The Department of Government
The Department of Government

GOV 310L • American Government

38070 • Prindle, David
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM JES A121A
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38085 • Theriault, Sean
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38055 • McDaniel, Eric
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM WCH 1.120
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This course is designed to provide an introduction to the processes and issues of United States and Texas government. The course will cover the relevant institutions in the development of the governmental process as well as discuss the role of the citizens in shaping our government. 

 

Required Texts and Items

  1. Central Ideas in American Government, 7e ISBN 978-0-9904165-5-5
  2. Tophat Monocle
  3. Additional readings, videos and films will be posted on Canvas
  4. Students are expected to be aware of current events and regularly read either the New York Times or Washington Post. Articles from these two media sources will be posted throughout the semester. Students should be prepared to answer questions related to the posted articles for papers and exams.
  5. Student Identification for exams.
  6. #2 Pencils for exams.

 

Grading Policy

Book Assignments                  15%

Top Hat Monocle                    10%

Outside Activities                   5%

Career Preparedness              10%

Exam One                               15%

Exam Two                                         20%

Exam Three                             25%    

Total                                                   100%

GOV 310L • American Government

38080
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM MEZ B0.306
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38060 • McIver, John
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM ART 1.102
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38050 • Epp, Derek
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM WAG 101
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38075
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 214
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 312L • Iss & Policies Amer Gov-Ut/Dc

38090 • Werner, Timothy
show description

This class will explore the theory and practice of business-government relations, with particular focus on federal government policymaking in Washington, D.C.. Students will meet in Austin during the latter half of the spring semester to explore relevant literature on business- government relations, including material on the legislative policy process, the regulatory process, interest group theory, lobbying, the social responsibility of business, and campaign finance. In May, students will attend a one-week session in Washington to meet with policymakers and their staffs, lobbyists, and others to learn more about the nuts and bolts of business-government relations in Washington. The Washington component of the program will be organized by an organization called The Washington Campus, which is run by a consortium of business schools, including UT. In addition to deepening students’ understanding of the politics of the policy process and the intricacies of business-government relations, this class will also help students develop their critical thinking and communication skills.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38140 • Moser, Robert
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38130 • Barany, Zoltan
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM MEZ 1.306
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Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Its topic – the politics of poverty – deals with questions concerning what poverty is and why it exists, with welfare policies in Texas, in the United States, and with poverty and politics in the Third World.  The course assumes the basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, but nothing more.

 

Questions concerning the nature and cause of poverty and inequality and what to do about them are by definition controversial and subject to much debate.  This course does not presume that either the professor, teaching assistants, or the readings have “The Answer” to such questions.  Rather, our collective goal for the semester is to identify the major schools of debate around such questions and for you to think about them.  If you have already decided how you feel about poverty, the course may provoke you to think again; if you have never given the question any thought, the course may provoke you into thinking about such questions.

 

Given the size and nature of the course, it is taught by lecture.  There will always be time for discussion and participation in class, however.  Attendance will make a difference, particularly because the lectures do not follow the readings.  (I am convinced of your ability to read the texts – which are selected for ease of understanding, relevance, and for its likelihood to keep you engaged – without having to spend time regurgitating them in class.)  The lectures, in other words, will be entirely different from what you read for that day.

 

 

 

Grading Policy

 

First Test                                 20

Second Test                            30

Third Test                                30

5-7-page paper                       20

 

 

Required Readings

 

(A) Auyero, Javier, ed. Invisible Austin: Life and Labor in an American City (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2015).

 

(B) Banerjee, Abhijit V., and Esther Duflo. Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty (New York: Public Affairs, 2012).

 

(V) Vance, J.D. Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis (New York: Harper, 2016).

 

 


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38125 • Weyland, Kurt
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM JES A121A
show description

This course will compare liberal democracy in the U.S. with the political systems of Great Britain, Sweden, Russia/Soviet Union, and Mexico. The main purpose is to analyze how different models of democracy as well as non-democratic types of political regime operate in practice and how they have changed over time. Specifically, we will examine liberal democracy (the case of the U.S.); social democracy (Sweden); the move from social to liberal democracy (Great Britain); Communist totalitarianism (Soviet Union), its move toward democratization, and the slide into authoritarian rule (Russia); & authoritarian rule & its democratization (Mexico). Through this wide-ranging approach, we will also examine how countries of very different historical and regional background and of different development levels deal with fundamental political issues. Thus, the course will examine political decision-making in different institutional and societal settings and analyze how these political differences affect public policies and the lives of common citizens.

Grading:

3 examinations + 3 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance norm. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty rules.

  

Texts (probable – but may potentially be replaced):

 

David Held, Models of Democracy, 3rd ed. (Polity Press, 2006)

 

Benjamin Ginsberg & Martin Shefter, Politics by Other Means, 3rd ed. (W.W. Norton, 2002)

 

M. Donald Hancock et al., eds., Politics in Europe: An Introduction to the Politics of the United Kingdom, ... Sweden, Russia,.. 5th ed. (Congressional Quarterly Press, 2011/12). [NOTE: We will use the 5th edition so students can obtain used copies; the 6th edition (2014) is very expensive].

 

Daniel Levy & Kathleen Bruhn, Mexico: The Struggle for Democratic Development, 2nd ed. (Univ. California Press, 2006).

 

Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

 

The readings amount to 70-100 pp. per week.

 


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38105
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM MEZ B0.306
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38110
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CAL 100
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38115
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM MEZ B0.306
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38100
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM UTC 3.124
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38135 • Enelow, James
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM CLA 0.112
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38120 • Stauffer, Dana
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM CLA 0.102
show description

This course examines American democracy in its origins, its evolution, its strengths and weaknesses, and its enduring character. We will read primary texts from the American colonial period, the American Founding, the pre-Civil-war period, the Progressive era, and the late twentieth century. Much of the course will be devoted to Alexis de Tocqueville’s classic work Democracy in America, one of the most famous books ever written on American politics. Written in the 1830s, the work takes up questions and themes that continue to resonate almost two centuries later. Tocqueville was interested in analyzing American democracy from all angles and his work is a mix of sociology, history, and moral psychology, as well as political science. Key themes of our examination will be: the relationship between religion and politics, the relationship between American materialism (and America’s economic life more generally) to its politics, and the meaning of American equality. We will also take up Tocqueville’s wide-ranging observations on American intellectual life, family life, and the relations between the sexes, as they relate to the American political experiment. In the last third of the course, we will read authors who challenge Tocqueville’s key arguments, or take his assertions in a new direction, and we will consider how well his predictions have been borne out.

 

This course satisfies the second half of the legislative requirement in Government.

 

Grading and Requirements:

 

Option 1 (No paper):

Midterm Exam: 40%

Pop Quizzes: 10%

Final Exam: 50%

Option 2 (With paper):

Midterm Exam: 20%

Pop Quizzes: 10%

Final Exam:  30%

Paper: 40%

 

Attendance is required and four or more unexcused absences will causes a drop in one’s final grade.

 

Required Texts:

1. A COURSE READER, available at Jenn’s Copying and Binding, 2518 Guadalupe St., at the corner of Guadalupe and Dean Keeton, tel. 482-0779.

