Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies
Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

Orlando R. Kelm


Associate ProfessorPh.D., University of California, Berkeley

Associate Professor, Department of Spanish & Portuguese and Department of Marketing Administration
Orlando R. Kelm

Contact

Interests


Teaching of foreign language for professional purposes; technology in foreign language education; Portuguese and Spanish phonetics; applied linguistics

Biography


Orlando R. Kelm (Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, 1989) is an Associate Professor of Hispanic Linguistics whose  professional interests center on the use language and culture for professional purposes, such as Business Spanish and Portuguese.  His current research focuses on the creation of instructional materials, including the use of innovative technologies in foreign language instruction.  He currently serves as the Director of the Portuguese Flagship Program at UT, Austin.

Courses


LAS 381 • Frgn Lang In Digital World

39305 • Spring 2022
Meets T 10:00AM-1:00PM MEZ 1.104
Hybrid/Blended
(also listed as ILA 386, LTC 388)

The course is designed for Graduate Students in linguistics, foreign language education, graduate students in other departments, including those who study literature but would benefit from a foundational knowledge of linguistics and pedagogy.

Language of Instruction:

Although the emphasis and examples in the course draw specifically from Spanish and Portuguese, the course will be taught in English, allowing students to focus on language learning in a language of their choice.

Course Description:

Our traditional foreign language methodology is confronting the reality of our digital age: instant access to information, video, audio, chats, conversations with people from anywhere at any time, and communication & information flows. All of these potentially change our pedagogical approach, which lead us to assess whether technology and social media are a hindrance or an asset to our language learning. In this course we look at two strands. First, we survey new digital options and tools in learning foreign languages. Second, we survey those options within the context of theories and models related to second language acquisition. That is to say, is there any theoretical foundation behind the effectiveness of these digital foreign language-learning tools? The course will include four units:

  1. Tools to organize materials, sort presentations, build portfolios: e.g., padlet.com, blendspace.com, wikispaces.com, getkahoot.com, YouTube Channels, Facebook Groups, Twitter Feeds, etc.
  2. Tools to enhance individual practice: e.g., memrise.com, mangolanguages.com, hello-hello.com, duolingo.com, busuu.com, livemocha.com, FluentU.com, LinqQ.com, HelloTalk.com, OpenLanguage.com, etc.
  3. Tools to enhance classroom activities: e.g., video conferencing (e.g., zoom, teams, gotomeeting), Aurasma.com, Vyclone.com, List.ly, coogle.it, etc.
  4. Tools that become available via Open Educational Resources and Creative Commons licenses: e.g., Brazilpod, Tá Falado, Conversa Brasileira, Língua da Gente, etc.

Theoretical Underpinnings

Among the theories that have had the greatest relationship to how we correlate language learning and social technologies is that of cognitive and social constructivism (e.g., Dewey, 1933; Fosnot, 2005, Piaget, 1972; Vygotsky, 1978; Bruner, 1990; Koohang, Riley, Smith & Schreurs, 2009). For the social constructivists, knowledge is something that is constructed within a social context. People in a community help each other out, lend support, interact with one another, serve as shadow guides, and build on each other’s progress. One of the major tenets of constructivism is that it is always collaborative. This has direct implications for language acquisition coupled with innovative social technologies, where learning is not simply the memorization of vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar, and syntax, but it is an active situation where people construct their meaning within a social context. The theory behind general cognitive and social constructivism correlates well with many of the second language acquisition theories that have evolved over recent years.

References

Bruner, J. (1990). Acts of meaning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Dewey, J. (1933). How we think: A restatement of the relation of reflective thinking to the educative process. Boston, MA: Heath and Company.

Fosnot, C. T. (Ed.). (2005). Constructivism: Theory, perspectives and practice(2nd ed.). New York: Teacher's College Press.

Koohang, A., Riley, L., Smith, T., & Schreurs, J. (2009). E-Learning and constructivism: From theory to application. Interdisciplinary Journal of E-Learning and Learning Objects, 5 91-109. http://www.ijello.org/Volume5/IJELLOv5p091-109Koohang655.pdf

Piaget, J. (1972). The psychology of the child. New York: Basic Books.

Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Requirements and Grading:

The final grade is based on the percentage of total points earned (A = 94+, A- = 90+, B+ = 87+, B = 84+, B- = 80+, C+ = 77+, C = 74+, C- = 70+, D+ = 67+, D = 64+, D- = 60+). Points are distributed on the following basis:

40%     Four oral presentations on content of units

30%     Four 1,000-word reaction papers on course units

10%     One bibliography of topics related to unit of interest

20%     YouTube Channel or Portfolio Project.

Possible Class Materials and Readings

                 Journal of Language Learning and Technology, http://llt.msu.edu

                 Foreign Lanuage Annals, https://www.actfl.org/resources/foreign-language-annals(See expecially Vol. 53, No 2.

                 Lamy, Marie-Noëlle and Katerina Zourou (Eds). 2013. Social Networking for Language Education. Palgrave Macmillan.

                 Walker, Aisha & Goodith White. 2013. Technology Enhanced Language Learning: Connecting Theory and Practice. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.

POR 330L • Intro Lang/Lingstcs In Socty

44435 • Spring 2022
Meets T 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 2.124
Hybrid/Blended
GC

POR 330L (45290)

Spring 2022

TTH 12:30 – 2:00, Mezes 1.212

INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS IN SOCIETY

 

Instructor:                Orlando R. Kelm

Office:                        Mezes 4.146

Telephone:               232-4534

Office Hours:            TTH 3:30 – 5:00

E-mail:                       orkelm@austin.utexas.edu

Internet:                    http://orlandokelm.wordpress.com/ 

 

  1. Description

 

This course serves as an introduction to the study of the Portuguese language both as a system and as an expression of cultural practices, beliefs, and histories in Portuguese-speaking areas of the world. Topics to be addressed include historical development and dialectal diversity; elements of sound and structure; discursive and pragmatic properties; and language use in contact contexts in communities of Portuguese language speakers

 

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

  1. Course Materials

 

Required Materials

 

Azevedo, Milton M. 2005. Portuguese: A Linguistic Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (PLI)

 

Padlet Homepage: https://padlet.com/orkelm/POR330L

Student Portfolio Homepage: https://padlet.com/orkelm/studentportfolio

 

Recommended Books

(Note: The following book serves for those who would like to have more background information on current issues in oral Portuguese.)

 

Perini, Mario. A. 2002. Modern Portuguese: A Reference Grammar. New Haven: Yale University Press.

 

  1. Course Schedule

Week 1

January

Tuesday, 18

Introduction to course

Textbook: Portuguese: A Linguistic Introduction

Padlet Wall

Student Padlet Portfolio

Checkin’ in with a Brazilian

Checkin’ in with a Texan

 

Thursday, 20

PLI Chapter 1, pgs 5-23: “The Portuguese language in the world”

 

Week 2

Tuesday, 25

PLI Chapter 1, cont. “A Little Portugal History Lesson”

 

Thursday, 27

PLI Chapter 1, cont. “Papiamentu and Creole Languages”

 

Week 3

February

Tuesday, 01

Due: Add elements to your padlet wall #1 about Portuguese language in the world and Creole Languages by 6:00am.

Student Padlet Wall Review: Portuguese Language in the World & Creole Languages

 

Thursday, 03

PLI Chapter 2, pgs 24-54: Sounds, Phonetics & Phonology

 

Week 4

Tuesday, 08

PLI Chapter 2, cont. “IPA and Phonetic Transcriptions in Portuguese”

Due: Report on Fellow Student Padlet Walls #1 about Portuguese Language in the World & Creole Languages. Post on canvas by 6:00am.

 

Thursday, 10

PLI Chapter 2, cont. “My Idiolect in Portuguese”

Resource: Idiolect Handout (see Padlet wall)

 

Week 5

Tuesday, 15

Due: Add elements to your padlet wall #2 about Sounds, Phonetics & Phonology by 6:00am.

Student Padlet Wall Review: Chapter 2

 

Thursday, 17

Due: Checkin’ in with a Brazilian #1: UT Student Questions about Sounds, Phonetics & Phonology. Submit your report to canvas by 6:00am.

 

Week 6

Tuesday, 22

PLI Chapter 3, pgs 55-98: Words & Morphology

Due: Report on Fellow Student Padlet Walls #2 about Sounds, Phonetics & Phonology. Post on canvas by 6:00am.

 

Tuesday, 24

PLI Chapter 3, cont. “Verbos Abundantes”

 

Week 7

March

Tuesday, 01

PLI Chapter 3, cont. “Preposições e mais preposições”

Due: Checkin’ in with a Texan #1: UNASP Student Questions. Submit your report to canvas by 6:00am.

 

Thursday, 03

Due: Add elements to your padlet wall #3 about Words & Morphology by 6:00am.

Student Padlet Wall Review: Chapter 3

 

Week 8

Tuesday, 08

Due: Checkin’ in with a Brazilian #2: UT Student Questions about Words & Morphology. Submit your report to canvas by 6:00am.

 

Thursday, 10

Special Movie Day

Due: Report on Fellow Student Padlet Walls #3 about Words & Morphology. Post on canvas by 6:00am.

 

Week 9

Spring Break – March 14 – 19

 

Week 10

Tuesday, 22

PLI Chapter 4, pgs 99-146: Sentences & Syntax

Due: Checkin’ in with a Texan #2: UNASP Student Questions. Submit your report to canvas by 6:00am.

 

Thursday, 24

PLI Chapter 4, pgs 99-146: “Never-ending uses of ‘se’”

 

Week 11

Tuesday, 29

PLI Chapter 4, pgs 99-146: “Tricky Word-Order in Portuguese”

Due: Checkin’ in with a Brazilian #3: UT Student Questions about Words & Syntax. Submit your report to canvas by 6:00am.

 

Thursday, 31

Due: Add elements to your padlet wall #4 about Sentences & Syntax by 6:00am.

Student Padlet Wall Review: Chapter 4

 

Week 12

April

Tuesday, 05

PLI Chapter 5, pgs 147-181: Portuguese in Time & History of the Portuguese Language

Due: Checkin’ in with a Texan #3: UNASP Student Questions. Submit your report to canvas by 6:00am.

 

Thursday, 07

PLI Chapter 5, cont. “Do Latim ao Português”

Due: Report on Fellow Student Padlet Walls #4 about Sentences & Syntax. Post on canvas by 6:00am.

 

Week 13

Tuesday, 12

PLI Chapter 5, cont. “Textos Medievais”

 

Thursday, 14

Due: Checkin’ in with a Brazilian #4: UT Student Questions about Sentences & Syntax. Submit your report to canvas by 6:00am.

 

Week 14

Tuesday, 19

Due: Add elements to your padlet wall #5 about Portuguese in Time & History of the Portuguese Language by 6:00am.

Student Padlet Wall Review: Chapter 5

 

Thursday, 21

PLI Chpater 6, pgs 182-210: Brief Review of “The Expansion of European Portuguese”

 

Week 15

Tuesday, 26

PLI Chapter 7, pgs 211-255: Brief Review of “Brazilian Portuguese

Due: Checkin’ in with a Texan #4: UNASP Student Questions. Submit your report to canvas by 6:00am.

 

 

Thursday, 28

PLI Chapter 8, pgs 256-291: Brief Review of “Sociolinguistic Issues”

Due: Report on Fellow Student Padlet Walls #5 about Portuguese in Time & History of the Portuguese Language. Post on canvas by 6:00am.

 

Week 16

May

Tuesday, 03

Due: Checkin’ in with a Brazilian #5: Brazilian Dialects and Sociolinguistics. Submit your report to canvas by 6:00am.

 

Thursday, 05

Wrap Up Assignments

 

Note 1:  There is no final exam for this course.

 

  1. Portfolio on Padlet

 

We will be using a Padlet wall (http://padlet.com) for students to create a portfolio of ancillary content related to each of the chapters in our textbook Portuguese: A Linguistic Introduction. The homepage padlet wall for our course is https://padlet.com/orkelm/POR330L You will notice that the wall contains extra links, videos, articles and other items that relate to the content of each chapter. Your assignment will be to also create a padlet wall, and also add extra content (of most interest to you personally) that relates to each chapter topic.

 

You will need to create a padlet account in order to create a wall. (In class we will go over how to do this.) On the wall, create and identify a space for each topic (similar to the homepage padlet wall). As you add content, be creative. This content could be vocabulary, lists, surveys, augmented reality, interactive videos, online quizzes, surveys, bulletin boards, mind maps, etc.

 

For each topic you are required to add 4 elements and write a brief 50-word summary (in Portuguese) for each element in which you explain how the item that you have added to the wall relates to the chapter topics. There are five days when you are required to complete your wall portfolio.

 

Each Padlet posting is worth 25 points, for a total of 125 points for the semester. Here is the grading rubric for the Padlet wall and 50-word summary:

 

  1. Content Added To Padlet Wall – 15 points (complete, on time, at least 4 examples)
  2. Content Added To Padlet Wall – 10 points (complete, on time, at least 3 examples)
  3. Content Added To Padlet Wall – 5 points (complete, on time, at least 2 examples)
  4. 50-Word Summary for each element – 10 points (complete, on time, and justifies postings)
  5. 50-Word Summary for each element – 5 points (complete, on time, weak or questionable justification)
  6. Failure to post items to the padlet wall before the due date results in a zero for that assignment.

 

Note: No points are given for late work.

 

There are also 5 days during the semester when students are required to post (on canvas by 6:00am) a written report and review (in Portuguese) about the Padlet wall postings of classmates. For each topic, choose the portfolio of at least 2 different classmates. Write a 100-word report about each. Include the following information in your report:

 

Name of the Student

Description of the Content

Insights into what you learned from the Student Portfolio

 

Each summary report is worth 20 points, for a total of 100 points for the semester. Here is a grading rubric for the Student Summary reports:

 

  1. 100-word report with description and insights for students 1 & 2 – 20 points
  2. Partial report with description and insights for students 1 & 2 – 10-15 points
  3. Partial report with description and insights for only 1 student – 5-10 points
  4. Failure to post a report on canvas before the due date results in a zero for that assignment.

 

  1. Checkin’ in with a Brazilian, Checkin’ in with a Texan

 

During the semester students will be given the contact information for Brazilian students who are enrolled at the Universidade Nacional Adventista de São Paulo (UNASP). Five times during the semester UT students chat with the Brazilians to discuss questions related to the linguistic topics that we are learning in class. Four times during the semester the UNASP students will choose the subjects of discussion, with topics that are important for them. Feel free to use any electronic format for the video conference communications (e.g., Zoom, What’s App, Google Hangout, Teams, FaceTime, etc.). It will be your responsibility to contact the UNASP student and schedule a time for the video conference sessions. Also, feel free to use any mixture of Portuguese or English in your interactions. All students at UNASP have various levels English proficiency.

 

The grading for this activity with your UNASP partner is a straight credit / no credit. You do not receive credit for the video conference per se, but you do receive credit for the written report that is submitted to canvas, as is due at 6:00am. Each 150+-word report that is completed on time is worth 10 points (5 x 10 = 50 + 4 x 10 = 40). No credit is given for late work. Basically, if you complete the written assignment, you will receive full credit. If you do not complete the assignment, you will receive zero. In order to receive credit, you need to submit a report on canvas with the following information:

 

  1. Name of your UNASP partner
  2. Date of the video conference session
  3. Notes with details about your partner’s answers to your questions
  4. Final observations about what you learned from the experience.

 

  1. Attendance

 

Attendance at each class session is mandatory. Each student starts the semester with 50 points for attendance.  Each absence reduces the total by 5 points. Absences due to representation and participation in university sponsored activities or religious holidays need to be approved beforehand.  Absences related to illness and family emergencies require documentation (e.g., doctor’s note, obituary, etc.)  No points are reduced with the approval or documentation.

 

  1. Grading

 

The final grade is based on the percentage of total points earned (A = 94+, A- = 90+, B+ = 87+, B = 84+, B- = 80+, C+ = 77+, C = 74+, C- = 70+, D+ = 67+, D = 64+, D- = 60+).  Scores are not rounded. No late work or make up work is allowed. Points are distributed on the following basis:

 

125 pts           Padlet Portfolio (5 x 25 = 125 pts)

100 pts           Padlet Student Reports (5 x 20 = 100 pts)

  50 pts            Checkin’ in with a Brazilian (5 x 10 = 50 pts)

  40 pts            Checkin’ in with a Texan (4 x 10 = 40 pts

  50 pts            Attendance (50 – 5 per absence)

365 pts          TOTAL

 

Notes

 

Students with Disabilities

Upon request, the University of Texas at Austin provides appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) is housed in the Office of the Dean of Students, located on the fourth floor of the Student Services Building. Information on how to register, downloadable forms, including guidelines for documentation, accommodation request letters, and releases of information are available online at https://diversity.utexas.edu/disability/how-to-register-with-ssd/. Please do not hesitate to contact SSD at (512) 471-6259, VP: (512) 232-2937 or via e-mail if you have any questions.

Academic Dishonesty

Academic dishonesty damages the reputation of the school and demeans the honest efforts of the majority of students.  The minimum penalty for an act of academic dishonesty will be a zero for that assignment or exam. 

The responsibilities for both students and faculty with regard to the Honor System are described on https://my.mccombs.utexas.edu/BBA/Code-of-Ethics. If the application of the Honor System to this class and its assignments is unclear in any way, it is your responsibility to ask for clarification.

Weapons Policy

With the exception of concealed handguns, no weapons may be brought into the classroom. Course participants with a license to carry a handgun must keep it concealed and on their person at all times. No weapons of any kind may be brought into the professor’s office.

