Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies
Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

Marcelo J. P. Paixão


Associate ProfessorPh.D., 2005, Sociology, Instituto Universitário de Pesquisas do Rio de Janeiro (IUPERJ)

Associate Professor, LLILAS and Department of African and African Diaspora Studies
Marcelo J. P. Paixão

Contact

Interests


Race relations and inequalities in Brazil and Latin American; public policies issues and monitoring; models of socioeconomic development; labor market; statistics of race, ethnic, and gender inequality

Courses


AFR 380P • Mthds For Soc Sci In Lat Am

30731 • Spring 2019
Meets M 10:00AM-1:00PM GWB 1.138

Please check back for updates.

AFR 302M • Numbering Race

30550 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLP 1.402

I. Course Description and Objectives

In this course, you will learn about quantitative methodology and statistics through the lens of race. You will have the opportunity to examine, analyze, and critique real-world data, quantitative research, and public discourse concerning race in America. Some empirical and quantitative skills you will learn this semester include (1) conceptualization and operationalization in quantitative measurement, (2) the calculation and interpretation of descriptive statistics and statistical relationships, (3) the application of statistical techniques to understand social phenomenon, and (4) techniques for presenting results from quantitative analysis. As we cover various statistical techniques, you will also learn about the origins of the concept race, including the actors (many of whom were scientists and statisticians) and actions that brought race into being and continue to justify racial thinking. We will also discuss how these efforts have impacted our current collective and individual understandings of race, especially as they relate to the quantitative study of race and various social problems. This course satisfies the core math requirement and carries the quantitative reasoning flag.

II. Course Requirements

A. Required Readings/ Materials
Leon-Guerrero, Anna, and Chava Frankfort-Nachmias. 2015. Essentials of Social Statistics for a

Diverse Society. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc. (LGFN) Scientific calculator

Additional readings will be available online through Canvas. Some of the readings posted are required for the course. Other readings, exercises, information sheets, and links to websites are posted to assist you in this course and enhance your class experience. I encourage you to look them over.

Numbering Race, Irizarry Fall 2015

B. Assignments and Assessment

Problem Sets

Problem sets include calculation and interpretation questions designed to gauge your understanding of the methodological and statistical concepts covered throughout the semester. Problem sets will be posted on Canvas at least one week prior to their due date. Students will need to show all of their work/calculations to receive full credit. Partial credit will be given to answers that are partially correct.

Reading Quizzes

Almost every week throughout the semester, you will have a short quiz on the material covered in the readings. You will be allowed to refer to your notes while taking the quiz, but not the readings or text. There are no make-ups for quizzes; however, I will drop your lowest quiz grade at the end of the semester.

In-Class Assignments

In-class assignments will offer you the opportunity to practice the mathematical, statistical, and critical thinking concepts covered in class.

Team Lab Assignments

To help familiarize you with quantitative methodology and the interpretation and presentation of quantitative data, there will be two team lab assignments. I will post each lab assignment on Canvas at least one week prior to the deadline. Lab assignments must be done with your team members (team member selections will be made after the final drop/add date).

Essays

Students must complete two essays that summarize/evaluate news articles/stories that present racial comparisons stemming from statistical analysis (due dates are noted on course schedule). Each essay must include a minimum of three news stories on a particular topic. These news stories can be from magazines, newspapers, or credible online news sources (check with your instructor if you have any questions). Essays must (1) be at least three-pages (typed), (2) summarize and critique/evaluate your selected news stories, and (3) incorporate concepts and ideas from class discussion and readings. Note: You may not use advertisements and data highlights (these are usually brief and present no real story or argument), academic articles (articles from peer-reviewed journals), or research articles from course readers to complete this assignment. More details regarding each essay will be provided during the semester.

LAS 322 • Measuring Racial Inequality

39965 • Spring 2018
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM GWB 1.130
(also listed as AFR 372F)

 “Measuring Racial Inequality” is an introductory course for the analysis of racial inequality through social statistics. The main objectives are: i) to understand the complexity of racial or ethnic variables used in demographic databases, like Census, household surveys, etc.; ii) to reflect about the concept of racial inequality hinged to its parallel conceptual dimensions: race, discrimination and theory of racial discrimination; iii) to study some statistical methods for the analysis of racial and ethnic inequality.

Coherently to these objectives, the course is split into two parts.

