perspective, and with several case studies, we will ask questions such as:  how are transnational political events like the Second World War, the Cold War and historical immigration movements articulated and used in current political debates? How do narratives of the past reproduce or challenge contemporary power relations? To what extent do political actors and institutions construct particular historical narratives that serve their current interests? In answering these questions, the course will put a specific focus on the role of memory in German and US immigration politics.

The course aims to enable students to understand central theories and concepts of memory studies, and to apply them in an empirical case study. At the end of the course, students will have a thorough theoretical and empirical understanding on the ways in which memory and politics intersect both as research fields and as political practices in contemporary societies.

 

Readings

Assmann, Aleida/Conrad, Sebastian (eds.) (2010): Memory in a Global Age. Discourses, Practices and Trajectories. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Halbwachs, Maurice (1980): The Collective Memory. New York: Harper and Row.

Kleist, Olaf/Glynn, Irial (eds.) (2012): History, Memory and Migration. Perceptions of the Past and the Politics of Incorporation, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Nebow, Richard N./Kansteiner, Wulf/Fogu, Claudio (2006) (eds.): The Politics of Memory in Post-war Europe. Durham: Duke University Press.

Olick, Jeffrey (2007): The Politics of Regret. On Collective Memory and Historical Responsibility. London/New York: Routledge.

Torpey, John. 2006. Making Whole What Has Been Smashed: On Reparations Politics. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press. 

Wittlinger, Ruth (2011): The Merkel’s Government Politics of the Past, German Politics and Society 26 (4), 9-27.


GOV 365N • Relg Ethics/Human Rights

37690 • Schofer, Jonathan
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 304
(also listed as J S 365, R S 373C)
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Course Description:

Do religions support human rights or conflict with human rights?   This course examines the grounds for human rights, and the relations between rights and religions.  Can religions reinforce human rights to protect against genocide, torture and disappearances, hate speech, and discrimination?  Can religious leadership within religions effectively combat violence against women, even when the violence is upheld by that same religion?   Students will study religions as providing grounds for human rights, as sometimes challenging conceptions of human rights, and as needing protections through human rights.  With this basis in the relations between religion and human rights, students will study the significance of the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations, and the following application of international human rights since the mid-twentieth century.

 

 


GOV 365N • Switzerland/Globalization

37694 • Hess, Peter
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GEA 114
(also listed as EUS 348, GSD 360)
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 370J • Campaigns And Elections

37710 • Shaw, Daron
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 0.130
(also listed as GOV 370L)
show description

Government 370L

Campaigns and Elections

 Prof. Daron Shaw

Fall 2019

COURSE OVERVIEW
This course is designed to introduce you to American political campaigns and elections through lectures and readings. It is not designed to serve as a “how to” manual for aspiring politicians or consultants. More often than not, it is more theoretical than practical. Still, some nuts and bolts information is essential and will be part of the curriculum. My main focus is on federal elections, though references are made to state and local elections. We spend some time revisiting past campaigns and elections in order to contrast and explicate contemporary American electoral politics. The lectures and readings pay particular attention to the presidential elections of 2012 and 2016. The races between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, and between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are not only the most recent, but provide vivid details supplementing the theoretical and descriptive points raised in the course.

 

As with the lower division version of this course, there are three primary objectives.  The first is to provide basic information about American elections and electioneering by examining both the rules of the game and the players. The second is to develop analytical skills with which to analyze complex relationships and phenomena. The third is to introduce you to the work of the political scientist by concentrating on paradigms and techniques of the discipline. Unlike the lower division course, the emphasis is on the latter two goals. 

  

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

 

Midterm Examinations

                                                                                          Midterm #1                                            50 points (25%)

                                                                                          Midterm #2                                            50 points (25%)

 

Campaign Simulation

                                                                                          Group Presentation                          40 points (20%)

                                                                                          Individual Paper                                  50 points (25%)

 

Participation and Attendance                                                                                             10 points (5%)

 

There are two main requirements for this course. First, there will be two exams. The first is worth twenty-five percent (25%) of your grade and will probably be given in early October. The second will also be worth twenty-five percent of your grade and will probably be given in early December, on the last day of class. The examinations are not cumulative; exam #1 covers material through week 6, while exam #2 covers material from weeks 7-14. They will feature a mixed format, with multiple choice, short answer, and essay questions. The exams draw roughly equally from lecture and the readings. When taking the exams, you are not allowed to talk or use your notes, books or neighbor's test.  Anyone caught cheating will be treated per University guidelines.  Study groups, on the other hand, are encouraged.  Failure to take either of the exams at the appointed times results in a grade of F.  I allow cumulative exams for those with compelling excuses, but I am the sole arbiter of what constitutes a compelling excuse. You need medical or extreme personal difficulties before I will consent to such an action. There will be no early exams, nor can exams be taken at any place other than the scheduled room. If you cannot take the exams at the scheduled time and place, you should not enroll in the course.

 

Second, there will be a campaign simulation. I will select several candidates from competitive U.S. Senate elections. Each candidate will have a team of five students, each of whom will be responsible for a report on a selected aspect of the campaign. The individual reports will be 8-10 pages long and will count for twenty-five percent (25%) of your grade. Details on the expectations for the report will be provided in class, but suffice it to say that you are expected to provide a plan detailing how your candidate will deal with one of the following aspects of the campaign: (1) budget, resource allocation, and fundraising, (2) polling and GOTV, (3) paid advertising, (4) scheduling, advance, and media, and (5) online and social media outreach.

 

Each campaign team will also be responsible for a twelve (12) minute presentation. Presentations will be held during a Saturday session in mid-November. The audience will include myself, other professors and political consultants, and several graduate students currently studying campaigns and elections. The point of the presentation is to present a strategic overview of the candidate’s prospects. Unlike the reports, the grade for the presentation will be collective (everyone on the team gets the same mark), and will constitute twenty percent (20%) of your overall grade.

