LBGQT Studies Program
lgbtq logo identity

Curran Nault


Ph.D., University of Texas - Austin

Assistant Professor, Radio-Television-Film
Curran Nault

Contact

Courses


WGS 335 • Queer Television-Wb

44414 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM
Internet
Wr

Please check back for updates.

WGS 393 • Global Trans Media Studies

45224 • Spring 2020
Meets M 9:00AM-12:00PM CMA 3.130

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.

AAS 310 • Asian American Film History

31510 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RLP 1.102
CD (also listed as AMS 315, RTF 301N)

This course will consider Asian American film from a historical perspective, from the pioneers of Hollywood, to the YouTube stars of today. 

RTF 359S • Queer Media Studies

08651 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CMA 6.170
CDWr (also listed as WGS 335C)

This course immerses students in the critical and theoretical analysis of queer media in order to explore dominant strategies used by the media industries, as well as those utilized by LGBTQI independents and subcultures. Important to this project are historical shifts in representation, including the mainstreaming of queerness, and the alternative media reception, production and exhibition practices developed by LGBTQI communities. Marginalized queer identities (including qpoc and transgender) will be centralized and the intersections of queer identities, queer politics and media culture will be engaged.

 

AAS 320 • Race/Internet/Social Media

32060 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GDC 4.304
CDWr (also listed as AMS 321)

Please check back for updates.

WGS 335 • Queer Art And Activism

45555 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 0.122
CDWr

Please check back for updates.

WGS 335 • Queer Television

45560 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CMA 3.124
CDWr

Please check back for updates.

AAS 310 • Asian American Film History

32155 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RLP 1.102
CD (also listed as AMS 315, RTF 301N)

This course will consider Asian American film from a historical perspective, from the pioneers of Hollywood, to the YouTube stars of today. 

AAS 320 • Documenting Difference

32188 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 208
CDWr (also listed as RTF 359S)

FLAGS: Writing

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will explore the theory, history, practice and poetics of minority documentary. With a particular emphasis on Asian American examples, students will engage documentary as a vital practice of minority activism and self-preservation. Students will be introduced to influential documentaries across a wide range of styles and modes (expository, observational, performative, reflexive, poetic, interactive) and will explore critical topics in documentary production and reception: fictions of realism, authenticity and objectivity; histories of ethnography; questions of documentary ethics; aesthetic strategies of documentary art and activism; politics of self-representation; transnationalism; mockumentaries and the lampooning of “truth.” Class assignments will be a combination of written and creative work, and students will have the opportunity to create their own short documentary or documentary prospectus for their final project.
 

WGS 303 • Introduction To Lgbtq Studies

45990 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.122
CDWr

Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies.

DESCRIPTION:
Explores concepts of gender and sexuality, race, class, religion, and nation; as well as skills in theory, history, and research methods relevant to LGBTQ studies. The course will also survey the making of modern understandings of sexual and LGBTQ identities in the last one hundred years and the implications of this history for broader understandings of gender and sexuality.

AAS 320 • Race, Internet, & Soc Media

35475 • Spring 2018
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 0.122
CDWr (also listed as AMS 321, RTF 359S)

Flags: Cultural Diversity in the U.S. and Writing

 

From its earliest incarnations, the Internet has been celebrated as a place where corporeal concerns such as race “don’t matter.” A sizable body of research and recent popular online trends have since proven otherwise. This course gives students the vocabulary to critically articulate the relationships between Internet technologies and embodied cultural practices of use that affiliate around “race.” Topics range from early text-‐based Internet identity tourism to the phenomenon of Asian American YouTube stars to the cultural discourses of “Black Twitter.” The course adopts an intersectional politics and includes attention to gender, sexuality and (dis)ability. Finally, this course, like new media more generally, is participatory by design and will encourage students to explore course topics through both critical thought and practical experience.

Grade Breakdown:

30%     Course blog
20%     Midterm Essay/Post
20%     YouTube Assignment
20%     Group Creative Project
10%     Attendance/Participation

WGS 303 • Introduction To Lgbtq Studies

46265 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 0.120
CDWr

Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies.