 

2. Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, Volume I. Translated by Arthur Goldhammer and edited by Olivier Zunz. Library of America. 2012.

 

3. Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, Volume II. Translated by Arthur Goldhammer and edited by Olivier Zunz. Library of America. 2012.

 

4. Online readings.


GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

38155 • Tulis, Jeffrey
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.120
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Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.


GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

38150 • Arellano, Alec
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM MEZ 1.202
show description

Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.


GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

38145 • Bell, Thomas
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 308
show description

Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.


GOV 314 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thou

38170 • Dempsey, Erik
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 208
(also listed as CTI 302)
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 314 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thou

38180 • Dempsey, Erik
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM GAR 0.128
(also listed as CTI 302)
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GOV 314 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thou

38185 • Wensveen, Jonathan
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 1.210
(also listed as CTI 302)
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GOV 314 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thou

38175 • Siddiqi, Ahmed
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BEN 1.124
(also listed as CTI 302)
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GOV 314 • Competing Visions Good Life

38165 • Abramson, Jeffrey
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 1.102
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GOV 314 • Intro To Politics In E Asia

38190 • Maclachlan, Patricia
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM SZB 296
(also listed as ANS 301M)
show description

 This lower-division survey course introduces students to the domestic politics and political systems of Japan, China, Taiwan and North and South Korea.  For each country, we explore key political institutions and processes from theoretical, historical, and comparative perspectives. Along the way, we touch on many of the questions that have intrigued scholars of East Asian politics, including the region’s distinctive models of economic development and paths to democracy, the legacies of strong states, and the nature of state-society relations. In so doing, we explore a number of relevant political science concepts and theories (e.g., authoritarianism, democratization, the “developmental state,” rational choice, historical institutionalism, civil society, and social movements) and assess their applicability to the region. By the end of the semester, students will have acquired the background knowledge to not only interpret current events in East Asia but also to pursue more in-depth scholarly study of this critically important part of the world.           

 

 

Prerequisites:

            None.

 

 

Texts:

            Students are not required to purchase textbooks.  All readings will be posted under Modules on the Canvas site for the course.

                              

           

Requirements:

  1. Quizzes on readings (approx. 8)                                                               15%

2.   In-class exam #1:                                                                                     25%

3.   Take-home essay assignment:                                                                   30%

In lieu of this assignment, students may write a short

(5-6 pp) research paper on a topic of their choice

4.    In-class exam #3 (cumulative):                                                                 30%

 


GOV 314 • Mid East: Adj/Chg Mdrn Time

38160 • Ahmadi, Shaherzad
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ B0.306
(also listed as MES 301L)
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 324J • Govs/Polit Of Eastern Europe

38195 • Liu, Amy
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM PAR 1
(also listed as EUS 348, REE 335)
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Eastern Europe is home to an ethnically diverse population. And in the past 100 years, the map for Eastern Europe has been redrawn more than a dozen times – often with great consequences for ethnic politics. The course is divided into five parts. We will begin by focusing on the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire at the end of World War 1, the Interwar Period, and World War 2. During these thirty-some years, we see the importance of ethnicity on state- building. We will then continue on to the Cold War, paying special attention to the institutional differences across the otherwise ideologically similar communist states. We will also note how the different governments used these institutions to mute ethnic matters. Next, we will examine how these institutional differences affected subsequent democratic transitions and government policies toward minorities. We will conclude by looking at how the European Union has redrawn Eastern Europe by opening up borders and the implications of these opened borders, namely the rise of right wing nationalism.

Grading Policy

Weekly Quizzes: 20% Midterm Examination: 20% Final Examination: 20% Coding Assignment: 20% Visual Presentation: 20%

Texts

Krenz, Maria. 2009. Made in Hungary: A Life Forged by History. Boulder, CO: Donner Publishing. 


GOV 324L • Govs & Polit Of Western Europe

38200 • Somer-Topcu, Zeynep
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 130
(also listed as EUS 350)
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This course provides students with a general introduction to the political institutions, voter behavior, and issues in West Europe. The objective is to equip students with a broad overview of the politics and political systems of Western Europe, as well as on concepts, methods, and tools to understand and analyze contemporary developments. The course is organized thematically (rather than in a country-specific way) around a framework that emphasizes the political determinants and policy consequences of institutional differences.

 

We will start the course with a short overview of the countries and the history of Europe. We will then look at political institutions in Europe, and briefly discuss the European Union. Toward the end of the course we will discuss West European voters, their political behavior, and important issue areas and policies in Europe.


GOV 335M • Natural Law Theory

38215 • Budziszewski, J
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM PAR 304
(also listed as PHL 342)
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 Please check back for updates.

 


GOV 335M • Religion In Amer Pol Thought

38210 • Budziszewski, J
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM PAR 303
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 Please check back for updates.

 


GOV 335N • Southern Political History

38220 • Enelow, James
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 420
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GOV 337M • Intnatl Politics Latin Amer

38230 • Weyland, Kurt
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 1
(also listed as LAS 337M)
show description

This course will analyze Latin America’s international relations in a wide-ranging, theoretically informed perspective. The first week will introduce students to a variety of theoretical approaches to this topic. For a few weeks thereafter, the course will examine U.S. policy toward Latin America, starting with the long list of U.S. interventions during the twentieth century (before and during the Cold War); we will focus on emblematic cases, such as Mexico (1910s), Guatemala (1954), Cuba (1959 ff), Chile (1970-73), Grenada (1983) & Panama (1989). We will then analyze how U.S. – Latin American relations have changed with the end of the Cold War. Thereafter, the course will for two weeks investigate the impact of economic structures and forces on the region’s international position and influence; in particular, what have the repercussions of Latin America’s “economic dependency” been, and how has international economic integration (e.g., NAFTA) changed the region’s insertion into the international economic and political system? Finally, the last few weeks of the course will discuss a variety of new issues that have arisen on Latin America’s international agenda, such as democracy and human rights; international migration; drugs and (other) international criminal activities; and the protection of the environment and of indigenous populations. How have the U.S. and Latin America dealt with all of these novel issues, and how do we need to adjust our theoretical frameworks to account for these new developments?

 

Grading:

 

1 six to seven page essay paper about questions distributed by the instructor; midterm and final examinations; 2 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance rule & policy. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty norms.

  

Texts (probable – but may potentially be replaced):

 

Michael Grow, U.S. Presidents and Latin American Interventions. University Press of Kansas, paperback edition, 2012.

 

Robert Pastor, Exiting the Whirlpool. Westview Press, 2001.

 

Russell Crandall, The United States and Latin America after the Cold War. Cambridge University Press, 2008.

 

Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

 

Pls. note: The readings will amount to about 100 pp. of material per week.


GOV 337M • Politics Of Dev In Lat Amer

38235 • Madrid, Raul
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.126
(also listed as LAS 337M)
show description

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GOV 337M • Politics Of Mexico

38225 • Greene, Kenneth
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 201
(also listed as LAS 337M)
show description

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GOV 347K • Gov And Politics Of South Asia

38255 • Liu, Xuecheng
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A217A
(also listed as ANS 347K)
show description

South Asia is bounded on the south by the Indian Ocean and on land by West Asia, Central Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia. This sub-region comprises eight developing countries—Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. South Asia is home to well over one fifth of the world's population, making it the most populous geographical region in the world.

