International Relations and Global Studies

IRG 301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

39650-39665 • Anderson, Michael
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM GSB 2.126
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This course serves as an introduction to the College of Liberal Arts’ new interdisciplinary major, International Relations and Global Studies.  Students will engage with many broad questions relating to the contemporary world, including:  How has the modern international system come into being?  What are the major opportunities and challenges related to the world-wide movement of capital, goods and ideas we have come to define as globalization?  To what extent does the United States dominate the geopolitical, economic and cultural landscape today?  Finally, are we entering a “post-American world,” and if so, what global repercussions might this entail?  This course will attempt to transcend the disciplinary boundaries of social sciences—whether political science, economics, or anthropology—and instead ask students to take a more holistic view of global issues, rooted in historical inquiry.
Class time will be divided evenly between lecture material and discussion.  Students will be evaluated based upon their performance in weekly online discussions, periodic in-class short-answer responses and multiple-choice quizzes, a mid-term paper and a final essay.


Course Objectives:
By the end of the semester, students will have the ability to:
1)    describe a broad array of global issues confronting international actors
2)    evaluate the role of the United States in the contemporary era of “globalization”
3)    identify and analyze in some detail the scholarly debate surrounding a particular global challenge or crisis


IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

39685 • Wang, Di
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 0.128
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This upper-level research seminar fulfills part of the requirement for the International Relations and Global Studies major.  Through readings, weekly discussions, writing workshops and individual consultation, this seminar provides students the opportunity to produce a significant paper of original research on a topic dealing with a contemporary international political economy issue ranging from major trade disputes, global financial crisis, to debates about the impact of globalization and economic liberalization on environment and social protection.

 

Grading Policies       

Grade component

Percent

Class participation

10

Discussion leaders

10

Term paper - research proposal

10

Term paper – first draft

20

Term paper - final paper

30

Oral presentation

20

Total

100

 

Readings

No textbook is required for this course. However, we will cover a number of important papers in the field which will be available from Canvas.

 


IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

39675 • Holmsten, Stephanie
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM PAR 308
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This course is restricted to IRG majors. For IRG program information please contact Dr. Michael Anderson, Director.

The concluding, capstone seminar for the International Relations & Global Studies major is designed to give you an opportunity to draw on your program of studies to prepare a rigorous analysis of a specific aspect of contemporary world affairs.  You have the choice of two formats.  One is a tightly organized research paper; the other is structured as a policy paper directed at a senior decision-maker in a national government or international organization. 

It is profitable to all to set a number of themes for the seminar.  That enhances exchanges and allows for collaborative projects. Still, students will be given reasonable latitude in selecting topics that interest them and/or on which they have acquired specialized knowledge.  We will examine closely the nature of the policy paper and its organization as the semester progresses.  The seminar paper – in either format -  should be viewed as representative of your abilities at this stage in your career and, as such, an effective way of presenting yourself and your abilities.

 The following is a short list of possible themes: democracy promotion as an instrument of foreign policy; the strains among three standards to assess global economic interdependence: growth, equity and stability; the ethical dimensions of the use of force; the interplay of domestic politics and foreign policy process/substance.


IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

39680 • Holmsten, Stephanie
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 3.116
show description

This course is restricted to IRG majors. For IRG program information please contact Dr. Michael Anderson, Director.

The concluding, capstone seminar for the International Relations & Global Studies major is designed to give you an opportunity to draw on your program of studies to prepare a rigorous analysis of a specific aspect of contemporary world affairs.  You have the choice of two formats.  One is a tightly organized research paper; the other is structured as a policy paper directed at a senior decision-maker in a national government or international organization. 

It is profitable to all to set a number of themes for the seminar.  That enhances exchanges and allows for collaborative projects. Still, students will be given reasonable latitude in selecting topics that interest them and/or on which they have acquired specialized knowledge.  We will examine closely the nature of the policy paper and its organization as the semester progresses.  The seminar paper – in either format -  should be viewed as representative of your abilities at this stage in your career and, as such, an effective way of presenting yourself and your abilities.

 The following is a short list of possible themes: democracy promotion as an instrument of foreign policy; the strains among three standards to assess global economic interdependence: growth, equity and stability; the ethical dimensions of the use of force; the interplay of domestic politics and foreign policy process/substance.


IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

39695 • Mosser, Michael
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM MEZ 1.118
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As an academic field of inquiry, international security tends to focus on the ability of states to remain secure in the face of threats to their internal and external sovereignty. Increasingly, however, the study of security has broadened to include not merely new actors, but also new conceptions of what it means to be ‘secure.’ While conflict among and within states (and increasingly non-state actors) is a major concern, the idea that insecurity can exist but still stop short of conflict has become increasingly accepted among both scholars and practitioners.  

Moreover, conflict and security have evolved since the end of the Cold War. While possible, the idea of a superpower-on-superpower strategic conflict on the scale of World War II seems increasingly unlikely. Rather, conflicts appear to occur now based much more on localized and transient grievances, or in certain cases where a major power feels the need to act unilaterally to accomplish some set of strategic aims.

This capstone course will treat all forms of conflict as our object of study, and will ask the following question: what types of conflict are we likely to see in the twenty-first century, and what patterns might we discern from these conflicts? No longer confined to interstate war, conflict since the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Soviet Union has ranged from superpower engaged in major conflict among states to civil war and intrastate violence. Moreover, states no longer hold the monopoly of violence. Indeed, in the last 15 years conflict has entered into areas previously thought unimaginable, such as in cyberspace.   


IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

39700 • Mosser, Michael
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM BEN 1.126
show description

As an academic field of inquiry, international security tends to focus on the ability of states to remain secure in the face of threats to their internal and external sovereignty. Increasingly, however, the study of security has broadened to include not merely new actors, but also new conceptions of what it means to be ‘secure.’ While conflict among and within states (and increasingly non-state actors) is a major concern, the idea that insecurity can exist but still stop short of conflict has become increasingly accepted among both scholars and practitioners.  

Moreover, conflict and security have evolved since the end of the Cold War. While possible, the idea of a superpower-on-superpower strategic conflict on the scale of World War II seems increasingly unlikely. Rather, conflicts appear to occur now based much more on localized and transient grievances, or in certain cases where a major power feels the need to act unilaterally to accomplish some set of strategic aims.

This capstone course will treat all forms of conflict as our object of study, and will ask the following question: what types of conflict are we likely to see in the twenty-first century, and what patterns might we discern from these conflicts? No longer confined to interstate war, conflict since the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Soviet Union has ranged from superpower engaged in major conflict among states to civil war and intrastate violence. Moreover, states no longer hold the monopoly of violence. Indeed, in the last 15 years conflict has entered into areas previously thought unimaginable, such as in cyberspace.   


IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

39690 • Wang, Di
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM UTC 4.120
show description

This upper-level research seminar fulfills part of the requirement for the International Relations and Global Studies major.  Through readings, weekly discussions, writing workshops and individual consultation, this seminar provides students the opportunity to produce a significant paper of original research on a topic dealing with a contemporary international political economy issue ranging from major trade disputes, global financial crisis, to debates about the impact of globalization and economic liberalization on environment and social protection.

 

Grading Policies       

Grade component

Percent

Class participation

10

Discussion leaders

10

Term paper - research proposal

10

Term paper – first draft

20

Term paper - final paper

30

Oral presentation

20

Total

100

 

Readings

No textbook is required for this course. However, we will cover a number of important papers in the field which will be available from Canvas.