DESCRIPTION:
Explores concepts of gender and sexuality, race, class, religion, and nation; as well as skills in theory, history, and research methods relevant to LGBTQ studies. The course will also survey the making of modern understandings of sexual and LGBTQ identities in the last one hundred years and the implications of this history for broader understandings of gender and sexuality.

WGS 393 • Queer Media Studies

46655 • Spring 2018
Meets T 9:30AM-12:30PM CMA 5.130

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.

AAS 301 • Intro To Asian Amer Studies

35980 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 136
CD (also listed as AMS 315)

Flag: Cultural Diversity in the US

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This interdisciplinary course introduces students to core questions regarding the historical and contemporary experiences of Asian Americans. Students will critically engage key issues, theories and debates in Asian American Studies, while also learning to unpack “Asian American” as a concept that contains an ever-shifting multiplicity of peoples, histories and places. Taking an intersectional approach to identity that explores race and ethnicity in conjunction with gender, sexuality, generation and nation, this course will engage diverse viewpoints, including those of women, LGBTQ+ individuals and people of color more generally. Key topics include: racial formation, (im)migration and citizenship, imperialism, social justice activism, intersectionality, multiraciality, solidarity, mediated representations, hybridity and transnationalism.
 
REQUIRED TEXTS
Wu, Jean Yu-wen Shen, and Thomas C. Chen. 2010. Asian American Studies Now: A Critical Reader. New
Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press. (Available at Campus Bookstore)
 
Zhou, Min and Anthony C. Ocampo. 2016. Contemporary Asian America: A Multidisciplinary Reader (3rd
Edition). New York: New York University Press. (Available at Campus Bookstore)
 
Additional Readings will be posted on Canvas. Students are responsible for retrieving and printing them.
       

COURSE GRADING
Requirements                                   % of Final Grade
Weekly Quizzes/Responses                    20%
Midterm                                               20%
Final                                                    20%
Group Presentation                               20%
Attendance and Participation                  20%



AAS 320 • Documenting Difference

36005 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 208
CDWr (also listed as RTF 359S)

FLAGS: Cultural Diversity in the US & Writing

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will explore the theory, history, practice and poetics of minority documentary. With a particular emphasis on Asian American examples, students will engage documentary as a vital practice of minority activism and self-preservation. Students will be introduced to influential documentaries across a wide range of styles and modes (expository, observational, performative, reflexive, poetic, interactive) and will explore critical topics in documentary production and reception: fictions of realism, authenticity and objectivity; histories of ethnography; questions of documentary ethics; aesthetic strategies of documentary art and activism; politics of self-representation; transnationalism; mockumentaries and the lampooning of “truth.” Class assignments will be a combination of written and creative work, and students will have the opportunity to create their own short documentary or documentary prospectus for their final project.
 
REQUIRED TEXTS
Spence, Louise and Vinicius Navarro. 2011. Crafting Truth: Documentary Form and Meaning. New
Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press. (Available at Campus Bookstore)
 
Additional Readings will be posted on Canvas. Students are responsible for retrieving and printing them.
 
COURSE GRADING
Requirements                                           % of Final Grade
Class Journals                                           20%
Response Essays and Review/Rewrite          40% (20% each)
Final Project                                              25%
Attendance/Participation                             15%

WGS 303 • Introduction To Lgbtq Studies

46775 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.212
CDWr

This introductory course will provide basic skills in theory, history, and research methods relevant to LGBTQ studies. Beginning from the premise that sexual identity has a history rather than being a universal category, we will explore concepts of gender and sexuality, as well as related categories of race, class, religion, and nation. We will also briefly survey the making of modern understandings of sexual and LGBTQ identities in the last one hundred years and the implications of this history for broader understandings of gender and sexuality.