 

Since the end of the Cold War, South Asia has become a focal point of growing international attention and concern by nuclear proliferation, the rise of Islamic militancy and the anti-terror war, the emergence of India as a global power, and regional effort for cooperation. South Asian nations have also been experiencing a profound political evolution of democratization.

 

This course provides students with a comprehensive and systematic introduction to the comparative political study of the eight nations of South Asia. Organized in parallel fashion to facilitate cross-national comparison, the course sections on each nation address several topical areas of inquiry: political culture and heritage, government structure and institutions, political parties and leaders, and social conflict and resolution. India, the preeminent power of the subcontinent, will receive more attention. In terms of the international relations of the region, this course will address several predominant region-wide issues: the India–Pakistan conflict, the rise of Islamic militancy and the AfPak war, and regional cooperation under the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC).

 

Prerequisites:

This is an introductory course, a background in Asian studies or Government is recommended but not required.

 

Grading Policy:

Two mid-term exams (60%). 

One short term paper of 6-7 pages (30%, first draft 15% and final draft 15%)

Overall class participation/attendance may be reflected in a plus or minus up to l0 points in determining the course grade.

 

In terms of the mid-term exams, any student missing a mid-term exam with a verified medical excuse or for an official university event with a letter from the responsible university authority may choose to take a makeup exam or do an alternative assignment.

 

We will adopt UT's new "plus & minus" grading system in this course. The following is a list of letter grades, their corresponding GPA values, and the percentage values that I plan to use for your assignments. Note that these percentage scores will not be noted on your transcript.

 

Letter grade                                                    GPA                                                     Percentage Score

 

A                                                                                  4.00                                                     94-100 %

A-                                                                                3.67                                                     90-93

B+                                                                                3.33                                                     87-89

B                                                                                  3.00                                                     84-86

B-                                                                                2.67                                                     80-83

C+                                                                                2.33                                                     77-79

C                                                                                  2.00                                                     74-76

C-                                                                                 1.67                                                     70-73

D+                                                                                1.33                                                     67-69

D                                                                                  1.00                                                     64-66

D-                                                                                0.67                                                     60-63

F                                                                                  0.00                                                     59 & below

===================================================

 

Textbooks:

 

The textbooks are all electronic resources and students can read them online or download them by purchase. We will just choose several chapters from each book as reading assignments.

 

  1. Robert C. Oberst, et al, Government and Politics in South Asia, 7th Edition

New York: Westview Press, 2013. (Electronic Resource) [GPSA]

  1. T.V. Paul ed., South Asia’s Weak States, Stanford, Calif.: Stanford Security Studies, 2010. (Electronic Resource) [SAWS]
  2. Lawrence Saez, The South Asian Association of Regional Cooperation (SAARC),

Hoboken: Taylor & Francis, 2012. (Electronic Resource)

  1. During the course of the semester, additional latest articles on South Asia may be added and distributed as required readings in class.

 

References:

Yek Raj. Pathak, SAARC: South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (Kathmandu: Rashtriya Samachar Samiti, 2014). (PCL: DS 331 S229 2014).

 


GOV 351L • Morality And Politics

38265 • Stauffer, Dana
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CLA 0.112
(also listed as CTI 325)
show description

Do the ends justify the means? If they don’t, what does? Is revenge just? Is it a good idea? What, if any, are legitimate grounds for starting a war? Is it always better that the truth come out in politics? Should politicians keep their promises? Is loyalty to our friends and family more important than the common good? What is the relationship between moral virtue and both political success and personal happiness? We will examine the ways in which great thinkers both ancient and modern have grappled with these questions. About half of the course will be devoted to examining the arguments that two great political philosophers, Aristotle and Machiavelli, make about the role of morality in politics. We will spend the other half of the course examining moral dilemmas, and how various characters resolve them, in plays and novels by authors such as Sophocles, Euripides, Shakespeare, Addison, and Ibsen.

 

This course carries the Ethics and Leadership flag. Ethics and Leadership courses are designed to equip you with skills that are necessary for making ethical decisions in your adult and professional life. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments involving ethical issues and the process of applying ethical reasoning to real-life situations.

 

 Required Texts:

 

1. Euripides II. By Euripides. Complete Greek Tragedies Series. University of Chicago.

 

2. Euripides IV. By Euripides. Complete Greek Tragedies Series. University of Chicago.

 

3. Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. By Aristotle. Translated by Robert C. Bartlett and Susan Collins. University of Chicago.

 

4. The Prince. By Niccolo Machiavelli. Translated by Harvey C. Mansfield. University of Chicago Press.

 

5. The Theban Plays. By Sophocles. Translated by Peter Ahrensdorf and Thomas L. Pangle. Agora.

 

6. Cato: A Tragedy and Selected Essays. By Joseph Addison. Edited by Christine Dunn Henderson and Mark E. Yellin. Liberty Fund.

 

7. Politics. By Aristotle. Translated by Ernest Barker. Oxford University Press.

 

8. Julius Caesar. By William Shakespeare. Bantam Classics.

 

9. Darkness at Noon. By Arthur Koestler. Bantam Books.

 

10. Ibsen: Four Major Plays, Volume II. By Henrik Ibsen. Signet Classics.

 

Grading and Requirements:

 

First Exam: 30%

Second Exam:  30%

Paper: 30%

Class Participation, Including Pop Quizzes: 10%

 

Attendance is required.


GOV 353D • Darwin & Politics Of Evolution

38270 • Prindle, David
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 301
(also listed as CTI 372)
show description

 

Purpose of the Course

 

            Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, generally shortened to The Origin of Species, is one of the two or three most influential science books ever published.  But unlike the case with other science books, The Origin, published in 1859, is also of profound political importance.  Part of this political importance—the implications of Darwin's theory for religious explanations of the diversity of life—is well understood by all socially-aware citizens.  But there is much less awareness of the political implications of controversies within the science of evolutionary biology founded by Darwin.

     In this class I will explicate and explore both the "outside" and "inside" political implications of the science launched by the Origin, and ask the students to evaluate them.

 

 Assigned Reading

 

1)  Charles Darwin,  The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, first edition,

      (Barnes and Noble Classics, 2004) [first published 1859]

2)  Jerry Coyne, Why Evolution is True  (Viking, 2009)

3)  Phillip Johnson, Darwin on Trial, second edition, (InterVarsity Press, 1993)

4)  David Prindle, Stephen Jay Gould and the Politics of Evolution  (Prometheus Books,

      2009)

5)  A package of readings, available online.

 

 Grading Criteria

 

        There are three assignments due in this class. I may make some minor adjustments in a few of the final grades to reflect excellent class participation, but in general, each of the three assignments counts one-third of the final grade.

        For your three assignments, you may choose to write two essays and take one test, or take two tests and write one essay.  It is up to you to decide how you mix the tests and essays, and in what order you choose to do them.  You may not, however, "load up" by turning in an essay at the same time that you take a test, thus getting two‑thirds of the assignments out of the way on the same day.