 

Classroom Professionalism Policy

The highest professional standards are expected of all members of the class.  Faculty are expected to be professional and prepared to deliver value for each and every class session. Students are expected to be professional in all respects.

The classroom experience is enhanced when:

  • Students arrive on time. On time arrival ensures that classes are able to start and finish at the scheduled time. On time arrival shows respect for both fellow students and faculty and it enhances learning by reducing avoidable distractions.
  • Students minimize unscheduled personal breaks. The learning environment improves when disruptions are limited.
  • Students are fully prepared for each class. Much of the learning takes place during classroom discussions. When students are not prepared they cannot contribute to the overall learning process. This affects not only the individual, but their peers who count on them, as well.
  • Students respect the views and opinions of their colleagues. The expression and defense of opinions are encouraged and part of the academic environment. Intolerance for the views of others is unacceptable.
  • Laptops and wireless devices are only used for course activities. In this class we use the Internet for the delivery of almost all of our course content.  You a welcome and encouraged to bring your laptop or mobile devices to class.  However, when students are surfing the web, responding to e-mails, instant messaging each other, etc. they are doing a disservice to their peers and potentially causing a distraction.  Restrict use to items related to the course.

 

Updated October 19, 2021

 

SPN 367D • Business In Hispan Life/Cul

45965 • Fall 2021
Meets TH 12:30PM-2:00PM JES A217A
Hybrid/Blended
GC

 

This course serves as an introduction to the study of the Business Spanish. The primary goal of the course is to gain experience in verbal communication, so that students can participate in meetings, exchanges, video conferences, presentations, and professional discussions, in Spanish and in areas related to finance, marketing, accounting, operations, etc. Grading in this course centers on four major components:

 

  • First, on canvas we have seven brief recorded introductory lectures, one for each unit. There are simple quiz questions embedded into the lectures. Listen to the lectures and respond to the questions to receive credit;
  • Second, we focus on the acquisition of vocabulary of business-related terminology. There are seven online vocabulary quizzes on canvas. These are based mainly from the vocabulary lists at the beginning and the end of the chapters in the textbook Éxito Comercial;
  • Third, students prepare seven brief 3-4 minute oral presentations on a number of business related topics. Grades on these ‘pass-offs’ are based on the student’s ability to describe accurate content, use correct grammar and vocabulary, give a polished presentation without being dependent on notes, and provide answers to expansion questions and clarifications related to the topic. You will perform these presentations with our Mexican partner students at the Tecnológio de Monterrey. You will submit a report via canvas to receive credit for these assignments;
  • Fourth, we will be conducting online negotiation simulations (including preparation and debriefing sessions) with our Mexican partner students at the Tecnológio de Monterrey. All students will be sub-divided into teams to participate in the simulation exercises. You will submit a report via canvas to receive credit for these assignments.

 

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

  1. Course Materials

 

Required Materials

 

Doyle, Michael Scott, Fryer, T. Bruce. 2019. Éxito Comercial Cengage.

Note: Latest is the 7th Edition. It is best to purchase the 6th or 7th edition, but only purchase the actual textbook. There is no need to purchase the digital platform or bundled materials.

 

Ancillary Materials

 

Canvas Course Homepage

Note: We will use canvas to present online lectures, share communications, take the quizzes, post grades, and keep track of course activities. Please follow canvas pages to keep up with class progress. The URL link for our zoom sessions will be as follows: https://utexas.zoom.us/my/orkelm (Note, this is the same URL that we can use for office hours. You can sign in to Zoom as a guest.)

 

Kelm, Orlando R. Padlet Wall: https://padlet.com/orkelm/spn367p

Note: This padlet wall contains extra items for background information, reference and practice in topics related to our course content. Use it as a personal resource.

 

SPN 367D • Business In Hispan Life/Cul

45975 • Fall 2021
Meets T 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.210
Hybrid/Blended
GC

 

This course serves as an introduction to the study of the Business Spanish. The primary goal of the course is to gain experience in verbal communication, so that students can participate in meetings, exchanges, video conferences, presentations, and professional discussions, in Spanish and in areas related to finance, marketing, accounting, operations, etc. Grading in this course centers on four major components:

 

  • First, on canvas we have seven brief recorded introductory lectures, one for each unit. There are simple quiz questions embedded into the lectures. Listen to the lectures and respond to the questions to receive credit;
  • Second, we focus on the acquisition of vocabulary of business-related terminology. There are seven online vocabulary quizzes on canvas. These are based mainly from the vocabulary lists at the beginning and the end of the chapters in the textbook Éxito Comercial;
  • Third, students prepare seven brief 3-4 minute oral presentations on a number of business related topics. Grades on these ‘pass-offs’ are based on the student’s ability to describe accurate content, use correct grammar and vocabulary, give a polished presentation without being dependent on notes, and provide answers to expansion questions and clarifications related to the topic. You will perform these presentations with our Mexican partner students at the Tecnológio de Monterrey. You will submit a report via canvas to receive credit for these assignments;
  • Fourth, we will be conducting online negotiation simulations (including preparation and debriefing sessions) with our Mexican partner students at the Tecnológio de Monterrey. All students will be sub-divided into teams to participate in the simulation exercises. You will submit a report via canvas to receive credit for these assignments.

 

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

  1. Course Materials

 

Required Materials

 

Doyle, Michael Scott, Fryer, T. Bruce. 2019. Éxito Comercial Cengage.

Note: Latest is the 7th Edition. It is best to purchase the 6th or 7th edition, but only purchase the actual textbook. There is no need to purchase the digital platform or bundled materials.

 

Ancillary Materials

 

Canvas Course Homepage

Note: We will use canvas to present online lectures, share communications, take the quizzes, post grades, and keep track of course activities. Please follow canvas pages to keep up with class progress. The URL link for our zoom sessions will be as follows: https://utexas.zoom.us/my/orkelm (Note, this is the same URL that we can use for office hours. You can sign in to Zoom as a guest.)

 

Kelm, Orlando R. Padlet Wall: https://padlet.com/orkelm/spn367p

Note: This padlet wall contains extra items for background information, reference and practice in topics related to our course content. Use it as a personal resource.

 

I B 285E • Stdies In Glbl Mgt/Bus Prac-Wb

03410 • Spring 2021
Meets T 3:30PM-5:30PM
Internet; Synchronous

DIR STD GLOBAL MGMT-UT/ SOUTH KOREA

MAN 285 - Unique # ?????

Tuesday, 3:30 – 5:30 p.m. – RRH ?????   

 

Spring 2021

 

Instructor:       Orlando R. Kelm                     Teach. Assist.: Shirley Shin

Office: Mezes  4.146                                      Office:

Telephone:       232-4534                                 Telephone:

Office Hours: TBD                                         Office Hours:

 

Orlando E-mail:           orkelm@austin.utexas.edu

Shirley E-mail:            Shirley.Shin@mba21.mccombs.utexas.edu

Homepage: http://orlandokelm.wordpress.com/

 

Note: During Pandemic Times and COVID-19

 

Our class will be 100% online this semester. As such, we do not have to deal with issues related to the wearing of a face-covering, quarantines or social distancing. However, it does mean that we need to deal with issues related to online formats.

  • First, consider Canvas your homepage for all information. The “pages” section will provide a day-to-day summary of all assignments. The mix of assignments, lectures, video exchanges can be confusing. Be sure to access “pages” on Canvas to keep it all straight.
  • Second, rest assured, weird things happen when we depend on the internet, band width, and online delivery. Your grade will never be negatively affected because of a technical issue. We will work around these issues as best we can.
  • Third, some class sessions will be recorded, but be aware that most of our class time is devoted to individual, small group, and class practice. All of the content is available online, but not everything can be recorded. You need to attend class during the schedule class sessions.
  • Fourth, I do not mean to insert myself in your private life. However, keep me informed of your own physical and mental health. If you or a member of your family tests positive for COVID, or if any other personal issue comes up during the semester, I am happy to work around things as best we can. You are more important than the content of our course. I’ll do all I can to create a positive experience while we learn the content.
  • Fifth, please see the Classroom Professionalism Statement at the end of this syllabus. This provides instructions for our online zoom video conference sessions.

 

 

  1. Description

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to understand and experience first-hand the challenges faced when doing business across borders. The country selected for the course this year is South Korea. Intercultural communication is more effective when we can identify and understand the reasons we culturally behave the way we do. The purpose of this course is to teach students how to recognize these behaviors and “resolve the cultural dilemmas” by drawing from the positive aspects of these differences. We do so within the context of South Korea. Using Trompenaars & Hampden-Turner’s Cultural Dilemmas Model, we learn how to identify and observe cultural differences, both in our own patterns as well as in the behavior of others.

 

  1. Learning Objectives
  1. Experience the complexities of doing business in another country.
  2. Experience the challenges and benefits (language, culture, work processes) of working in different countries.
  1. Gain greater insight (via contrast) into US business style/approaches/criteria.
  2. Gain appreciation for the role of national history, politics, and culture in shaping economic conditions and business practices.
  3. Analyze the challenges faced by companies in South Korea, both national and multinational.
  4. Interact with South Koreans through points of contact for company visits or student projects, or simply as attendees at various activities.
  5. Learn to identify resolve cultural dilemmas by drawing on the strengths of each.
  6. Course Materials

Required Materials

Trompenaars, Fons & Charles Hampden-Turner. 2012. Riding the Waves of Culture: Understanding Diversity in Global Business. 3rd Edition. New York: McGraw Hill

 

Related Online Resources

Kelm, Orlando R. Padlet Wall, “Cross-Cultural Competence: Making the most of our cultural differences” http://padlet.com/orkelm/culturalcompetence

 

World Clock Meeting Planner

https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/meeting.html

 

  1. Course Schedule

Week 1

Tuesday, Jan 19

  1. Introduction to course
  2. Assessing Business Culture: Models
  3. Trompenaars & Hampden-Turner’s Cultural Dilemmas

Homepage: http://www.thtconsulting.com/

Homepage: http://www.cultureforbusiness.com/

Homepage: http://www.ridingthewavesofculture.com/

  1. Course Essay Assignments and Cultural Assessment Assignments
  2. Video Exchange with Korean Companies (US Affiliate and Korean Based)
  3. This week in Korea Assignments

 

Week 2

Tuesday, Jan 26

T&HT - Ch 1. An Introduction to Culture, pg1-16; Ch 2. The One Best Way of Organizing Does Not Exit, pg 17-26; Ch 3. The Meaning of Culture.

 

Class Assignment 1: Initial 500-Word Essay, “What makes me North American and what makes them Korean.” Post to canvas by 6:00am.

 

Class Assignment 2: Trompenaars Hampden-Turner’s Intercultural Awareness Profiler (IAP) - http://www2.thtconsulting.com/tools/#webtools  (Take the assessment. Write a brief 100-word description of your results, your reaction to those results and how they might apply to intercultural communication. Post to canvas by 6:00am.)

 

Class Assignment 3: Harvard’s Project Implicit – Implicit Association Tests (IAT) related to Social Attitudes and Mental Health - https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/  (Choose any two of the assessments and complete the test. Write a brief 100-word description of your results, your reaction to those results and how they may relate to intercultural communication. Post to canvas by 6:00am.)

 

Week 3

Tuesday, Feb 02

T&HT - Ch 4. Relationships and Rules (Universalism vs. Particularism), pg 39-64.

Videos 1 and 2:  High Noon (Universalism), Les Miserables (Particularism)

 

Class Assignment 4: “This Week in Korea.” Post to your canvas by 6:00am.

 

Week 4

Tuesday, Feb 09

(Video Exchange with Korean Company (US Affiliate and Korean Based. Note: This schedule is a placeholder. The actual date and time of the video exchange depends on the schedules of our guests.)

 

Class Assignment 5: Brief 200-word essay, “How the video exchange with Company X illustrated Universalism vs. Particularism.” Post to canvas by 11:59pm on the evening of the video exchange.

 

Week 5

Tuesday, Feb 16

T&HT – Ch 5. The Group and the Individual (Individualism vs. Communitarianism), pg 65-86

Videos 3 and 4: Casablanca (Individualism), Ikiru (Communitarianism)

 

Class Assignment 6: “This Week in Korea.” Post to your canvas by 6:00am.

 

Week 6

Tuesday, Feb 23

(Video Exchange with Korean Company (US Affiliate and Korean Based. Note: This schedule is a placeholder. The actual date and time of the video exchange depends on the schedules of our guests.)

 

Class Assignment 7: Brief 200-word essay, “How the video exchange with Company X illustrated Individualism vs. Communitarianism.” Post to canvas by 11:59pm on the evening of the video exchange.

 

Week 7

Tuesday, Mar 02

T&HT – Ch 6. Feelings and Relationship (Affective vs. Neutral), pg 87-100.

T&HT – Ch 7. How Far We Get Involved (Specific vs. Diffuse), pg 101-124.

Videos 5 and 6: Scarlet Letter (Specific), The Apartment (Diffuse)

 

Class Assignment 8: “This Week in Korea.” Post to your canvas by 6:00am.

 

Week 8 and Week 9

Pre-Spring Break and Spring Break Mar 08 – Mar 20

 

Week 10

Tuesday, Mar 23

(Video Exchange with Korean Company (US Affiliate and Korean Based. Note: This schedule is a placeholder. The actual date and time of the video exchange depends on the schedules of our guests.)

 

Class Assignment 9: Brief 200-word essay, “How the video exchange with Company X illustrated Affect vs. Neutral and Specific vs. Diffuse.” Post to canvas by 11:59pm on the evening of the video exchange.

 

Week 11

Tuesday, Mar 30

T&HT - Ch 8. How We Accord Status (Achieved vs. Ascribed), pg 125-146.

Videos 7 and 8: My Fair Lady (Achieved), Tengoku to Jigoku (Ascribed)

 

Class Assignment 10: “This Week in Korea.” Post to your canvas by 6:00am.

 

Week 12

Tuesday, Apr 06

(Video Exchange with Korean Company (US Affiliate and Korean Based. Note: This schedule is a placeholder. The actual date and time of the video exchange depends on the schedules of our guests.)

 

Class Assignment 11: Brief 200-word essay, “How the video exchange with Company X illustrated Achieved vs. Ascribed.” Post to canvas by 11:59pm on the evening of the video exchange.

 

Week 13

Tuesday, Apr 13

T&HT – Ch 9. How We Manage Time (Sequential vs. Synchronic), pg 147-172;

Videos 9 and 10: Groundhog Day (Sequential), Shall we dansu? (Synchronous)

 

Class Assignment 12: “This Week in Korea.” Post to your canvas by 6:00am.

 

Week 14

Tuesday, Apr 20

(Video Exchange with Korean Company (US Affiliate and Korean Based. Note: This schedule is a placeholder. The actual date and time of the video exchange depends on the schedules of our guests.)

 

Class Assignment 13: Brief 200-word essay, “How the video exchange with Company X illustrated Sequential vs. Synchronic.” Post to canvas by 11:59pm on the evening of the video exchange.

 

Week 15

Tuesday, Apr 27

T&HT – Ch 10. How We Relate to Nature (Inner vs. Outer Directed), pg 173-192.

Videos 11 and 12: The Seventh Seal (Outer) The Ballad of Narayama (Inner)

 

Class Assignment 14: “This Week in Korea.” Post to your canvas by 6:00am.

 

 Week 16

Tuesday, May 04

(Video Exchange with Korean Company (US Affiliate and Korean Based. Note: This schedule is a placeholder. The actual date and time of the video exchange depends on the schedules of our guests.)

 

Class Assignment 15: Brief 200-word essay, “How the video exchange with Company X illustrated Sequential vs. Synchronic.” Post to canvas by 11:59pm on the evening of the video exchange.

 

Class Assignment 16: Final 1000-Word Essay, “How my perception of North American and Korean culture has changed over the semester.” Post on canvas 6:00am.

 

Note 1:  There is no final exam for this course.

 

  1. Class Assignments

There are 16 assignments during the course. They are written in red in the syllabus, which indicates that something is due. The assignment types are subdivided into the following categories:

 

  1. Essays (2)

There are two essays that students write as part of this course:

Initial Essay. At the beginning of the semester, write a brief 500-word essay entitled “What makes me North American and what makes them Korean.” The object of this essay to access your initial attitudes and knowledge about the characteristics of these two groups. Post your essay on canvas by 6:00am on the due date. This essay is worth 50 points.

Final Essay. Write a 1000-word essay entitled, “How my perception of North American and Korean culture has changed over the semester.” Post your essay on canvas by 6:00am on the due date. This essay is worth 100 points.

 

  1. Cultural Assessments (2)

At the beginning of the semester students are required to post results from two different cultural assessment surveys together with a brief 100-word description of the results, your reaction to the results, and how the results might apply to intercultural communication. These serve as a baseline for comparison throughout the semester. Each assignment is worth 10 points, for a total of 20 points.

 

3. This Week in Korea (5)

There are five days when students are required to provide a cultural analysis of “This Week in Korea.” Building from the dilemmas that we will learn in class, find a current event that is happening in Korea and analyze it using one of the dilemma’s as described by Trompenaars & Hampden-Turner’s Dilemma Theory. Write an executive summary based on your analysis. Each executive summary assignment is worth 25 points, for a total of 125pts. The summary should contain the following features:

Introduction: One paragraph that describes and summarizes the major cultural issues that are most salient or important to you.  This should include aspects that seem most different from those norms found in US culture.

Statement of the Cultural Conflict: A specific statement of the cultural conflict or dilemma (usually not more than two or three sentences).