 

Finally, attendance and participation are strongly encouraged. I reserve the right to give pop quizzes at any time, and these quizzes are worth five percent of your final grade.

 

 

READINGS

There is one required text for the course, which will be available at the University Co-Op bookstore.

 

John Sides, Daron Shaw, Keena Lipsitz, and Matt Grossman. 2019 (third edition, with 2018 election update). “Campaigns and Elections: Rules, Reality, Strategy, Choice.” Norton Publishing. 

 

GOV 370L • Campaigns And Elections

36732 • Shaw, Daron
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 0.130
(also listed as GOV 370J)
show description

Government 370L

Campaigns and Elections

 Prof. Daron Shaw

Fall 2019

COURSE OVERVIEW
This course is designed to introduce you to American political campaigns and elections through lectures and readings. It is not designed to serve as a “how to” manual for aspiring politicians or consultants. More often than not, it is more theoretical than practical. Still, some nuts and bolts information is essential and will be part of the curriculum. My main focus is on federal elections, though references are made to state and local elections. We spend some time revisiting past campaigns and elections in order to contrast and explicate contemporary American electoral politics. The lectures and readings pay particular attention to the presidential elections of 2012 and 2016. The races between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, and between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are not only the most recent, but provide vivid details supplementing the theoretical and descriptive points raised in the course.

 

As with the lower division version of this course, there are three primary objectives.  The first is to provide basic information about American elections and electioneering by examining both the rules of the game and the players. The second is to develop analytical skills with which to analyze complex relationships and phenomena. The third is to introduce you to the work of the political scientist by concentrating on paradigms and techniques of the discipline. Unlike the lower division course, the emphasis is on the latter two goals. 

  

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

 

Midterm Examinations

                                                                                          Midterm #1                                            50 points (25%)

                                                                                          Midterm #2                                            50 points (25%)

 

Campaign Simulation

                                                                                          Group Presentation                          40 points (20%)

                                                                                          Individual Paper                                  50 points (25%)

 

Participation and Attendance                                                                                             10 points (5%)

 

There are two main requirements for this course. First, there will be two exams. The first is worth twenty-five percent (25%) of your grade and will probably be given in early October. The second will also be worth twenty-five percent of your grade and will probably be given in early December, on the last day of class. The examinations are not cumulative; exam #1 covers material through week 6, while exam #2 covers material from weeks 7-14. They will feature a mixed format, with multiple choice, short answer, and essay questions. The exams draw roughly equally from lecture and the readings. When taking the exams, you are not allowed to talk or use your notes, books or neighbor's test.  Anyone caught cheating will be treated per University guidelines.  Study groups, on the other hand, are encouraged.  Failure to take either of the exams at the appointed times results in a grade of F.  I allow cumulative exams for those with compelling excuses, but I am the sole arbiter of what constitutes a compelling excuse. You need medical or extreme personal difficulties before I will consent to such an action. There will be no early exams, nor can exams be taken at any place other than the scheduled room. If you cannot take the exams at the scheduled time and place, you should not enroll in the course.

 

Second, there will be a campaign simulation. I will select several candidates from competitive U.S. Senate elections. Each candidate will have a team of five students, each of whom will be responsible for a report on a selected aspect of the campaign. The individual reports will be 8-10 pages long and will count for twenty-five percent (25%) of your grade. Details on the expectations for the report will be provided in class, but suffice it to say that you are expected to provide a plan detailing how your candidate will deal with one of the following aspects of the campaign: (1) budget, resource allocation, and fundraising, (2) polling and GOTV, (3) paid advertising, (4) scheduling, advance, and media, and (5) online and social media outreach.

 

Each campaign team will also be responsible for a twelve (12) minute presentation. Presentations will be held during a Saturday session in mid-November. The audience will include myself, other professors and political consultants, and several graduate students currently studying campaigns and elections. The point of the presentation is to present a strategic overview of the candidate’s prospects. Unlike the reports, the grade for the presentation will be collective (everyone on the team gets the same mark), and will constitute twenty percent (20%) of your overall grade.

 

Finally, attendance and participation are strongly encouraged. I reserve the right to give pop quizzes at any time, and these quizzes are worth five percent of your final grade.

 

 

READINGS

There is one required text for the course, which will be available at the University Co-Op bookstore.

 

John Sides, Daron Shaw, Keena Lipsitz, and Matt Grossman. 2019 (third edition, with 2018 election update). “Campaigns and Elections: Rules, Reality, Strategy, Choice.” Norton Publishing. 

 

GOV 370L • Pol Of Voter Suppression

37725 • Jones, Bryan
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM BUR 136
show description

Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 370L • Problems In US Politics

37730 • Gerring, John
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 1.102
show description

Problems in US Politics

 

GOV 370L, Spring 2019

TTh 3:30-5:00, MEZ 1.102

Closing limit: 25

 

John Gerring

jgerring@austin.utexas.edu

Office: BAT 3.136

Office hours: TTh 2-3:30

 

 

 

What’s wrong with American politics? Those who follow politics are familiar with the litany of complaints. Both liberals and conservatives find much that is wanting – though, naturally, they don’t always agree on what it might be.

            Typically, “normative” questions are downplayed in political science. We shall place them front and center as a way of motivating the course. Specifically, we shall try to identify potential problems with American politics, to conceptualize them clearly, to measure them in a systematic fashion, to chart their history, to compare their status in other countries, to understand their causes and their effects, and their possible solutions. In short, we shall try to apply social science to the apparent problems of American politics.