            At the end of the semester, an average of 92.3 or higher will earn an "A,", 90 to 92 will earn an “A-,” 88 to 89.7 will earn a “B+,” 82.3 to 87.7 will earn a "B," 80 to 82 will earn a "B-," 78 to 79.7 will earn a "C+," 62.3 to 77.7 will earn a "C," 60 to 62 will earn a "C-," and 50 to 59.7 will earn a "D."  People who have missed one or more of the three assignments, or who average below 50, will receive an “F.” 

          Prerequisites

 

            Student are able to enroll in this class through two channels.  First, Government majors who are eligible for upper-division standing may enroll through the usual departmental processes.  Second, students who are participating in the Thomas Jefferson Center’s “great books” program (officially, CTI in the catalogue), may enroll in the class through that program.

 

 

 

 

 

 


GOV 355M • Applied Rsrch: Polit Sci

38280 • Findley, Michael
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM CLA 0.120
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 355M • Human Behav As Rational Actn

38275 • Lin, Tse-Min
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GDC 2.210
show description

GOV 355M : Human Behavior as Rational Action

 

Writing Flag & Quantitative Reasoning Flag

  

The term “rational action” as used in the economic approach is generally equated with maximizing behavior. Individual human agents are assumed to have consistent and stable preferences over alternatives each of which is assigned some “utility.” Maximization entails choosing the course of action that yields the highest expected utility. One is rational to the extent one uses the best means to achieve one’s goals.

 

In this course we will learn a variety of social and political models based on such a notion of individual rationality and to investigate the collective consequences that can be logically inferred from its assumptions. In particular, we will find through the “Prisoner’s Dilemma,” the “Tragedy of the Commons,” and the “Free-Rider Problem” a contrast between rational man and irrational society. Self-serving behavior of individuals does not usually lead to collectively satisfactory results.

 

So this course is about the stories of the Prisoners, the Herdsmen, and the Free-Riders. As a matter of fact, we will show that the Dilemma, the Tragedy, and the Problem share essentially the same mathematical structure, and hence they are essentially the same story - a story about human destiny. We will also introduce the various approaches that have been proposed for the escape from such a destiny.

 

Prerequisites

 

Upper-division standing required.

6 semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 

Grading Policy

 

1. First Paper (6-8 pages): 25%                      2. Second Paper (7-9 pages): 25%

3. Third Paper (8-10 pages): 30%                   4. Presentation: 10%

5. Attendance: 10%

 

Texts

 

1. Thomas C. Schelling (1978), Micromotives and Macrobehavior (Norton).

2. Robert Axelrod (1984), The Evolution of Cooperation (Basic Books).

3. Dennis Chong (1991), Collective Action and the Civil Rights Movement (Chicago).

4. Elinor Ostrom (1990), Governing the Commons (Cambridge).

5. Howard Rheingold (2002), Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution (Basic Books).

 


GOV 357L • Judicial Process And Behavior

38285 • Sager, Alan
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM WAG 420
show description

GOV357L: Judicial Process and Behavior 

Dr. Alan Sager                                                                                            Spring 2018

 

Prerequisites

            There are no perquisites for this course other than what normally is required for upper division Government courses.

Course Description

            This course focuses on understanding and explaining  judicial behavior. In order to do this, this course examines not only what judges do, but also all aspects of the judicial process such as juries, attorneys, prosecutors, judicial selection, plea bargaining, court structures and the social and political settings in which courts operate.

            Most of the assignments involve reading and analyzing judicial opinions in actual cases. These opinions not only reveal what the judge is thinking, but also explain how the judicial process works.  Some assignments include viewing videos. To further understand the judicial process we will also look at some of  the quantitative research on judicial behavior.

            The cases are drawn from a variety both "public' and "private" law areas.  Case topics include negligence and product liability law, international law,  criminal law and procedure, the interpretation of federal statutes, and constitutional law  Some cases used in this course come from the most recent terms of the U.S. Supreme Court.

            Students are expected to keep current with the reading and video  assignments and to come to class prepared to discuss the cases and related materials assigned for that day.   As part of their daily preparation, students are expected to actually write summaries of cases called "briefs" and bring them to class. 

            This class is designed for students who want a general understanding of the judicial and legal process, students who are thinking about attending or are enrolled in law school and students who intend to teach in the area of government and civic in public schools.

           

GRADING CRITERIA

   3 Hour Exams                                                                                                       approx. 63%

   2 short papers 3-4 pages each one of which is  a   brief                              approx. 22%

   Class participation, quizzes and attendance                                                  approx. 15%

 

Textooks for the course:   There are two paperback texts.

 Pritchett, Murphy and Epstein, Court,  Judges and Politics, available only as a used paperbackanda packet of cases printed by the Co-Op for this class


GOV 357M • Civil Liberties

38290 • Perry, H
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 4.112
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 357M • Constitutional Interpretatn

38295 • Perry, H
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 1.104
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 357M • Structure Of Indiv Liberties

38300 • Jacobsohn, Gary
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 2.124
(also listed as CTI 326)
show description

The focus of this course is on the ways in which the Constitution protects individual rights as it accommodates the often competing claims of groups, communities, and the state. We examine rights under the Constitution as they have evolved and been defined through judicial interpretation during periods of crisis and normalcy.  Some of the topics to be considered include: equal protection under law, substantive and procedural due process, freedoms of speech and religion, and privacy. Under these rubrics are to be found such issues as affirmative action, capital punishment, hate speech, property rights, abortion, and gender discrimination. If it is important to defend a right  -- for example, privacy – against the intrusive reach of the state, must all rights be so defended with equal vigilance?  Is there a principled way to distinguish among rights, say between speech and the right to bear arms, such that the Court would be justified in treating them differently as far as a constitutional defense is concerned?  By the end of the course students should have an informed judgment on such questions, which is to say, on the role of the Supreme Court in contemporary American politics.  Much of the reading is of Supreme Court opinions that highlight the politics of constitutional development.

 

  1. No prerequisites
  2. Hour Exam (30%), paper (30%), final exam (40%)

             Texts: Donald P. Kommers, John E. Finn, and Gary J. Jacobsohn. eds., AMERICAN

                                CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: LIBERTY, COMMUNITY, AND THE BILL OF

                                RIGHTS (Vol. 2, 3rd ed.)

Michael Dorf., ed., CONSTITUTIONAL LAW STORIES

 


GOV 357M • Supreme Court And Public Pol

38286-38289 • Powe, Lucas
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM TNH 2.114
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 360N • Defense Policy

38305 • Dorn, Edwin
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SRH 3.221
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 360N • Intel And National Security

38310 • Pope, James
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SRH 3.122
show description

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GOV 360N • Internatl Political Economy

38325 • Wang, Di
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 1.126
show description

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of international political economy (IPE), an interdisciplinary field related to international politics and international economics. It examines how domestic and international politics influence the economic relations between countries. Why do governments promote or oppose globalization? Why do countries cooperate economically in some situations but not others? Why do countries adopt bad economic policies? We will address these questions and others with a focus on the policies of international trade (the flow of goods), foreign direct investment (the flow and location of production), and financial and exchange rate policies (the flow of capital). While no prerequisites are required, a familiarity with macroeconomics is strongly recommended for success in this course.  