Analysis: Your analysis of the critical cultural issues.

Recommendations: Based on your analysis, provide recommendations or alternative solutions on how to deal with these cultural issues.

 

Points are based on the following rubric:

Ex. Sum. Follows Outline

(1-3 pts)

Identifies Cultural Conflict

(1-6 pts)

Uses Theory for Analysis

(1-6 pts)

Recommendation

(1-6 pts)

Details

(1-4 pts)

3pts. Includes all 4 required parts

2pts. Includes all parts, but they are hard to identify

1pt. Does not follow required outline

5-6pts. Clear focus on cultural conflict and relates to topic

3-4pts. Attempts to identify cultural conflict, but not well applied

1-2pts. Excludes specific cultural conflict

5-6pts. Appropriate application of theory

3-4pts. Mentions theory, but not well applied.

1-2pts. Excludes theoretical application

 

 

5-6pts. Appropriate and feasible recommendation

3-4pts. Recommendation, but stating the obvious or not applicable

1-2pts. Excludes recommendation

1pt. Adheres to size limit

1pt. Turns in assignment on time

1pt. Grammar and vocabulary do not distract

1pt. Punctuation and writing style

 

 

5. Video Exchange with Korean Companies (6)

There are six days when we invite representatives (both US Affiliate and Korea-based) from Korean companies to participate in a video exchange. As we learn about the company, its operations and business philosophy, students assess what characteristics about the company represent possible cultural dilemmas (as presented by Trompenaars and Hampden-Turner). Student then write a brief 200-word assessment about how the exchange provided evidence of THT’s Dilemma Theory. Of course, not every visit will provide evidence of a given dilemma, and we will be flexible in accepting a wide range of possibilities. Each essay is worth 50 points, for a total of 300 points.

 

Note: At this time we are still arranging for companies that are in a position to meet with us. We are looking at Hyundai, SK, Samsung, LG, CJ Entertainment, among others.

 

Note: The schedule in the syllabus is simply a placeholder. The actual time of the video exchange will depend on the availability of the invited guests. Be aware that Korea is 14 hours ahead of Austin. Chances are that some of our video exchanges will take place in the evening, when it is early morning in Korea

 

  1. Grading

The final grade is based on the percentage of total points earned (A = 94+, A- = 90+, B+ = 87+, B = 84+, B- = 80+, C+ = 77+, C = 74+, C- = 70+, D+ = 67+, D = 64+, D- = 60+).  Scores are not rounded. No late work or make up work is allowed. Points are distributed on the following basis:

 

150 pts Essay Assignments (1 x 50, 1 x 100 = 150 pts)

  20 pts Survey Assessments (2 x 10 = 20 pts)

125 pts This Week in Latin America (5 x 25 = 125 pts)

300 pts Video Exchange Essays (6 x 50 = 300 pts)

595 pts  TOTAL

 

 

Notes

Students with Disabilities

Upon request, the University of Texas at Austin provides appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) is housed in the Office of the Dean of Students, located on the fourth floor of the Student Services Building. Information on how to register, downloadable forms, including guidelines for documentation, accommodation request letters, and releases of information are available online at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd/index.php. Please do not hesitate to contact SSD at (512) 471-6259, VP: (512) 232-2937 or via e-mail if you have any questions.

 

Campus Carry

For those students who are 21 years of age and who legally carry a licensed and concealed firearm, we remind you that your bags must be within arm’s reach. We also remind you that if others see a gun, it is not legal (not concealed). FYI, Prof. Kelm’s office has not been designated as a no-carry zone.

Senate Bill 212 and Title IX Reporting Requirements. Under Senate Bill 212 (SB 212), the professor and TAs for this course are required to report for further investigation any information concerning incidents of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking committed by or against a UT student or employee. Federal law and university policy also requires reporting incidents of sex- and gender-based discrimination and sexual misconduct (collectively known as Title IX incidents). This means we cannot keep confidential information about any such incidents that you share with us. If you need to talk with someone who can maintain confidentiality, please contact University Health Services (512-471-4955 or 512-475-6877) or the UT Counseling and Mental Health Center (512-471-3515 or 512-471-2255). We strongly urge you make use of these services for any needed support and that you report any Title IX incidents to the Title IX Office.

Academic Dishonesty

Academic dishonesty damages the reputation of the school and demeans the honest efforts of the majority of students.  The minimum penalty for an act of academic dishonesty will be a zero for that assignment or exam.  The responsibilities for both students and faculty with regard to the Honor System are described at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/conduct/academicintegrity.php. If the application of the Honor System to this class and its assignments is unclear in any way, it is your responsibility to ask for clarification.

The highest professional standards are expected of all members of the class.  Faculty are expected to be professional and prepared to deliver value for each and every class session. Students are expected to be professional in all respects.

Classroom Professionalism Policy

Our online class experience is enhanced when:

  • Students login on time. Logging in on time ensures that classes are able to start and finish at the scheduled time. On time arrival shows respect for both fellow students and faculty and it enhances learning by reducing avoidable distractions.
  • Video and audio during video conference sessions. We will be using zoom for our video conference sessions. Please keep your video on, but to avoid feedback, please mute your audio, which you can turn on when needed.
  • Video surroundings and background. Feel free to enter the zoom sessions from anywhere. However, be aware of how your dress and background will be seen by others. For example, I recommend that you not wear pajamas. (Crazy I know, but you’d be amazed as what we’ve seen.)
  • Students are fully prepared for each class. Much of the learning takes place during classroom discussions. Read the assigned chapters When students are not prepared they cannot contribute to the overall learning process. This affects not only the individual, but their peers who count on them, as well.
  • Students respect the views and opinions of their colleagues. The expression and defense of opinions are encouraged and part of the academic environment. Intolerance for the views of others is unacceptable.
  • Internet access during class. Because we use the internet for all of the course content and delivery, there is always a temptation to “multitask.” Please refrain from surfing the web, responding to e-mails, instant messaging each other, etc. This creates a disservice to our peers and potentially causes a distraction. Restrict use to items related to the course.

 

Updated: October 1, 2020

POR 327C • Adv Grammar/Writing In Ctx-Wb

45170 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
GCWr

 Spring 2021

 

POR 327C Advanced Grammar and Writing in Context

TTH 9:30 – 11:00

 

Instructor:                Orlando R. Kelm

Office:                        Mezes 4.146

Telephone:                232-4534

Office Hours:            TTH 11:00 – 12:30

E-mail:                       orkelm@austin.utexas.edu

Internet:                    http://orlandokelm.wordpress.com/ 

 

 

Note: POR 327C During Pandemic Times and COVID-19

 

Our class will be 100% online this semester. As such, we do not have to deal with issues related to the wearing of a face-covering, quarantines or social distancing. However, it does mean that we need to deal with issues related to online formats.

  • First, consider Canvas your homepage for all information. The “pages” section will provide a day-to-day summary of all assignments. The mix of quizzes, assignments, lectures, simulations, Padlet walls. Be sure to access “pages” on Canvas to keep it all straight.
  • Second, rest assured, weird things happen when we depend on the internet, band width, and online delivery. Your grade will never be negatively affected because of a technical issue. We will work around these issues as best we can.
  • Third, there are online quizzes and recorded online lectures. Be sure to watch all of the lectures and take all of the quizzes as scheduled.
  • Fourth, some class sessions will be recorded, but be aware that most of our class time is devoted to individual, small group, and class practice. All of the content is available online, but not everything can be recorded. You need to attend class during the schedule class sessions.
  • Fifth, all of the quizzes and assignments are designed to be “open book.” This is to minimize the issues related to cheating or other dishonest behavior. It is simply easier to allow for open book quizzes than it is to control for it. Still, all work should represent your own, and not that of others.
  • Sixth, I do not mean to insert myself in your private life. However, keep me informed of your own physical and mental health. If you or a member of your family tests positive for COVID, or if any other personal issue comes up during the semester, I am happy to work around things as best we can. You are more important than the content of our course. I’ll do all I can to create a positive experience while we learn the content.
  • Seventh, please see the Classroom Professionalism Statement at the end of this syllabus. This provides instructions for our online zoom video conference sessions.

 

  1. Description

This course provides intermediate-level students of Portuguese with an opportunity to improve their oral proficiency, writing ability, and to do so with a focus on advanced grammar principles that are challenging for learners of Portuguese.  The course is design to provide practical oral and written exercises. We use a number of online and open-resource materials in Portuguese language to serve as the foundation for the oral and written assignments. Every unit includes a day to study with the online materials, another day to write brief compositions about the topic, and another day to review related grammar principles and to orally perform the designated tasks. There are also two online midterm exams, both of which focus on the grammar principles that have come up in the course discussions.

 

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

  1. Course Materials

Required Materials

 

Kelm, Orlando R. Brazilpod Homepage: https://coerll.utexas.edu/brazilpod/

  • Tá Falado
  • Conversa Brasileira
  • Língua da Gente
  • Portuguese Communication Exercises

Perini, Mario. A. 2002. Modern Portuguese: A Reference Grammar. New Haven: Yale University Press.

 

  1. Course Schedule

Week 1

January

Tuesday, 19

Introduction to course

Online Resources at BrazilPod

Mini-Composition Assignments

Grammar Review Days

“Can-Do Statement” Oral Pass-Off Assignments

 

Thursday, 21

Introduction to Group Can-Do Statement Assignment #1.

 

 

Week 2

Tuesday, 26

Breve Composição #1: Memorable Plane Ride (Bring a hard copy to class)

 

Thursday, 28

Grammar Review Lesson #1

Group Can-Do Statement #1 Oral Pass-Off

 

Week 3

February

Tuesday, 02

Introduction to Group Can-Do Statement Assignment #2.

 

 

Thursday, 04

Breve Composição #2: Staying in shape (Bring a hard copy to class)

 

Week 4

Tuesday, 09

Grammar Review Lesson #2

Group Can-Do Statement #2 Oral Pass-Off

 

Thursday, 11

Introduction to Group Can-Do Statement Assignment #3

 

 

Week 5

Tuesday, 16

Breve Composição #3: Current Event (Bring a hard copy to class)

 

Thursday, 18

Grammar review lesson #3

Group Can-Do Statement #3 Oral Pass-Off

 

Week 6

Tuesday, 23

Introduction to Group Can-Do Statement Assignment #4

 

 

Thursday, 25

Note: Boren Fellowship Panel

Breve Composição #4: Life without electricity (Bring a hard copy to class)

 

Week 7

March

Tuesday, 02

Grammar review lesson #4

Group Can-Do Statement #4 Oral Pass-Off

 

Thursday, 04

Introduction to “personal can-do statement #1”

 

  • Personal #1. Topic of your Personal Can-Do Statement
    • Vocabulary – As related to your Personal Can-Do Statement
    • Grammar – As related to your Personal Can-Do Statement
    • Resources As related to your Personal Can-Do Statement
      • Língua da Gente:
      • Portuguese Communication Exercises:
      • Conversa Brasileira:
      • Tá Falado:
    • Demonstration Task: (Describe the task and a link to a real-life scenario)

 

Week 8

Tuesday, 09

South Korea

Breve Composição: Personal can-do statement #1 (Note: Email to Prof. Kelm by 12:00 noon)

Personal Can-Do Statement #1 Oral Pass-Off

 

Thursday, 11

South Korea

Grammar Test #1 (online)

 

Week 9

Spring Break Mar 15 – Mar 19

 

Week 10

Tuesday 23

Introduction to Group Can-Do Statement Assignment #5

 

 

Thursday, 25

Breve Composição #5: The house I grew up in (Bring a hard copy to class)

 

Week 11

Tuesday, 30

Grammar review lesson #5

Group Can-Do Statement #5 Oral Pass-Off

 

April

Thursday, 01

Introduction to Group Can-Do Statement Assignment #6

 

 

Week 12

Tuesday, 06

Breve Composição #6: Plot of a favorite movie (Bring a hard copy to class)

 

Thursday, 08

Grammar review lesson #6

Group Can-Do Statement #6 Oral Pass-Off

 

 

 

Week 13

Tuesday, 13

Introduction to Group Can-Do Statement Assignment #7

 

 

Thursday, 15

Introduction to “personal can-do statement #2”

 

  • Personal #2. Topic of your Personal Can-Do Statement
    • Vocabulary – As related to your Personal Can-Do Statement
    • Grammar – As related to your Personal Can-Do Statement
    • Resources As related to your Personal Can-Do Statement
      • Língua da Gente:
      • Portuguese Communication Exercises:
      • Conversa Brasileira:
      • Tá Falado:
    • Demonstration Task: (Describe the task and a link to a real-life scenario)

 

Week 14

Tuesday, 20

Breve Composição: Personal can-do statement #2 (Note: Email to Prof. Kelm by 12:00 noon)

 

Personal Can-Do Statement #2 Oral Pass-Off

 

Thursday, 22

Breve Composição #7: Describe another time period

 

Week 15

Tuesday, 27

Grammar review lesson #7

Group Can-Do Statement #7 Oral Pass-Off

 

Thursday, 29

Grammar review lesson #8

 

Week 16

May

Tuesday, 04

Final Pass-Offs and Review

 

Thursday, 06

Final Pass-Offs and Review

Grammar Test #2 (online)

 

Note 1:  There is no final exam for this course.

 

  1. Can-Do Statements and Oral Pass-Off

The can-do pass-off presentation consists of a 4-5 minute oral presentation in which the student demonstrates ability to talk about a given topic in Portuguese. There are 7 group can-do assignments and 2 personal can-do assignments. During the semester, students pass off each topic two times, once on the assigned date in the syllabus and once again during the last week of the semester. The 7 group can-do assignments contain topics that all students will study.  The 2 personal can-do assignments allow each student to identify the topic and focus, but require similar preparation for vocabulary, grammar, links to BrazilPod, and a practical demonstration task.

 

The object of the pass-off presentation is to provide students the opportunity to use correct grammar and vocabulary, give a polished presentation without being dependent on notes or visual prompts, and provide clarifications and answers to questions as they come up.  Students may use notes to help them with the outline of the presentation, but they must not be dependent on the notes.

 

The grading sheet has a line to gather the signature and date from the classmate who listens to your pass off. At the end of the semester, students are required to turn in the completed grading sheets to the professor. It is your official record of the pass-off presentations. Each pass-off presentation is worth 10 points (9 x 2 x 10 = 180 pts).

 

  1. Breve Composição

Each of the can-do statement exercises has an accompanying Demonstration Task. Students write a brief one-page composition related to the demonstration task topic. IN CLASS we discuss the content of the written compositions, and it is essential to bring a hard copy to class for group discussions. There are also specific days during the semester when we have grammar review lessons, and the topics for these review lessons come from examples in the compositions. Each written composition is worth 25 points (9 x 25 = 225 pts).

 

  1. Midterm Exams

There are two midterm exams. These online open-book quizzes via canvas are based on the grammar review sessions that we have in class. Students may use class notes and online resources to assist during the exams. Each midterm exam is worth 100 points, for a total of 200. Each exam will be available at 6:00am on the assigned date and it will be available until 11:59pm on the following day. Students may take the test any time during that timeframe. The exams are designed to be completed in about an hour, but all students are allowed three hours to complete the quiz.

 

  1. Grading

The final grade is based on the percentage of total points earned (A = 94+, A- = 90+, B+ = 87+, B = 84+, B- = 80+, C+ = 77+, C = 74+, C- = 70+, D+ = 67+, D = 64+, D- = 60+).  Scores are not rounded. No late work or make up work is allowed. Points are distributed on the following basis:

 

180 pts           Can-Do Oral Pass-off (9 x 20 = 180 pts)

225 pts           Written Compositions (9 x 25 = 200 pts)

200 pts           Exams (2 x 100 = 200 pts)

605 pts          TOTAL

 

Notes

Students with Disabilities

Upon request, the University of Texas at Austin provides appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) is housed in the Office of the Dean of Students, located on the fourth floor of the Student Services Building. Information on how to register, downloadable forms, including guidelines for documentation, accommodation request letters, and releases of information are available online at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd/index.php. Please do not hesitate to contact SSD at (512) 471-6259, VP: (512) 232-2937 or via e-mail if you have any questions.

 

Campus Carry

For those students who are 21 years of age and who legally carry a licensed and concealed firearm, we remind you that your bags must be within arm’s reach. We also remind you that if others see a gun, it is not legal (not concealed). FYI, Prof. Kelm’s office has not been designated as a no-carry zone.

Senate Bill 212 and Title IX Reporting Requirements. Under Senate Bill 212 (SB 212), the professor and TAs for this course are required to report for further investigation any information concerning incidents of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking committed by or against a UT student or employee. Federal law and university policy also requires reporting incidents of sex- and gender-based discrimination and sexual misconduct (collectively known as Title IX incidents). This means we cannot keep confidential information about any such incidents that you share with us. If you need to talk with someone who can maintain confidentiality, please contact University Health Services (512-471-4955 or 512-475-6877) or the UT Counseling and Mental Health Center (512-471-3515 or 512-471-2255). We strongly urge you make use of these services for any needed support and that you report any Title IX incidents to the Title IX Office.

 

Academic Dishonesty

Academic dishonesty damages the reputation of the school and demeans the honest efforts of the majority of students.  The minimum penalty for an act of academic dishonesty will be a zero for that assignment or exam.  The responsibilities for both students and faculty with regard to the Honor System are described at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/conduct/academicintegrity.php. If the application of the Honor System to this class and its assignments is unclear in any way, it is your responsibility to ask for clarification.