Of particular concern are causal relationships. One should bear in mind that the ills of American politics – whatever they may be – are probably not the product of a single cause. That said, not all potential causal factors are equal. Some are undoubtedly more important than others. Some are more distal and others more proximal. Some may have a narrow sphere of influence while others affect a wide range of phenomena. Some might not be causes at all. This is what we will puzzle over.

Section I: Methodology

To address these questions in a systematic and rigorous fashion, students will need a grounding in social science methodology. This is the focus of the first part of the course (roughly three weeks), during which we will read sections from a methodology textbook (Gerring & Christenson 2017) and I will do a fair bit of lecturing. Some students may be familiar with this territory; even so, a refresher is in order by way of preface to the main section of the course.

Flipping the Classroom

The first part of the course follows a traditional template, where the teacher teaches and the students listen – hopefully asking questions and making notes. This format is good for imparting lots of information but not very good at eliciting original thought or honing writing and presentational skills.

The hallmark of a good education is not the facts you learn but your ability to learn new facts, and analyze those facts – to take a problem and work through it on your own or in the company of your peers, and to present your solution. This is what employers are looking for in the modern workforce, where most (well-paying) jobs demand creativity, analytic skills, independent learning, and skillful presentation - not rote memorization and highly repetitive, structured assignments.

            To facilitate this, Sections II and III “flip” the traditional classroom. That is, students do the research and teaching, and I facilitate, ask questions, offer suggestions, and occasionally critique.

Each student will be asked to choose one problem area to focus on, as listed on the syllabus. I will try to accommodate people’s choices, but we can have no more than two people working on a single topic. So you may end up with a topic that is not your first choice.

You may choose the entire area, as listed on the syllabus, or a smaller problem that lies within that broad area. In most cases, two people will join forces on the same general topic. Each should address different facets of that topic in their presentation and their paper. (If there additional issues that you think should be addressed but are not listed on the syllabus let me know and we can talk about adding them.)

Section II: First Presentations

Students signed up for each meeting will be in charge of that meeting. You should  begin by introducing the subject to the rest of the class, with the aid of PPT.

Each presenter should plan to talk for roughly 25-30 minutes. (It may take you a little longer than that if you are interrupted with questions and comments from the audience, but that’s fine.)

If there is more than one presenter for a topic (as there will be for most class meetings), please coordinate so that the presentations are not redundant. Likewise, make sure that you choose distinctive topics for your research projects.

Questions you might consider… What is the problem? How should it be conceptualized and measured? (Pay particular attention to the definition of complex, ambiguous concepts, e.g., “populism.”) What is its history and possible future course? How does the situation in the US compare with other countries? What are the possible causes and effects? What are some possible solutions?

Don’t feel like you have to address all of these questions. And please try to avoid the sort of “ABC’s of American government.” Assume your audience is familiar with the basics of our constitution and our institutions – the sort of thing that an introductory course in American politics might impart. This is an advanced course in American politics so you can assume that everyone is on first or second base, so to speak.

The main objective should be to craft a coherent and well-organized presentation. State clearly what you will accomplish at the outset. Your second slide (after the title slide) should contain an outline of the talk, and this outline should be logically ordered – just like an outline for a research paper.

In the final part of your talk – comprising one or two slides – discuss how you plan to focus your own research. What part of this vast problem will you address? What evidence is available? What is your preliminary argument? How does it build upon, or differ from, what others have said?

The last slide(s) of the PPT should display a list of the works (books and articles) that you surveyed – your working bibliography. PPT should be posted that day on Canvas.

All of the topics laid out below are vast, so you will need to decide how to define it and bound it. State clearly at the outset what you intend to cover and be sure you cover it in some fashion (though naturally you won’t have time to go into a great deal of detail given the breadth of these topics). So, you might take a topic like polarization and – after talking about the topic in a general vein for a few minutes – focus on polarization in a particular venue (e.g., Congress) or a particular causal factor.

In surveying the literature, pay particular attention to methodological issues – things we discussed in Section I. How do we know what we (think we) know? What’s the evidence? How strong is it? What are potential weaknesses? Why do people disagree on a particular question? What’s the methodological basis for their disagreement? (Are they looking at different facts? Do they have differing interpretations of those facts? Are the facts wrong? Is the interpretation wrong? What’s going on?)

The presentation will be accompanied and followed by questions and discussion from the rest of the class. Those in the audience should act as (constructive) critics. That is, they should offer their own views, especially if at variance with the speaker’s views. This is an occasion for a wide-ranging discussion of the problem at-hand (within the available time-constraints). With respect to the presentation itself, audience members should praise the strengths of the presentation while also pointing out ambiguities and weaknesses, and giving specific feedback on the proposed topic. How can the presenter achieve his/her goals? Is it a tractable topic? (Is it too big, or too small?) What evidence might be helpful?

The audience is a crucial element of the presentation. Do not think of this as a day off. Even though I have not assigned readings, I expect you to engage with the speaker and the topic, bringing your own research into the discussion. (Note that all of the topics overlap considerably, so you may know something about the speaker’s topic that s/he does not.)

Section III: Second Presentations

This section will follow the format of the previous section. However, instead of speaking generally about the topic (as you did in the first presentation) focus exclusively on your own research, which should be much further along than it was the first time you presented.

As previously, each presentation should be approximately 25-30 minutes, followed by discussion. As previously, members of the audience will function as constructive critics. Issues for debate are both substantive (Is the presenter correct?) and methodological (Are there strong grounds for accepting the presenter’s argument? What is the evidence, and has it been correctly construed?). Indeed, many of the debates boil down to methodological issues. Should we accept the correlation between money and voting behavior in Congress as a sign of the influence of money? How can we play out the counterfactual (a member’s behavior if s/he didn’t receive a campaign contribution from a corporation or individual)? When citing a study, the presenter will need to be able to answer questions about its methodology. It is not sufficient to note that it was published in a peer review journal with lots of fancy tables and graphs. This is why the first section of the course, on social science methodology, is so important.

