The Department of Government
The Department of Government

GOV 310L • American Government

38096
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.102
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38095 • McDaniel, Eric
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38090
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM MEZ B0.306
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38099 • O'Brien, Shannon
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM BUR 106
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38097 • McIver, John
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 1.306
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38098
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.110
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38094 • Prindle, David
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM JES A121A
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 312L • Iss & Policies Amer Gov-Ut/Dc

38091 • Patterson, Jeffery
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Iss & Policies In Amer Gov-Hon

38100 • Roberts, Brian
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.122
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Iss & Policies In Amer Gov-Wb

38142 • Moser, Robert
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38130 • Weyland, Kurt
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM JES A121A
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GOV 312L: Issues & Policies in American Government: The U.S. in Comparative Perspective

 Kurt Weyland

 

Course description:

 

This course will compare liberal democracy in the U.S. with the political systems of Great Britain, Sweden, Russia/Soviet Union, and Mexico. The main purpose is to analyze how different models of democracy as well as non-democratic types of political regime operate in practice and how they have changed over time. Specifically, we will examine liberal democracy (the case of the U.S.); social democracy (Sweden); the move from social to liberal democracy (Great Britain); Communist totalitarianism (Soviet Union), its move toward democratization, and the slide into authoritarian rule (Russia); & authoritarian rule & its democratization (Mexico). Through this wide-ranging approach, we will also examine how countries of very different historical and regional background and of different development levels deal with fundamental political issues. Thus, the course will examine political decision-making in different institutional and societal settings and analyze how these political differences affect public policies and the lives of common citizens.

 

 

Grading:

 

3 examinations + 3 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance norm. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty rules.

 

 

Texts (probable – but may potentially be replaced):

 

David Held, Models of Democracy, 3rd ed. (Polity Press, 2006)

 

Benjamin Ginsberg & Martin Shefter, Politics by Other Means, 3rd ed. (W.W. Norton, 2002)

 

M. Donald Hancock et al., eds., Politics in Europe: An Introduction to the Politics of the United Kingdom, ... Sweden, Russia,.. 6th ed. (Congressional Quarterly Press, 2014). [NOTE: We will use the 6th edition so students can obtain used copies; the 7th edition (2018) is very expensive].

 

Daniel Levy & Kathleen Bruhn, Mexico: The Struggle for Democratic Development, 2nd ed. (Univ. California Press, 2006).

 

Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

 

Substantial reading load of 70-100 pp. per week.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38120 • Brownlee, Jason
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.122
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38140 • Enelow, James
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM RLP 0.102
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38115 • Stauffer, Dana
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM RLP 0.102
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38135 • Barany, Zoltan
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM BUR 108
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The Politics of Poverty

 

GOV 312L/# 38135

 

Spring 2019 – M-W 14:30-16:00 – Burdine Hall 108

 

Prof. Z. D. Barany, barany@austin.utexas.edu | BAT 3.156 | MW 11-12, 13:30-14:00

 

About this course

 

Government 312 L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Its topic – the politics of poverty – deals with questions concerning what poverty is and why it exists, with welfare policies in Texas, in the United States, and with poverty and politics in the Third World.  The course assumes the basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, but nothing more.

 

Questions concerning the nature and cause of poverty and inequality and what to do about them are by definition controversial and subject to much debate.  This course does not presume that either the professor, teaching assistants, or the readings have “The Answer” to such questions.  Rather, our collective goal for the semester is to identify the major schools of debate around such questions and for you to think about them.  If you have already decided how you feel about poverty, the course may provoke you to think again; if you have never given the question any thought, the course may provoke you into thinking about such questions.

 

Given the size and nature of the course, it is taught by lecture.  There will always be time for discussion and participation in class, however.  Attendance will make a difference, particularly because the lectures do not follow the readings.  (I am convinced of your ability to read the texts – which are selected for ease of understanding, relevance, and for its likelihood to keep you engaged – without having to spend time regurgitating them in class.)  The lectures, in other words, will be entirely different from what you read for that day.

 


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38125 • Madrid, Raul
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 212
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38144
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 4.122
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

38145 • Dempsey, Erik
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 308
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Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.


GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

38155 • Tulis, Jeffrey
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 302
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Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.


GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

38150 • Abramson, Jeffrey
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLM 7.124
show description

Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.


GOV 314 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thou

38190 • Gregg, Benjamin
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 1.210
(also listed as CTI 302)
show description

 

Title: Classics of Social Scientific Thought: Human Nature and Political Community

Semester: Spring 2019

Professor: Benjamin Gregg

 

Requested time/venue: Tu/Th 3:30-5 pm in CLA 1.108 (or elsewhere is CLA, if

possible; prefer Greek-style lecture hall)

 

Description: This seminar explores a range of responses to a fundamental question of political theory: What is human nature? (Indeed: Is there a human nature?) It examines the respective accounts of four of the greatest philosophical thinkers of Western civilization: from the classical era, we read Plato (Republic, ca. 380 BCE; Symposium, ca. 385-370 BCE) and Augustine (Confessions, ca. 397-400; City of God, ca. 400); from the modern era, Hobbes (Leviathan, 1651) and Rousseau (Discourse on the Origin of Inequality, 1755). In its second half, the seminar studies two major contributions in evolutionary psychology. Steven Pinker and David Buss articulate the major claims of contemporary evolutionary psychology: that human nature “was designed” by natural selection in the Pleistocene epoch (from 2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) and that our psychological adaptations “were designed” tens of thousands of years ago to solve problems faced by our hunter-gatherer ancestors. This approach implies a distinct vision for the organization of political community, informed as it is by a conception of human nature. David Buller claims by contrast that our minds are not adapted to the Pleistocene but, like the immune system, are continually adapting over both evolutionary time and individual lifetimes. His argument entails a very different vision for the organization of political community, informed by the rejection of the very idea of human nature. As we read our authors and compare and contrast them with each other, we are guided by a second question: What does each of these theories suggest with regard to how a just political community might best be organized and, in particular, how justice might be conceived and pursued today in light of what we have learned from our authors?

 

Grading Policy: The course grade is the average of three essays, each responding to the student’s choice from a list of prompts, and adjusted for the quality of the student’s in-class participation

 

Required texts: selections from each of the following:

 

Plato: The Republic

Plato: Symposium

Augustine: City of God

Augustine: Confessions

Hobbes: Leviathan

Rousseau: First and Second Discourses

Steven Pinker, The Blank State: The Modern Denial of Human Nature (2002)

David Buller, Adapting Minds: Evolutionary Psychology and the Persistent Quest for       Human Nature (2005)


GOV 314 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thou

38185 • Dempsey, Erik
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM GAR 0.132
(also listed as CTI 302)
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Please check back for updates.