Classroom Professionalism Policy

The highest professional standards are expected of all members of the class. Faculty are expected to be professional and prepared to deliver value for each and every class session. Students are expected to be professional in all respects. The classroom experience is enhanced when:

  • Students arrive on time. On time arrival ensures that classes are able to start and finish at the scheduled time. On time arrival shows respect for both fellow students and faculty and it enhances learning by reducing avoidable distractions.
  • Students minimize unscheduled personal breaks. The learning environment improves when disruptions are limited.
  • Students are fully prepared for each class. Much of the learning takes place during classroom discussions. When students are not prepared they cannot contribute to the overall learning process. This affects not only the individual, but their peers who count on them, as well.
  • Students respect the views and opinions of their colleagues. The expression and defense of opinions are encouraged and part of the academic environment. Intolerance for the views of others is unacceptable.
  • Laptops and wireless devices are only used for course activities. In this class we use the Internet for the delivery of almost all of our course content.  You a welcome and encouraged to bring your laptop or mobile devices to class.  However, when students are surfing the web, responding to e-mails, instant messaging each other, etc. they are doing a disservice to their peers and potentially causing a distraction.  Restrict use to items related to the course.

 

Updated: October, 13, 2020

 

SPN 367D • Business In Hispan Life/Cul-Wb

45765 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
GC

SPRING 2021

  

SPN 367 D Business in Hispanic Life and Culture

44185 TTH 8:00 – 9:30

44190 TTH 11:00-12:30

 

Instructor of Record: Orlando R. Kelm

Co-Instructor:          Olivia del Roble Hernández Pozas (TEC de Monterrey)

Office:                        Mezes 4.146

Telephone:                232-4534 (Cell = 512 965-5356)

Office Hours:            TBD

Zoom:                         https://utexas.zoom.us/my/orkelm

E-mail:                       orkelm@austin.utexas.edu, rmoser@uga.edu, rgordon@uga.edu

Internet:                    http://orlandokelm.wordpress.com/ 

 

  1. Description

 

This course serves as an introduction to the study of the Business Spanish. The primary goal of the course is to gain experience in verbal communication, so that students can participate in meetings, exchanges, video conferences, presentations, and professional discussions, in Spanish and in areas related to finance, marketing, accounting, operations, etc. Grading in this course centers on four major components:

 

  • First, on canvas we have seven brief recorded introductory lectures, one for each unit. There are simple quiz questions embedded into the lectures. Listen to the lectures and respond to the questions to receive credit;
  • Second, we focus on the acquisition of vocabulary of business-related terminology. There are seven online vocabulary quizzes on canvas. These are based mainly from the vocabulary lists at the beginning and the end of the chapters in the textbook Éxito Comercial;
  • Third, students prepare seven brief 3-4 minute oral presentations on a number of business related topics. Grades on these ‘pass-offs’ are based on the student’s ability to describe accurate content, use correct grammar and vocabulary, give a polished presentation without being dependent on notes, and provide answers to expansion questions and clarifications related to the topic. You will perform these presentations with our Mexican partner students at the Tecnológio de Monterrey. You will submit a report via canvas to receive credit for these assignments;
  • Fourth, we will be conducting online negotiation simulations (including preparation and debriefing sessions) with our Mexican partner students at the Tecnológio de Monterrey. All students will be sub-divided into teams to participate in the simulation exercises. You will submit a report via canvas to receive credit for these assignments.

 

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

  1. Course Materials

 

Required Materials

 

Doyle, Michael Scott, Fryer, T. Bruce. 2019. Éxito Comercial Cengage.

Note: Latest is the 7th Edition. It is best to purchase the 6th or 7th edition, but only purchase the actual textbook. There is no need to purchase the digital platform or bundled materials.

 

Ancillary Materials

 

Canvas Course Homepage

Note: We will use canvas to present online lectures, share communications, take the quizzes, post grades, and keep track of course activities. Please follow canvas pages to keep up with class progress. The URL link for our zoom sessions will be as follows: https://utexas.zoom.us/my/orkelm (Note, this is the same URL that we can use for office hours. You can sign in to Zoom as a guest.)

 

Kelm, Orlando R. Padlet Wall: https://padlet.com/orkelm/spn367p

Note: This padlet wall contains extra items for background information, reference and practice in topics related to our course content. Use it as a personal resource.

 

  1. Course Schedule

 

Week 1

January

Tuesday, 19 (Synchronous class via Zoom)

Introduction to course

  • Éxito Comercial, Vocabulario, Lecturas Comerciales, Pass-Offs
  • Introduction Lectures with Embedded Quiz
  • TEC de Monterrey Partnerships for Pass-Offs
  • Vocabulary Quizzes
  • Virtual Negotiation Simulations with TEC de Monterrey Students
  • Explanatory Note: Everything in RED means something is due that counts on your grade. Everything in GREEN means something that we do with our partners at TEC de Monterrey.

 

Thursday, 21 (Synchronous class via Zoom)

Reading assignment by end of scheduled class time

Éxito Comercial, Capítulo 1, El comercio y el contexto hispano

Breve Vocabulario Útil

Lectura Comercial: Los contextos del comercio global

Glosario de términos útiles

Pass-Off Topic #1: Talk about the demographics of a specific country. Give information about its GDP, GDP per capita, population, age distribution, inflation, workers by sector, exports, imports, literacy, education, etc.

Due: Listen to Introduction Lecture and Quiz #1 “Demographics of a country” before the scheduled class time.

Due: Padlet Icebreaker: Get to know you video (Post Video by 11:59pm): https://globalclassroom.padlet.org/global/icebreakertecut

 

Week 2

Tuesday, 26 (Synchronous class via Zoom)

Introduction to course

  • Getting to know you

 

Thursday, 28 (Synchronous class via Zoom)

Éxito Comercial, Capítulo 1, El comercio y el contexto hispano

Práctica: Producto Interno Bruto y Producto Nacional Bruto

Note: Assign UT/TEC Partnerships for Pass-Off Assignments

 

Week 3

February

Tuesday, 02 (Asynchronous class, study on your own)

Due: Online on Canvas: Vocabulary Quiz #1, Chapter 1: El comercio y el contexto hispano. (Due by end of scheduled class time)

 

Thursday, 04 (Synchronous class via Zoom)

Guest Lecture from TEC de Monterrey: Olivia del Roble Hernández Pozas, “Técnicas de Negociación”

Due: Padlet Icebreaker Video. Write comments of videos to two UT partners and twoTEC partners. (Post Video by 11:59pm)

 

Week 4

Tuesday, 09 (Asynchronous class, study on your own)

Reading assignment by end of scheduled class time

Éxito Comercial, Capítulo 2, La empresa

Breve Vocabulario Útil

Lectura Comercial: Organización y clasificación de le empresa comercial

Pass-Off Topic #2: Describe the organization and classification of businesses.  Consider sole proprietorship, companies, and corporations. Discuss the make-up of partners, silent partners, stock holders and the advantages and disadvantages of each. Review how they raise capital, the role of stocks and bonds, payment of dividends, etc.

Due: Listen to Introduction Lecture and Quiz #2 “Business Classifications” by end of scheduled class time

Due: Complete the oral presentation of Pass-off #1 “Country Demographics” with your TEC partner and submit report to canvas by 11:59pm

 

Thursday, 11 (Synchronous class via Zoom)

Extra Forma Jurídica Practice Activity

 

Week 5

Tuesday, 16 (Asynchronous class, study on your own)

Due: Online on Canvas: Vocabulary Quiz #2, Chapter 2: La empresa. (Due by end of scheduled class time)

 

Thursday, 18 (Synchronous class via Zoom)

Lecture: Orlando Kelm “Cross-Cultural Communication”

 

Week 6

Tuesday, 23 (Asynchronous class, study on your own)

Reading assignment by end of scheduled class time

Éxito Comercial, Capítulo 3, La gerencia

Breve Vocabulario Útil

Lectura Comercial: Requisitos y modelos administrativos

Pass-Off #3: Describe the organization of management, both horizontally (upper management, middle management, etc.) and by department (finance, production, accounting, human resources, etc.) What are the characteristics and abilities of effective managers and leaders.

Due: Listen to Introduction Lecture and Quiz #3 “Management” by end of scheduled class time

Due: Complete the oral presentation of Pass-off #2 “Organization and Classification of Businesses” with your TEC partner and submit report to canvas by 11:59pm

 

Thursday, 25 (Synchronous class via Zoom)

Note: Boren Fellowship Panel

Preparation for Negotiation Simulation: Earning My New Job (Boss Battle mode)

 

Week 7

March

Tuesday, 02 (Asynchronous class, study on your own)

Due: Online on Canvas: Vocabulary Quiz #3, Chapter 3: La gerencia. (Due by end of scheduled class time)

 

Thursday, 04 (Synchronous class via Zoom)

Video Conference Negotiation Simulation: Earning My New Job (Boss Battle mode with TEC de Monterrey Students.)

Due: Submit your simulation report on canvas by 11:59pm

 

Week 8

Tuesday, 09 (Asynchronous class, study on your own)

Reading assignment by end of scheduled class time

Éxito Comercial, Capítulo 4a, La banca

Breve Vocabulario Útil

Lectura Comercial: Custodia y control del dinero

Vocabulario

Pass-Off #4: Describe banking, the role and function of banks, the services that are offered, the types of accounts that are available. Describe a check and what information is required on checks.

Due: Listen to Introduction Lecture and Quiz #4 “Banking” by end of scheduled class time

Due: Complete the oral presentation of Pass-off #3 “Management” with your TEC partner and submit report to canvas by 11:59pm

 

Thursday, 11 (Synchronous class via Zoom)

Video Conference Debriefing of Negotiation Simulation, Earning My New Job (Boss Battle mode)

Due: Submit your simulation debriefing report on canvas by 11:59pm

 

Week 9

Spring Break Mar 15 – Mar 19

 

Week 10

Tuesday, 23 (Asynchronous class, study on your own)

Due: Online on Canvas: Vocabulary Quiz #4, Chapter 4a: La banca. (Due by end of scheduled class time)

 

Thursday, 25 (Synchronous class via Zoom)

Extra Banking Practice Activity

 

Week 11

Tuesday, 30 (Asynchronous class, study on your own)

Reading assignment by end of scheduled class time

Éxito Comercial, Capítulo 4b, La contabilidad

Breve Vocabulario Útil

Lectura Comercial: La contabilidad o contaduría

Vocabulario

Pass-Off #5: Describe accounting procedures: a balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement, assets, liabilities, depreciation, equity, retained earnings, etc.

Due: Listen to Introduction Lecture and Quiz #5 “Accounting” by end of scheduled class time

Due: Complete the oral presentation of Pass-off #4 “Banking” with your TEC partner and submit report to canvas by 11:59pm

 

April

Thursday, 01 (Synchronous class via Zoom)

Extra Accounting Practice Activity

 

Week 12

Tuesday, 06 (Asynchronous class, study on your own)

Due: Online on Canvas: Vocabulary Quiz #5, Chapter 4b: La contabilidad. (Due by end of scheduled class time)

 

Thursday, 08 (Synchronous class via Zoom)

Preparation for Negotiation Simulation, Funding My Dream (Grand Finale mode)

 

Week 13

Tuesday, 13 (Asynchronous class, study on your own)

Reading assignment by end of scheduled class time

Éxito Comercial, Capítulo 9, Marketing I: Mercados y publicidad

Breve Vocabulario Útil

Lectura Comercial: Segmentación del mercado y publicidad

Vocabulario

Pass-Off #6: Describe marketing, the 4 P’s, the functions of marketing, the role of surveys, interviews, brand recognition, slogans, etc.

Due: Listen to Introduction Lecture and Quiz #6 “Marketing” by end of scheduled class time

Due: Complete the oral presentation of Pass-off #5 “Accounting” with your TEC partner and submit report to canvas by 11:59pm

 

Thursday, 15 (Synchronous class via Zoom)

Video Conference Negotiation Simulation, Funding My Dream (Grand-Finale mode with TEC de Monterrey Students.)

Due: Submit your simulation report on canvas by 11:59pm

 

Week 14

Tuesday, 20 (Asynchronous class, study on your own)

Due: Online on Canvas: Vocabulary Quiz #6, Chapter 9: Marketing. (Due by end of scheduled class time)

 

Thursday, 22 (Synchronous class via Zoom)

Video Conference Debriefing of Negotiation Simulation, Funding My Dream (Grand-Finale mode)

Due: Submit your simulation debriefing report on canvas by 11:59pm

 

Week 15

Tuesday, 27 (Asynchronous class, study on your own)

Reading assignment by end of scheduled class time

Éxito Comercial, Capítulo 11, Las finanzas

Breve Vocabulario Útil

Lectura Comercial: El financiamiento, los inversionistas y la bolsa

Vocabulario

Pass-Off #7: Describe investments and the stock market.  What is the difference between common and preferred stocks and bonds.  Include a description of interest and dividends, etc.

Due: Listen to Introduction Lecture and Quiz #7 “Finance” by end of scheduled class time

Due: Complete the oral presentation of Pass-off #6 “Marketing” with your TEC partner and submit report to canvas by 11:59pm

 

Thursday, 29 (Synchronous class via Zoom)

Extra Finance Practice Activity

 

Week 16

May

Tuesday, 04 (Asynchronous class, study on your own)

Due: Online on Canvas: Vocabulary Quiz #7, Chapter 10: Finance. (Due by end of scheduled class time)

 

Thursday, 06 (Asynchronous class, study on your own)

Due: Complete the oral presentation of Pass-off #7 “Finance” with at UT partner and submit report to canvas by 11:59pm

Note: TEC will have already completed their semester by this date. Choose a UT partner from class to complete this pass-off assignment.

Note: Final Day to complete all assigned work. No late work accepted after 11:59pm

 

  1. “Pass-Offs” Oral Presentations

 

Instructions for Student pass-off presentations

 

The pass-off presentation consists of a 3-4 minute oral presentation in which the student demonstrates ability to talk about a given business topic in Spanish. There are 7 pass-off topics. During the semester, students present the topics two times, once informally with a partner from UT and once formally with a partner from TEC de Monterrey. The official pass-off with the TEC partner is generally due two weeks from the day that we first present the topic in class. Each UT student will have an official pass-off partner from TEC. We will provide you with a list of Tec de Monterrey students and their contact information. Feel free to use any electronic format for communication (e.g., What’s App, Google Hangout, FaceTime, etc.). It will be your responsibility to contact the Tec de Monterrey student and schedule a time to perform the pass-off presentation within the scheduled due dates.

 

The object of the pass-off presentation is to give students the opportunity to use correct grammar and vocabulary, give a polished presentation without being dependent on notes or visual prompts, and provide clarifications and answers to questions as they come up.  Students may use a written outline of the presentation, but they must not be dependent on the notes.

 

The grading for the pass-off assignments with your TEC partner is a straight credit / no credit. Each pass-off presentation that is completed on time is worth 10 points (7 x 10 = 70). No credit is given for late work. Basically, if you complete the pass-off assignment, you will receive full credit. If you do not complete the assignment, you will receive zero. In order to receive credit, you need to submit a report on canvas with the following information:

  1. Name of your TEC partner
  2. Date of the presentation
  3. Notes with details about the feedback that your TEC partner gave to you
  4. Final observations about what you learned from the presentation experience.

 

Oral Presentation Tasks Related to Business Topics

 

  1. Talk about the demographics of a specific country. Give information about its GDP, GDP per capita, population, age distribution, inflation, workers by sector, exports, imports, literacy, education, etc.
  2. Describe the organization and classification of businesses. Consider sole proprietorship, companies, and corporations. Discuss the make-up of partners, silent partners, stock holders and the advantages and disadvantages of each.  Review how they raise capital, the role of stocks and bonds, payment of dividends, etc.
  3. Describe the organization of management, both horizontally (upper management, middle management, etc.) and by department (finance, production, accounting, human resources, etc.) What are the characteristics and abilities of effective managers and leaders.
  4. Describe banking, the role and function of banks, the services that are offered, the types of accounts that are available. Describe a check and what information is required on checks.
  5. Describe accounting procedures: a balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement, assets, liabilities, depreciation, equity, retained earnings, etc.
  6. Describe marketing, the 4 P’s, the functions of marketing, the role of surveys, interviews, brand recognition, slogans, etc.
  7. Describe investments and the stock market. What is the difference between common and preferred stocks and bonds.  Include a description of interest and dividends, etc.

 

  1. Introduction Lectures on Panopto Video

 

On canvas there are 7 Panopto Videos that model the topics of the pass-off presentations for each unit. These mini-lectures are based on the Lecturas Comeriales from the textbook Exito Comerical. The lectures have simple quizzes embedded into the online presentation. Listen to the lectures and complete the quizzes as assigned. Each lecture is worth 10 points and points can only be earned during the timeframe when the lecture is available on canvas. No credit is given for late work.

 

  1. Chapter Quizzes

 

Seven times during the semester we will have a vocabulary quiz via canvas on the vocabulary words from each chapter of the textbook Éxito Comercial. Each quiz is worth 20 points, for a total of 140. We will take each quiz during the first 30 minutes of class. These quizzes are all open book, but to be honest, if you need to look through the book to find the answer you will most likely not have enough time to complete the assignment. Although there is no specific grade for attendance in this class, the vocabulary quizzes can only be taken during the class sessions. There is no make up for missed quizzes.

