Institute of Historical Studies
Institute of Historical Studies
Institute for Historical Studies


The Institute

Founded in 2007, the Institute for Historical Studies in the Department of History has provided a dynamic space for scholarly inquiry and exchange.  Embodying the history department’s commitment to excellence in research and teaching, the Institute organizes international conferences, fosters scholarly presentations and roundtables,  promotes critical discussion of historical themes and methods, and encourages reflections on the origins and legacies of historical events.

Through its multifaceted programming, the Institute for Historical Studies serves as the intellectual heart of the history department, offering a venue for scholars to share their work and building bridges to other department and centers at the university, as well as the broader Austin community.  Each year, the Institute sponsors an international residential fellowship competition around a specific theme of critical importance to the historical profession and of general relevance to understanding the problems of the contemporary world.  Applicants may be at the senior, mid-career, or junior level.  The Institute’s annual theme culminates in a spring conference that brings together academic scholars from around the nation and the world.  The Institute also offers limited visiting research affiliation for scholars who wish to conduct research at the University of Texas.

The programming of the Institute also includes the History Faculty New Book Series, where members of the history department share the findings of their most recent publications with colleagues, affiliates, and students.  Showcasing the historian’s pivotal role as the guardian of public memory, the Institute’s Commemorations series hosts roundtable discussions to assess the making and meaning of landmark events on their  anniversaries.  These forums are widely publicized and open to the general public.  The Institute also sponsors or co-sponsors numerous events, including lectures, symposia, and films, working closely with other centers, departments, and academic units across the university.

Housed in Garrison Hall, the Department of History’s newly renovated, longtime home, the Institute for Historical Studies is a meeting place for historians and historically-minded scholars of all fields and periods. For more information on the Institute’s policies and programs please review our website.
Garrison Hall East Entrance


WATCH: “Moi, Un Noir” Trailer

Moi, Un Noir | Feb. 20, 7pm, CLA 1.302B
(1958, France, dir: Jean Rouch)

Winner of the prestigious Prix Louis Delluc in 1958, MOI, UN NOIR marked Jean Rouch's break with traditional ethnography, and his embrace of the collaborative and improvisatory strategies he called "shared ethnography" and "ethnofiction."

MOI, UN NOIR depicts an ordinary week in the lives of men and women from Niger who have migrated to Abidjan, Cote D'Ivoire for work. After a short introduction by Rouch, "Edward G. Robinson"-Omarou Ganda, who like the film's other subject-collaborators plays himself under the name of a Western movie star-takes over the film's narration, recreating dialogue and providing freewheeling commentary on his experiences. Robinson describes the bitter reality of life in Treichville, a poor inner suburb populated largely by migrants, and his work as a day laborer (bozori) in the ports. When the weekend arrives, he and his friends go to the beach and the bars, but even during this brief respite from their drudgery, they remain second-class citizens. MOI, UN NOIR also brings inside Robinson's richly detailed inner life, as he describes his fantasy of becoming a championship boxer, his dream of marrying "Dorothy Lamour" (Gambi, another Nigerien migrant), and his childhood memories of Niger. MOI, UN NOIR captures both the sorrows and the occasional joys of these migrants' experience in all their psychological complexity. A landmark of documentary cinema, Rouch's stylistic innovations here exerted a profound influence on the French New Wave, and his collaborative process helped bolster the national cinemas of West Africa.

Introduced by Nancy Schiesari, Producer/Director/Cinematographer, and Professor, Department of Radio Television Film, Moody College of Communication, University of Texas at Austin, with discussion following. Free and open to the public. No RSVP necessary. Part of the Faces of Migration: Classic and Contemporary Feature Film Series.

Tue. Feb. 20, 7pm, in CLA 1.302B, Glickman Conference Center. Parking: Brazos Garage, 210 E. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.. Event details here. Free and open to the public. No RSVP needed.


Fellowships

History Faculty New Book Series, 2017-2018