GOV 314 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thou

38175 • Bennett, Zachary
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112
(also listed as CTI 302)
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GOV 314 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thou

38180 • Wensveen, Jonathan
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM GAR 0.120
(also listed as CTI 302)
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Please check back for updates.


GOV 314 • Diasporas In World Politics

38160 • Grossman, Jonathan
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 0.118
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DESCRIPTION:

Diasporas are playing an increasingly important role in world politics. The relative number of immigrants in both developed and developing countries is steadily growing. Today, more than half of the world's states have established "diaspora organizations" – official agencies and ministries that nurture those countries' ties with emigrants and their descendants. In academia, the interdisciplinary field of diaspora studies is progressively gaining importance and popularity.

The Jewish diaspora is one of the oldest diasporas in the world, and probably the most studied one. Many (although definitely not all) scholars regard it as the archetypal ethno-national diaspora. In 1948, it regained its ancestral homeland when the State of Israel was established. On the one hand, Israel has been officially committed to the security and well-being of the diaspora since then. On the other hand, due to its pragmatic foreign policy, Israeli policy makers have not always taken into account the diaspora's vital interests.

READING:

Abramson, Yehonatan. “Making a Homeland, Constructing a Diaspora: The Case of Taglit-Birthright Israel.” Political Geography 58 (2017): 14–23.
Adamson, Fiona B. “Crossing Borders: International Migration and National Security.” International Security 31, no. 1 (2006): 165–99.
———. “The Growing Importance of Diaspora Politics.” Current History 115, no. 784 (2016): 291–97.
Adamson, Fiona B., and Madeleine Demetriou. “Remapping the Boundaries of `State’ and `National Identity’:

GRADING:

  • Attendance: 10%
  • Participation: 20%
  • Article/Chapter Presentation: 10%
  • Midterm Assignment: Creating a Diaspora Timeline using the free Timeglider application): 30%

GOV 314 • Human Rights: Theories/Pracs

38170 • Brownlee, Jason
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 304
show description

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GOV 314 • Mid East: Adj/Chg Mdrn Time

38165 • Di-Capua, Yoav
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM RLP 0.102
(also listed as HIS 306N, MES 301L)
show description

This is an introductory class to the history of the Middle East in the 20th century. The main question for consideration is which forces and what sort of developments transformed this region from a relatively peaceful region to a radicalized environment and a source for opposition against the “West.” By exploring critical political, social, intellectual and economic themes such as colonialism, Arab nationalism, secular modernism, the impact of Zionism and military conflict, the rise of political Islam, the status of women and the oil revolution, we would identify the main internal and external forces, as well as the critical processes, that shaped the region during the last century.

·        James Gelvin, The Modern Middle East; A History (Oxford: Oxford
                 University Press, 2004).
·        James Gelvin, The Israel-Palestine Conflict : One Hundred Years of War
                  (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005).


GOV 320K • US Const Devel: Structures

38195 • Sager, Alan
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM RLP 1.104
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Government 320K                                                 American Constitutional Development I

Spring 2019                                                                                      Dr. Sager

 

Course Description

            This course is an overview of American Constitutional Development.  Through an analysis of U.S. Supreme Court decisions, we will study the development of the Constitution from the Marshall Court to the Rehnquist Court.  This course focuses on what are called constitutional structures and processes.  Topics include the development of judicial, executive and legislative power, federalism, substantive due process, and property rights  and takings under the 5th amendment.

           

            To deepen our insights into the development of the Constitution, in addition to case materials,  the course will utilize video and audio materials which include oral argument in the U.S. Supreme Court, histories and reenactments of famous cases, and brief biographies of current  and past Supreme Court Justices. 

           

            There are four major goals for this course:

            1. To identify the major historical themes and controversies about our Constitution

            2. To better understand Constitutionalism and  our Constitution;  what  our Constitution is and  is not and how it  may have changed and developed over the past 200 years.

            3. To develop a high level of skill in  reading, briefing  and understanding Supreme Court opinions, with special attention on what questions to ask when reading an opinion   Part of this skill includes being able to see and understand the point of view of the person writing an opinion.

            4. To raise participants' "cultural literacy"  with regard to  our Constitution, and the U.S. Supreme Court.

 

            To fulfill these goals, some of the questions we will attempt to answer include:

            1. What is a Constitution supposed to do and who is supposed to interpret it?

 2  What difference, if any does the context in which the  Constitution was
created matter and how much should it matter?

3. What differences, if any, have existed among the justices as to what the Constitution means?

4. How do various justices go about interpreting the Constitution? What accounts for their differences? In other words, what are the various theories of constitutional interpretation?

            5. What impact does the Court and Constitution have on American society.?

 

To answer these questions, we will discuss each of the assigned cases.  Our cases provide the data for fashioning answers to these questions and for moving us toward the course goals.

 

a) Prerequistes   none
 
b) This course focuses on the development of American Constitutional law in the areas of structures, e.g. federalism, and processes, e.g. how cases get to the Supreme Court.  Most of the assignments involve reading and analyzing judicial opinions in actual cases. These opinions not only reveal what various justices, scholars and leaders think  the Constitution says about the issues at hand, they also reveal how, and perhaps why,  justices think and reason as they do.  In reading and studying these opinions, we will also pay close attention to the theories and methods of  interpretation embedded,in these opinions.  
 
c) Grading policy   2 short papers (9 and 11%)  3 hour exams (20, 21 and 24%)  class attendance and participating  15%
Use plus and minus grading system
 
d) Texts

1.Lee Epstein and Thomas G. Walker, Constitutional Law For A Changing America: Institutional Powers and Constraints,Congressional Quarterly 2017 9th Edition

2. T.R. Van Geel, Understanding Supreme Court Opinions, Longman, New York, any edition.)

3. Burton Folsom, New Deal, Raw Deal

4. Larry Arnn  The Founder’s Key

 

 

Tenative Grading:                                      Approximate  Weight

3 hour examinations                                               64%(19%, 21%, 24%)

Class participation and preparation                     15%(Attendance and preparation)
Brief and short paper                                           21%(Brief  9%, paper 12%)

 

 

 

Required Textbooks and Readings:

Lee Epstein and Thomas G. Walker, Constitutional Law For A Changing America: Institutional Powers and Constraints, (9th edition)           

T.R. van Geel, Understanding Supreme Court Opinions, 8th Edition.
Bert Folsom,   New Deal, Raw Deal.
Larry Arne, The Founder’s Key

 

           

Class Participation            .  The grade on this part consists of the following:

A. Demonstrating a reasonable level of daily preparation and understanding of the material covered

            B. Contributions made to class discussion and analysis.

C. Overall attendance. More than 3 unexcused absences can affect your final average,

 


GOV 324J • Govs/Polit Of Eastern Europe

38200 • Liu, Amy
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM PAR 203
(also listed as EUS 348, REE 335)
show description

PREREQUISITES

Students wishing to enroll in this class must have taken a foundational course in government, European studies, or Russian/East European studies. The course also assumes basic knowledge of world history. Students who find themselves lost during lectures or class discussions should see me during office hours immediately.