 

  1. Participation Grade and IceBreaker Video

 

There are 14 days when we have synchronous class sessions via zoom. During these sessions, send at least five messages in the chat window. These messages make up your participation grade in class.  (14 x 5 = 70 pts). We also have an introduction icebreaker video assignment to get us rolling at the beginning of the semester. Here’s the padlet wall URL: https://globalclassroom.padlet.org/global/icebreakertecut

 

  1. Grading

 

The final grade is based on the percentage of total points earned (A = 94+, A- = 90+, B+ = 87+, B = 84+, B- = 80+, C+ = 77+, C = 74+, C- = 70+, D+ = 67+, D = 64+, D- = 60+).  Scores are not rounded. No late work or make up work is allowed. Points are distributed on the following basis:

 

  70 pts            Pass-Off Oral Presentations (7 x 10 = 70 pts)

  70 pts            Introduction Lecture Quizzes (7 x 10 = 70 pts)

  70 pts            Class Participation Exchange (14 x 5 = 70 pts)

140 pts           Vocabulary Quizzes (7 x 20 = 140 pts)

  40 pts            Negotiation Simulation (2 x 20 = 40 pts)

  40 pts            Negotiation Debriefing (2 x 20 = 40 pts)

  20 pts            Icebreaker Video and Comments (2 x 10 = 20 pts)

450 pts          TOTAL

 

Notes

 

Students with Disabilities

Upon request, the University of Texas at Austin provides appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) is housed in the Office of the Dean of Students, located on the fourth floor of the Student Services Building. Information on how to register, downloadable forms, including guidelines for documentation, accommodation request letters, and releases of information are available online at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd/index.php. Please do not hesitate to contact SSD at (512) 471-6259, VP: (512) 232-2937 or via e-mail if you have any questions.

 

Campus Carry

For those students who are 21 years of age and who legally carry a licensed and concealed firearm, we remind you that your bags must be within arm’s reach. We also remind you that if others see a gun, it is not legal (not concealed). FYI, Prof. Kelm’s office has not been designated as a no-carry zone. Given that our class will be 100% online, this should not be an issue in our course.

Academic Dishonesty

Academic dishonesty damages the reputation of the school and demeans the honest efforts of the majority of students.  The minimum penalty for an act of academic dishonesty will be a zero for that assignment or exam. 

The responsibilities for both students and faculty with regard to the Honor System are described on https://my.mccombs.utexas.edu/BBA/Code-of-Ethics. If the application of the Honor System to this class and its assignments is unclear in any way, it is your responsibility to ask for clarification.

 

Senate Bill 212 and Title IX Reporting Requirements. Under Senate Bill 212 (SB 212), the professor and TAs for this course are required to report for further investigation any information concerning incidents of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking committed by or against a UT student or employee. Federal law and university policy also requires reporting incidents of sex- and gender-based discrimination and sexual misconduct (collectively known as Title IX incidents). This means we cannot keep confidential information about any such incidents that you share with us. If you need to talk with someone who can maintain confidentiality, please contact University Health Services (512-471-4955 or 512-475-6877) or the UT Counseling and Mental Health Center (512-471-3515 or 512-471-2255). We strongly urge you make use of these services for any needed support and that you report any Title IX incidents to the Title IX Office.

 

Classroom Professionalism Policy

The highest professional standards are expected of all members of the class.  Faculty are expected to be professional and prepared to deliver value for each and every class session. Students are expected to be professional in all respects.

Our online class experience is enhanced when:

  • Students login on time. Logging in on time ensures that classes are able to start and finish at the scheduled time. On time arrival shows respect for both fellow students and faculty and it enhances learning by reducing avoidable distractions.
  • Video and audio during video conference sessions. We will be using zoom for our video conference sessions. Please keep your video on, but to avoid feedback, please mute your audio, which you can turn on when needed.
  • Video surroundings and background. Feel free to enter the zoom sessions from anywhere. However, be aware of how your dress and background will be seen by others. For example, I recommend that you not wear pajamas.
  • Students are fully prepared for each class. Much of the learning takes place during classroom discussions. Read the assigned chapters and listen to the introduction videos. When students are not prepared they cannot contribute to the overall learning process. This affects not only the individual, but their peers who count on them, as well.
  • Students respect the views and opinions of their colleagues. The expression and defense of opinions are encouraged and part of the academic environment. Intolerance for the views of others is unacceptable.
  • Internet access during class. Because we use the internet for all of the course content and delivery, there is always a temptation to “multitask.” Please refrain from surfing the web, responding to e-mails, instant messaging each other, etc. This creates a disservice to our peers and potentially causes a distraction. Restrict use to items related to the course.

 

Updated October 13, 2020

 

UGS 303 • Cultural Issues With Lat Am-Wb

61840-61853 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
GC ID

Cultural Issues in Dealing with Latin America

UGS 303 Signature Course (59780, 59785, 59790)

 

Spring 2020

 

Class:  TTH 2:00 – 3:30 SZB 330

Lab: 59780 M 2:00 – 3:00 MAI 220C

Lab: 59785 M 3:00 – 4:00 MAI 220C

Lab: 59790 M 4:00 – 5:00 MAI 220C

 

Instructor:       Orlando R. Kelm                     Teach. Assist.: Nicole Larrondo

Office: Mezes  4.146                                      Office: BEN 5th floor. Desk 50

Telephone:       232-4534                                

Office Hours: TTH 12:30 – 2:00                    Office Hours:  M 12:45-1:45 / T 12:45-1:45

 

E-mail:             orkelm@austin.utexas.edu                 Email: nicolelarrondo@utexas.edu

Homepage: http://orlandokelm.wordpress.com/  https://nicolarrondo.youcanbook.me

 

  1. Description

Intercultural communication is more effective when we can identify and understand the reasons we culturally behave the way we do. The purpose of this course is to teach students how to recognize these behaviors and “resolve the cultural dilemmas” by drawing from the positive aspects of these differences. We do so within the context of North America and Latin America. We begin by teaching three distinct theoretical models that approach the subject of intercultural communication: David Victor’s LESCANT model, Hammer’s Intercultural Development Inventory, and Trompenaars & Hampden-Turner’s Cultural Dilemmas. Using these three models, students learn how to identify and observe cultural differences, both in their own patterns as well as in the behavior of others. From there, the major task of the course becomes an analysis of various cultural scenarios about Latin American where students provide suggestions and recommendations on how to resolve the dilemmas. Assigned work includes interaction with students at partner schools in Brazil, survey assignments, “This Week in Latin America” assignments, and written assignments related to Gems of the University and the University Lecture Series.

 

As a signature course, students will also have the opportunity to use the content from this course to develop critical thinking and communication skills, as well as develop a sense of social responsibility. As with other signature courses, students also have opportunities to develop information literacy, learn of the Gems of the University, and attend lectures that are part of the University Lecture Series.

 

Note:  This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

  1. Course Materials

Required Materials

Trompenaars, Fons & Charles Hampden-Turner. 2012. Riding the Waves of Culture: Understanding Diversity in Global Business. 3rd Edition. New York: McGraw Hill

 

Kelm, Orlando R., David A. Victor. 2016. The Seven Keys to Communicating in Brazil: An Intercultural Approach. Washington D.C.: Georgetown University Press.

Online Order with 30% discount code TGUF: http://press.georgetown.edu/book/languages/seven-keys-communicating-brazil

 

Related Online Resources

Kelm, Orlando R. Padlet Wall, “Cross-Cultural Competence: Making the most of our cultural differences” http://padlet.com/orkelm/culturalcompetence

Kelm, Orlando R. Pathbrite, Homepage: https://pathbrite.com/orkelm/profile

World Clock Meeting Planner

https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/meeting.html

 

  1. Course Schedule

Week 1

Tuesday, Jan 19

  1. Introduction to course
  2. Assessing Business Culture: Models
  3. Trompenaars & Hampden-Turner’s Cultural Dilemmas

Homepage: http://www.thtconsulting.com/

Homepage: http://www.cultureforbusiness.com/

Homepage: http://www.ridingthewavesofculture.com/

  1. David Victor’s LESCANT Model

LESCANT: http://kelmcultural.wordpress.com/david-victors-lescant-model/

  1. Mitchell Hammer’s Intercultural Development Inventory

IDI: https://idiinventory.com

  1. Pathbrite and Photo Portfolio Assignments
  2. Quizzes
  3. Brazilian Partners for Discussion Groups and Interactive Assignments
  4. Universidade Nacional Adventista de São Paulo - UNASP (Prof. Milton Torres)
  5. This week in Latin America (4)
  6. Gems of the University (1)
  7. University Lecture Series (1)
  8. Student Teaching during Lab Sessions (1)

 

 

 

Thursday, Jan 21

T&HT - Ch 1. An Introduction to Culture, pg1-16; Ch 2. The One Best Way of Organizing Does Not Exit, pg 17-26; Ch 3. The Meaning of Culture.

Class Assignment 1: Initial 500-Word Essay, “What makes me North American and what makes them Latin American.” Post on canvas by 6:00am.

 

Week 2

Monday Lab, Jan 25

Discussion Topic, “A Little About Me” We will be reviewing the bio that students wrote on their Pathbrite Portfolio.

Class Assignment 2: Pathbrite Portfolios - https://pathbrite.com  (Create an account, add an introductory portfolio with a 200-word public bio of yourself.  (Include optionally photos, quotes, links, interests, etc.) Send a copy of your Pathbrite homepage URL to canvas

 by 6:00am.

 

Tuesday, Jan 26

T&HT - Ch 4. Relationships and Rules (Universalism vs. Particularism), pg 39-64.

 

Thursday, Jan 28

Videos 1 and 2:  High Noon (Universalism), Les Miserables (Particularism)

 

Week 3

Monday Lab, Feb 01

Learning to use UT resources, libraries, and other information literacy skills:

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/signaturecourses

            Note: Meet with Sarah Brandt in Learning Lab 4 on the main floor of PCL

 

Tuesday, Feb 02

T&HT – Ch 5. The Group and the Individual (Individualism vs. Communitarianism), pg 65-86

 

Thursday, Feb 04

Videos 3 and 4: Casablanca (Individualism), Ikiru (Communitarianism)

 

Week 4

Monday Lab, Feb 08

Class Assignment 3: “This Week in Latin America” #1. Post to your Pathbrite Portfolio by 6:00am.

 

Tuesday, Feb 09

LESCANT: Language, Environment, Social Organization

 

Thursday, Feb 11

LESCANT: Language, Environment, Social Organization cont.

Quiz #1 Language and Environment. Submit online by 11:59pm

 

Week 5 (Exchange Week with Brazilian Partners)

Monday Lab, Feb 15

LESCANT Photos

Class Assignment 4: Add 6 photos/artifacts to your e-portfolio that demonstrate a cultural aspect of USA culture. Post 2 photos/artifacts for each as related to Language, Environment, Social Organization from the LESCANT Model. Include a 50-word justification and explanation for each photo/artifact. Post to your Pathbrite Portfolio by 6:00am.

 

Monday, Feb 15

*Initial Introductory Video Conference with UNASP students at 7:00pm São Paulo Time (= 4:00pm Austin Time)

 

Tuesday, Feb 16

LESCANT: Context, Authority, Non-Verbal, Time

 

Thursday, Feb 18

LESCANT: Context, Authority, Non-Verbal, Time cont.

 

(One-on-one video Exchange with UNASP partners (Make an appointment to conduct a video conference with your UNASP partner. Introduce your UNASP partner to the Trompenaars and Hamden-Turner dilemma about Universalism versus Particularism and Individualism versus Communitarianism. Explain the benefits and pitfalls of both, and describe the advantages of resolving the conflict. Find out your Brazilian partner’s impressions of where they fit on the continuum. Schedule your video conferen to be completed by XXX. Submit your report about the video session to canvas by 11:59pm on xxxx.

 

 

Week 6 (Exchange Week with Brazilian Partners)

Monday Lab, Feb 22

LESCANT Photos

Class Assignment 5: Add 8 photos/artifacts to your e-portfolio that demonstrate a cultural aspect of USA culture. Post 2 photos/artifacts for each as related to Context, Authority, Non-Verbal, Time from the LESCANT Model. Include a 50-word justification and explanation for each photo/artifact. Post to your Pathbrite Portfolio by 6:00am.

 

Tuesday, Feb 23

Interaction Assignment 1: Review the portfolio posts related to (Language)ESCANT of at least 2 American and 5 Brazilian colleagues. Write a comment or question to each in their respective comments section in each of THEIR Pathbrite Portfolios. Discuss the photos or elements that they have added as related to culture. Due by 6:00am.

 

Thursday, Feb 25

Note: Boren Fellowship Panel

Interaction Assignment 2: Review the portfolio posts related to L(Environment)SCANT of at least 2 American and 5 Brazilian colleagues. Write a comment or question to each in their respective comments section in each of THEIR Pathbrite Portfolios. Discuss the photos or elements that they have added as related to culture. Due by 6:00am.

 

Week 7 (Exchange Week with Brazilian Partners, Brazilian Carnaval Friday, March 1 – Saturday, March 9)

 

Monday Lab, Mar 01

Class Assignment 6: “This Week in Latin America” #2. Post to your Pathbrite Portfolio by 6:00am.

 

Tuesday, Mar 02

Interaction Assignment 3: Review the portfolio posts related to LE(Social Organization)CANT of at least 2 American and 5 Brazilian colleagues. Write a comment or question to each in their respective comments section in each of THEIR Pathbrite Portfolios. Discuss the photos or elements that they have added as related to culture. Due by 6:00am.

 

Thursday, Mar 04

Interaction Assignment 4: Review the portfolio posts related to LES(Context)ANT of at least 2 American and 5 Brazilian colleagues. Write a comment or question to each in their respective comments section in each of THEIR Pathbrite Portfolios. Discuss the photos or elements that they have added as related to culture. Due by 6:00am.

 

Week 8 (Exchange Week with Brazilian Partners)

Monday Lab, Mar 08

Harvard’s Project Implicit

Class Assignment 7: Harvard’s Project Implicit – Implicit Association Tests (IAT) related to Social Attitudes and Mental Health - https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/  (Choose any two of the assessments and complete the test. Then add an item to your Pathbrite portfolio with a description of your results, your reaction to those results and how they may relate to intercultural communication. Post to your Pathbrite Porfolio by 6:00am.)

 

Tuesday, Mar 09

*Note: Prof. Kelm in South Korea

Interaction Assignment 5: Review the portfolio posts related to LESC(Authority)NT of at least 2 American and 5 Brazilian colleagues. Write a comment or question to each in their respective comments section in each of THEIR Pathbrite Portfolios. Discuss the photos or elements that they have added as related to culture. Due by 6:00am.

 

Thursday, Mar 11

*Note: Prof. Kelm in South Korea

Interaction Assignment 6: Review the portfolio posts related to LESCA(Nonverbal)T of at least 2 American and 5 Brazilian colleagues. Write a comment or question to each in their respective comments section in each of THEIR Pathbrite Portfolios. Discuss the photos or elements that they have added as related to culture. Due by 6:00am.

Quiz #2 Social Organization and Context. Submit online by 11:59pm

 

(One-on-one video Exchange with UNASP partners (Make an appointment to conduct a video conference with your UNASP partner. Introduce your UNASP partner to the Trompenaars and Hamden-Turner dilemma about Affective versus Neutral and Specific versus Diffuse. Explain the benefits and pitfalls of both, and describe the advantages of resolving the conflict. Find out your Brazilian partner’s impressions of where he/she fits on the continuum. Schedule your video conference to be completed by XXX. Submit your report about the video session to canvas by 11:59pm on xxxx.

 

Week 9

Spring Break Mar 15 – Mar 19

 

Week 10 (Exchange Week with Brazilian Partners)

Monday Lab, Mar 22

Interaction Assignment 7: Review the portfolio posts related to LESCAN(Time) of at least 2 American and 5 Brazilian colleagues. Write a comment or question to each in their respective comments section in each of THEIR Pathbrite Portfolios. Discuss the photos or elements that they have added as related to culture. Due by 6:00am.

 

Tuesday, Mar 23

T&HT – Ch 6. Feelings and Relationship (Affective vs. Neutral), pg 87-100.

T&HT – Ch 7. How Far We Get Involved (Specific vs. Diffuse), pg 101-124.

 

Thursday, Mar 25

Videos 5 and 6: Scarlet Letter (Specific), The Apartment (Diffuse)

*Video Conference Session #1 with UNASP students at 4:00pm São Paulo Time (= 2:00pm Austin Time)

 

Week 11 (Exchange Week with Brazilian Partners)

Monday Lab, Mar 29

Class Assignment 8: Trompenaars Hampden-Turner’s Intercultural Awareness Profiler (IAP) and Intercultural Competence Profiler (ICP) - http://www2.thtconsulting.com/tools/#webtools  (Take both of the assessments. Add an item to your Pathbrite portfolio with a 100-word description of your results, your reaction to those results and how they might apply to intercultural communication. Post to Pathbrite by 6:00am.)

 

Tuesday, Mar 30

T&HT - Ch 8. How We Accord Status (Achieved vs. Ascribed), pg 125-146.

 

Thursday, Apr 01

Videos 7 and 8: My Fair Lady (Achieved), Tengoku to Jigoku (Ascribed)

 

 

 

Week 12 (Exchange Week with Brazilian Partners)

Monday Lab, April 05

Class Assignment 9: “This Week In Latin America” #3 (Use H&HT in analysis). Post to your Pathbrite Portfolio by 6:00am.