Writing assignment

The final draft of the paper will be handed in at the end of the semester. You will need to respond to the comments and suggestions you receive from your colleagues, and from me, in your presentations.

            Target length for the paper is 10-15 pp (single-space, 1-inch margins all around, 12-point font). However, do not to be too concerned with the length of the paper. This is the least important aspect of your work. Put differently, some papers are too long and others are too short. But this is not because they have failed to reach, or have surpassed, an arbitrary page threshold. It is because, based on their merits, they have more to do – or there are redundant features that need to be excised.

            Students are encouraged to exchange ideas, sources, and drafts – especially if they are working on related topics. But writing must be done individually. Any sharing of text will be viewed as plagiarism unless it is explicitly cited.

In putting together your presentation and paper you should survey the literature on the topic – books and articles, with special attention to scholarly work (though one shouldn’t take this distinction too seriously, as sometimes work addressed to a broad audience of lay readers is topnotch).

You should also develop an argument. The argument might be original, or it might be derivative. If the latter, you must have some original content. For example, if there are contending perspectives on a topic you might show why one argument is superior to others. Or you might show how arguments that seem to be conflicting can actually be reconciled. You might also review a wider range of empirical material than previous studies have done. This, too, is an original and valuable contribution. You might, finally, do some empirical work of your own. This is not required, but with some subjects – if they have not been adequately probed, or some aspect of existing studies seems suspect – it may be invaluable.

Background sources

To get you started, I have listed background sources for each topic on the syllabus. (If I have PDF copies of the books, I will post these on Canvas. Articles should be available electronically from the library homepage.)

My list of background sources features books, with only a smattering of articles, and many of the books are written for a popular audience – which makes them accessible and fun, but also perhaps rather limited.

The topics, as well as the background sources, overlap. This means that one topic or book will often touch on other topics. Try to focus as much as possible on “your” topic, so as not to trespass on other people’s topics. But don’t worry too much about it. Overlap is fine, as you can learn from each other.

My list of background sources is intended as a jumping-off place. You will need to find additional material. What that material is depends of course on how you choose to orient your presentation and paper.

Note that just because a source is relevant to your topic does not mean that you need to read it from beginning to end. It means that you must read in a focused, strategic manner.

I encourage you to spend more time on academic sources than popular sources. Still, with a topic such as ours it is important to see what journalists, pundits, and bloggers have to say. Sometimes, it’s pretty sophisticated; sometimes, it’s merely dogmatic. You will have to judge.

This is not a course on current events. Still, it’s important to stay on top of what’s going on in the crazy world of US politics. For general coverage and commentary see: New York Times, Washington Post, Vox, FiveThirtyEight, Monkey Cage. For a sampling of right- and left-wing views see: Real Clear Politics.

To situate yourself, it may be helpful to begin by taking a look at an American politics textbook. I think most of them are pretty good, though naturally their coverage of particular issues will vary. More specialized textbooks are also available for many of the subjects we are dealing with in this course. These should be especially helpful in gaining an overview of the subject.

Beyond textbooks, academic work appears in a variety of university presses and in journals, most of which are available electronically through the library and many of which are hosted in JSTOR.

Search for academic work on a subject with Google Scholar or Web of Science. If you find a source that is right on topic, take a look at the sources that it cites and the sources that cite it (which Google Scholar and Web of Science will allow you to do).

Participation

I expect active participation from students, within the constraints imposed by class size. However, do not think of participation simply as a matter of “saying something.” There are insightful comments and questions, and then there is irrelevant drivel. You know what I’m getting at. Be especially judicious in the use of anecdotes drawn from your personal life. Sometimes, they are relevant to the subject matter; sometimes, not.

            Let me say a word about my own responses to your comments. You should realize that any instructor who incorporates discussion into classroom activity is in a somewhat awkward position. I want to encourage open and frank discussion but I must also be sure to correct any misperceptions that arise from such discussion. If a comment is factually or logically wrong I will call attention to it. The purpose is not to embarrass the speaker but simply to clarify the point – for that person and for everyone else, many of whom may share the confusion. Making mistakes is part of the learning experience. If you do not allow yourself to make mistakes you are preventing yourself from learning. I make mistakes all the time. There is nothing wrong with a wrong answer. Oftentimes, the most productive sort of answer or question is one that reveals what is not clear in people’s minds. It is problematic, however, if your answer reveals that you have not done the assigned reading or that you have not been paying attention to previous class discussion.

            Please be attentive to standard rules of decorum: avoid dogmatism, respect others’ views, and try to move class discussion forward (pay attention to what others say and respond to the previous point). We will observe the 1-finger/2-finger rule. When you raise two fingers it means that your comment follows directly upon the preceding point. Use the locution “like” only when comparing things – not, like, when pausing in the middle of a sentence.

Eligibility

This is an upper division course in political science (aka government). I am expecting that many students will be avid political junkies. All students should have taken at least one introductory course in American politics. If you’re unsure about the basics, review a textbook on American politics.

You should be aware that this class will require a good deal of time and effort on your part. If you are unable to make this time-commitment you may be happier in a different course.

Grades

Grades will be based on the following components: (a) attendance (10%), (b) participation, including feedback on others work (20%), (c) first presentation (10%), (d) second presentation (10%), (e) outline of research paper (10%), (f) final draft of research paper (30%).


GOV 370L • The United States Congress

37735 • Craig, Alison
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 0.128
show description

Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 370R • Money In US Politics

37745 • Roberts, Brian
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 1.102
show description

Concerns about the influence of money in American politics scream at us daily from news headlines, Twitter feeds, and the like.  Lurking beneath these headlines, however, are very nuanced issues of philosophy, law, politics, and policy.  This course explores the nature and consequences of money in American politics.