 

Course Description

Eastern Europe is home to an ethnically diverse population. And in the past 100 years, the map for Eastern Europe has been redrawn more than a dozen times – often with great consequences for ethnic politics. The course is divided into four parts. We will begin by focusing on the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire at the end of World War 1, the Interwar Period, and World War 2. During these thirty-some years, we see the importance of ethnicity for state-building. We will then continue on to the Cold War, paying special attention to the institutional differences across the otherwise ideologically similar communist states. We will also note how the different governments used these institutions to mute ethnic matters. Next, we will examine how these institutional differences affected subsequent democratic transitions and government policies toward minorities. We will conclude by looking at how the European Union has redrawn Eastern Europe by opening up borders and the implications of these opened borders, namely the rise of right wing nationalism.

 

Note: The importance of the Soviet Union in Eastern Europe politics cannot be overstated. To this end, we will study the Soviet Union/Russia briefly, but note that the primary emphasis in this course is on the region to the east of present-day Germany and to the west of present-day Russia. We will not spend much time talking about any country formerly in the Soviet Union, i.e., Ukraine and the Baltic states.

 

GRADING POLICY

Your final grade is composed of the following five parts:

 

  1. Quizzes: 20%
  2. Midterm Examination: 20%
  3. Final Examination: 20%
  4. Coding Assignment: 20%
  5. Coding-Based Paper Assignment : 20%

 

readings

One book is required for this course. You can buy a used copy for as little as $1.20 on Amazon:

  • Krenz, Maria. 2009. Made in Hungary: A Life Forged by History. Boulder, CO: Donner Publishing (hereafter referred to as “Krenz”).

 

I will place most of the assigned readings (e.g., articles and book chapters) on Canvas. You can access them with your EID and password at https://canvas.utexas.edu. Readings not on Canvas can be accessed directly through Google. There are a few assigned videos to watch. Those can be found on YouTube.


GOV 335M • Liberty And Religion

38215 • Viroli, Maurizio
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM MEZ 1.204
(also listed as CTI 335)
show description

DESCRIPTION:
The purpose of the course is to explore the various ways in which political philosophers, jurists, artists, historians and prophets have discussed the connections between religion and political liberty in Europe and in America. The main theoretical question underlying the seminar is whether republican liberty needs a religious basis or can do without it. Of equal importance is the issue of the analogies and differences between republican religion and different and opposite forms of political religions like monarchical and totalitarian religion. A distinctive feature of the seminar is the study of pictorial sources, like Ambrogio Lorenzetti’s ‘Allegory of Good and Bad Government’, that express with particular eloquence the religious content of republican liberty. The course intends offer students the possibility to compare American civil religion with previous forms of republican religion in Europe, and to invite them to critically reflect on the power of religion in political life.

TEXT:

  • Quentin Skinner, Visions of Politics, Cambridge University Press, 2002, vol. II Renaissance Virtues (selection)
  • Michael Walzer, Exodus and Revolution
  • Niccolò Machiavelli, Discourses on Livy, Harvey C. Mansfield (ed.), Chicago University Press, 1997 (selection).
  • Dostoevsky, The Legend of the Grand Inquisitor
  • Jean Jacques Rousseau, Of the Social Contract, Hackett edition (selection)
  • Alexis De Tocqueville, Democracy in America Charles Mayer edition (selection)

 

GRADING:
30% participation in class
30% midterm exam
40 % final exam


GOV 335M • Natural Law Theory

38220 • Budziszewski, J
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM BEN 1.122
(also listed as PHL 342)
show description

GOV 335M / PHL 342:

NATURAL LAW THEORY

Professor J. Budziszewski

 

 

Unique number:      38220

Class meets:               MW 1:00-2:30pm, BEN 1.122

Prof's office hours:   W 9:30am-12:45pm in MEZ 3.106

Prof’s email:              jbud@undergroundthomist.org

Prof’s office phone:  232-7229; phone does not record messages; email strongly preferred

Course website:         Canvas

Prof’s website:           The Underground Thomist, http://UndergroundThomist.org

Course policies:         See the FAQ at the “Other Things My Students May Need” section of the Teaching page at my personal website.

 

PREREQUISITES, FLAGS, AND FIELD

 

The course can be taken as either GOV 335M or PHL 342.  It carries a writing flag and fulfills part of the basic education requirement in writing.  If taken as a government course, enrollment requires six semester hours of lower-division government.  The subfield is Political Theory / Political Philosophy.

 

DESCRIPTION

 

“Natural law” refers to moral law – in particular, the fundamental moral principles that are built into the design of human nature and lie at the roots of conscience.  Natural law thinking is the spine of the Western tradition of ethical and legal thought.  The founders of the American republic also believed in the natural law -- in universal and "self-evident" principles of justice and morality which the Declaration of Independence called "the laws of Nature and of Nature's God."   For generations afterward, most Americans took the reality of natural law for granted.  Thomas Jefferson appealed to it to justify independence; Abraham Lincoln appealed to it to criticize slavery; Martin Luther King appealed to it to criticize racial discrimination. You would hardly guess any of this from the present day, because belief in natural law has come to be viewed as "politically incorrect."  Nevertheless, the tradition of natural law is experiencing a modest renaissance.

 

Is there really a natural law?  What difference does it make to society and politics if there is?  Is it really "natural"?  Is it really "law"?  To consider these questions, we will read a variety of influential works on natural law from the middle ages to the present.  Probably, most of your liberal arts education has implicitly rejected the whole idea, but in this course, for a change, you have an opportunity to hear the other side.

 

We will focus on the classical natural law tradition, not the revisionist version which was popular among the social contract writers.  The first two units of the course focus on the ethical and legal thought of the most important and influential classical natural law thinker in history, Thomas Aquinas.  He is a difficult writer, but we will work through his Treatise on Law carefully and I will provide lots of help.  In the final unit, which is about the continuing influence of the classical natural law tradition, we will read a number of authors including Thomas Jefferson, U.S. Supreme Court Justice John McLean, Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King, C.S. Lewis, a contemporary theologian, and two contemporary philosophers.

 

GRADING POLICY

 

Unit 1, Foundations of Law:  Analytical outline (25%).

Unit 2, Natural and Human Law:  Take-home essay (25%).