GOV 360N • Just War/Ir: Evol/Impact

38320 • Miller, Paul
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.122
show description

When does God say to kill people? The just war tradition is a body of thought in the western tradition about restrictions that should be placed on the occasion and conduct of political violence in light of normative and ethical considerations. It addresses itself to the question: When is it just to kill? It stands in distinction to both pacifism, according to which it is never just to kill, and realism, according to which killing needs no justification other than raison d’Etat. Just warriors believe that killing is a morally serious act that needs special justification—but also that some circumstances give that justification.

            This course is appropriate for upper-division undergraduates and graduate students prepared to do a substantial amount of reading in pre-modern literature and to discuss ideas at length in writing and in a seminar-style conversation. (Graduate students interested in enrolling will register for a government conference course with the instructor). The course is designed as a simultaneous, dual-track seminar for undergraduate and graduate students, with separate reading and writing assignments for each level. Graduate students are expected to do the required readings given to undergraduates, plus additional materials as well. This course fulfills both the writing flag and ethics and leadership flag.

            This course is an intellectual history of the just war tradition. It attempts to recover the tradition in its original theological depth. Students will read primary sources from antiquity, the Middle Ages, the early Modern Age, and the contemporary era. We will ask if the tradition is coherent without its theological context. We will explore what resources the just war tradition has for addressing contemporary security concerns. And we will seek to restore intellectual integrity to a tradition of historical, social, and theological inquiry.


GOV 365L • Asian Rgnlism/Multilat Coop

38345 • Liu, Xuecheng
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 101
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 365N • Comparative Legal Systems

38380 • Brinks, Daniel
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ B0.306
show description

Judicial politics is the study of how political dynamics shape courts and how courts, in turn, shape politics and society. This course is an introduction to the comparative study of judicial politics, designed for students who want to learn more about the role of courts in the modern state and to better understand their growing importance as political actors. We will engage with different theories to compare and contrast how law, politics and judiciaries interact around the world. To help us understand and apply the readings, we will role-play a constituent assembly and design our own court.

Participating in this course will help you understand questions such as the following: What is the political logic that gives rise to judicial power? How do different courts make decisions? How do different political contexts (democracy, authoritarianism) shape the way courts make decisions? Why are some judiciaries more independent than others? Can courts bring about social and political change?

The readings will help you develop an understanding of some of the key theories and debates in the field of comparative judicial politics. We will constantly put the theories we engage with in dialogue with events and facts about judicial systems in the United States, Europe, Latin America and Africa. Over the course of the semester we will apply what we learn about courts and politics in a collective class project: the design of the highest court of the land in a fictional country inspired by events in contemporary Egypt. The class will represent different political factions present in the Egyptian parliament and we will prepare for and hold debates to determine the characteristics of our fictional country’s supreme court.

The readings are often quite challenging and many of them are quite long. In order to participate in the debates regarding institutional design you will need to be very familiar with the readings. The class will demand a significant amount of preparation each week. You should not take this class if you are not able or willing to spend time on it outside of class hours. Attendance is mandatory and part of your grade.

 

Class requirements:

  • 2 quizzes worth 10% each (20% total)
  • A midterm worth 25%
  • A final worth 30%
  • Class participation, worth 25% total, calculated on the basis of
  • The quiz lottery results (the quiz lottery randomly tests student preparation and attendance)
  • A series of very short written assignments due throughout the semester
  • Participation in class debates and group assignments

GOV 365N • Eur Union/Regional Integrtn

38390 • Somer-Topcu, Zeynep
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 301
(also listed as EUS 348)
show description

Introduction

 

From the European Coal and Steel Community of six countries, the European Union has grown to be composed of 27 member states. It is governed by an ever-growing and strengthening set of political institutions. Member states share common economic and social policies, a common foreign and security policy, and (for some member states at least) a common currency, the Euro. They are also together suffering through the current economic recession.

 

This course provides students with a general introduction to the politics, history, governing structure, and policies of the European Union. The course begins with an overview of the theories and the evolution of European integration. We will then look at how the EU is governed, and where the power lies. Finally, we will survey important European-level policies and issues, and conclude with a discussion on the future of the EU.

 

By the end of the semester, students should be familiar with:

 

a)     The history of the European Union starting with the early history after the World War II and the developments throughout the years from the European Community of six countries to the European Union of twenty-seven.

 

b)    The main theories and conceptual approaches used to explain and make sense of the European integration process.

 

c)     The composition, structures, and functioning of the main EU institutions (the European Commission, the Councils, the European Parliament, and the European Court of Justice)

 

d)    The European elections to the European Parliament and the democratic deficit problem

 

e)     The European Union policies and its areas of regulation from agriculture to monetary policies and foreign policies of the European Union.


GOV 365N • Europe Environmntl Politics

38375 • Mosser, Michael
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A209A
(also listed as EUS 348)
show description

Environmental politics is one area where Europe arguably leads the world. Europe has, at both the national and European-Union level, committed itself to achieving reductions in carbon emissions far greater than anywhere else in the world.

This course will examine the history of environmental politics in both the member states of the European Union and the EU itself. Beginning with a conceptual treatment of general environmental politics and policies, the course moves to a history of European environmentalism, before shifting to a discussion on the institutional responses at important ‘traditional’ Member States (Germany, France, Italy and the UK) as well as ‘new‘ Member States (Czech Republic, Poland and Hungary). The final section of the course examines EU environmental policies themselves, such as the EU Emissions Trading System and its institutional commitment to meeting Kyoto Protocol goals.


GOV 365N • Human Rights & World Politics

38385 • Evans, Rhonda
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 201
(also listed as WGS 340)
show description

Human rights feature prominently in contemporary world politics. The decades since World War II have witnessed the construction of a large and complex international human rights regime that consists of the United Nations and several regionally based human rights systems. This course, focusing primarily on the UN, introduces you to the legal, political, and policy dimensions of international human rights. In so doing, it: (1) explores the philosophical and moral foundations of these rights; (2) surveys the legal and institutional infrastructure and processes that exist at domestic and international levels for the promotion of human rights; (3) examines the main actors involved in human rights advocacy, including states, international organizations, tribunals, activists, nongovernmental organizations, and national human rights institutions; and (4) emphasizes the role of law and quasi-judicial institutions in international human rights advocacy. The following questions animate this course. What exactly are international human rights?  How do they matter, if at all?  In other words, do human rights work? And if so, under what conditions do they work? These are very important questions considering the significant resources and efforts that are devoted to international human rights institutions and advocacy each year. And yet, you may be surprised to learn that we actually know relatively little about the efficacy of international human rights. In exploring why this is so, we will consider the various challenges to studying international human rights from an empirical (as opposed to a normative) perspective. This will require us to cover the basic mechanics of political science research. Students should emerge from this course with an enhanced understanding of the mechanics of human rights advocacy and an improved ability to evaluate its effectiveness. 

 

c)   Grading Policy

The final course grade will be based on a student’s performance on three exams, a five-page paper, and an assigned research project.

 

d)   Texts

We will only use a course packet.  No textbooks are required.