In the first one, the students will be in touch with selected problems related to how social scientists may understand demographic statistics disaggregated by race and ethnicity. This section is important so that the students can avoid an essentialist understanding on this matter. Or, in other words, we believe that it is necessary that the students can reflect on issues related to the complexity of the variables race and ethnicity for social statistics.

In the second part of the course, the students will be introduced to some of the most well known quantitative methods of analysis of social and racial inequality in the social sciences. The course will focuses on statistical concept and reasoning/interpretation rather than mathematics. Explanation will be based on simple example using Excel.

Each week the Instructor will give extra class exercises comprehending: i) researches on national statistical bureaus; ii) analysis of pre-tabulated demographic information; and iii) mechanisms for accessing data and micro data sets of social researches.

The Instructor is expecting that the students attending the course have different academic and personal background. As it is an introductory course, the objective is that even students with a basic level of knowledge of mathematics and statistics can attend class. Anyway, the Instructor is expecting that every student already has some previous understanding of elementary concepts as well as openness to study this kind of subject.

Finally, it is important to note that the course “Measuring Racial Inequality” is part of the process of setting out the Laboratory for the Study of Ethnic and Racial Equity (LAESER), placed at The University of Texas, Austin (LAESER’s office is located in SRH, Office 3105) and coordinated by Prof. Marcelo Paixão. As such, one of the objectives of the course is to raise interest of UT undergraduate students for the subject. Depending on mutual interest, capacity and resources, the possibility to join LAESER is welcomed.

 

Grading

First exam: 30%

Second exam: 30%

Research Paper: 20%

Weekly summaries: 10%

Presentation: 10%

LAS 381 • Ethnic Race Relation Latin Ame

40165 • Spring 2018
Meets W 10:00AM-1:00PM GWB 1.138
(also listed as AFR 380P)

The course will debate the problem of the ethnic and racial relations in Latin America region

LAS 322 • Measuring Racial Inequality

40385 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BIO 301
(also listed as AFR 372F)

Currently, one of the most important issues in the social sciences is the problem of social inequality. The question covers several aspects like the causes of disparities, ethical and normative dimensions, public policies addressing the problem, and tools and methodologies for measuring social inequality.
Nevertheless, the specific matter of racial and ethnic inequality is as important as the problem of social inequality in general. Because it does not only include all the aspects listed above, but because it incorporates new complexities related to the relations and connections between ethnic-racial groups, social classes, and gender; as well as the means for measuring this kind of inequality.
The course Measuring Ethnic-Racial Inequality will cover the following topics: i) social and racial inequality - concepts and theory ii) how to measure ethnic and racial inequality - main methods and limits; iii) sources of statistical information.

LAS 322 • Racism/ Inequality Lat Amer

40230 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CMA 3.114
(also listed as AFR 374E)

Course Description:

Latin America is known as one of the most unequal continents around the globe. But, unlike the latter, the majority of Latin American countries gained their independence about 200 years ago. Also, for several periods, Latin America underwent significant economic prosperity, high rates of growth and intensive urbanization processes.

So, the main question we will consider in this course is: why at the beginning of the 21st century does Latin America continue to experience such economic setbacks and high levels of social inequality? How do we link these problems to ethnic and racial injustice? What is the role of structural and cultural variables to explain this situation? How can we analyze the current stage of social, ethnic and racial inequality in the Latin American region using social indicators? Which are the methods to conceptualize social indicators? And how can we use them to study racial, ethnic, gender and social inequalities in Latin America as well as around the world?

The course is based on introductory readings on those topics. We will debate the set of questions above analyzing the following issues: i) race and ethnic diversity in Latin American countries and the national discourses of nation-building, citizenship and development; ii) economic, social, ethnic and racial profile of contemporary Latin America (in the industrialization period, during the foreign debt crisis, and in the neoliberalism era); iii) public policies to combat poverty and to implement affirmative action, and new contradictions within the Latin American societies; iv) the use of demographic statistics to analyze ethnic and racial inequalities in Latin America.