Unit 3, Legacy of the Classical Natural Law Tradition:  Whole-course journal (25%).

Class participation (25%).

 

Absences also affect your grade.  Please read the attendance policy in the Frequently Asked Questions section of my personal scholarly website.

 

I do not use plusses and minuses.

 

TEXTS

 

Even if you prefer to use the PCL Reserve Room or read online, you must bring physical copies of the readings to class, even if only photocopies or printouts.  Electronic devices such as laptops, cellphones, sound recorders, and smart pens must be powered down and stowed away during class.  There are no exceptions except for pacemakers.

 

Required:

 

J. Budziszewski, Commentary on Thomas Aquinas’s Treatise on Law (Cambridge, 2014).  This is a paperback.

 

Additional shorter readings, which will be made available on Canvas or online.

 

Recommended:

 

J. Budziszewski, Companion to the Commentary (Cambridge, 2014).  This free electronic book will be available through Canvas, and it is also available at my personal website.


GOV 335N • Southern Political History

38225 • Enelow, James
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 214
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 337M • Intnatl Politics Latin Amer

38240 • Weyland, Kurt
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM MEZ B0.306
(also listed as LAS 337M)
show description

GOV 337M/LAS 337: International Politics of Latin America

 Kurt Weyland

 

Course description:

 

This course will analyze Latin America’s international relations in a wide-ranging, theoretically informed perspective. The first week will introduce students to a variety of theoretical approaches to this topic. For a few weeks thereafter, the course will examine U.S. policy toward Latin America, starting with the long list of U.S. interventions during the twentieth century (before and during the Cold War); we will focus on emblematic cases, such as Mexico (1910s), Guatemala (1954), Cuba (1959 ff), Chile (1970-73), Grenada (1983) & Panama (1989). We will then analyze how U.S. – Latin American relations have changed with the end of the Cold War. Thereafter, the course will for two weeks investigate the impact of economic structures and forces on the region’s international position and influence; in particular, what have the repercussions of Latin America’s “economic dependency” been, and how has international economic integration (e.g., NAFTA) changed the region’s insertion into the international economic and political system? Finally, the last few weeks of the course will discuss a variety of new issues that have arisen on Latin America’s international agenda, such as democracy and human rights; international migration; drug trafficking; and the protection of the environment and of indigenous populations. How have the U.S. and Latin America dealt with all of these novel issues, and how do we need to adjust our theoretical frameworks to account for these new developments?

 

 

Grading:

 

1 six to seven page essay paper about questions distributed by the instructor; midterm and final examinations; 2 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance rule & policy. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty norms.

 

 

Texts (probable – but may potentially be replaced):

 

Michael Grow, U.S. Presidents and Latin American Interventions. University Press of Kansas, paperback edition, 2012.

 

Robert Pastor, Exiting the Whirlpool. Westview Press, 2001.

 

Russell Crandall, The United States and Latin America after the Cold War. Cambridge University Press, 2008.

 

Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

 

Pls. note: Substantial reading load of about 100 pp. of material per week.


GOV 337M • Law/Hmn Rghts/Viol In Lat Am

38226 • Dizard, Jacob
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM SRH 1.313
(also listed as LAS 337M)
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 337M • Mex Amer Political Thought

38227 • Vasquez, Antonio
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PHR 2.116
(also listed as MAS 374)
show description

Course Description

The 1967 publication of El Grito: Journal of Contemporary Mexican American Thought and Aztlan: Chicano Journal of the Social Sciences and the Arts in 1970 marked the emergence of a distinct Mexican American intellectual formation in academia. At the one hand, this discourse demonstrated a continuity of oppositional  consciousness as reflected in writings by preceding generations of intellectuals. At the same time, early writings contextualized experiences  of inequality confronting Mexican American communities as a condition of colonialism and anti-colonialism. The purpose of this undergraduate seminar is to collaboratively and critically explore the multiple complementary and contradictory counter-hegemonic intellectual variations that have contributed to Mexican American political thought, and, in turn, Mexican American Studies. In addition to analyzing first works from the discipline, students will engage in writings by earlier generations of intellectuals and their contemporaries in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, as well as more recent reconfigurations in Latina/o Studies.

Selected Readings

Padilla, Genaro M. My History, Not Yours: The Formation of Mexican American Autobiography. University of Wisconsin Press, 1994.

Bufe, Chaz, and Mitchell Cowen Verter (Editors). Dreams of Freedom: A Ricardo Flores Magon Reader. AK Press, 2005.

Mariscal, George, Brown-Eyed Children of the Sun: Lessons from the Chicano Movement, 1965-1975. University of New Mexico Press, 2005.

Sandoval, Chela. Methodology of the Oppressed. University of  Minnesota Press, 2000.

Grading

  • Participation: 20%
  • Papers: 80%

GOV 337M • Politics Of Dev In Lat Amer

38245 • Madrid, Raul
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM JES A215A
(also listed as LAS 337M)
show description

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GOV 337M • Politics Of Mexico

38230 • Greene, Kenneth
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CAL 100
(also listed as LAS 337M)
show description

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GOV 347K • Gov And Politics Of South Asia

38255 • Liu, Xuecheng
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A215A
(also listed as ANS 347K)
show description

South Asia is bounded on the south by the Indian Ocean and on land by West Asia, Central Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia. This sub-region comprises eight developing countries—Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. South Asia is home to well over one fifth of the world's population, making it the most populous geographical region in the world. 

Since the end of the Cold War, South Asia has become a focal point of growing international attention and concern by nuclear proliferation, the rise of Islamic militancy and the anti-terror war, the emergence of India as a global power, and regional effort for cooperation. South Asian nations have also been experiencing a profound political evolution of democratization.

This course provides students with a comprehensive and systematic introduction to the comparative political study of the eight nations of South Asia. Organized in parallel fashion to facilitate cross-national comparison, the course sections on each nation address several topical areas of inquiry: political culture and heritage, government structure and institutions, political parties and leaders, and social conflict and resolution. India, the preeminent power of the subcontinent, will receive more attention. In terms of the international relations of the region, this course will address several predominant region-wide issues: the India–Pakistan conflict, the rise of Islamic militancy and the AfPak war, and regional cooperation under the South Asian Association of Regional Cooperation (SAARC).

This course also carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

Prerequisites:

Since this is an introductory course, a background in Asian studies or Government is recommended but not required.

Grading Policy:

  • Two mid-term exams (60%). 
  • One short term paper of 6-7 pages (30%, first draft 15% and final draft 15%)
  • Overall class participation/attendance may be reflected in a plus or minus up to l0 points in determining the course grade.