Contemporary debates over money in politics go to the heart of the U.S. Constitution, pitting the First Amendment rights of speech and assembly against the perceived fairness and efficacy of a republican government awash, some claim, in increasingly unaccountable money. 

 

Campaign finance issues lie at the crossroads of a bewildering number of analytical perspectives. We examine the work of historians, social scientists, legal scholars, and interested parties on all sides of the debate in an effort not only to assess current policy debates but also to understand how we got here.

 

The objective of the course is not to persuade you of any particular point of view but, rather, to arm you with the substantive knowledge, theoretical foundation, and analytical tools needed to be resolute in whatever conclusions you draw from this experience.

 


GOV 379S • Politics In Fiction

37770 • Sparrow, Bartholomew
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM BAT 1.104
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 379S • Regime Persp On Amer Politics

37775 • Tulis, Jeffrey
Meets W 3:30PM-6:30PM CAL 21
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 381L • Campaigns And Elections

37785 • Shaw, Daron
Meets W 6:30PM-9:30PM BAT 5.102
show description

Government 381L

Campaigns and Elections

 

Prof. Daron Shaw

Fall 2019 

COURSE OVERVIEW

 

This course has two objectives.  The first is to introduce you to the literature and controversies that animate our understanding of American elections and political campaigns.  In this sense, the format of the class will be fairly typical; weekly reading assignments will serve as the basis for critical inquiries into a range of issues.  The second objective is to teach you what it means to do empirical research in this area.  Most of us can readily identify the short-comings of the political science we read, but far fewer can pose interesting alternatives, formulate testable hypotheses and research designs, acquire pertinent data and carry out convincing tests and analyses.  This course aims at focusing your abilities and talents on these endeavors as well as bringing you up to speed on the literature.

 

COURSE EVALUATION

Your grade will be determined as follows:

Class Assignments

  1. Weekly Overviews of the Readings 20%
  2. Discussion Leader Presentations 20%

 

Research Paper

  1. Proposal 5%         
  2. Draft 15%      
  3. Final Draft 40%.     

 

COURSE MATERIALS

  1. Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes (2017). “Shattered.”  Crown Publishing.
  2. Sasha Cohen (2013). “Victory Lab.” Broadway Books.
  3. Marty Cohen, David Karol, Hans Noel, and John Zaller (2008), “The Party Decides.” University of Chicago Press.
  4. Donald Green and Alan Gerber, (2004), “Get Out the Vote.” 3rd edition. Brookings Press.
  5. Eitan Hersh (2015), “Hacking the Electorate.” Cambridge University Press.
  6. Sunshine Hillygus and Todd Shields (2008), “The Persuadable Voter.” Princeton University Press.
  7. Michael Lewis-Beck, Helmut Norpoth, William Jacoby, and Herb Weisberg (2008), “The American Voter Re-Visited.” University of Michigan Press.
  8. Daniel Shea and Michael Burton (2015), “Campaign Craft.” 5th edition. Praeger Press.
  9. Lynn Vavreck (2009), “The Message Matters.” Princeton University Press.
  10. Daron Shaw (2004), “The Race to 270.” University of Chicago Press.

 

Students will have to purchase these books online.  All readings are available either in the assigned books or through JSTOR (which you can access through any UT computer).


GOV 382M • Nietzsche

37800 • Pangle, Lorraine
Meets T 12:30PM-3:30PM BAT 1.104
show description

Government 382M

Nietzsche

Lorraine Pangle

Fall 2019

 

 

This course will consist in a close reading of Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra, parts 1-3, and of Twilight of the Idols. Our aim will be to understand Nietzsche’s radical critique of past political philosophy, including both Socratic thought and the modern Enlightenment project, and of the modern, cosmopolitan, bourgeois, commercial world that he saw as the ultimate product of rationalist philosophy. Major themes of the course will be human nature and its relation to history; the character of human excellence, freedom, and nobility; the will to power; the ills of modern society, including nihilism, the death of God, and the prospect of the last man; Nietzsche’s new perspectival account of truth; the task of philosophy; and the relationship of the philosopher to the rest of society.

  

Text

 

The Portable Nietzsche, ed. Kaufmann (New York: Penguin), ISBN 014015062

 

 

Course Requirements and Grading Policy

 

5 bi-weekly 1-2 page papers (maximum 500 words) on a passage not yet discussed in class, due at the beginning of class in alternate weeks for the first 10 weeks of term (5% each).

 

5 bi-weekly question sets, elucidating a few of the most important problems in a section of the text not yet discussed in class, and submitted by e-mail before class in alternate weeks for the first 10 weeks of term (5% each).

 

Term paper of 10-15 pages on a topic of your choosing (35%).

 

Class Participation: 15%.

 

 


GOV 382M • Socratic Political Philosophy

37805 • Stauffer, Devin
Meets W 6:30PM-9:30PM GAR 1.134
show description

GOV 382M

 

Socratic Political Philosophy

 

Devin Stauffer

 

 

Course Description

 

This course will examine the foundations of classical political philosophy through an intensive study of some of Plato’s most important dialogues. We will begin by studying Plato’s Charmides, a dialogue that treats the question of Socratic education and its relationship to political ambition. After the Charmides, we will study Plato’s Hippias Major, where Socrates discusses the character of nobility with the sophist Hippias, and then the Lysis, the Platonic dialogue on the relationship between friendship, virtue, and politics. Throughout the course, we will discuss the difference between the Socratic and the sophistic approaches to the question of virtue, especially in its connection to civic life; the problem of the relationship between philosophy and politics; and the Socratic understanding of human nature. The course aims to develop the capacity of students for concentrated, in-depth study of Plato’s dialogues, which will be approached not just as important moments in the history of political thought but as expressions of a philosophic position that should be examined to see whether it still retains its power and validity.   