 

Monday, April 05

*Video Conference Session #2 on Language, Environment Social Organization, 7:00pm São Paulo Time (= 5:00pm Austin Time)

 

Tuesday, Apr 06

T&HT – Ch 9. How We Manage Time (Sequential vs. Synchronic), pg 147-172;

 

Thursday, Apr 08

Videos 9 and 10: Groundhog Day (Sequential), Shall we dansu? (Synchronous)

 

Week 13 (Exchange Week with Brazilian Partners)

Monday Lab, Apr 12

Class Assignment 10: 16 Personalities (Similar to Myers & Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) - https://www.16personalities.com/ Take the test and add an item to your Pathbrite portfolio with a description of your results, your reaction to those results, and how they may apply to intercultural communication. Post to your Pathbrite Portfolio by 6:00am.

 

Tuesday, Apr 13

T&HT – Ch 10. How We Relate to Nature (Inner vs. Outer Directed), pg 173-192;

 

Thursday, Apr 15

Note: Academy of Management Mexico Conference

Videos 11 and 12: The Seventh Seal (Outer) The Ballad of Narayama (Inner)

 

Week 14 (Exchange Week with Brazilian Partners)

Monday Lab, Apr 19

Class Assignment 11: Richard Step Strengths and Weaknesses Test - http://richardstep.com/richardstep-strengths-weaknesses-aptitude-test/  Take the test and add an item to your Pathbrite portfolio with a 100-word description of your results, your reaction to those result, and how they may apply to intercultural communication. Post to your Pathbrite Portfolio by 6:00am.

 

Tuesday, Apr 20

T&HT – Ch 13 Reconciling Cultural Dilemmas, pg 241-262;

 

Thursday, Apr 22

*Video Conference Session #3 on Language, Environment Social Organization, 4:00pm São Paulo Time (= 2:00pm Austin Time)

 

Week 15 (Exchange Week with Brazilian Partners)

Monday Lab, Apr 26

Class Assignment 12: American Accent Quiz (short version from New York Times) - https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/upshot/dialect-quiz-map.html?_r=1&  (Take the test and add an item to your Pathbrite portfolio with a description of your results, your reaction to those results, and how they may apply to intercultural communication. Post to your Pathbrite Portfolio by 6:00M.)

 

Tuesday, Apr 27

Hammer’s Intercultural Development Inventory Introduction

 

Thursday, Apr 29

Intercultural Development Inventory Assessment

Quiz #3 Authority, Nonverbal, Time. Submit online by 11:59pm

 

Week 16 (Exchange Week with Brazilian Partners)

Monday Lab, May 03

Class Assignment 13: “This Week In Latin America” #4 (Use H&HT in analysis). Post to your Pathbrite Portfolio by 6:00am.

 

Tuesday, May 04

Report: Gems of the University Report

 

Thursday, May 06

Report: University Lecture Series Report, cont.

 

Class Assignment 14: Final 1000-Word Essay, “How my perception of North American and Latin American culture has changed over the semester.” Send an electronic copy to Nicole and post a copy on your Pathbrite Portfolio by 6:00am.

 

Note 1:  There is no final exam for this course.

 

  1. Class Assignments

There are 14 assignments during the course. They are written in red in the syllabus, which indicates that something is due. The assignment types are subdivided into the following categories:

 

  1. Essays (2)

There are two essays that students write as part of this course:

Initial Essay. At the beginning of the semester, write a brief 500-word essay entitled “What makes me North American and what makes them Latin American.” The object of this essay to access your initial attitudes and knowledge about the characteristics of these two groups. Send this essay (electronically) to Nicole by 6:00am on Thursday, January 22. Additionally, add this essay to your e-portfolio. This essay is worth 50 points.

Final Essay. Write a 1000-word essay entitled, “How my perception of North American and Latin American culture has changed over the semester.” Send an electronic copy to Nicole by 6:00am on the last day of class, Thursday, May 8. Additionally, add this essay to your e-portfolio. This essay is worth 100 points.

 

2. LESCANT Photos (2)

There are 2 days when students are required to add photographs/artifacts to their Pathbrite Portfolio, together with a 50-word justification and explanation of how each exemplifies some aspect of North American culture. The assigned photos fall under the various LESCANT topics. There are 7 topics x 2 photos with written justification for each x 10 points = 140 total points.  No late work or make-up work is allowed.

 

Note: On your pathbrite settings, be sure to create categories for each of the LESCANT topics and label all of your photos with these categories. DO NOT USE THE “TAGS” BOX.

 

Note: On your pathbrite settings, add your 50-word justification to the “Description” box.  And make sure that your Portfolio settings are set to “public” and that “allow comments?” is set on “Yes.”

 

Note: Our Brazilian partners will be looking at your photo/artifact entries as part of the interaction assignments (explained below).

 

  1. Survey and General (6)

There are 6 days when students are required to post results from a number of different surveys or online assessments, together with a brief description of the results and how those results related to intercultural communication.  Each assignment is worth 10 points, for a total of 60 points. No late work or make-up work is allowed.

 

4. This Week in Latin America (4)

There are four days when students are required to provide a cultural analysis of “This Week in Latin America.” Building from the examples that we will learn in class (e.g., Spanish-language commercials, news, websites, photos, etc.), find a current event that is happening in Latin America and analyze it using one of the theoretical models as assigned: LESCANT Model, Hammer’s IDI, Trompenaars & Hampden-Turner’s Dilemma Theory. Write an executive summary based on your analysis. Note: In class you may be asked to also provide an oral summary. Each executive summary assignment is worth 25 points, for a total of 100pts.

 

Note: No late work or make-up points allowed.

 

Each executive summary is worth 25 points.  The summary should contain the following features:

Introduction: One paragraph that describes and summarizes the major cultural issues that are most salient or important to you.  This should include aspects that seem most different from those norms found in US culture.

Statement of the Cultural Conflict: A specific statement of the cultural conflict (usually not more than two or three sentences).

Analysis: Your analysis of the critical cultural issues.

Recommendations: Based on your analysis, provide recommendations or alternative solutions on how to deal with these cultural issues.

 

Points are based on the following rubric:

Ex. Sum. Follows Outline

(1-3 pts)

Identifies Cultural Conflict

(1-6 pts)

Uses Theory for Analysis

(1-6 pts)

Recommendation

(1-6 pts)

Details

(1-4 pts)

3pts. Includes all 4 required parts

2pts. Includes all parts, but they are hard to identify

1pt. Does not follow required outline

5-6pts. Clear focus on cultural conflict and relates to topic

3-4pts. Attempts to identify cultural conflict, but not well applied

1-2pts. Excludes specific cultural conflict

5-6pts. Appropriate application of theory

3-4pts. Mentions theory, but not well applied.

1-2pts. Excludes theoretical application

 

 

5-6pts. Appropriate and feasible recommendation

3-4pts. Recommendation, but stating the obvious or not applicable

1-2pts. Excludes recommendation

1pt. Adheres to size limit

1pt. Turns in assignment on time

1pt. Grammar and vocabulary do not distract

1pt. Punctuation and writing style

 

 

5. Quizzes (3)

There are three days when students complete online quizzes, related to content in the book The 7 Keys Brazil book. The take home quizzes are available via canvas and must be submitted electronically by 11:59pm on the due date. The quiz is designed to be completed in less than 1 hour, however, you have a three-hour window to complete the quiz. The quiz is designed to be open book. Feel free to refer to class notes, pathbrite portfolio and the 7 Keys book during the quiz. However, the quiz should represent your own work and not that of others. Each quiz is worth 100 points, for a total of 300pts.

 

  1. Student Teaching during labs (1)

There will also be 25 points given for student teaching assignments during lab sessions.

 

E. Interaction Assignments

As mentioned above, for each of the LESCANT topics students add elements to their e-portfolio. At the same time students from our partner schools in Brazil are completing a similar assignment. Review the e-portfolio of your colleagues and choose artifacts from at least 2 American and 5 Brazilian colleagues, from which you are required to write a question or comment in each of their respective comments section. Discuss the photos or artifacts that they have added, as related to the cultural topic. The comments are due by 6:00am on the mornings before we discuss the topics in class session.

There are 7 interaction assignments and each is worth 25 points, for a total of 175 points for the semester. Here is a grading rubric for the interaction assignments:

 

  • 25 (comments and questions complete for all 7 colleagues, relative, tagged, on time)
  • 20 (comments and questions complete for 6 of the colleagues, relative, tagged, on time)
  • 15 (comments and questions complete for 5 of the colleagues, relative, tagged, on time)
  • 10 (comments and questions complete for 4 of the colleagues, relative, tagged, on time)
  • 5 (comments and questions complete for 2 of the colleagues, relative, tagged, on time)
  • 0 (comments and questions complete for 1 of the colleagues, relative, tagged, on time)
  • -5 points for spurious or not-relevant comments

 

  1. Gems of the University

Among the resources that we have here at UT, there are many “Gems of the University.” We will provide you with a list of these campus locations. During the semester students are required to visit any one of these gems. In doing so, observe the surroundings, exhibits, content, and collections. In what ways are there underlying cultural aspects to these gems? What do they tell us about North American culture (or other cultures depending on the content of your visit)?  Students are required to write an executive summary about this visit, noting any of the cultural features that relate to the cultural models that we are discussing in class. This assignment is worth 25 points.

 

  1. University Lecture Series

As part of a signature course, students have the opportunity to attend events of the “University Lecture Series.” During the semester students are required to attend any one of these lectures. In doing so, observe the surroundings, content, delivery, and style of the lecture. In what ways are there underlying cultural aspects to these lectures? What do they tell us about North American culture (or other cultures depending on the content of the lecture)? Students are required to write an executive summary about this visit, noting any of the cultural features that relate to the cultural models that we are discussing in class. This assignment is worth 25 points.

 

Here is the schedule for Spring 2020

 

-Tuesday, February 25, 7-8pm – Thomas Palaima, Ph.D. (with Michael Lesy, Professor Emeritus, Hampshire College, and Aloysius Martinich, Roy Allison Vaughan Centennial Professor in Philosophy, UT Austin) – Immigration and Imagination

 

-Monday, March 9, 7-8pm – Kevin Foster, Ph.D. – (working title) Factors that Impact African American and Latina/o Student Achievement

 

-Monday, March 30, 7-8pm – Mary Steinhardt, Ed.D. – (working title) Building Resilience and Strength when Challenged with Change and Stressful Situations

 

-Tuesday, April 7, 7-8pm – John Bartholomew, Ph.D. – If Exercise is Good For You, Why Don’t We Do More?

 

More detailed information about the lectures can be found at http://www.utexas.edu/ugs/uls.

 

 

  1. Attendance

Attendance at each class session is mandatory. Each student starts the semester with 50 points for attendance. Each absence reduces the total by 5 points. Absences due to representation and participation in university sponsored activities or religious holidays need to be approved beforehand. Absences related to illness and family emergencies require documentation (e.g., doctor’s note, obituary, etc.) No points are reduced with the approval or documentation.

 

  1. Grading

The final grade is based on the percentage of total points earned (A = 94+, A- = 90+, B+ = 87+, B = 84+, B- = 80+, C+ = 77+, C = 74+, C- = 70+, D+ = 67+, D = 64+, D- = 60+).  Scores are not rounded. No late work or make up work is allowed. Points are distributed on the following basis:

 

150 pts Essay Assignments (1 x 50, 1 x 100 = 150 pts)

140 pts LESCANT Photos (7 x 2 x 10 = 140 pts)

  60 pts Survey and General Assignments (6 x 10 = 60 pts)

100 pts This Week in Latin America (4 x 25 = 100 pts)

175 pts Interaction Assignments (7 x 25 = 175 pts)

300 pts Quizzes (3 x 100 = 300 pts)

  25 pts Student Teaching during labs (1 x 25 = 25 pts)

  25 pts Gems of the University (1 x 25 = 25 pts)

  25 pts University Lecture Series (1 x 25 = 25 pts)

  50 pts Attendance (50 – 5 per = 50 pts)

1050 pts          TOTAL

 

 

Notes

Students with Disabilities

Upon request, the University of Texas at Austin provides appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) is housed in the Office of the Dean of Students, located on the fourth floor of the Student Services Building. Information on how to register, downloadable forms, including guidelines for documentation, accommodation request letters, and releases of information are available online at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd/index.php. Please do not hesitate to contact SSD at (512) 471-6259, VP: (512) 232-2937 or via e-mail if you have any questions.

 

Campus Carry

For those students who are 21 years of age and who legally carry a licensed and concealed firearm, we remind you that your bags must be within arm’s reach. We also remind you that if others see a gun, it is not legal (not concealed). FYI, Prof. Kelm’s office has not been designated as a no-carry zone.

Senate Bill 212 and Title IX Reporting Requirements. Under Senate Bill 212 (SB 212), the professor and TAs for this course are required to report for further investigation any information concerning incidents of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking committed by or against a UT student or employee. Federal law and university policy also requires reporting incidents of sex- and gender-based discrimination and sexual misconduct (collectively known as Title IX incidents). This means we cannot keep confidential information about any such incidents that you share with us. If you need to talk with someone who can maintain confidentiality, please contact University Health Services (512-471-4955 or 512-475-6877) or the UT Counseling and Mental Health Center (512-471-3515 or 512-471-2255). We strongly urge you make use of these services for any needed support and that you report any Title IX incidents to the Title IX Office.

 

Academic Dishonesty

Academic dishonesty damages the reputation of the school and demeans the honest efforts of the majority of students.  The minimum penalty for an act of academic dishonesty will be a zero for that assignment or exam.  The responsibilities for both students and faculty with regard to the Honor System are described at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/conduct/academicintegrity.php. If the application of the Honor System to this class and its assignments is unclear in any way, it is your responsibility to ask for clarification.

Classroom Professionalism Policy

The highest professional standards are expected of all members of the class. Faculty are expected to be professional and prepared to deliver value for each and every class session. Students are expected to be professional in all respects. The classroom experience is enhanced when:

  • Students arrive on time. On time arrival ensures that classes are able to start and finish at the scheduled time. On time arrival shows respect for both fellow students and faculty and it enhances learning by reducing avoidable distractions.
  • Students minimize unscheduled personal breaks. The learning environment improves when disruptions are limited.
  • Students are fully prepared for each class. Much of the learning takes place during classroom discussions. When students are not prepared they cannot contribute to the overall learning process. This affects not only the individual, but their peers who count on them, as well.
  • Students respect the views and opinions of their colleagues. The expression and defense of opinions are encouraged and part of the academic environment. Intolerance for the views of others is unacceptable.
  • Laptops and wireless devices are only used for course activities. In this class we use the Internet for the delivery of almost all of our course content.  You a welcome and encouraged to bring your laptop or mobile devices to class.  However, when students are surfing the web, responding to e-mails, instant messaging each other, etc. they are doing a disservice to their peers and potentially causing a distraction.  Restrict use to items related to the course.

 

Updated: January 20, 2020

SPN 367D • Business In Hispan Life/Cul-Wb

44185 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM
Internet; Synchronous
GC

 

This course serves as an introduction to the study of the Business Spanish. The primary goal of the course is to gain experience in verbal communication, so that students can participate in meetings, exchanges, video conferences, presentations, and professional discussion, in Spanish and in areas related to finance, marketing, accounting, operations, etc. Grading in this course centers on two major components. First, we focus on vocabulary acquisition of business-related terminology. There are eight in-class vocabulary quizzes, based mainly from the chapters in the textbook Éxito Comercial. Second, students prepare brief 3-4 minute oral presentations on a number of business related topics. Grades on these ‘pass-offs’ are based on the student’s ability to describe accurate content, use correct grammar and vocabulary, give a polished presentation without being dependent on notes, and provide answers to expansion questions and clarifications related to the topic.

 

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

SPN 367D • Business In Hispan Life/Cul-Wb

44190 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
GC

 

This course serves as an introduction to the study of the Business Spanish. The primary goal of the course is to gain experience in verbal communication, so that students can participate in meetings, exchanges, video conferences, presentations, and professional discussion, in Spanish and in areas related to finance, marketing, accounting, operations, etc. Grading in this course centers on two major components. First, we focus on vocabulary acquisition of business-related terminology. There are eight in-class vocabulary quizzes, based mainly from the chapters in the textbook Éxito Comercial. Second, students prepare brief 3-4 minute oral presentations on a number of business related topics. Grades on these ‘pass-offs’ are based on the student’s ability to describe accurate content, use correct grammar and vocabulary, give a polished presentation without being dependent on notes, and provide answers to expansion questions and clarifications related to the topic.

 

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

LAS 322 • Business In Hispan Life/Cul

39198 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.122
GC (also listed as SPN 367P)
  1. Description

 

This course serves as an introduction to the study of the Business Spanish. The primary goal of the course is to gain experience in verbal communication, so that students can participate in meetings, exchanges, video conferences, presentations, and professional discussion, in Spanish and in areas related to finance, marketing, accounting, operations, etc. Grading in this course centers on two major components.  First, we focus on vocabulary acquisition of business-related terminology.  There are eight in-class vocabulary quizzes, based mainly from the chapters in the textbook Éxito Comercial.  Second, students prepare brief 3-4 minute oral presentations on a number of business related topics. Grades on these ‘pass-offs’ are based on the student’s ability to describe accurate content, use correct grammar and vocabulary, give a polished presentation without being dependent on notes, and provide answers to expansion questions and clarifications related to the topic.

 

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

  1. Course Materials

 

Required Materials

 

Doyle, Michael Scott, Fryer, T. Bruce. 2019. Éxito Comercial Cengage.

Note: Latest is the 7th Edition. Please purchase the 7th edition, but only purchase the actual textbook. There is no need to purchase the digital platform or bundled materials.