Any student missing a mid-term exam with a verified medical excuse or for an official university event with a letter from the responsible university authority may choose to take a make-up exam or do an alternative assignment.

We will adopt UT's "plus & minus" grading system in this course. The following is a list of letter grades, their corresponding GPA values, and the percentage values that I plan to use for your assignments. Note that these percentage scores will not be noted on your transcript. 

Textbooks:

The textbooks are all electronic resources and students can read them online or download them by purchase. We will just choose several chapters from each book as reading assignments.

 

  1. Robert C. Oberst, et al, Government and Politics in South Asia, 7th Edition New York: Westview Press, 2013. (Electronic Resource) [GPSA]
  1. T.V. Paul ed., South Asia’s Weak States, Stanford, Calif.: Stanford Security Studies, 2010. (Electronic Resource) [SAWS]
  2. Lawrence Saez, The South Asian Association of Regional Cooperation (SAARC), Hoboken: Taylor & Francis, 2012. (Electronic Resource)
  1. During the course of the semester, additional latest articles on South Asia may be added and distributed as required readings in class.

 

References: 

  1. Paul R. Brass ed., Routledge Handbook of South Asian Politics: India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal (Hoboken: Taylor & Francis, 2010).
  2. Neil Devotta ed., An Introduction to South Asian Politics (New York: Routledge, 2016)

 


GOV 353D • Darwin & Politics Of Evolution

38275 • Prindle, David
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 420
(also listed as CTI 372)
show description
 

GOV 355M • Applied Rsrch: Polit Sci

38285 • Denly, Michael
Meets F 1:00PM-4:00PM RLP 1.102
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 355M • Human Behav As Rational Actn

38280 • Lin, Tse
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.216
show description

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GOV 357M • Civil Liberties

38320 • Perry Jr, H
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 4.112
(also listed as CTI 326)
show description

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GOV 357M • Structure Of Indiv Liberties

38325 • Jacobsohn, Gary
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 203
(also listed as CTI 326)
show description

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GOV 357M • Supreme Court And Public Pol

38300-38315 • Powe, Lucas
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM TNH 2.114
show description

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GOV 360N • Defense Policy

38330 • Dorn, Edwin
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SRH 3.221
show description

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GOV 360N • Intel And National Security

38335 • Pope, James
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SRH 3.122
show description

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GOV 360N • International Security

38347 • Kessler, Alan
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 136
show description

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GOV 360N • Internatl Busn & Politics

38340 • Jensen, Nathan
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 2.124
show description

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GOV 360N • Internatl Political Economy

38345 • Wang, Di
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 203
show description

GOV 360N: International Political Economy

Dr. Di Wang

 

Course Description

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of international political economy (IPE), an interdisciplinary field related to international politics and international economics. It examines how domestic and international politics influence the economic relations between countries. Why do governments promote or oppose globalization? Why do countries cooperate economically in some situations but not others? Why do countries adopt bad economic policies? We will address these questions and others with a focus on the policies of international trade (the flow of goods), foreign direct investment (the flow and location of production), and financial and exchange rate policies (the flow of capital). While no prerequisites are required, a familiarity with macroeconomics is strongly recommended for success in this course. 

 

Course Objectives

The course aims at (1) providing substantive knowledge on the political economy of international trade, investment, and finance and (2) developing analytical skills of students to explain cause-effect relationships in international political economy and to assess causal arguments empirically.  As such, course reading materials are theoretical or empirical (case study or statistical analysis) in nature.  The course also includes debate sessions that help students (3) develop presentation skills.

 

Required Textbook

The following book is required for this course and available from the University Coop Bookstore. All other readings will be made available to students through Canvas.

 

Oatley, T. H. (2012). International political economy. Boston: Longman.

 

Grading Policies

Grade component

Percent

Class attendance/participation

10

Debate

20

Exam #1

20

Exam #2

20

Exam #3

30

Total

100

 

 


GOV 360N • Internatl Political Economy

38346 • Wellhausen, Rachel
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM RLP 0.112
show description

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GOV 360N • Terrorism/Counterterrorism

38350 • Findley, Michael
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ B0.306
show description

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GOV 365L • Asian Rgnlism/Multilat Coop

38370 • Liu, Xuecheng
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 303
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

 

GOV 365L and   ANS 361

Spring  2019

 

 

Course Description

 

Instructor: Xuecheng Liu

Bldg / Room: PAR 303

Days & Time: TTH 12:30-2:00 pm

Office:

Office Hours Tuesday 2:00-5:00 pm or by appointment

Office Phone: 512-471-5121

Email: xcliu_ut@yahoo.com

 

PREREQUISITE: 6 SEMESTER HOURS OF LOWER-DIVISION COURSEWORK IN GOVERNMENT, INCLUDES CROSS-CULTURAL CONTENT.

 

    

Asian Regionalism and Multilateral Cooperation

                                                (GC and WR)

 

Asia’s rise as a region will shape the future world order. Asian regionalism as a vitally important dimension of Asia’s rise has attracted critical attention of Asia experts and policy makers. This course first addresses the nature, functional principles, leadership, and policy making process of contemporary Asian regionalism in comparison with the experiences of European integration. We also explore the linkage between the momentum of Asian integration and contemporary Asian nationalism. Then we will introduce and assess the origins and its developments of leading regional cooperation mechanisms: ASEAN, China-Japan-ROK Summit Meeting, SAARC, and SCO. Finally, in terms of engaging with the Asian multilateral cooperation we will discuss policies and strategies of major powers, particularly, the United States and China.

 

This course contains four main parts:

1, Comparison between Asian Regionalism and European Experiences: Concept, principles, leadership, and policy making process;

2. Asian Regionalism and Asian Nationalism: explore the linkage between the emerging Asian cooperation and contemporary Asian nationalism, focusing on Chinese nationalism, Indian nationalism, and Japanese nationalism;

3. Introduce four most important cooperation mechanisms: Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in Southeast Asia; China-Japan-ROK Summit Meeting in Northeast Asia; South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) in South Asia; and Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) in Central Asia;

4. Major Powers' Responses to Asian Cooperation: Focus on American and Chinese Strategies for engaging with Asian Integration and multilateral cooperation.

 

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work. Writing Flag classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

 

This course also carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

 

Grading Policy:

 

  1. Two take-home essays (6-7 pages) 40%
  2. One 12-page term paper, 50%

   Note: Writing of the term paper includes the paper proposal, the first draft

(15 points), and the second (revised) draft (25 points), and the final draft

(10 points).

  1. Class participation, 10%

Overall class participation/attendance may be reflected in a plus or minus up to l0

points in determining the course grade.