GOV 365N • Institutions & Comp Pol-Ec Dev

38350 • Maclachlan, Patricia
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM SZB 422
show description

 This new research- and writing-intensive undergraduate seminar explores the institutional foundations of alternative pathways to political-economic development in both economically advanced and developing countries.  What drives economic development?  Why do some countries develop more quickly and effectively than others? And how do the specific linkages between states and their economies influence their economic and political trajectories?  In answering these and related questions, we explore the experiences of a variety of countries from around the world from comparative and historical perspectives and from the vantage point of institutions theory.

 

  In addition to introducing students to some influential academic works in the field, this course prepares them to pursue theoretically informed, independent research projects. Each week, we will set aside time to instruct students on key aspects of the research and writing processes, including the formulation of research questions and hypotheses, developing bibliographies, research design, and proposal writing.  We will also introduce the class to basic methodological skills in the social sciences, including data analysis. Students will report regularly on their progress to the rest of the class and present their final papers at the end of the semester in a conference-style setting.

 

 

Prerequisites

            Students who wish to enroll in this course must receive prior approval from the instructors.  The Department of Government will open an on-line application process shortly before the fall registration period.

 

Grading Scheme

            1. Participation in class discussions: 15%

            2. Quizzes on assigned readings (approximately 5): 5%

            3. Research paper proposal + in-class presentation: 10%

            4. 1-page (peer) review of another student’s paper proposal: 5%

            5. Research paper (15-18 pages) in 2 drafts: 50%

            6. In-class paper presentation: 10%

            7. In-class discussion of another student’s first paper draft: 5%

 

 

 

Required Texts:

            1. Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson. Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity and Poverty.  Crown Business, 2012.

            2. Francis Fukuyama. Political Order and Political Decay: From the Industrial Revolution to the Globalization of Democracy. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015.

            3. James Mahoney and Kathleen Thelen, eds.  Advances in Comparative Historical Analysis. Cambridge University Press, 2015.

           

 

            Additional journal articles and book chapters will be made available to students at the beginning of the semester.

 

 


GOV 365N • Islam And Politics

38355 • Ayoub, Samy
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SZB 416
(also listed as ISL 373)
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 365N • Politics Of Memory: Ger/US

38360 • Laubenthal, Barbara
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GEA 114
(also listed as AMS 321, EUS 348, GSD 360)
show description

What role do narratives of the past play in current politics and policies in Germany and the United States? This course addresses this question by engaging with key theoretical and empirical debates from the burgeoning research field of politics of the past. We will look at the role that memories play in German and US politics today from a comparative perspective, and with several case studies, we will ask questions such as:  how are transnational political events like the Second World War, the Cold War and historical immigration movements articulated and used in current political debates? How do narratives of the past reproduce or challenge contemporary power relations? To what extent do political actors and institutions construct particular historical narratives that serve their current interests? In answering these questions, the course will put a specific focus on the role of memory in German and US immigration politics.

The course aims to enable students to understand central theories and concepts of memory studies, and to apply them in an empirical case study. At the end of the course, students will have a thorough theoretical and empirical understanding on the ways in which memory and politics intersect both as research fields and as political practices in contemporary societies.

 

Readings

Assmann, Aleida/Conrad, Sebastian (eds.) (2010): Memory in a Global Age. Discourses, Practices and Trajectories. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Halbwachs, Maurice (1980): The Collective Memory. New York: Harper and Row.

Kleist, Olaf/Glynn, Irial (eds.) (2012): History, Memory and Migration. Perceptions of the Past and the Politics of Incorporation, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Nebow, Richard N./Kansteiner, Wulf/Fogu, Claudio (2006) (eds.): The Politics of Memory in Post-war Europe. Durham: Duke University Press.

Olick, Jeffrey (2007): The Politics of Regret. On Collective Memory and Historical Responsibility. London/New York: Routledge.

Torpey, John. 2006. Making Whole What Has Been Smashed: On Reparations Politics. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press. 

Wittlinger, Ruth (2011): The Merkel’s Government Politics of the Past, German Politics and Society 26 (4), 9-27.

 

Grading

Participation (10 %)

Two response papers (30 %)

Oral presentation (30 %)

Final paper (30 %)


GOV 365N • Soc Justice/Sec Policy-Pol

38370 • Eaton, David
(also listed as EUS 348, P A 325, REE 335)
show description

Through this program we aim to bring together an array of topics of interest to UT students, with the goal of creating a critical mass of interest in Central Eastern Europe. By building on existing programs in Warsaw but taking advantage of instructor’s contacts, exepertise, and ability to synthesize a range of materials through group discussions, excursions, and assignments, we hope to increase student travel to and study of this region in fields of critical national interest relevant not just to students in CREEES but IRG, European Studies, Government, and beyond. Students will be introduced to policy case studies in Poland and a general overview while studying at UT, afterwhich they will have an opportunity to delve in-depth into one of four topics while in-country, working closely with experts in one of the following fields:

(a) Identity, Diversity and Tolerance in Polish Society; (b) Security Policy in Central Europe and Poland;

(c) Cyber-security Issues and Policy in Poland; and (d) The Criminal Justice System in Poland.

The aim of the program is to expose the student population to the limited study abroad opportunities in fields such as cybersecurity policy and criminal justice studies, while offering an interdisciplinary experience, combined with optional language training and the potential for professional experience abroad. This structure allows students to focus on a specialization while in-country, allowing one program to cover an array of topics, without succumbing to the lack of depth typically associated with a survey course.

As the topics are clearly linked to potential professional trajectories, students will have the option (for an additional fee) to further their professional interests by being placed in on-site internships in the field they are specializing in during the Maymester. Internships would take place after the program and would be eligible for additional UT credit through an affiliation agreement with the host institution, Collegium Civitas in Warsaw. Strategically located in the capital of Poland, a hub for issues of economic, political and historical relevance, the program will capitalize on academic and professional connections in the region. Poland, and Warsaw in particular, offers students a very specific perspective on global issues and EU policies, where they will surely encounter and discuss concerns over social justice and security policy different than those found in many other countries.

Students will write and present a final research paper on a topic of personal interest. There is a common core of orienting lectures/discussions during Spring Semester 2018 and through the assignments and extra-curricular meetings with policy professionals in-country, including US intelligence officials, US, Polish & German foreign service personnel, members of the NATO batallion, and former members of the Solidarity movement.