 

Texts

 

Plato’s Charmides. Translated by Thomas G. West and Grace Starry West (Hackett)

 

The Roots of Political Philosophy: Ten Forgotten Platonic Dialogues. Edited by Thomas Pangle (Cornell University Press)

 

Plato’s Dialogue on Friendship: An Interpretation of the Lysis, with a New Translation. David Bolotin (Cornell)

 

Requirements and Grading

 

Seminar paper: 60%

Three short papers: 20%

Participation: 20%

 

(Note: these percentage are approximate.)

 

Prerequisites

 

Graduate standing or permission of the professor. 

 


GOV 384M • Public Opinion & Public Policy

37815 • Wlezien, Christopher
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM BAT 5.102
show description

GOV 384M • Public Opinion & Public Policy

Fall 2019
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM

 

The University of Texas at Austin 

Government 384M:

Public Opinion and Public Policy

 

Fall 2019

 

Christopher Wlezien

Wlezien@austin.utexas.edu

Course Description

This course examines the interrelationships between public opinion and public policy in the US and other countries, and should be of relevance to students of American Politics, Comparative Politics, and Public Policy.  It is designed to meet the needs of graduate students who hope to do original research, master a doctoral field, or teach in the area.  The literature that has been chosen is not inclusive of the wide-ranging and rapidly-expanding work that comprises the field, and encompasses those areas of recurrent scholarly interest, but should serve as a useful starting point.  The first half of the course treats public opinion as a dependent variable and policy as an independent variable the second half of the course reverses things, treating policy as the dependent variable instead.  I think this structure and the readings themselves will give you a good sense for what we have learned about the subject and help you identify your own avenues for research.

Course Format

The class is a seminar.  Throughout the semester, participants will engage in two basic activities.  First, each week we will as a group plough through a set of assigned readings on the scheduled topic.  All students are expected to do all reading and be prepared to actively participate, as this is critical to the healthy functioning of the seminar.  Second, beginning in week 3, one or two students will take responsibility for each session.  This should promote participation, limit my proclivity for filibustering, and help prepare each student for the day when he or she must lead a class.  Seminar leaders are expected to distribute by e-mail five discussion questions for the class meeting. 

Grades

The main assignment for this class is the preparation of an original research paper, about which more detailed information will be provided in class, first in week 1 and then during the course, as appropriate. 

Performance in the class will be assessed as follows:

25%  General class performance

25%  Class presentations

50%  Research paper

  •  5%   Hypothesis
  • 10%  Proposal
  • 35%  Final Paper.

Readings

The course readings will include numerous articles and books, most likely including the following:

Brooks, Clem and Jeff Manza.  2007.  Why Welfare States Persist: Public Opinion and the Future of Social Provision.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Erikson, Robert S., Michael B. MacKuen, and James A. Stimson. 2002.  The MacroPolity.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Jones, Bryan and Frank Baumgartner. 2005.  The Politics of Attention.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Mettler, Suzanne. 2011.  The Submerged State.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Soroka, Stuart and Christopher Wlezien. 2010.  Degrees of Democracy: Politics, Public Opinion and Policy.  New York: Cambridge University Press.

 


GOV 385L • Advanced Statistical Analysis

37825 • Lin, Tse
Meets TW 5:00PM-6:30PM MEZ 1.120
(also listed as SDS 385)
show description

Semester Fall 2019

GOV 385L – Title Advanced Statistical Analysis

SDS 385.14 – Title Maximum Likelihood Estimation

 

Substantial Writing Component: NO

 

Unique                       Days   Time                           Bldg/Room                 Instructor

                                    TW      5:00-6:30p                   MEZ 1.120                  LIN

 

Course Description

 

In this course we will study some advanced statistical analyses, including models with categorical or limited dependent variable, event count models, event history models, and other models depending on your interests. Most of these models rely on the maximum likelihood method of estimation, and hence we will first discuss probability distributions and statistical estimation theory, with an emphasis on the MLE. We will use STATA and/or R for statistical analysis and MATHEMATICA for mathematical analysis.

 

Prerequisites

 

Statistical Analysis in Political Science II or its equivalent

 

Grading Policy

 

You are required to write a research paper based on a statistical procedure introduced in this class. The topic of the paper is your own choice, but you should discuss your ideas with the instructor early in the semester to obtain his approval. Depending on substantive merits, topics based “simplistic” methods may not be acceptable. By the end of October, you should turn in a paper proposal laying out your theoretical arguments, describing your data, and presenting your research design. You should work closely with the instructor in developing ideas, formulating models, acquiring data, and carrying out the analyses. Your grade will be based on the end result as well as your interaction with the instructor while working on this paper. There will be homework assignments and/or exams as the instructor deems necessary.

 

Required Texts:

 

* G. King.1998. Political Methodology: The Likelihood Theory of Statistical Inference.

   Michigan.

* J. S. Long and J. Freese. 2014. Regression Models for Categorical Dependent

   Variables Using Stata. 3nd ed. Stata Press.

 

Recommended Texts:

 

* S. R. Eliason. 1993. Maximum Likelihood Estimation: Logic and Practice. Sage.

* W. H. Greene. 2012. Econometric Analysis. 7th ed. Pearson  & Prentice Hall.

* T. F. Liao. 1994. Interpreting Probability Models. Sage.

* A packet of journal articles and book chapters.

 


GOV 385R • Formal Political Analysis II

37835 • Wolford, Michael
Meets W 12:30PM-3:30PM BAT 5.102
show description

GOV 385R: Formal Political Analysis II

Prerequisites:

Graduate standing in Government, GOV 385N: Formal Political Analysis I

Course description:

Builds on the skills developed in Formal Political Analysis I by introducing further refinements of common solution concepts and introduces more sophisticated classes of games; designed to complete a student’s toolkit for producing formal-theoretic research.