 

 

Textbooks:

1. Frost, Ellen L., Asia’s New Regionalism ANR

  (Boulder. Colorado: Lynne Rienner Publications, 2008)

  ISBN 978-1-58826-579-1 [Selected chapters distributed by email]

2. Aggarwal, Vind K.,Asia’s New Institutional Architecture ANIA

(Dordrecht: Springer, 2007). [Electronic Resource]

3. Saez, Lawrence, The South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation

(SAARC): An emerging collaboration Architecture (Hoboken: Taylor & Francis, 2012). [Electronic Resource]

4. Pempel, T. J., Regionalism, Economic Integration and Security in Asia (REISA)

  (Northamptom, USA: Edward Elgar Publishing Inc., 2011). [Electronic Resource]

5. Mahbubani, Kishore, The New Asian Hemisphere: The Irresistible Shift of Global Power to the East (NAH) (New York: PublicAffairs, 2009). [Electronic Resource]

6. He, Baogang, Contested Ideas of Regionalism in Asia (CIRA) (London: Routledge Taylor and Francis, 2017) [Electronic Resource]

7. Capannelli, Giovanni and Masahiro Kawai, Political Economy of Asian Regionalism (PEAR) (New York: Springer Science and Business Media, 2014). [Electronic Resource]

8. Port, Bertrand, Douglas Webber, Regional Integration in East Asia and Europe: Covergence or Divergence? London: Taylor and Francis, 2005, (Electronic Resourse)

9. National Security Strategy of the United States of America

     https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/NSS-Final-12-18-2017-0905-2.pdf

10. Selected chapters of the recently published books and journal articles distributed by

  email.


GOV 365N • British Politics And Govt

38375 • Leal, David
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM RLP 0.112
show description

GOV 365N, British Politics and Govt

a)  Prerequisites 

none that I require.

 

b)   Course Description

 

This course examines key aspects of British politics and government.  While no longer as powerful as during its days of empire, Britain is a longstanding ally of the United States and remains an important global power.  To understand the course of US, European, Atlantic, and global politics requires an understanding of the UK.  We begin with an overview of modern British political history, including the ideas, actors, laws, structures, and events that set the stage for contemporary politics.  We then examine the major political institutions, including the Parliament, parties, Prime Minister, Civil Service, media, and judiciary.  The next section covers elections and public opinion, including campaigns, candidates, constituencies, rules, voters, and recent election results.  Lastly, we discuss emerging developments, including Brexit, British identity, devolution, and austerity.  Throughout the class, we will ask about the nature of democracy and freedom in the UK, make comparisons with US politics and government, and discuss the relationship of Britain with the US and the world in a post-empire era. 

 

c)   Grading Policy

 

Exam #1 (20% of course grade; covers first third of the class material)
 
Exam #2 (30% of course grade; covers second third of the class material)
 
Exam #3 (30% of course grade; covers last third of the class material and includes cumulative questions)
 
Book review (20% of course grade)
 

 

d)   Texts

Philip Norton. 2010. The British Polity, 5th edition. London: Routledge.

 

Richard Heffernan, Colin Hay, Meg Russell, and Philip Cowley (Eds.) 2016. Developments in British Politics, 10th edition. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

David Denver, Christopher Carman, and Robert Johns. 2012. Elections and Voters in Britain, 3rd Edition. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Additional readings available online and in a course pack (available for purchase at Jenn’s).

 

 


GOV 365N • Comparative Legal Systems

38387 • Brinks, Daniel
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RLP 1.106
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 365N • Europe Environmntl Politics

38385 • Mosser, Michael
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 206
(also listed as EUS 348)
show description

EUS 348/GOV 365N:
European Environmental Politics

Spring 2019

Unique: 36155/38385

 

Dr. Michael W. Mosser

Course location: PAR 206

Office:  Mezes 3.222

Course time: TTh 930 am-11:00 am

Phone: 512.232.7280

Office hours: Via Canvas Calendar

Email: mosserm@austin.utexas.edu

 

Course concept

Environmental politics is one area where Europe arguably leads the world. Europe has, at both the national and European-Union level, committed itself to achieving reductions in carbon emissions far greater than anywhere else in the world.

This course will examine the history of environmental politics in both the member states of the European Union and the EU itself. Beginning with a conceptual treatment of general environmental politics and policies, the course moves to a history of European environmentalism, before shifting to a discussion on the institutional responses at important ‘traditional’ Member States (Germany, France, Italy and the UK) as well as ‘new‘ Member States (Czech Republic, Poland and Hungary). The final section of the course examines EU environmental policies themselves, such as the EU Emissions Trading System and its institutional commitment to meeting Kyoto Protocol goals. This section examines Europe in light of its relationship to the United States and other global powers as they re-evaluate environmental policy positions.

Assignments and grading

Your course grade will consist of a midterm exam grade, a take-home final exam grade, a short paper grade and a discussion/participation grade. All assignments will be converted to a 100-point scale with no curve. All grades, including final grades, will use the plus (+) and minus (-) system. Grade standards for all assignments are as follows:

 

93 >     A  

90-92   A-

87-89   B+  

80-86   B   

77-79   B-   

75-76   C+   

70-74   C

67-69   C-

60-66   D

< 60  F

 

 

 

Exams: 50%

As this class is an upper-division course, a major portion of the grade for the course will consist of exams, consisting of a midterm exam and a take-home final exam. Both the midterm and the take-home final exam will be worth 25% of your course grade.

Paper: 30%

The paper for this class will be a short (2000 word) exploratory paper on one of the five topics chosen by the instructor. Such a paper should be a reasonably thorough treatment of the topic chosen, including a clear thesis statement, logical consistency in the arguments used to show the validity of the thesis, and a clear and concise conclusion that effectively summarizes your argument. The paper should be no more than 2000 words in length. The paper will comprise 30% of your total grade for the course. The paper grade itself will be divided into four sections:

 

     Topic choice: due 1 February. Worth 10% of paper grade (3% of course grade).

     Topic outline and list of references: due 15 February. Worth 20% of paper grade (6% of course grade).

     First draft of paper:  due 15 April.  Worth 20% of paper grade (6% of course grade).

     Final draft of paper: due 10 May.  Worth 50% of paper grade (15% of course grade).

Attendance/Participation: 20%

There is a distinction between attendance and participation. Attendance will be managed through Canvas and will take place at five intervals throughout the session. Each of these attendance days will count for 2% of your course grade (for a total of 10%).

Participation will count for 10% of your total grade.

Participation will be divided into two sections:  in-class participation and online discussion. While not everyone enjoys speaking in class, discussion questions will count for as much as in-class participation. Discussion questions will count for 7.5% of your course grade; in-class participation will count for 2.5% of your course grade.