AAS 320 • Race, Internet, & Soc Media

35910 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WEL 3.402
CDWr (also listed as AMS 321, RTF 359)

Flags: Cultural Diversity in the U.S. and Writing

From its earliest incarnations, the Internet has been celebrated as a place where corporeal concerns such as race “don’t matter.” A sizable body of research and recent popular online trends have since proven otherwise. This course gives students the vocabulary to critically articulate the relationships between Internet technologies and embodied cultural practices of use that affiliate around “race.” Topics range from early text-‐based Internet identity tourism to the phenomenon of Asian American YouTube stars to the cultural discourses of “Black Twitter.” The course adopts an intersectional politics and includes attention to gender, sexuality and (dis)ability. Finally, this course, like new media more generally, is participatory by design and will encourage students to explore course topics through both critical thought and practical experience.

Grade Breakdown:

30%     Course blog
20%     Midterm Essay/Post
20%     YouTube Assignment
20%     Group Creative Project
10%     Attendance/Participation

 

WGS 305 • Intro To Women's & Gender Stds

46870 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GEA 127
CD

This course is an introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary field that raises critical questions about the meaning of sex, gender and sexuality in society. Students will intellectually engage key issues, theories and debates in Women's and Gender Studies, both historical and contemporary, across a range of formations, from the material (toys, technologies), to the political (policy, activism), to the economic (work, wages), to the familial (maternity, kinship), to the cultural (film, music). Taking an intersectional approach to identity that explores sex, gender and sexuality in conjunction with race, ethnicity, ability, generation and nation, this course will engage diverse viewpoints, including those of people of color, LGBTQ+ individuals and women outside the U.S.

WGS 324 • Gender And Media Culture

46899 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CMA 3.116
Wr

Please check back for updates.

AAS 301 • Intro To Asian Amer Studies

35800 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 136
CD (also listed as AMS 315)

Flag: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to critical questions regarding the historical and contemporary experiences of Asian Americans. Students will intellectually engage key issues, theories and debates in Asian American Studies, and learn to unpack the very idea of “Asian American” as containing an ever-shifting multiplicity of peoples, histories and places. Taking an intersectional approach to identity that explores race and ethnicity in conjunction with gender, sexuality, generation and nation, this course will engage diverse viewpoints, including those of women, LGBT+ individuals and people of color more generally. Key topics to be explored include: (im)migration, citizenship, imperialism, panethnicity, racial formation, intersectionality, multiraciality, transnationalism, hybridity and mediated representation.

AAS 320 • Documenting Difference

35825 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 1.102
CDWr (also listed as RTF 359S)

Flags: Cultural Diversity in the U.S. and Writing

This course will explore the theory, history, practice and poetics of minority documentary, as well as the related fields of oral history and archiving. With a particular emphasis on Asian American examples, students will engage documentary (as well as oral history and archiving) as a vital practice of minority self-representation and self-preservation. Students will be introduced to a variety of documentary modes (poetic, expository, observational, participatory, reflexive and performative/personal), as well as key doc topics: jargons of authenticity; inscriptions of science, truth and knowledge; ethnography and colonialism; realism and fictions of objectivity; ethics of responsibility; grassroots political filmmaking and strategies of resistance; depictions of the self. Class projects will be a combination of written and creative work, and students will have the opportunity to create their own short documentaries, oral histories, or archival projects.

WGS 303 • Introduction To Lgbtq Studies

46811 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GEA 127
CD

This introductory course will provide basic skills in theory, history, and research methods relevant to LGBTQ studies. Beginning from the premise that sexual identity has a history rather than being a universal category, we will explore concepts of gender and sexuality, as well as related categories of race, class, religion, and nation. We will also briefly survey the making of modern understandings of sexual and LGBTQ identities in the last one hundred years and the implications of this history for broader understandings of gender and sexuality.

