The Department of Government
The Department of Government

Michael Denly


MA, Development Management and Policy, Georgetown

Graduate student

Contact

Interests


Political economy of development; anti-corruption; natural resources

Biography


Welcome! I am a PhD student in the Department of Government at the University of Texas at Austin and Governance Team Leader at Innovations for Peace and Development. I study political economy, with a particular focus on corruption, natural resources, and public goods provision. Some of my ongoing projects relate to Honduras, Guatemala, India, and Pakistan.

I teach a two-semester undergraduate Research Practicum course at UT-Austin. The course focuses on research design as well as basic statistics and programming, including in R, Stata, ArcGIS, LaTeX, Mendeley, and Excel.

Prior to joining UT-Austin, I worked for the US State Department, the European Comission, and the World Bank. Since starting my PhD, I have consulted extensively for the World Bank and USAID on governance and anti-corruption issues.

I completed a dual MA in Development Management and Policy from Georgetown University and Universidad Nacional de San Martin in Argentina. I also hold an MSc in Public Policy and Human Development from Maastricht University in the Netherlands and a BA in International Studies from the University of Denver. While completing my undergraduate degree, I spent semesters at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, and the University of Bologna, Italy, as well as a summer researching at the University of Alicante, Spain.

Courses


GOV 355M • Applied Rsrch: Polit Sci

38285 • Spring 2019
Meets F 1:00PM-4:00PM RLP 1.102

This course is the second semester of a two-semester program that attempts to provide undergraduate students with a fairly comprehensive introduction to the research process in the social sciences. As part of this program, students will attend regular classes, write their own first-rate research paper, and gain internship experience with Innovations for Peace and Development (IPD). Students are required to take both semesters of this two-semester, interdisciplinary research program.

During the first semester, the classroom part of the course covered the essential elements of applied social science research, including arguments, concepts, measures, causality, and basic statistics. Given that knowledge of statistical software, text editors, reference management software, and mapping software is increasingly helpful for success in the social sciences, the course also provided training in Stata, R, Python, LaTeX, Mendeley, and ArcGIS. At the end of the first semester, students completed their own well-developed Research Proposals in lieu of a final exam.

During the second semester, classroom instruction will cover experiments, data structures, data cleaning, hypothesis testing, measurement challenges, linear regression, as well as the basics of panel data, regression discontinuity designs, difference-in-differences, synthetic controls, logistic regression, and network analysis. Training the above software programs will continue during the second semester as well. At the end of the second semester, students will complete their own research projects, write-up their results in a formal paper, and present their findings to the class.

GOV 362L • Government Research Internship

38555 • Fall 2018
Meets F 1:00PM-4:00PM CBA 4.326

This course is the first semester of a two-semester program that attempts to provide undergraduate students with a fairly comprehensive introduction to the research process in the social sciences. As part of this program, students will attend regular classes, write their own first-rate research paper, and gain internship experience with Innovations for Peace and Development (IPD). Students must take both semesters of this two-semester, interdisciplinary research program.

During the first semester, the classroom part of the course will cover the essential elements of applied social science research, including arguments, concepts, measures, causality, and basic statistics. Given that knowledge of statistical software, text editors, reference management software, and mapping software is increasingly helpful for success in the social sciences, the course will also provide training in Stata, R, LaTeX, Mendeley, and ArcGIS. At the end of the first semester, students will hand-in and present their own well-developed Research Proposals in lieu of a final exam.

During the second semester, classroom instruction will cover experiments, causal inference, qualitative analysis, and different types of regression and analyses. Training in relevant software will continue during the second semester as well. At the end of the second semester, students will complete their own research projects, write-up their results in a formal paper, and present their findings to the class.

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages


External Links



  • Department of Government

    The University of Texas at Austin
    158 W 21st ST STOP A1800
    Batts Hall 2.116
    Austin, TX 78712-1704
    512-471-5121