In-class participation will be graded as follows:

  • Attending every day, but not participating in class: 80/100
  • Attending every day, participating via question answering (from instructor): 90/100
  • Attending every day, participating via question answering and active learning (extending discussion, asking follow-up questions): 100/100

Online discussion postings are critical to class participation grades. So that we can discuss points raised in the online postings in Thursday’s class, discussion questions for the week on which I am lecturing will be due by 5:00 pm every Wednesday (unless directed otherwise). They should be drawn from the readings or contemporary news accounts and should reflect any questions, comments, or cries of outrage you may have regarding the arguments set forth by the authors or news stories. Discussion posting will most definitely will help you get the most from the class.

Online discussion postings will be graded as follows:

  • •12-15 postings: Full credit
  • •8-11 postings: 70% credit
  • •5-7 postings: 50% credit
  • •Less than 5 postings: No credit

 

There are no discussion postings necessary for midterm week. The total number of discussion postings will be counted at the end of the semester, and also will be examined throughout the semester for evidence of consistent posting. Do not expect to “catch-up” post only at the end of the semester and receive full participation credit.

A word on late or missed assignments. Over the course of the semester, it is inevitable that some event will cause a time management issue, which might lead to a missed assignment deadline. Though normally handled on a case-by-case basis, there are some baseline penalties for missed or delayed assignments, detailed here:

  • Missed exams will receive a 5% deduction per day until made up.

Other important information

Plagiarism / academic misconduct:

Don’t do it. Minimum penalties for cheating are zeros on quizzes or exams where the cheating takes place, and a grade of F on a paper that has been plagiarized. Questions about what constitutes academic misconduct should be brought to my attention.

Undergraduate Writing Center: 

The Undergraduate Writing Center, FAC 211, 471-6222: http://www.uwc.utexas.edu/) offers free, individualized, expert help with writing for any UT undergraduate, by appointment or on a drop-in basis. Any undergraduate enrolled in a course at UT can visit the UWC for assistance with any writing project. They work with students from every department on campus, for both academic and non-academic writing. Their services are not just for writing with "problems." Getting feedback from an informed audience is a normal part of a successful writing project. Consultants help students develop strategies to improve their writing. The assistance they provide is intended to foster independence. Each student determines how to use the consultant's advice. The consultants are trained to help you work on your writing in ways that preserve the integrity of your work.

University of Texas Honor Code:

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.  Any student found guilty of scholastic dishonesty may receive an “F” in the course and be remanded to the appropriate University of Texas authorities for disciplinary action.  For more information, view Student Judicial Services at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs.

Religious Holidays:

According to UT-Austin policy, students must notify the instructor of an impending absence at least 14 days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If a student must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, the student will be given an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

Student Privacy: 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) requires that student privacy be preserved.  Thus the posting of grades, even by the last four digits of the social security number, is forbidden.  All communication will remain between the instructor and the student, and the instructor will not be able to share details of the student’s performance with parents, spouses, or any others.

Documented Disability Statement:

The University of Texas will make reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities. Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (Video Phone) as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining authorized accommodations.

Emergency Evacuation Policy:

In the event of a fire or other emergency, it may be necessary to evacuate a building rapidly.  Upon the activation of a fire alarm or the announcement of an emergency in a university building, all occupants of the building are required to evacuate and assemble outside.  Once evacuated, no one may re-enter the building without instruction to do so from the Austin Fire Department, University of Texas at Austin Police Department, or Fire Prevention Services office.  Students should familiarize themselves with all the exit doors of each room and building they occupy at the university, and should remember that the nearest exit routes may not be the same as the way they typically enter buildings.  Students requiring assistance in evacuation shall inform their instructors in writing during the first week of class.  Information regarding emergency evacuation routes and emergency procedures can be found at http://www.utexas.edu/emergency.

 


GOV 365N • Germany And Immigration

38379 • Laubenthal, Barbara
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GEA 114
(also listed as EUS 348, GSD 360)
show description

A massive influx of refugees, conflicts about cultural diversity and religion, debates on the lack of highly-skilled workers - immigration currently is at the top of the German public agenda. However, discussions on immigration are taking place in a political climate much different from twenty years ago. Until the year 2000, despite being a major destination for international migration, Germany defined itself as a non-immigration country and aimed at preventing permanent immigration. However, for some years now, the integration of migrants has become a central aim and in some fields the country even pursues a pro-active immigration policy. What factors have encouraged this change, and how has immigration changed German society and culture? These are the questions that the course will address. Applying a historical perspective and using central theories and concepts of contemporary migration research, we will analyze recent changes in the fields of labor migration, asylum and undocumented migration and the integration of migrants. We will ask how the changes that have taken place are reflected on a cultural level, looking at the (contested) incorporation of Islam in German society, the reflection of immigration in contemporary art, movies and novels, and regional and civil society initiatives to preserve the memory of immigration.

The course aims at providing students with a profound knowledge of the main characteristics of Germany as an immigration country and on the current central empirical research topics on immigration in Germany. It also aims at enabling students to understand and apply central theories and concepts of contemporary migration studies beyond the case of Germany. At the end of the course, students should also be able to understand and assess Germany’s profile as an immigration country in comparison to other immigration countries such as the United States.

Texts

  • Borkert, Maren/Bosswick, Wolfgang (2011): The Case of Germany, in: Zincone, Giovanna/Penninx, Rinus/Borkert Maren (eds.): Migration Policymaking in Europe. The Dynamics of Actors and Contexts in Past and Present, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 95-128.
  • Bretell, Caroline/Hollifield, James F. (2006): Migration Theory. Talking across Disciplines (2nd edition). London: Routledge.
  • Göktürk, Deniz/Gramling, David/Kaes, Anton (eds.) (2007): Germany in Transit. Nation and Migration, 1955-2005, Berkeley, CA: California University Press.
  • Green, Simon (2013): “Germany. A changing country of immigration,” German Politics, 22 (3), 333-351

Grading

  • 2 Writing Assignments (3 pages)   20 %
  • Participation and Homework          20 %
  • Oral Presentation                          20 %
  • Final Paper                                   40 %

GOV 365N • Human Rights & World Politics

38390 • Evans, Rhonda
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ B0.306
(also listed as WGS 340)
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 365N • Institutions & Comp Pol-Ec Dev

38380 • Lu, Xiaobo
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM JES A218A
show description

Institutions and Comparative Political-Economic Development

 

Writing Flag & Independent Inquiry Flag

 

Spring 2019

MW 10-11:30am, JESA218A

 

Professor Xiaobo Lü and Professor Patricia Maclachlan

 

 

            This new research- and writing-intensive undergraduate seminar explores the institutional foundations of alternative pathways to political-economic development in both economically advanced and developing countries.  What drives economic development?  Why do some countries develop more quickly and effectively than others? Why do some countries have strong institutions to safeguard property rights and maintain law & order, while others do not?  And how do the specific linkages between states and their economies influence their economic and political trajectories?  In answering these and related questions, we explore the experiences of a variety of countries from around the world from comparative and historical perspectives and from the vantage point of institutions theory.