AAS 310 • Asian American Film History

35069 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CMA 5.190
CD (also listed as AMS 315, RTF 301N)

FLAG:Cultural Diversity

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course will consider Asian American film from a historical perspective, from the pioneers of the silent era, to the YouTube stars of today. Students will explore Asian American films from a number of cinematic genres (romance, melodrama, comedy) and forms (Hollywood, independent, documentary, experimental), as well as their attendant constraints and freedoms. Foundational to this course is the belief that film history can only be understood in relation to dominant social structures and the workings of the film industries and, as such, textual, reception and industrial analysis will all be employed. Key issues discussed will include: politics of representation in classic Hollywood cinema; the rise of Asian American independents; oppositional practices of Asian American spectatorship; intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality in Asian American films; exhibition and distribution strategies of Asian American film festivals; and transnational Asian (American) cinema. While this course will focus primarily on cinema, students will also have the opportunity to examine related forms of Asian American mediamaking, including the contemporary turn to web series and television shows like ABC’s Fresh Off the Boat.

TEXTS:

Hamamoto, Darrell and Sandra Liu, eds. Countervisions: Asian American Film Criticism. Philadelphia: Temple Univ. Press, 2000.

Mimura, Glen M. Ghost Life of Third Cinema: Asian American Film and Video. Minneapolis: Univ. of Minnesota Press, 2009.

Nguyen, Hoang Tan. A View from the Bottom. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2014.

Ono, Kent A. and Vincent Pham, eds. Asian Americans and the Media. Polity, 2008.

GRADING:

Short Response Essays…25%Midterm Paper…30%Final Paper…30%Attendance/Participation…15%

 

AAS 320 • Race, Internet, & Soc Media

35090 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GAR 2.112
CDWr (also listed as AMS 321, RTF 359)

FLAGS: Cultural Diversity and Writing

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

From its earliest incarnations, the Internet has been celebrated as a place where bodily concerns such as race “don’t matter.” A sizable body of research and recent popular online trends have since proven otherwise. This course gives students the vocabulary to critically articulate the relationships between Internet technologies and embodied cultural practices of use that affiliate around “race.” Topics range from early text-based Internet identity tourism to the phenomenon of Asian American YouTube stars to the cultural discourses of “Black Twitter.” The course adopts an intersectional politics and includes attention to gender as well as (dis)ability.

TEXTS:

Lisa Nakamura, “Cybertypes”

Henry Jenkins, “Convergence Culture”

Radhika Gajjala, “South Asian Technospaces”

Madhavi Mallapragada, “Virtual Homelands”

Wendy Chun, “Orienting Orientalism”

Mizuko Ito, “Networked Publics”

Liz Ellcessor, “Bridging Disability Divides”

MiaMcKenzie, “Black Girl Dangerous”

Aymar Jean Christian, “The Web as Television Reimagined?”

 

GRADING:

Final Research Paper: 30%Online written reading responses: 20%Paper 1: 25%Quizzes: 15%Attendance: 5%Participation: 5%

WGS 305 • Intro To Women's & Gender Stds

45989 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.120
CD

Introduction to the role of gender identity and representation in key social institutions and processes, including borders, displacements, and diasporas. Analysis of the social narratives of gender, race, and sexuality.

AAS 320 • Documenting Difference

34970 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.104
CDWr (also listed as RTF 359S)

Flags: Cultural Diversity in the U.S. and Writing

This course will explore the theory, history, practice and poetics of minority documentary, as well as the related fields of oral history and archiving. With a particular emphasis on Asian American examples, students will engage documentary (as well as oral history and archiving) as a vital practice of minority self-representation and self-preservation. Students will be introduced to a variety of documentary modes (poetic, expository, observational, participatory, reflexive and performative/personal), as well as key doc topics: jargons of authenticity; inscriptions of science, truth and knowledge; ethnography and colonialism; realism and fictions of objectivity; ethics of responsibility; grassroots political filmmaking and strategies of resistance; depictions of the self. Class projects will be a combination of written and creative work, and students will have the opportunity to create their own short documentaries, oral histories, or archival projects.

 

AFR 317E • Intro To Women's & Gender Stds

29565 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GWB 2.204
CDGC (also listed as WGS 305)

Please check back for updates.

WGS 393 • Queer Media Studies

46244 • Fall 2015
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM CAL 200

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.