Grading policy:

Students will be graded on semi-weekly homework (30%), two exams (50%), and a final paper (20%).

Texts:

Fudenberg, Drew and Jean Tirole. 1991 Game Theory MIT Press.


GOV 388L • Internatl Political Economy

37845 • Wellhausen, Rachel
Meets W 9:30AM-12:30PM BAT 1.104
show description

GOV 388L • International Political Economy

 

Fall 2019 Graduate Seminar

 

Meeting details: W 12:30-3:30 (BAT 1.104)

 

Professor: Dr. Rachel Wellhausen

 

Prerequisites: None

 

Course Description:

This graduate seminar is designed as a Ph.D.-level overview of international political economy (IPE), with applications to both advanced and developing countries. The course examines political dynamics in several topic areas: international trade; international monetary and financial relations; international investment; and special topics including migration and the environment. In the course, we use political economic theories to identify the welfare effects and distributional consequences of foreign economic policy decisions. We use the tools of political science to analyze how interest groups, voters, bureaucrats, policy-makers, ideas, and power politics interact to shape policy outcomes. It is my hope that this course will generate ideas for your own research, leading to publishable papers and dissertation topics.

 

Grading Policy:

Class participation (20%): Students are expected to read each work on the syllabus closely and to come to class prepared to discuss and critique the readings.

 

Four reaction papers (30%): Students are expected to write four reaction papers (2-3 pages in length), each of which critiques a week’s readings. Students are free to choose which four weeks’ readings they would like to critique. Reaction papers are due at the beginning of class. Retroactive papers (that discuss the prior week’s readings) are not permitted. The format will be discussed further in person.

 

Research paper and presentation (50%): Students will write an original research paper on a topic related to international political economy. Students will turn in a one-page prospectus for topic approval approximately three weeks after the beginning of the semester. At the semester’s end, students will give a conference-style presentation on the paper. The paper should identify a research puzzle, situate that puzzle in the relevant literature, offer a theory with testable hypotheses to explain the puzzle, and lay out an actionable research design. The paper should then include, at minimum, preliminary evidence addressing the hypotheses. Students are encouraged to draw on preexisting resources to provide this preliminary evidence. Finally, the paper should describe what additional research would be required to fully address the hypotheses. Expectations will be discussed further in person.

 

93 and above             A

            90-92                         A-

            87-89                         B+

            83-86                         B

            80-82                         B-

            77-79                         C+

            73-76                         C

            70-72                         C-

            67-69                         D+

            63-66                         D

            60-62                         D-

            59 and below             F

 

Required Texts:

Frieden, Jeffry. 2006. Global Capitalism: Its Fall and Rise in the Twentieth Century. New York: WW Norton.

 

Peters, Margaret E. 2017. Trading Barriers: Immigration and the Remaking of Globalization. Princeton University Press.

 

Bastianes, Ida and Nita Rudra. 2018. Democracies in Peril: Taxation and Redistribution in Globalizing Economies. Cambridge University Press.

 

Jensen, Nathan M., Glen Biglaiser, Quan Li, Edmund Malesky, Pablo M. Pinto, Santiago M. Pinto, and Joseph L. Staats. 2012. Politics and Foreign Direct Investment. Ann Arbor: Michigan Studies in International Political Economy.

 

Recommended:

Krugman, Paul, Maurice Obstfeld, and Marc Melitz. International Economics: Theory and Policy. (9th or other recent edition) Prentice Hall.

 

Graham, Benjamin A.T., Jacob R. Tucker. 2019. "The International Political Economy Data Resource." The Review of International Organizations 14:1, 149-161.


GOV 390K • Compar Study Of Pol Systems

37850 • Weyland, Kurt
Meets M 3:30PM-6:30PM BAT 5.102
show description

GOV 390K — COMPARATIVE STUDY OF POLITICAL SYSTEMS 

  Monday, 3:30 - 6:30 pm, BAT 5.102

 

This course provides a very wide-ranging, theoretically and methodologically pluralistic introduction to the field of Comparative Politics. After a brief discussion of the great variety of methodological approaches that are applied in our field, we will systematically compare and assess the major theoretical approaches (“paradigms”) that Comparativists have drawn on, especially “culturalism,” Marxism & neo-Marxism, historical institutionalism, rational choice, and rational-choice institutionalism. Thereafter, we will assess how these theoretical approaches work by discussing a number of important substantive issues and topics, especially the political economy & development of the global North & the global South; revolution; political regime change, especially democratization; political parties and voting; interest groups and social movements; and nationalism and ethnic conflict. The readings on these substantive topics will reflect the diverse theoretical and methodological approaches discussed before.

 

Grading:

 

3    2-3 pp. discussion papers to be distributed to all participants and to be presented and discussed in class (answering & discussing one of the 8-10 weekly study questions)

1    5 pp. essay

1    10 pp. essay or research design

1     final exam

lots of participation in class discussion

 

Texts (preliminary listing; books marked with “?” may be replaced if my search for a good substitute ends up successful):

 

Ronald Inglehart, Cultural Evolution (Cambridge UP, 2018) 

Robert Bates, Markets and States in Tropical Africa (U. California Pr., 1984, reprints 2005 &

 2014) 

Mark Lichbach & Alan Zuckerman, eds., Comparative Politics, 2nd ed. (Cambridge UP, 2009)  ?

Dietrich Rueschemeyer, Evelyne Huber Stephens & John Stephens, Capitalist Development and Democracy (U. Chicago Pr., 1992)     ?