 

            In addition to introducing students to some influential academic works in the field, this course prepares them to pursue theoretically informed, independent research projects. Each week, we will set aside time to instruct students on key aspects of the research and writing processes, including the formulation of research questions and hypotheses, developing bibliographies, research design, and proposal writing.  We will also introduce the class to basic methodological skills in the social sciences. Students will report regularly on their progress to the rest of the class and present their final papers at the end of the semester in a conference-style setting.

 

            This is a highly demanding course. Students will be quizzed weekly on the readings, which typically range from 100 to 200 pages per week.  Students are also expected to conduct independent research on a topic of their choice and to complete a 15~18-page research paper.

 

            This course is a particularly good fit for students who plan to write an honors thesis or attend graduate school.  It aims to train students to become critical thinkers and to acquire the analytical skills necessary to understand contemporary political and economic events. It will also help prepare students for careers in academia, government, think-tanks, and the non-profit sector.

 

 

Prerequisites

            This course has no formal prerequisites.  However, only majors or students with a strong grounding in political science should consider enrolling.  Please direct questions about eligibility to the instructors at xiaobolu@austin.utexas.edu and pmaclachlan@austin.utexas.edu.

 

 

Grading Scheme

            1. Participation in class discussions: 15%

            2. Quizzes on assigned readings (approx. 6): 5%

            3. Research paper proposal + in-class presentation: 10%

            4. 1-page (peer) review of another student’s paper proposal: 5%

            5. Research paper (15-18 pgs) in 2 drafts: 50%

            6. In-class paper presentation: 10%

            7. In-class discussion of another student’s first paper draft: 5%

 

 

 

Required Texts:

            1. Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson. Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity and Poverty.  Crown Business, 2012.

 

 

            A course pack with additional journal articles and book chapters will be available for purchase at the beginning of the semester.

 

 


GOV 365N • Soc Justice/Sec Policy-Pol

38384 • Redei, Lorinc
(also listed as EUS 348, REE 335)
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GOV 370K • African American Politics

38395 • Philpot, Tasha
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 1
(also listed as AFR 374D)
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African-American Politics

GOV 370K/AFR 374D

 

 

Description

 

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African-American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors, creators and initiators in the political process. Specifically, this course will examine various political controversies that surround the role of race in American society and how these controversies affect public opinion, political institutions, political behavior, and salient public policy debates. This course will assess and evaluate the contemporary influence of race in each of these domains while also exploring their historical antecedents.

 

This course carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.

 

Prerequisites

 

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 

Required Text Books

 

There are two required text books for this course, which are available at the University Co-op:

 

Walton, Hanes, Jr. and Robert C. Smith. 2014.  American Politics and the African American Quest for Universal Freedom.  7th  Edition. New York: Addison Wesley Longman.

 

Philpot, Tasha S., and Ismail K. White, eds. 2010. African-American Political Psychology: Identity, Opinion, and Action in the Post-Civil Rights Era. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. (This book is available electronically through the library website for free.)

 

Grading

 

Exam 1                                                25%

Exam 2                                                25%

Exam 3                                                25%

Quizzes and in-class assignments       25%

 


GOV 370L • Problems In US Politics

38405 • Gerring, John
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 304
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Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 370L • The Politics Of Health Care

38425 • McDaniel, Eric
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM UTC 3.124
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Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 370L • The Politics Of Title IX

38410 • Philpot, Tasha
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 206
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The Politics of Title IX

GOV 370L

TuTh 11:00 am to 12:30 pm

PAR 206

 

Description

 

This course will critically examine how the passage of Title IX has affected the educational and career opportunities of women in the United States, with a particular emphasis on collegiate athletics.  The course will begin by discussing the evolution of Title IX, from its initial passage to its interpretation by the courts.  The discussion will also include critiques of and opposition to Title IX.  The course will then discuss historical issues related to women and sports, including gender stereotypes, race, and media representations of women.  This will be followed by more contemporary issues related to Title IX, such as sexual discrimination and harassment, pay-for-play, and athlete activism.  The course will conclude with a discussion of Title IX’s greatest successes and where there are still barriers left to break in terms of gender equality.

 

Prerequisites

 

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 

Required Text Books

 

There are two required textbooks for this course, which are available at the University Co-op:

 

Carpenter, Linda Jean and R. Vivian Acosta.  2005.  Title IX.  Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

 

Cahn, Susan K.  2015.  Coming On Strong: Gender and Sexuality in Women’s Sports, 2nd Ed.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

 

Grading

 

Your grade will be based on two exams, a Sports Comparison Paper, and several pop quizzes/in-class assignments. The weight of each assignment in determining your final grade is as follows:

 

Exam 1                                                25%

Exam 2                                                25%

Sports Comparison Paper                   25%

Quizzes and in-class assignments       25%


GOV 379S • Citizens In Democratic Pol

38445 • Luskin, Robert
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM CBA 4.342
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GOV 379S • Regime Persp Amer Poltc-Honors

38455 • Tulis, Jeffrey
Meets M 3:30PM-6:30PM BAT 1.104
(also listed as CTI 335)
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GOV 662L • Government Rsch Internship-D C

38365 • Swerdlow, Joel
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Course Pre-requisites, Co-requisites and/or other Restrictions:

Acceptance into the University of Texas, Archer Fellowship Program

Course Description: This course will focus on the role of media, the Congress, the

President and other governmental and non-governmental actors in the policy-making

process. Through a variety of sources (academic texts, newspaper and journal articles,

websites, blogs, advocacy papers) we will look at (and hopefully reconcile) the textbook

and “real world” versions of how policy is made in Washington, D.C.

This course is divided into four phases where we will use a variety of techniques

(lectures/discussion, in-class presentations and guest speakers) to gain a better

understanding of the policy-making process. In Phase I, we will discuss how policy is

defined: where ideas come from and who plays a role in defining what we consider to be

important policy problems. In Phase II, we will look at how policy is made and how the

structures of our unique form of government affect the policy-making process. In Phase

III we will meet with policy-makers to hear their first hand accounts of the policy-making

process and finally, in Phase IV we will try to understand the policy-making process

through a legislative simulation and class discussions/debates of some of the important

issues of the day.



  • Department of Government

    The University of Texas at Austin
    158 W 21st ST STOP A1800
    Batts Hall 2.116
    Austin, TX 78712-1704
    512-471-5121