RTF 386C • Queer Media Studies

08750 • Fall 2013
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM CMA 6.174
(also listed as WGS 393)

This course introduces students to the critical analysis of queer media culture.  Focusing primarily on media texts produced in the United States, we will explore the dominant strategies used by the media industries to represent members of the LGBTQI community and their issues, as well as those utilized by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, queer, and intersexed folks in practices of self-representation. Important to this project are historical shifts in the representation of non-straight individuals, in particular their growing visibility in commercial media culture and the mainstreaming of queerness.  In addition, we will examine media reception practices among queer folks, as well as the alternative media economies developed by members of the LGBTQI community.  Key to this course is an exploration of the intersections of queer identity, queer politics, and media culture.

AAS 310 • Asian American Film History

36125 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A215A
CDWr (also listed as AMS 315)

Course Description:

This course will consider Asian American film from a historical perspective, and through a variety of theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches -- including industrial, reception and texual analysis. Foundational to this course is the belief that film history can only be understood in relation to social structures, identities of sex/gender and nation, and the workings of the film industries.

Using both a chronological and thematic approach, this course will expose students to Asian American films from a number of cinematic genres (romance, horror, comedy) and will allow students to explore a variety of film forms (Hollywood, independent, documentary and experimental cinema), as well as their attendant constraints and freedoms. Key issues discussed will include: stereotypes of Asian Americans in the classic Hollywood cinema; oppositional practices of Asian AMerican production and spectatorship; intersections of race, class, gener and sexuality in Asian American films; the exhibition and distribution strategies of Asian American film festivals; and transnational Asian (American) cinema.

 

Course Goals:

By the end of the semester, students should:

  • Have a greater understanding of the bredth and complexity of Asian American film and film history
  • Be able to critically analyze cinematic representations of Asian Americans and apply theoretical insights to their analyses
  • Posses further knowledge about Asian AMerican spectatorial and industrial practices and how to research these practices
  • Appreciate the intersections of Asian American film and identities of class, gender, sexuality and nation
  • Be familiar with the inner workings of an Asian American film festival

AAS 310 • Asian American Film History

35980 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A216A
(also listed as AMS 315)

AAS 310/AMS 315 :: Asian American Film History


Course Overview


This course will consider Asian American film from a historical perspective, and through a variety of theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches – including industrial, reception and textual analysis.  Foundational to this course is the belief that Asian American film history is best understood in relation to social structures, identities of sex/gender and nation, and the workings of the film industries. 

Using both a chronological and thematic approach, this course will expose students to Asian American films from a number of cinematic genres (romance, horror, comedy) and will allow students to explore a variety of film forms (Hollywood, independent, documentary and experimental cinema), as well as their attendant benefits and disadvantages.  Key issues discussed will include:  stereotypes of Asian Americans in classic Hollywood cinema; oppositional practices of Asian American production and spectatorship; intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality in Asian American films; strategies of exhibition, distribution and community formation within Asian American film festivals and media arts centers; and transnational Asian (American) cinema. 

Course Goals

By the end of the semester, students should:

•    Have a greater understanding of the breadth and complexity of Asian American film history
•    Be able to critically analyze cinematic representations of Asian Americans and apply theoretical insights to their analyses
•    Posses further knowledge about Asian American spectatorial and industrial practices
•    Appreciate the intersections of Asian American film representation and identities of class, gender, sexuality and nation
•    Be familiar with the inner workings of the Austin Asian American Film Festival (www.aaaff.org)

Course Materials

The following two required texts are available in the bookstore, the readings from these texts have been identified in parentheses within the course schedule:

1    Countervisions: Asian American Film Criticism. Eds. Darrell Hamamoto and Sandra Liu. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 2000.

2    Screening Asian Americans. Ed. Peter X. Feng. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2002.

Readings not in the above books will be distributed in class the week before they are to be read.  You are advised to purchase a three ring binder in order to house these readings.  If you miss class, it is your responsibility to find the readings at the library or to photocopy them from a classmate.
Evaluation

Exam 1...30%
Exam 2...30%
Quizzes…15%
Discussion Questions…10%
Attendance/Participation…15%

A word about grades:  I have tried to design this course so that diligence and honest effort are rewarded.  If you are working hard and feel your grades are not reflecting this, meet with me so we can talk about strategies for improvement.  Please do not wait until the end of the semester to address this.