 

Grading:

 

  • Pre-departure Meetings and Lectures*14 @ 10 points each (1 hour each)  140 points
  • International Travel Safety Training*      1 @ 50 points                                                50 points
  • In-country Course Lectures: Attendance and Participation      10 @ 10 points per lecture day                                                                                                                  100 points
  • In-country Course Assessment**  Varies with specialization, indicated in descriptions below                                                                                                                        150 points
  • In-country Extra-curriculuar Meetings: US/German embassies, intelligence officials, political movements                           3 @ 20 points each                           60 points
  • Cultural Excursions & Field Trip to Krakow: Participation        5 excursions @ 20 points each, 3-day field trip @ 50 points                                                               150 points
  • Field Journal                                                25 journal entries @ 2 points each          50 points
  • Reflection Essay                                          1 @ 100 points                      100 points
  • Final Research Paper/Field Project & Presentation**  1 project @ 150 points, 1 presentation @ 50 points                                                                             200 points
  • TOTAL POINTS                                                                                                            1000

GOV 370L • Campaigns And Elections

38435 • Shaw, Daron
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.126
show description
This course is designed to introduce you to American political campaigns and elections through lectures and readings. It is not designed to serve as a “how to” manual for aspiring politicians or consultants. More often than not, it is more theoretical than practical. Still, some nuts and bolts information is essential and will be part of the curriculum. My main focus is on federal elections, though references are made to state and local elections. We spend some time revisiting past campaigns and elections in order to contrast and explicate contemporary American electoral politics. The lectures and readings pay particular attention to the presidential elections of 2012 and 2016. The races between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, and between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are not only the most recent, but provide vivid details supplementing the theoretical and descriptive points raised in the course.

 

As with the lower division version of this course, there are three primary objectives.  The first is to provide basic information about American elections and electioneering by examining both the rules of the game and the players. The second is to develop analytical skills with which to analyze complex relationships and phenomena. The third is to introduce you to the work of the political scientist by concentrating on paradigms and techniques of the discipline. Unlike the lower division course, the emphasis is on the latter two goals. 

  

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

 

Midterm Examinations

                                                                                          Midterm #1                                            50 points (25%)

                                                                                          Midterm #2                                            50 points (25%)

 

Campaign Simulation

                                                                                          Group Presentation                          40 points (20%)

                                                                                          Individual Paper                                  50 points (25%)

 

Participation and Attendance                                                                                              10 points (5%)

 

There are two main requirements for this course. First, there will be two exams. The first is worth twenty-five percent (25%) of your grade and will probably be given in early October. The second will also be worth twenty-five percent of your grade and will probably be given in early December, on the last day of class. The examinations are not cumulative; exam #1 covers material through week 6, while exam #2 covers material from weeks 7-14. They will feature a mixed format, with multiple choice, short answer, and essay questions. The exams draw roughly equally from lecture and the readings. When taking the exams, you are not allowed to talk or use your notes, books or neighbor's test.  Anyone caught cheating will be treated per University guidelines.  Study groups, on the other hand, are encouraged.  Failure to take either of the exams at the appointed times results in a grade of F.  I allow cumulative exams for those with compelling excuses, but I am the sole arbiter of what constitutes a compelling excuse. You need medical or extreme personal difficulties before I will consent to such an action. There will be no early exams, nor can exams be taken at any place other than the scheduled room. If you cannot take the exams at the scheduled time and place, you should not enroll in the course.

 

Second, there will be a campaign simulation. I will select several candidates from competitive U.S. Senate elections. Each candidate will have a team of five students, each of whom will be responsible for a report on a selected aspect of the campaign. The individual reports will be 8-10 pages long and will count for twenty-five percent (25%) of your grade. Details on the expectations for the report will be provided in class, but suffice it to say that you are expected to provide a plan detailing how your candidate will deal with one of the following aspects of the campaign: (1) budget, resource allocation, and fundraising, (2) polling and GOTV, (3) paid advertising, (4) scheduling, advance, and media, and (5) online and social media outreach.

 

Each campaign team will also be responsible for a twelve (12) minute presentation. Presentations will be held during a Saturday session in mid-November. The audience will include myself, other professors and political consultants, and several graduate students currently studying campaigns and elections. The point of the presentation is to present a strategic overview of the candidate’s prospects. Unlike the reports, the grade for the presentation will be collective (everyone on the team gets the same mark), and will constitute twenty percent (20%) of your overall grade.

 

Finally, attendance and participation are strongly encouraged. I reserve the right to give pop quizzes at any time, and these quizzes are worth five percent of your final grade.

 

 

READINGS

There is one required text for the course, which will be available at the University Co-Op bookstore.

 

John Sides, Daron Shaw, Keena Lipsitz, and Matt Grossman. 2018 (3rd edition). “Campaigns and Elections: Rules, Reality, Strategy, Choice.” Norton Publishing. 

 

GOV 370L • Election Campaigns

38415 • Luskin, Robert
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 310
show description

Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 370L • Political Psychology

38430 • Albertson, Bethany
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM MEZ 1.120
show description

Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 370L • Politics & Religion In The US

38405 • Leal, David
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM WAG 420
show description

Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 370L • Social Movements: Thry/Prac

38425 • O'Brien, Shannon
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ B0.306
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Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 370L • The Politics Of Title IX

38410 • Philpot, Tasha
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM JES A209A
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Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 370L • The United States Congress

38420 • Theriault, Sean
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM CLA 0.126
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Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 374N • Political Internship-Wb

38445 • Henson, James
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Students may register for the course (GOV 374N, Political Internship) by application only -- registration access is limited to those students who have applied and been approved. To apply, complete the Qualtrics application form you'll find at this link.  Answer all questions until the form tells you you have completed the survey.

The Government Department internship program provides students an opportunity to combine work experience in government and politics with academic coursework. This course emphasizes guiding students through the design and execution of a carefully defined small-scale research project, and an analysis of their research that can be communicated intelligibly to a public audience. The coursework is designed to sharpen students’ ability to use basic academic research skills as tools in a professional environment, and to convey the results of their research in ways that contribute to public discourse about politics, policy, and government.

Most of students’ time and energy will be directed toward performing the duties of their internships in a manner that reflects positively on them and on The University of Texas at Austin. A solid performance as an intern provides a rich learning experience, the possibility of future intellectual and professional opportunities, and also reflects well on the program, paving the way for future students to have the same opportunities current interns enjoy.

However, interns should be clear about the nature of this course. Students are not receiving credit from the Government Department primarily for fulfilling their internships. Students receive grades and credit for completing the internships in conjunction with guided course work. Supervisor evaluations are taken into account in assigning grades per the grading criteria below, but 75% of your course grade is based on assessment of academic work completed for the course.

The Government Department internship program provides students an opportunity to combine work experience in government and politics with academic coursework.  This course emphasizes guiding students through the design and execution of a carefully defined small-scale research project, and an analysis of their research that can be communicated intelligibly to a public audience using evidence-based argument.  The coursework is designed to sharpen students’ ability to use basic academic research skills as tools in a professional environment, and to convey the results of their research in ways that contribute to public discourse about politics, policy, and government.

 

Most of students’ time and energy will be directed toward performing the duties of their internships in a manner that reflects positively on them and on The University of Texas at Austin.  A solid performance as an intern provides a rich learning experience, the possibility of future intellectual and professional opportunities, and also reflects well on the program, paving the way for future students to have the same opportunities current interns enjoy.

 

However, interns should be clear about the nature of this course.  Students are not receiving credit from the Government Department primarily for fulfilling their internships.  Students receive grades and credit for completing the internships in conjunction with guided course work.  Supervisor evaluations are taken into account in assigning grades per the grading criteria below, but 75% of your course grade is based on assessment of academic work completed for the course. 