POR 330L • Intro Lang & Lingstcs In Socty

44230 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 2.122
GC
  1. Description

 

This course serves as an introduction to the study of the Portuguese language both as a system and as an expression of cultural practices, beliefs, and histories in Portuguese-speaking areas of the world. Topics to be addressed include historical development and dialectal diversity; elements of sound and structure; discursive and pragmatic properties; and language use in contact contexts in communities of Portuguese language speakers

 

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

  1. Course Materials

 

Required Materials

 

Azevedo, Milton M. 2005. Portuguese: A Linguistic Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (PLI)

 

Padlet Homepage: http://padlet.com/orkelm/por330L

Student Portfolio: http://padlet.com/orkelm/por330Lstudentportfolio

 

Recommended Books

(Note: The following book serves for those who would like to have more background information on current issues in oral Portuguese.)

 

Perini, Mario. A. 2002. Modern Portuguese: A Reference Grammar. New Haven: Yale University Press.

UGS 303 • Cultural Issues With Lat Am

59780-59790 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM SZB 330
GC ID

Intercultural communication is more effective when we can identify and understand the reasons behind our culturally distinct activities. The purpose of this course is to teach students how to recognize these cultural behaviors and to resolve cultural dilemmas by drawing from the positive aspects of these differences. We do so within the context of North America and Latin America. We begin by teaching three distinct theoretical models that approach the subject of intercultural communication: David Victor's LESCANT model, Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions, and Hampden-Turner & Trompenaars' Cultural Dilemmas. Using these three models, students learn how to identify and observe cultural differences, both in their own patterns as well as in the behavior of others. From there, the major task of the course becomes an analysis of various cultural scenarios about Latin American where students provide suggestions and recommendations on how to resolve the dilemmas. Assigned work includes the writing of executive summaries, building of e-portfolio, contributions to the course discussion blog, and group oral presentations that are based on examples that students find from current events, online materials and personal experiences.

LAS 322 • Business In Hispan Life/Cul

38795 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.104
GC (also listed as SPN 367P)

 

This course serves as an introduction to the study of the Business Spanish. The primary goal of the course is to gain experience in verbal communication, so that students can participate in meetings, exchanges, video conferences, presentations, and professional discussion, in Spanish and in areas related to finance, marketing, accounting, operations, etc. Grading in this course centers on two major components.  First, we focus on vocabulary acquisition of business-related terminology.  There are eight in-class vocabulary quizzes, based mainly from the chapters in the textbook Éxito Comercial.  Second, students prepare brief 3-4 minute oral presentations on a number of business related topics. Grades on these ‘pass-offs’ are based on the student’s ability to describe accurate content, use correct grammar and vocabulary, give a polished presentation without being dependent on notes, and provide answers to expansion questions and clarifications related to the topic.

 

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

LAS 322 • Business In Hispan Life/Cul

38800 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM BEN 1.124
GC (also listed as SPN 367P)

 

This course serves as an introduction to the study of the Business Spanish. The primary goal of the course is to gain experience in verbal communication, so that students can participate in meetings, exchanges, video conferences, presentations, and professional discussion, in Spanish and in areas related to finance, marketing, accounting, operations, etc. Grading in this course centers on two major components.  First, we focus on vocabulary acquisition of business-related terminology.  There are eight in-class vocabulary quizzes, based mainly from the chapters in the textbook Éxito Comercial.  Second, students prepare brief 3-4 minute oral presentations on a number of business related topics. Grades on these ‘pass-offs’ are based on the student’s ability to describe accurate content, use correct grammar and vocabulary, give a polished presentation without being dependent on notes, and provide answers to expansion questions and clarifications related to the topic.

 

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

POR F367P • Busn Brazilian Life/Cul-Bra

84025 • Summer 2019
GC

Develop vocabulary, grammar, expressions, and interactional skills for professional purposes. Topics include cultural issues that influence professional activities in Portuguese-speaking communities.

Topic 1: Business in Brazilian Life and Culture. Cultural aspects of business practices in Brazil.

POR 327C • Adv Grammar/Writing In Context

44750 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.104
GCWr

A.  Description

 

This course provides intermediate-level students of Portuguese with an opportunity to improve their oral proficiency, writing ability, and to do so with a focus on advanced grammar principles that are challenging for learners of Portuguese.  The course is design to provide practical oral and written exercises. We use a number of online and open-resource materials in Portuguese language to serve as the foundation for the oral and written assignments. Every unit includes a day to be exposed to the online materials, another day to write brief compositions about the topic, and another day to review related grammar principles and to orally perform the designated tasks. There are also two online midterm exams, both of which focus on the grammar principles that have come up in the course discussions.

 

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

B.  Course Materials

 

Required Materials

 

Kelm, Orlando R. Brazilpod Homepage: https://coerll.utexas.edu/brazilpod/

-       Tá Falado

-       Conversa Brasileira

-       Língua da Gente

-       Portuguese Communication Exercises

-        

Perini, Mario. A. 2002. Modern Portuguese: A Reference Grammar. New Haven: Yale University Press.

 

UGS 303 • Cultural Issues With Lat Am

61560-61570 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM SZB 330
GC ID

A.  Description

 

Intercultural communication is more effective when we can identify and understand the reasons we culturally behave the way we do. The purpose of this course is to teach students how to recognize these behaviors and “resolve the cultural dilemmas” by drawing from the positive aspects of these differences. We do so within the context of North America and Latin America. We begin by teaching three distinct theoretical models that approach the subject of intercultural communication: David Victor’s LESCANT model, Hammer’s Intercultural Development Inventory, and Trompenaars & Hampden-Turner’s Cultural Dilemmas. Using these three models, students learn how to identify and observe cultural differences, both in their own patterns as well as in the behavior of others. From there, the major task of the course becomes an analysis of various cultural scenarios about Latin American where students provide suggestions and recommendations on how to resolve the dilemmas. Assigned work includes interaction with students at partner schools in Brazil, survey assignments, “This Week in Latin America” assignments, and written assignments related to Gems of the University and the University Lecture Series.

 

As a signature course, students will also have the opportunity to use the content from this course to develop critical thinking and communication skills, as well as develop a sense of social responsibility. As with other signature courses, students also have opportunities to develop information literacy, learn of the Gems of the University, and attend lectures that are part of the University Lecture Series.

 

Note:  This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

B.  Course Materials

 

Required Materials

 

Trompenaars, Fons & Charles Hampden-Turner. 2012. Riding the Waves of Culture: Understanding Diversity in Global Business. 3rd Edition. New York: McGraw Hill

 

Related Online Resources

 

Kelm, Orlando R. Padlet Wall, “Cross-Cultural Competence: Making the most of our cultural differences” http://padlet.com/orkelm/culturalcompetence

 

Kelm, Orlando R. Pathbrite, Homepage: https://pathbrite.com/orkelm/profile

 

World Clock Meeting Planner

https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/meeting.html

 

Recommended Books

 

Kelm, Orlando R., David A. Victor. 2016. The Seven Keys to Communicating in Brazil: An Intercultural Approach. Washington D.C.: Georgetown University Press.

(Online Order with 30% discount code TGUF: http://press.georgetown.edu/book/languages/seven-keys-communicating-brazil )

 

LAS 322 • Id/Resolv Cul Dilemma: Bra/Us

39709 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.126
GC (also listed as PRC 320E)

Please check back for updates.

LAS 322 • Business In Hispan Life/Cul

39714 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.212
GC (also listed as SPN 367P)

Please check back for updates.

POR 330L • Intro Lang & Lingstcs In Socty

45290 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.212
GC

Examines the dynamics of language structure and use throughout the Portuguese-speaking world. Covers topics such as sound systems, grammatical structures, historical developments, language learning and loss, dialect differences, and their social significance.

POR F367P • Busn Brazilian Life/Cul-Bra

85145 • Summer 2018
GC

Develop vocabulary, grammar, expressions, and interactional skills for professional purposes. Topics include cultural issues that influence professional activities in Portuguese-speaking communities.

Topic 1: Business in Brazilian Life and Culture. Cultural aspects of business practices in Brazil.

UGS 303 • Cultural Issues With Lat Am

62185-62195 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SZB 330
GC ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

ILA 386 • Frgn Lang In Digital Human

45750 • Fall 2017
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM BEN 1.118

Audience: The course is designed for Graduate Students in linguistics, foreign language education, graduate students in other departments, including those who study literature but would benefit from a foundational knowledge of linguistics and pedagogy.

Course Description: Our traditional foreign language methodology is confronting the reality of our digital age: instant access to information, video, audio, chats, conversations with people from anywhere at any time, and communication & information flows. All of these potentially change our pedagogical approach, which lead us to assess whether technology and social media are a hindrance or an asset to our language learning. In this course we look at two strands. First, we survey new digital options and tools in learning foreign languages. Second, we survey those options within the context of theories and models related to second language acquisition. That is to say, is there any theoretical foundation behind the effectiveness of these digital foreign language-learning tools? The course will include four units:

  1. Tools to organize materials, sort presentations, build portfolios: e.g., padlet.com, blendspace.com, wikispaces.com, getkahoot.com, YouTube Channels, Facebook Groups, Twitter Feeds.
  2. Tools to enhance individual practice: e.g., memrise.com, mangolanguages.com, hello-hello.com, duolingo.com, busuu.com, livemocha.com, FluentU.com, LinqQ.com, HelloTalk.com, OpenLanguage.com.
  3. Tools to enhance classroom activities: e.g., Aurasma.com, Vyclone.com, List.ly, coogle.it.
  4. Tools that become available via Open Educational Resources and Creative Commons licenses: e.g., Brazilpod, Tá Falado, Conversa Brasileira, Língua da Gente.

Requirements and Grading:

The final grade is based on the percentage of total points earned (A = 94+, A- = 90+, B+ = 87+, B = 84+, B- = 80+, C+ = 77+, C = 74+, C- = 70+, D+ = 67+, D = 64+, D- = 60+). Points are distributed on the following basis:

40%     Four oral presentations on content of units

30%     Four 1,000-word reaction papers on course units (to be posted on the course padlet wall)

10%     One bibliography of topics related to unit of interest

20%     YouTube Channel or Aurasma portfolio project.

Possible Class Materials and Readings

Journal of Language Learning and Technology, http://llt.msu.edu

Lamy, Marie-Noëlle and Katerina Zourou (Eds). 2013. Social Networking for Language Education. Palgrave Macmillan.

Walker, Aisha & Goodith White. 2013. Technology Enhanced Language Learning: Connecting Theory and Practice. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.

Zou, Bin, Minjie Xing, Yuping Wang, Mingyu Sun and Catherine H. Xiang (eds). 2013. Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances. Hershey, PA: IGI Global: Information Science Reference. 

POR 330L • Intro Lang & Lingstcs In Socty

45955 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.102
GC

Examines the dynamics of language structure and use throughout the Portuguese-speaking world. Covers topics such as sound systems, grammatical structures, historical developments, language learning and loss, dialect differences, and their social significance.

POR 330L • Intro Lang & Lingstcs In Socty

46015 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BEN 1.102
GC

Examines the dynamics of language structure and use throughout the Portuguese-speaking world. Covers topics such as sound systems, grammatical structures, historical developments, language learning and loss, dialect differences, and their social significance.

UGS 303 • Cultural Issues With Lat Am

62825-62835 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SZB 370
GC ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

SPN 330L • Intro Lang And Ling In Society

46455 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 2.124
GC

Examines the dynamics of language structure and use throughout the Spanish-speaking world, and covers topics such as sound systems, grammatical structures, historical developments, language learning and loss, and dialect differences and their social significance.

SPN 330L • Intro Lang And Ling In Society

46460 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 303
GC

Examines the dynamics of language structure and use throughout the Spanish-speaking world, and covers topics such as sound systems, grammatical structures, historical developments, language learning and loss, and dialect differences and their social significance.

SPN F330L • Intro Lang And Ling In Society

86355 • Summer 2016
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM MEZ 2.118
GC

Examines the dynamics of language structure and use throughout the Spanish-speaking world, and covers topics such as sound systems, grammatical structures, historical developments, language learning and loss, and dialect differences and their social significance.

POR 330L • Intro Lang & Lingstcs In Socty

45080 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.102
GC

Examines the dynamics of language structure and use throughout the Portuguese-speaking world. Covers topics such as sound systems, grammatical structures, historical developments, language learning and loss, dialect differences, and their social significance.

UGS 303 • Cultural Issues With Lat Am

61700-61710 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 203
GC

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

SPN 330L • Intro Lang And Ling In Society

45645 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 1.120
GC

Examines the dynamics of language structure and use throughout the Spanish-speaking world, and covers topics such as sound systems, grammatical structures, historical developments, language learning and loss, and dialect differences and their social significance.

SPN 346 • Sounds And Intonation

45655 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 2.118

Introduction to the study of Spanish phonetics and phonology, focusing on four aspects: mechanisms of sound production, representation of sounds and intonation, dialect variation, and comparison with English.

SPN F330L • Intro Lang And Ling In Society

87260 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM MEZ 2.118
GC

Examines the dynamics of language structure and use throughout the Spanish-speaking world, and covers topics such as sound systems, grammatical structures, historical developments, language learning and loss, and dialect differences and their social significance.

POR 327C • Adv Grammar/Writing In Context

45560 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM MEZ 2.122
GC

Study and practice of Portuguese grammar, including reading exercises and guided composition designed to develop writing skills across styles. Students will be exposed to various topics in Portuguese language, literature, and culture.

POR 330L • Intro Lang & Lingstcs In Socty

45565 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.102
GC

Examines the dynamics of language structure and use throughout the Portuguese-speaking world. Covers topics such as sound systems, grammatical structures, historical developments, language learning and loss, dialect differences, and their social significance.

LAS 322 • Business In Hispan Life/Cul

40550 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 2.118
GC (also listed as SPN 367P)

Topics vary each semester to allow curriculum flexibility for faculty members and visiting scholars.

SPN 346 • Sounds And Intonation

47320 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A207A

Introduction to the study of Spanish phonetics and phonology, focusing on four aspects: mechanisms of sound production, representation of sounds and intonation, dialect variation, and comparison with English.

POR F341 • Cul Diff: Btwn Usa/Brazil-Bra

88095 • Summer 2014
GC

POR 341

Summer 2007, Salvador, Bahia

 

AFRO-BRAZIL AND AFRO-BRAZILIANS: LITERATURES, CULTURE, REPRESENTATION

The purpose of this six week course is to analyze the literary, cultural and social representation of Afro-Brazilians (blacks and mulattoes) from 1800s to contemporary authors. After a brief introduction of the histories of resistance against slavery in colonial times (quilombos), the course will focus on Nineteenth century literatures on and about Afro-Brazilians with an emphasis on Nineteenth century black rebellions (Malês), and the contradictions of abolitionist literature. The first four decades of the twentieth century will focus on modernismo-regionalista literatures, to criticize views of Brazilian racial democracy and the contradictions of Populist depictions of Afro-Brazilians. The last part of the course will focus on contemporary works written by Afro-Brazilian authors, from the social emergence of Abdias do Nascimento “Movimento Negro” to contemporary narratives, music and documentaries which main focus are the cultures of poverty, abandonment, violence in the inner cities, and social discrimination. The course will include cultural tours around main cultural sites in Salvador, Bahia. The course will be taught in Portuguese (readings in English and Portuguese) and will include documentaries and film in Portuguese (or with English subtitles). Students will write a 10 page final paper in Portuguese. The topic will be chosen by the student with the assistance of Prof. Arroyo.

 

The class will meet from Monday to Thursday (10-12) in ACBEU.

Thursdays and Friday afternoons will be used for tours. Please check your calendars. Attendance is mandatory. All materials are required. One 10 page paper will be presented at the end of the six week period. Two themes, students choose one.

 

Books (required):

João J. Reis, Black Rebellions in Brazil. The Muslims uprisings of 1835 in Bahia (Amazon)

 

Luso-Brazilian Books:

Guimãraes Bernardo. A escrava Isaura.

Caminha, Adolfo. Bom crioulo.

Amado, Jorge. Tenda dos milagres.

Rui Gomes. O Pagador de promessas.

 

 

One course pack available at Speedway Copy and Printing (Dobie Mall) (Pquete inclui Leituras críticas e Quarto de despejo, Joanna Carolina de Jesus)

POR 362 • Advanced Composition

47000 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM MEZ 1.102

Translation of English texts into Portuguese and free composition; special attention to idiomatic expressions and to grammatical and syntactical features.

SPN 130D • Spanish Across Disciplines

47540 • Spring 2014
Meets M 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.104

Students read and discuss Spanish language materials related to the subject matter of another designated course.

LAS 370P • Cul Aspects Busn In Brazil

40855 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.118
(also listed as PRC 320E)

Please check back for updates.

SPN 130D • Spanish Across Disciplines

47320 • Fall 2013
Meets T 2:30PM-3:30PM BEN 1.118

Students read and discuss Spanish language materials related to the subject matter of another designated course.

SPN 346 • Practical Phonetics

47335 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BEN 1.122

Introduction to the study of Spanish phonetics and phonology, focusing on four aspects: mechanisms of sound production, representation of sounds and intonation, dialect variation, and comparison with English.

POR 362 • Advanced Composition

46230 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM MEZ 1.118

Translation of English texts into Portuguese and free composition; special attention to idiomatic expressions and to grammatical and syntactical features.

SPN 130D • Spanish Across Disciplines

46825 • Spring 2013
Meets M 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 302

Students read and discuss Spanish language materials related to the subject matter of another designated course.

SPN 130D • Spanish Across Disciplines

46550 • Fall 2012
Meets M 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 208

Students read and discuss Spanish language materials related to the subject matter of another designated course.

SPN 346 • Practical Phonetics

46570 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 3.122

Introduction to the study of Spanish phonetics and phonology, focusing on four aspects: mechanisms of sound production, representation of sounds and intonation, dialect variation, and comparison with English.