Theda Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions (Cambridge UP, 1979)

Guillermo O’Donnell and Philippe Schmitter, Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies (Johns Hopkins UP, 1986)

Sidney Tarrow, Power in Movement, 3rd ed. (Cambridge UP, 2011)  

Kanchan Chandra, ed., Constructivist Theories of Ethnic Politics (Oxford UP, 2012)   

 

Many, many journal articles and book chapters on electronic reserve.


GOV 390L • Military In Politics

37855 • Barany, Zoltan
Meets M 3:30PM-6:30PM BAT 1.104
show description

GOV 390L, U#39140 (cross-listed with Latin American Studies and Middle East Studies)

Fall 2019/BAT 1.104/M 3:30-6:30

Instructor:  Prof. Z. D. Barany

Office: BAT 3.156/Office hours: M: 10:30-12, 1:30-3

 

This course is designed to familiarize graduate students with the military’s role in modern state and society.  The focus is on the sociopolitical character of the armed forces.  We will examine the most important issues of civil-military relations, such as why is civilian control important, what types of control arrangements are conducive to healthy civil-military relations in various types of political regimes, and in what ways do military elites respond to state policies and social movements. 

 

The class begins with nine weeks of intensive readings in order to get you grounded in the literature and help you learn to appreciate the diversity of civil-military relations in different political systems. You will write eight brief (one single-spaced page) discussion proposals to facilitate debate about the readings.  These should contain two or three paragraph-long questions raised by the readings for the class that you will send to your classmates and me by midnight on Sunday (the previous day).  We will conclude with student presentations (approximately 20-minute summations of your research project) followed by Q&A sessions.  The topic of the seminar paper must be settled by October 16; a detailed, annotated outline of the paper is due in class two weeks later.

 

The research paper is the most important requirement of this course.  It should be 20 to 25 double-spaced pages in length and should be informed by at least 25 different sources (books, articles, etc.).  The paper should be structurally sound and the argument(s) should be built to follow logical reasoning.  Ideally, it would take advantage of some existing theory to inform its argument(s); it should be analytical and feature relatively little descriptive material (i.e., ask not “how?” ask rather “why?”).   The paper is due, via e-mail, on December 11.  I will be happy to look at and discuss drafts until November 27.

 

Grading

  1. 8 discussion proposals   (2.5% each)                                                                      : 20
  2. seminar participation (including presentation of the research paper)                     : 30                     
  3. research paper (20-25 pages)                                                                                  : 50

 

I will assume that as graduate students you will do the readings as assigned.  I want you to immerse yourselves in the books in order to be able to make critical and insightful comments during the seminar meetings.  Since the seminar is based on discussion, without your substantive, engaged participation it will be of little use.

 

 

Readings

 

Barany, Zoltan. The Soldier and the Changing State: Building Democratic Armies in        Africa,             Asia, Europe, and the Americas (Princeton University Press, 2012)

 

------. How Armies Respond to Revolutions and Why (Princeton University Press, 2016)

 

Dwyer, Maggie. Soldiers in Revolt: Army Mutinies in Africa (Oxford University Press,

2018).

 

Pion-Berlin, David, and Raphael Martínez. Soldiers, Politicians, and Civilians:     Reforming Civil-Military Relations in Democratic Latin America(Cambridge             University Press, 2017)

 

Pollack, Kenneth M. Armies of Sand: The Past, Present, and Future of Arab Military
            Effectiveness (Oxford University Press, 2019)

 

Renz, Bettina. Russia’s Military Revival (Polity Press, 2018)

 

Shah, Aqil. Army and Democracy: Military Politics in Pakistan (Harvard University

Press, 2014)

 

Teigen, Jeremy. Why Veterans Run (Temple University Press, 2018)


GOV 398T • Supv Teaching In Government

37895 • Hunter, Wendy
Meets TH 9:30AM-12:30PM BAT 1.104
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SUPERVISED TEACHING IN GOVERNMENT

GOV 398T

Fall 2019

Professor Wendy Hunter

 

 

Course Description

This course is intended to enhance your confidence and effectiveness as a teacher.  Practical in focus, it will concentrate on how to design a syllabus, lecture effectively, lead engaging discussions, develop assignments to assess learning, head off problems with students and deal with them after they occur.  Additional topics to be covered include employing diverse teaching techniques for larger vs. smaller classes, reaching and motivating different kinds and levels of students, and rising to some of the challenges specific to our discipline, such as the discussion of controversial social and political topics.

            In keeping with the practical focus of the course, we will identify a core set of problems that occur frequently in teaching large undergraduate courses, develop insights on why they occur, and arrive at solutions for handling them.  We will also discuss how to learn from student feedback and how to design a teaching portfolio.    

 

Class sessions will proceed by discussing handouts I have made up based on synthesizing the literature on the given topic of the week.  

 

The main texts we will draw on are Teaching at its Best: A Research-Based Resource for College Instructors by Linda B. Nilson (2010, John Wiley and Sons, Inc.) and How Learning Works: 7 Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching by Susan A. Ambrose et al. (2010, John Wiley and Sons, Inc.).  They, as well as other readings, will be made available through e-mails to the group of students taking the course.  They will also be posted on CANVAS.  

 

There are no prerequisites. The course must be taken on a Credit/No Credit basis.   Assignments and their relative weighting in the final grade are as follows.   

 

*Seminar participation (15 percent)

*Syllabus design of one course (25 percent).  Instructions will be handed out.

*Development and write up of two in-class activities to be done in relation to the

            envisioned course around which the syllabus is designed (25 percent).

*A stand up (videotaped) lecture on the research related to your dissertation or on a topic of

            your choice (25 percent).

*Preliminary teaching statement for the job market (10 percent)   

 



  • Department of Government

    The University of Texas at Austin
    158 W 21st ST STOP A1800
    Batts Hall 2.116
    Austin, TX 78712-1704
    512-471-5121