 

GRADE CALCULATION

 

Course component

Percent of final grade

Project assignment #1:  Proposal

15%

Project assignment #2: Data Graphic Prototype

15%

Project assignment #3: 1st Draft – Analysis Text

15%

Project assignment #4:  Final Research Project

30%

Mid term supervisor evaluation

10%

Final supervisor evaluation

15%

 

 

 

Grade scale for final grades:

A  94-100%

A- 90-93%

B+ 87-89%

B  84-86%

B- 80-83%

C+ 77-79%

C  74-76%

C- 70-73%

D+ 67-69%

D  64-66%

D- 60-63%

F  59 and below

 

Again: Students must complete all of the assignments in order to receive a passing grade for the course.  Decimal points will be rounded. Sign up sheets from events and meetings will be considered in borderline cases.

REQUIRED TEXTS: none


GOV 379S • Complex Emergen Human Act

38455 • Newberg, Paula
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM CBA 4.338
(also listed as LAH 350)
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Climate change. Conflicts. Coups d’etat. Displacement. Ethnic cleansing.   Floods. Genocide. Pandemics. Refugees. Rights violations. War crimes.

When these phenomena occur together, in varying combinations, they comprise complex emergencies –- overlapping, intersecting processes that can overwhelm a government and possibly an entire country, create and deepen humanitarian disasters, interrupt economic development, and lead to foreign policy crises. (Think, for example, of the crisis in Syria, the global refugee crisis, Ebola in west Africa, or some hurricanes in the Atlantic.) The causes of these crises are many, ranging from political extremism, poverty, resource scarcity and weak states to inadequate governance and diplomatic failures.

We will spend the semester investigating complex emergencies and the ways that states, societies and international humanitarian actors respond to them. Along the way, we will explore competing philosophies of humanitarian response (including neutrality and impartiality), international humanitarian law, thorny problems that arise when humanitarians meet difficult political actors, efforts to use international human rights law to resolve seemingly intractable problems, and ways the international community responds to (and sometimes does not) - and tries to solve (and often does not) -- these emergencies.

We will study recent and contemporary cases from different regions, and seminar members will also explore specific elements of emergencies in their essays.

Readings and reference materials

Source material for this subject is voluminous, varied and invariably interesting.

We will use David Keen’s Complex Emergencies ({Polity Press 2008) to help anchor our early class discussions and debates. It will be available for purchase before the term begins. For those who are interested, two additional volumes will be available for purchase: Elizabeth Ferris’s, The Politics of Protection (Brookings Institution 2011); and Didier Fassin and Mariella Pandolfi’s edited collection, Contemporary States of Emergency (Zone Books 2013).

Most of our reading (and some viewing) will be based around academic studies, current and historical news reports, participant testimonies, websites, videos, blog sites and case studies.

Prerequisites for enrolling

This seminar is intended for upper division students. Previous experience in this field is not required; all seminar members should have completed University prerequisites in Government and History.

Course requirements

Our seminar will be successful if everyone attends every class, prepares carefully, and participates actively. The subject is constantly changing, and our collaborative work will help to further our collective understanding of the problem of complex emergencies.

Written work will be graded on the basis of clarity, structure organization, quality of argument, familiarity with class material, and improvement as we all become more comfortable with the subject.

Clearly drafted memoranda responding to each week's readings will be due by noon each Monday (posted on Canvas); everyone is expected to review all of these short memos before class on Tuesday, with written responses to each other's memos assigned on a rotating basis.

Tw carefully crafted papers (approximately 2500 words in length) will be assigned during the semester. (50% of the course grade)

Attendance is required.  Seminar members are expected to participate actively in every class session, lead class discussions as designated (including reporting on written assignments), and work together as needed to further our collective conversation. (50% of the course grade.)

Seminar members are required to meet with me individually during the course of the semester to discuss classroom and written assignments.

Honor code and academic integrity

The core values of the University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the University is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community. Should you have any questions regarding University policies concerning academic integrity, please visit the website of the Office of the Dean of Students: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu

Accommodations

The University provides, on request, appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. Students for whom such services are needed should contact -- at the beginning of the semester -- the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities. (512-471- 6259: http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/

 Religious holidays

The University requires students to notify instructors at least fourteen days prior to a pending absence due to religious observance. If you must miss a class, an assignment or a project in order to observe a religious holiday, you will be given an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

Emergency evacuation policy

The Office of Campus Safety and Security (512-471-5767: (http://www.utexas.edu/safety) recommends the following safety practices: When a fire alarm is activated, please evacuate the building, assemble outside and follow instructions from the faculty; do not re-enter the building until instructed by the Austin Fire Department, the UT /Austin Police Department or the Fire Prevention Services office. Please familiarize yourself with the closest exit doors in the building. Should you need assistance for possible evacuation, please inform me during the first week of class.

 

 


GOV 379S • Pope Francis's Cath Church-Ita

38460 • Theriault, Sean
(also listed as LAH 350, T C 358)
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MAYMESTER COURSE
POPE FRANCIS'S CATHOLIC CHURCH: THE MAKING OF THE MODERN PAPACY - ROME, ITALY

This program offers the unique opportunity to explore first-hand the history and politics of papal succession and church policy in Rome, Italy. Specifically, we will concentrate on Pope Francis, the Holy See, the Vatican, and the world that it serves. The course will introduce, describe, and analyze how the Church makes its decisions and why. In addition to a regular classroom schedule, we will visit the great churches of Rome, meet with the Princes of the Church, and observe the church's far-reaching influence. By the end of the course, students will have developed an understanding of the Church as a historical, religious, and political organization. Local program staff in Rome will organize orientation and housing and support students throughout the program's duration.

The deadline to apply for this program is Nov. 1, 2017. More information including application instructions can be found here: https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/plan2/current_stdnts/abroad/italy.php

ENROLLMENT NOTE: Students who enroll in this class and are not accepted into the Maymester progarm will be dropped from the course in January.  Students may enroll in a full course load (12-17 hours) in addition to the 3 hour Maymester course as the Maymester course is not counted against total registration hours.


GOV 662L • Government Rsch Internship-D C

38340 • Swerdlow, Joel
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Course Pre-requisites, Co-requisites and/or other Restrictions:

Acceptance into the University of Texas, Archer Fellowship Program

Course Description: This course will focus on the role of media, the Congress, the

President and other governmental and non-governmental actors in the policy-making

process. Through a variety of sources (academic texts, newspaper and journal articles,

websites, blogs, advocacy papers) we will look at (and hopefully reconcile) the textbook

and “real world” versions of how policy is made in Washington, D.C.

This course is divided into four phases where we will use a variety of techniques

(lectures/discussion, in-class presentations and guest speakers) to gain a better

understanding of the policy-making process. In Phase I, we will discuss how policy is

defined: where ideas come from and who plays a role in defining what we consider to be

important policy problems. In Phase II, we will look at how policy is made and how the

structures of our unique form of government affect the policy-making process. In Phase

III we will meet with policy-makers to hear their first hand accounts of the policy-making

process and finally, in Phase IV we will try to understand the policy-making process

through a legislative simulation and class discussions/debates of some of the important

issues of the day.



  • Department of Government

    The University of Texas at Austin
    158 W 21st ST STOP A1800
    Batts Hall 2.116
    Austin, TX 78712-1704
    512-471-5121