Grading Scale
90-100 – A
80-89 – B
70-79 – C
60-69 – D
59 and below – F

Course Schedule

Week 1 – Introductions

R 8/27 Course Introduction

Week 2 – Race and Representation:  Setting the Terms

T 9/1 Constructing Race
Read:  Robert G. Lee, “Where are You From?” and “Yellowface”

Evening Screening: Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (Spielberg, 1984)

R 9/3 Visualizing Asian America
Read:  Robert G. Lee, “Orientalism and Race:  From Chinese to Chinaman”

Week 3 – Classic Hollywood, Classic Stereotypes

T 9/8 Stereotyping:  From Yellow Peril to Model Minority (And Back Again)
Read:  Jun Xing, “Cinematic Asian Representation”

Evening Screening:  The Cheat (DeMille, 1915)

R 9/10 Danger!:  Fearing Asian American Men
Read:  Gina Marchetti, “The Rape Fantasy:  The Cheat and Broken Blossoms”

Week 4 – Classic Hollywood, Classic Stereotypes Continued

T 9/15 Desire!:  Fetishizing Asian American Women
Read:  Gina Marchetti, “Scream of the Butterfly” and Maggie Wang, “For Those Who Love Yellow Girls”

Evening Screening:  The World of Suzie Wong (Quine, 1960)

R 9/17 Strategies of Resistance:  Reading Against the Grain
Read:  Peter X. Feng, “Recuperating Suzie Wong:  A Fan’s Nancy Kwan-dary” (Countervisions)

Week 5 – Staging Resistance, Seeking Independence

T 9/22 Strategies of Resistance:  Transcoding and Detournement
Read:  Stuart Hall, “Contesting a Racialized Regime of Representation” and Valerie Soe, “Fighting Fire with Fire” (Countervisions)

Evening Screening:  My Asian America…Or Honk if You Love Buddha (Tajima-Pena, 1996)

R 9/24 Talking Back:  Asian American Voices, Asian American Filmmaking
Read:  Jun Xing, “A Cinema in the Making”
**Quiz 1**
 
Week 6 – A Dream No Longer Deferred:  The Emergence of Independent Asian American Film Production

T 9/29 Talking Back: Asian American Voices, Asian American Filmmaking Continued
Read:  Peter X. Feng, “Being Chinese American, Becoming Asian American: Chan is Missing” (Screening)
In-class screening:  Section from Chan is Missing (Wang, 1982)
(Take Home Exam 1 will be distributed by this date)

Evening Screening:  The Joy Luck Club (Wang, 1993)

R 10/1 Cultivating Community:  Asian American Film Festivals and Media Centers
Guest Talk – Masashi Niwano, Executive Director of the Austin Asian American Film Foundation
Read:  Stephen Gong, “A History in Progress:  Asian American Media Arts Centers” (Screening)
 
Week 7 – More than Meets the “I”:  Identity in Plural

T 10/6 Intersectionality
Read:  Yvonne Tasker, “Fists of Fury: Discourses of Masculinity and Race in the Martial Arts Cinema”

Evening Screening:  Banana Split (Fulbeck, 1990) and Cunanan’s Conundrum (Gaffney, 1997)

R 10/8 Multiraciality
Guest Talk – Alex Cho, Critical Race Media Scholar
Read:  Gina Marchetti, “Pursuits of Hapa-ness:  Kip Fulbeck’s Boyhood Among Ghosts”

Week 8 – More than Meets the “I”:  Identity in Plural Continued

T 10/13 Bad Asians and the Question(ing) of Sexuality
Read:  Eve Oishi, “Bad Asians” (Countervisions) and John Caldwell, “Invisible No More”

