The Department of Government
The Department of Government

Nathaniel Gilmore


Assistant ProfessorPh.D., University of Toronto

Interests


Early-modern political thought and jurisprudence, historical political thought, Rome in political thought

Biography


Professor Gilmore writes on legal and historical political thought. His first book, Montesquieu and the Spirit of Rome, is under review at Oxford University's Studies in the Enlightenment series, and he has published papers in the American Political Science Review, the Journal of the History of Ideas, and the Wiley-Blackwell Companion to the Political Culture of the Roman Republic. He teaches survey courses on capitalism, political psychology, and tyranny as well as seminars on the Roman historians, St. Augustine, Montesquieu, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and J.S. Mill.

Courses


GOV 314E • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thought

37885 • Spring 2022
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 101
SB (also listed as CTI 302)

Explores the origins of social scientific thought in the history of political philosophy and traces the development of one or more of the social sciences in modern times. Focuses on fundamental ideas about human nature, civil society, and politics, explored through reading such authors as Aristotle, Aquinas, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and Freud.

GOV 314E • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thought

37890 • Spring 2022
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM GAR 1.126
SB (also listed as CTI 302)

Explores the origins of social scientific thought in the history of political philosophy and traces the development of one or more of the social sciences in modern times. Focuses on fundamental ideas about human nature, civil society, and politics, explored through reading such authors as Aristotle, Aquinas, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and Freud.

GOV 314E • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thought

38525 • Spring 2021
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM SZB 296
Hybrid/Blended
SB (also listed as CTI 302)

The modern world is, among other things, the world of capitalism. When we speak
of progress today we ordinarily mean economic progress or at least that progress
technological, scientificthat depends on the economy and feeds it in turn; wherever we are goingwhere is that, exactly?capitalism is our fuel.

But the world wasn’t always modern, and it wasn’t always capitalist. To understand
our world, we must understand where our economic order came from and what effects it has had. How has it changed us? What has it unlocked? What has it suppressed? What, really, have we gained, and what have we lost? How can we maximize the good and minimize the bad in this rapid, disorienting, sometimes nauseating, spectacular, suffering world?

This is a political science course (you do not need any background in economics),
but our first premise is an economic premise: nothing, not even economics itself, is without cost.

After a few comments on Aristotle and Sallust, we will study John Locke and Adam
Smith, who described and desired the modern world. We will then move to this world’s greatest critic, Rousseau, and three German discontents who followed him. Finally, we will arrive in the twentieth century and examine arguments by those who wish to restrain or channel capitalism (Polanyi, Piketty) and those who wish to unleash it (Hayek, Friedman). We’ll conclude with Raghuram Rajan, who wants something in between.

This is an upper-level course at one of the finest universities in the country; it will
push you, and I will push you, but you will hike the trail yourselfwhat you accomplish here will be your own. Most readings will be relatively short so that you have time to read them slowly; the papers will be short because concision is the first virtue of a good writer.

GOV 314E • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thought

38530 • Spring 2021
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 301
Hybrid/Blended
SB (also listed as CTI 302)

The modern world is, among other things, the world of capitalism. When we speak
of progress today we ordinarily mean economic progress or at least that progress
technological, scientificthat depends on the economy and feeds it in turn; wherever we are goingwhere is that, exactly?capitalism is our fuel.

But the world wasn’t always modern, and it wasn’t always capitalist. To understand
our world, we must understand where our economic order came from and what effects it has had. How has it changed us? What has it unlocked? What has it suppressed? What, really, have we gained, and what have we lost? How can we maximize the good and minimize the bad in this rapid, disorienting, sometimes nauseating, spectacular, suffering world?

This is a political science course (you do not need any background in economics),
but our first premise is an economic premise: nothing, not even economics itself, is without cost.

After a few comments on Aristotle and Sallust, we will study John Locke and Adam
Smith, who described and desired the modern world. We will then move to this world’s greatest critic, Rousseau, and three German discontents who followed him. Finally, we will arrive in the twentieth century and examine arguments by those who wish to restrain or channel capitalism (Polanyi, Piketty) and those who wish to unleash it (Hayek, Friedman). We’ll conclude with Raghuram Rajan, who wants something in between.

This is an upper-level course at one of the finest universities in the country; it will
push you, and I will push you, but you will hike the trail yourselfwhat you accomplish here will be your own. Most readings will be relatively short so that you have time to read them slowly; the papers will be short because concision is the first virtue of a good writer.

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages



  •   Map
  • Department of Government

    The University of Texas at Austin
    158 W 21st ST STOP A1800
    Batts Hall 2.116
    Austin, TX 78712-1704
    512-471-5121