 

Readings (subject to change):

  • Esping-Andersen, G. The three worlds of the Welfare State. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1990.
  • Ferranti, D.; Perry, G.; Ferreira, F.; Walton, M. Inequality in Latin America: breaking with history?. Washington, D.C.: The World Bank, 2004.
  • Fernandes, F. The Negro in Brazilian society. New York: Columbia University Press, 1969.
  • Gino G. Marginality. New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction Books, 1980.
  • Graham, R. (ed.) The idea of race in Latin American, 1870-1940. Austin, Texas: Texas University Press, 2006 [1990].
  • Hasenbalg, C. “Race and socioeconomic inequalities in Brazil”. In: Pierre-Michel Fontaine (Editor). Race, class, and power in Brazil. Los Angeles: Center for Afro-American Studies, University of California, 1985 (p. 25-41).
  • Marques, G.; Chong, A.; Duryea, S.; Mazza, J.; Ñopo, H. (coords.) Outsiders? The changing patterns of exclusion in Latin American and Caribbean. Washington D.C: Inter-American Development Bank, 2008.
  • Ñopo, H. New centuries, old disparities: gender and ethnic earnings gaps in Latin American and the Caribbean. Washington D.C.: IDB, 2012.
  • Sen, A. Development as freedom. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1999.
  • Telles, E. Race in another America: the significance of skin color in Brazil. Princeton / Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2006.
  • Telles, E; PERLA research team - Pigmentocracies: ethnicity, race, and color in Latin America. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2014.
  • Weber, Max. “Class, status and Party”. In: From Max Weber: essays in sociology. New York: Routledge, 2009.

 

Grading:

Presence and participation (10%)

Weekly reaction papers (10%)

Two sets of in-class essay questions (80%)

LAS 381 • Race/Ethnicity Latin Amer

40450 • Fall 2016
Meets T 3:00PM-6:00PM SRH 1.320
(also listed as AFR 380P, P A 388K)

Description:

The course will debate the problem of the ethnic and racial relations in Latin America region. As such, the seminars will cover these questions: i) comparative studies of ethnic and racial models in Latin American countries; ii) ethnic and racial inequality and tools of measuring; iii) new legal framework, public policies and affirmative action in the Latin America region.

  

 Readings:

  • Esping-Andersen, G. – The three worlds of the Welfare State. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1990
  • Ferranti, D.; Perry, G.; Ferreira, F.; Walton, M.. Inequality in Latin America: breaking with history?. Washington D.C. The World Bank, 2004
  • Fernandes, F. The Negro in Brazilian society. New York: Columbia University Press, 1969. (Chapter 2, pp. 55-130; if possible, please read Chapter 3, pp. 131-186)
  • Gino G. Marginality. New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction Books, 1980. (Part II, pp. 49-90)
  • Graham, R. (ed.) – The idea of race in Latin American, 1870-1940. Austin, Texas: Texas University Press, 2006 [1990]
  • Friedman, M. – Capitalism and freedom. Chicago / London: Chicago University Press, 2002 [1962]
  • Hasenbalg, C. “Race and socioeconomic inequalities in Brazil”. In: Pierre-Michel Fontaine (Editor). Race, class, and power in Brazil. Los Angeles: Center for Afro-American Studies, University of California, 1985
  • Marques, G.; Chong, A.; Duryea, S.; Mazza, J.; Ñopo, H. (coords.) – Outsiders? The changing patterns of exclusion in Latin American and Caribbean. Washington D.C: Inter-American Development Bank, 2008
  • Nobles, Melissa. Shades of citizenship: Race and the census in modern politics. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000
  • Ñopo, H. – New centuries, old disparities: gender and ethnic earnings gaps in Latin American and the Caribbean. Washington D.C.: IDB, 2012, 

LAS 381 • Solidarity Econ In Lat Amer

39841 • Spring 2016
Meets T 12:00PM-3:00PM SRH 1.320
(also listed as P A 388K)

The Solidarity Economy movement in Latin America arose from the crisis of the labor market in this region after the 1980s. The movement has been seeking alternatives forms of socioeconomic survival for the unemployed and people marginalized from the formal labor market, including Afro-descendants and indigenous groups. Some examples of these alternatives are cooperative enterprise, solidarity currency, coalitions of popular entrepreneurship, microfinance to communities, and solidarity collateral.

LAS 381 • Race And Equity In Brazil

39649 • Fall 2015
Meets M 12:00PM-3:00PM GWB 1.138
(also listed as AFR 380P)

Explores policy-related issues related to race and gender in the African diaspora, from both qualitative and quantitative perspectives

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages



  • Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
    SRH 1.310
    2300 Red River Street D0800
    Austin, Texas 78712