SPN S346 • Practical Phonetics

89105 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 301

Spanish 346 

Practical Phonetics

 

Instructor:                  Orlando R. Kelm

Office:                         Mezes 4.146

Telephone:                 512 232-4534

Office Hours:             TBA

E-mail:                       orkelm@mail.utexas.edu

Internet:                     http://orlandokelm.wordpress.com/ 

 

Description:

The object of this course is to introduce the study of Spanish phonetics by analyzing the speech patterns of four Spanish dialects: Mexico, Argentina, Spain, and Caribbean.  Students learn to use the symbols from the International Phonetic Alphabet, as applied to the sounds of Spanish.  Unit topics include: IPA symbols, phonation, language vs. dialects, syllable division, vowels and diphthongs, phonemes vs. allophones, as well as specific units on the variation of four Spanish dialects.  There are 5 unit quizzes and 2 transcription exercises, as well as group class note exercises.

A. Course Materials

Kelm, Orlando R. Course Wiki: http://practicalphonetics.wikispaces.com

Recommended Books (We won’t use them as part of the course, but they serve for those who want more background information on the subject of Spanish phonetics):

Guitart, Jorge M. 2004. Sonido y sentido: Teoría y práctica de la pronunciación del español con audio CD. Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press.

Morgan, Terrell A. 2010.  Sonidos en contexto. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Schwegler, Armin, Juergen Kempff and Ana Ameal-Guerra. 2010. Fonética y fonología españolas. 4th Edition.  Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

LAS 381 • Business In Latin America

40375 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM CBA 4.330
(also listed as I B 395)

This course, (taught in Spanish, but designed for both native and non-native speakers of Spanish), consists of the analysis of the cultural issues that come up when doing business in Latin America.  Course materials are found on the course blog: http://kelmcultural.wordpress.com/.  Content for the class comes from online interviews with Latin American professionals who deal with a variety of cultural issues that Americans will encounter when working in Latin America and Spain.  The cultural items are reviewed within the context of Language, Environment, Social Organization, Contexting, Authority, Non-verbal Communication, and Time.  The interviews are saved as video clips and are accessible over the Internet.  The 200+ interviews are subdivided into four major categories including the following: Negotiation Style, Language Issues, Courtesy and Social Situations, Time and Scheduling, U.S./Spain Negotiations.

 

POR 362 • Advanced Composition

45930 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.120

Translation of English texts into Portuguese and free composition; special attention to idiomatic expressions and to grammatical and syntactical features.

LAS 370S • Business In Hispan Life/Cul

40315 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.210
GC (also listed as SPN 350)

Please check back for updates.

SPN 346 • Practical Phonetics

46485 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.122

Introduction to the study of Spanish phonetics and phonology, focusing on four aspects: mechanisms of sound production, representation of sounds and intonation, dialect variation, and comparison with English.

SPN S611D • Intermediate Spanish II-Arg

89180 • Summer 2011

 

  • This document contains important information and represents an agreement between the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and its students.
  • You are responsible for knowing all of the information contained in this document.
  • You indicate acceptance of these policies by registering for this course.

 

 

1.  PURPOSE, GOALS, AND OBJECTIVES OF THE LANGUAGE PROGRAM

The objective of the Spanish language program addresses the basic tenet of a liberal arts education: the development of a critical thinking approach towards the analysis of language in society. This objective is framed in an overall worldwide trend towards political and economical internationalization and an increasingly diverse and multicultural work environment.

 

The Spanish language program focuses on the development of multilingual literacies through the analysis and use of Spanish as a second language. The program focuses on the development of three major types of competencies (all equally ranked in terms of importance):

 

(1)  linguistic competence (Spanish phonetics/phonology, morphosyntax, lexicon, discourse, etc.)

(2)  communication / interactional competence (sociocultural uses of the language, pragmatics, cultural background / perspectives)

(3)  metalinguistic competence (language as a conceptual, symbolic system)

 

 

2.  COURSE DESCRIPTION, GOALS, AND OBJECTIVES

A. SPN 611D is the third course in The University of Texas lower-division Spanish program. This is a six-credit course.  The course focuses on further developing speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in Spanish while building vocabulary, learning basic rules and terminology of Spanish grammar, and gaining a better understanding of Hispanic cultures in order to communicate in an accurate, effective, and informed manner within a variety of sociocultural situations.

 

B. PREREQUISITE FOR 611D: the prerequisite for this course is a passing grade (C or better) in SPN 610 D, equivalent credit transferred from another university, or credit by exam. If you do not have the prerequisite, please drop the course now. For questions concerning prerequisites or eligibility, talk to your instructor or make an appointment with one of the Liberal Arts Advisors for Spanish: Liz Hastings (eyhastings@mail.utexas.edu) and Christine Fisher (fisher@mail.utexas.edu).  Their office is located in BEN 2.108.

 

 

 

 

 

 

C. GOALS FOR SPN 611 D

By the end of this course you should be able to do the following:

 

(a) describing in detail 

(b) narrating in the  past

(c) narrating past events and reacting subjectively to them

(d) expressing opinions and reacting to dramatic events and situations

(e) reporting what other people said

(f) discussing past actions affecting the present

(g) recognizing dialectal, social and contextual variation

(h) talking about actions completed before other past actions

(i) talking about hypothetical situations in the future or past

(j) understanding the main ideas in moderately complex written texts (with improved skimming, cognate recognition, and inference skills)

(k) understanding the main ideas of  moderately complex oral discourse (with improved recognition of tone, content, context, intonation, etc.)

(l) maintaining conversations of a substantial length (with improved fluency strategies, such as circumlocution, discourse markers, etc.)

(m) producing written work of a substantial length (with improved organization, connectors, and appropriateness of register)

SPN S325L • Intro Spn Amer Lit Snc Mod-Arg

89195 • Summer 2011
GC

 SPN 325L Introduction to Spanish American Literature since Modernism (2nd summer session).
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course offers a survey of major literary trends and writers of Spanish American literature since Modernism within a cultural context. While the course uses a selection of works that are recognized by critics, specialists, and readers as the most outstanding, it will also include other less-known authors that are equally notable in order to reflect the diversity of Spanish American literature. Most works will be read in their entirety; however, an occasional work may be abridged. The course will include the four genres and will require both textual and thematic analyses of the works so as to prepare students for more advanced courses.
 
COURSE OBJECTIVES
This course is designed to help you
·       read and understand literary texts within an historical and cultural context;
·       foster and develop an individual critical points of view;
·       analyze and compare different literary texts; and
·       write short responses and essays that focus on text and thematic analysis.

SPN S327G • Adv Grammar & Compositn I-Arg

89210 • Summer 2011

Within the language program, SPN 327G is the first in the Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition two-course sequence. It is a bridge course between lower and upper-division Spanish designed to:

  • help you inductively master grammar points of particular concern to speakers of English
  • perfect your grammar skills through a variety of tasks designed to clarify and expand your knowledge about particular grammatical points. The oral, reading, and writing activities used to present the grammar offer relevant cultural knowledge that you will be expected to investigate and compare with your own culture.
  • acquire and apply strategies of composition development (pre-writing, writing, revising, editing, and evaluation), and
  • promote critical and integrative thinking skills.

 

This learner-based course will lead you through a guided inductive approach that presents you with selected samples to analyze in order to

  • discover patterns of oral and written discourse,
  • formulate hypotheses about the linguistic and communicative functions of the Spanish language, and
  • develop an understanding of Hispanic culture.

 

All in-class activities, readings, and assignments are in Spanish.

 

SPN S346 • Practical Phonetics-Arg

89235 • Summer 2011


LAS 381 • Business In Latin America

40717 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM GSB 5.142A
(also listed as I B 395)

coming soon

POR 362 • Advanced Composition

46525 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.120

Translation of English texts into Portuguese and free composition; special attention to idiomatic expressions and to grammatical and syntactical features.

LAS 370S • Business In Hispan Life/Cul

40270 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.210
(also listed as SPN 350)

Course Title: Business in Hispanic Life and Culture

Instructor Name: Kelm, Orlando

 

Description:

This course consists of the analysis of the cultural issues that come up when doing business in Latin America.  Course materials are found on the course blog: http://kelmcultural.wordpress.com/.  Content for the class comes from online interviews with Latin American professionals who deal with a variety of cultural issues that Americans will encounter when working in Latin America and Spain.  The cultural items are reviewed within the context of Language, Environment, Social Organization, Context, Authority, Non-verbal Communication, and Time.  The interviews are saved as video clips and are accessible over the Internet.  The 200+ interviews are subdivided into four major categories including the following: Negotiation Style, Language Issues, Courtesy and Social Situations, Time and Scheduling, U.S./Spain Negotiations.

 

Texts:

All other materials are found on the WEB at the following URL:

 http://kelmcultural.wordpress.com/

 

Grading:

The final grade is determined by a percentage of points earned for the semester (A=90+, B=80+, C=70+, D=60+):

 

Culture Portfolio                        1 x 50 pts =                50

Executive Summaries                        4 x 50 pts =            200

Mental Maps                                    4 x 25 pts =              100

Blog Comments/Posts                        10 x 10 pts =            100

Presentación Oral                        1 x 100 pts =            100

Attendance                                    50 pts – 2 =               50

TOTAL                                                            600 pts

SPN 346 • Practical Phonetics

46640 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.102

Introduction to the study of Spanish phonetics and phonology, focusing on four aspects: mechanisms of sound production, representation of sounds and intonation, dialect variation, and comparison with English.

SPN S346 • Practical Phonetics

88690 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM MEZ 1.120


SPN 346 • Practical Phonetics

48155 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.306

Introduction to the study of Spanish phonetics and phonology, focusing on four aspects: mechanisms of sound production, representation of sounds and intonation, dialect variation, and comparison with English.

SPN 346 • Practical Phonetics

48170 • Fall 2008
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 4.110

Introduction to the study of Spanish phonetics and phonology, focusing on four aspects: mechanisms of sound production, representation of sounds and intonation, dialect variation, and comparison with English.

SPN S346 • Practical Phonetics

90005 • Summer 2008
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM BEN 1.124


POR 321 • Practical Phonetics

47010 • Spring 2008
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM JES A205A

Introduction to the study of Portuguese phonetics and phonology, focusing on four aspects: mechanisms of sound production, representation of sounds and intonation, dialect variation, and comparison with English.

SPN S346 • Practical Phonetics

90155 • Summer 2007
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM BEN 1.124


SPN 346 • Practical Phonetics

47850 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.122

Introduction to the study of Spanish phonetics and phonology, focusing on four aspects: mechanisms of sound production, representation of sounds and intonation, dialect variation, and comparison with English.

LAS 370S • Business In Hispan Life/Cul

41425 • Fall 2006
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BEN 1.104
(also listed as SPN 350)

Please check back for updates.

SPN S346 • Practical Phonetics

89875 • Summer 2006
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM BEN 1.124


POR 321 • Practical Phonetics

46040 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GAR 3

Introduction to the study of Portuguese phonetics and phonology, focusing on four aspects: mechanisms of sound production, representation of sounds and intonation, dialect variation, and comparison with English.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

47105 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM BEN 1.124

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN F346 • Practical Phonetics

89095 • Summer 2005
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 306

Introduction to the study of Spanish phonetics and phonology, focusing on four aspects: mechanisms of sound production, representation of sounds and intonation, dialect variation, and comparison with English.

SPN 345L • Intro To Hispanic Linguistics

45610 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BEN 1.126

Introduction to the study of the Spanish language through different areas of linguistics such as phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, sociolinguistics, and second-language acquisition.

SPN 393T • Teaching Spn For Spec Purposes

44015 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 4.120

PROFESSOR LUIS CARCAMO-HUECHANTE

POR 322L • Conf Crs In Luso-Brazilian Lit

43890 • Fall 2003

Conference course.

POR S612 • Accl Sec-Yr Por: Oral Ex/Rd/Cm

88755 • Summer 2003
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-12:30PM BAT 217

DESCRIPTION: This course is focused on the development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills while building vocabulary, REVIEWING ESSENTIAL RULES AND TERMINOLOGY OF PORTUGUESE GRAMMAR, BEING INTRODUCED TO MORE COMPLEX GRAMMAR STRUCTURES, AND GAINING A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF PORTUGUESE SPEAKING CULTURES, WITH A FOCUS ON BRAZIL, IN ORDER TO COMMUNICATE IN AN ACCURATE, EFFECTIVE, AND INFORMED MANNER WITHIN A VARIETY OF SOCIO-CULTURAL SITUATIONS.

 

SPN 393T • Teaching Spanish For Business

44460 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 4.120

PROFESSOR LUIS CARCAMO-HUECHANTE

SPN S346 • Practical Phonetics

88705 • Summer 2001
Meets MTWTHF 2:30PM-4:00PM BAT 307


SPN 393T • Tech Teaching Cul/Lang/Lin/Lit

43970 • Spring 2001
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BAT 107

PROFESSOR LUIS CARCAMO-HUECHANTE

CIBER


Orlando R. Kelm 柯安良, (kē, ān liáng)

Associate Director, Business Language Education

Center for Global Business / CIBER

McCombs School of Business

University of Texas, Austin 78712

TEL (512) 232-4534  FAX (512) 471-8073

URL: http://orlandokelm.wordpress.com

 

Internet Based Publication Projects


 

“Cultural Interviews with International Business Executives” 2018. Updated version of the nearly 1000 previous Spanish, German, Chinese, Turkish and Japanese online interviews. Update includes Russian and Portuguese. <http://sites.utexas.edu/culturalinterviews/>.
 
“Língua da Gente.” 2014-2018. Audio podcast lessons with accompanying PDF files, and discussion blog. <http://linguadagente.coerll.utexas.edu>.
 
“Língua da Gente” Application. 2014-2017.  Mobile App with exercises to accompany the Língua da Gente podcast series. <http://openlanguage.com/library/learn-portuguese/24/latest>.
 
"Conversa Brasileira." 2009-2012. Video podcast lessons with accompanying PDF files, and discussion blog. <http://coerll.utexas.edu/brazilpod/cob/>.

 

Online Interviews


 


Olá Brasil!: Intercultural Learning at a Distance in a Global Classroom, May 7, 2018. http://spark.facultyinnovate.utexas.edu/ola-brasil-intercultural-learning-at-a-distance-in-global-classrooms/

 
Open Education Week Promotion of Open Access. Texas Libraries, March 5, 2018. https://blogs.lib.utexas.edu/texlibris/2018/03/05/open-education-week-promotion-of-open-access/
 
The Foreign Language Mastery Show. Host John Fotheringham. Nov. 25, 2009.  http://l2mastery.com/blog/shownotes/interview-with-dr-orlando-kelm/
 
The Global Wanderer: Intelligent Talk – Business. Culture. Travel. Host: Michael Froehls, June 11, 2013. http://theglobalwanderer.tumblr.com/post/52749385036/intercultural-awareness
 
The Hum of Language Acquisition: The Official Voice of OpenLanguage. Host: Jenny Zhu, July 31, 2013. http://blog.openlanguage.com/2013/07/31/the-openlanguage-learners-series-conversation-with-a-reluctant-polyglot/
 
Travel Wisdom Podcast. Host Ladan Jiracek. Feb 13, 2015-10-15. http://www.podcastchart.com/podcasts/travel-wisdom-podcast-how-travelling-can-plant-the-seeds-of-wisdom-and-lead-to-success-in-life/episodes/ep-42-orlando-kelm-on-learning-languages-as-a-cultural-thing-also-his-portuguese-podcast
 
Communicating in Brazil: Professor’s New Book Promotes Understanding Across Cultures. Jeremy Simon. December 12, 2016. http://www.today.mccombs.utexas.edu/2016/12/orlando-kelm-brazil-communication-new-book

 

Publications


 

Kelm, Orlando R., David Victor, and Haru Yamada. The Seven Keys to Communicating in Japan: An Intercultural Approach.  Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press, 2017. Pp 254.
 
Kelm, Orlando R. and David A. Victor. The Seven Keys to Communicating in Brazil: An Intercultural Approach.  Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press, 2016. Pp 211.
 
Kelm, Orlando R. Conversa Brasileira. Reproduced and distributed on demand by the Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL), The University of Texas at Austin. 2013. Pp 352.
 
http://www.lulu.com/shop/orlando-r-kelm/conversa-brasileira/paperback/product-21180214.html
 
Kelm, Orlando R., John N. Doggett, and Haiping Tang. When we are the foreigners: What Chinese think about working with Americans. Charleston, SC: Createspace.com. 2011. Pp 146.
 
Interview Article: Ladan Nikravan, Diversity Executive, Oct. 4, 2011, <http://www.diversity-executive.com/article.php?in=1325>
 
Review: Kirkus Indie Review, Oct. 3, 2011, <http://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/indie/orlando-r-kelm/when-we-are-foreigners/>
 
Review: Trevor Williams, Global Atlanta, Sept. 21, 2011, <http://www.globalatlanta.com/article/25079/>
 
Kelm, Orlando R., Mary Risner. Brazilians Working with Americans: Cultural Case Studies. Austin, TX: The University of Texas Press, 2007. Pp 196.
 
Review: Vanessa Fitzgibbon, Luso-Brazilian Review, Volume 47, Number 1, 2010, pp. 254-256.
 
Review: Maria Antonia Cowles, The Modern Language Journal, Volume 93, Number 1, 2009, pp. 132.

 

 

 


  • Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
    SRH 1.310
    2300 Red River Street D0800
    Austin, Texas 78712