Evening Screening:  Fire (Mehta, 1998) or Colma: The Musical (Wong, 2006) – student choice

R 10/15 Filmmaking from the Edge
Guest Talk – PJ Raval, Filmmaker and Scholar
Read:  No reading, because…
**Exam 1 Due**

Week 9 – Documentation and Experimentation:  Revisiting the Past, Rewriting the Present

T 10/20 The Personal is Political:  Autobiography, Memory and Documentary
Read:  Marita Sturken, “The Politics of Video Memory” (Screening) or Glen Masato Mimura, “Antidote for Collective Amnesia?” (Countervisions) – TBD
In-class Screening:  History and Memory (Tajiri, 1991)

Evening Screening:  AKA Don Bonus (Nakasako and Sokly, 1995)

R 10/20 Creative Defiance:  Experimental Feminist Filmmaking
Read:  Jun Xing, “Hybrid Cinema by Asian American Women” (Countervisions)
In-class Screening:  Section from Surname Viet, Given Name Nam (Minh-ha, 1989)
 
Week 10 – The Industry:  Negotiations and Barriers

T 10/27 Dilemmas of the Asian American Actor
Read:  Sections from Margaret Cho, I’m the One That I Want and Jun Xing, “Role Playing”
In-class screening:  episode of All-American Girl

Evening Screening:  Better Luck Tomorrow (Lin, 2003)

R 10/29 Hitting the Big Time . . . Almost
Read:  Margaret Hillenbrand, “Of Myths and Men:  Better Luck Tomorrow and the Mainstreaming of Asian American Cinema”
**Quiz 2**

Week 11 – De-Centering Whiteness

T 11/3 Seeing Whiteness
Read:  Richard Dyer, “The Matter of Whiteness” or TBD

Evening Screening:  Gran Torino (Eastwood, 2009)

R 11/5 Appropriation and Asiaphilia
Read:  Chin, et al. “Chinese Tattoos” (group of short essays) and MiHi Ahn, “Gwenihana”

Week 12 – Racial Union, Racial Discord

T 11/10 (Screening) Racial Politics
Read:  Bill Nichols, “Historical Consciousness and the Viewer: Who Killed Vincent Chin?” (Screening)
In-class Screening:  Who Killed Vincent Chin? (Choy and Tajima, 1988)

Evening Screening:  Mississippi Masala (Nair, 1991)

R 11/12 (Speaking) Racial Politics
Read:  Binita Mehta, “Emigrants Twice Displaced:  Race, Color and Identity in Mira Nair’s Mississippi Masala” (Screening)

Week 13 – Multiculturalism, A Laughing Matter?

T 11/17 Multiculturalism
Read:  Mary Beltran, “The New Hollywood Racelessness:  Only the Fast, Furious (and Multi-Racial Will Survive” and Mark Olsen, “Harold and Kumar Push the Limits of Multiculturalism”

Evening Screening:  Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle (Leiner, 2004)

R 11/19 A Laughing Matter?
Read:  Richard Howells, “Is it Because I Is Black?:  Race, Humor and the Polysemiology of Ali G”
(Take-Home Exam 2 will be distributed by this date)
 
Week 14 – “No, Really, Where Are You From?”:  Questioning National Identity

T 11/24 Contesting the Nation
Read:  Gina Marchetti, “The Wedding Banquet:  Global Chinese Cinema and the Asian American Experience”

Evening Screening:  The Wedding Banquet (Lee, 1993)

R 11/26 Thanksgiving Break – No Class


Week 15 – “No, Really, Where Are You From?”:  Questioning National Identity Continued

T 12/1 Transnational Media and Hybrid Identities
Read:  Julian Stringer, “Cultural Identity and Diaspora in Contemporary Hong Kong Cinema” (Countervisions)
**Quiz 3**

Evening Screening: The Grudge (Shimizu, 2004)

R 12/3 The Horror of Globalization
Read:  Pennylane Shen, “It Came from the East…Japanese Horror Cinema in the Age of Globalization”

Week of Dec. 10: Take Home Exam 2 Due – exact date TBD

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