Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies
Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach


ProfessorPh.D., University of Minnesota-Minneapolis

Professor, Department of Geography & the Environment; Raymond Dickson Centennial Professor #1; Past President, American Association of Geographers
Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach

Contact

Interests


Geoarchaeology; hydrology and water quality; geomorphology; spatial statistics; gender, science, and human rights, Mesoamerica.

Courses


GRG 356C • Geo-Archaeol And Envir History

36855 • Spring 2022
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM RLP 1.106

Long-term ecology as reconstructed from settlement and land-use histories. Empirical case studies in environmental history from the Mediterranean region, the Near East, and Mesoamerica. Applications to degradation, desertification, sustainability, and global change.

Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 382N, Geography 356C, 382K.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

GRG 390L • Research In Geography

36954 • Spring 2022
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM RLP 3.102

Builds on topics explored in Geography 390K by focusing on epistemology and research in the field of geography. Students develop plans for research and write a research proposal.

Required of all first-year graduate students in geography.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Geography 390K.

GRG 382K • Geo-Archaeol And Envir History

37885 • Fall 2021
Meets TH 2:30PM-5:30PM RLP 3.102

Long-term ecology as reconstructed from settlement and land-use histories. Empirical case studies in environmental history from the Mediterranean region, the Near East, and Mesoamerica. Applications to degradation, desertification, sustainability, and global change. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 382N, Geography 356C, 382K.

This interdisciplinary course addresses the principles and applications of Environmental History, directly linking contemporary issues of land degradation and ecological change to archaeological themes such as settlement and land-use histories. Geoarchaeology and related biological investigations allow empirical testing of popular hypotheses about the environmental impact of pastoralism and different agricultural systems, based on the principle that "historical monitoring" is essential to understanding processes and their consequences. Regional examples with different time-frames are critically examined from the Mediterranean Basin, the Near East, Mesoamerica, and Australia. These illustrate the potential of both archaeology and environmental history to re- evaluate neo-ecological assumptions about ecological transformation, degradation and sustainability.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

SAME AS ANT 382N.

GRG 401C • The Natural Environment-Wb

37265-37290 • Spring 2021
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM
Internet; Synchronous
N1

An introduction to the study of the Earth from a holistic perspective including geologic, atmospheric, ecological, and water sciences and its relevance to present-day environmental problems.

Taught as a Web-based course.

GRG 410C • Spatial Data And Analysis-Wb

37385 • Spring 2021
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM
Internet; Synchronous

Fundamental concepts in spatial data acquisition, analysis, and presentation, with emphasis on the needs of professionals in cartography, geographic information systems (GIS), and remote sensing.

Taught as a Web-based course.

GRG 396T • Enviro Hydrology & Society-Wb

36395 • Fall 2020
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM
Internet; Synchronous

In order to manage a resource successfully, one must understand the nature and occurrence of that resource, and human interactions with the resource. Our focus will be on Water Resources and Hydraulic Society. This course aids that understanding by exploring three areas of Water Resources Geography: Hydrology and Climate, Physical and Biological Interactions, and Water Resources Management. Important local, regional, global, and topical issues will be highlighted along the way. The student will also be familiarized with water resources research techniques & data sources.

GRG 410C • Spatial Data And Analysis

36965 • Spring 2019
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM RLP 1.404

MW 2:30-4:00 p.m.

Lab W 4:00-5:30 p.m.

This is an entry level course that will prepare the student for higher level courses in geographic methods and techniques. The course content consists of a series of modules designed to cover topics common to courses in Cartography, Geographic Information Science, Field Techniques, and Remote Sensing of the Environment.

We will examine quantitative and qualitative methods of sampling, representing, classifying, and analyzing geographic phenomena. We will examine conceptions of temporal and spatial scale, location, distance and direction, and examine a broad range of geographic research methods. Specific topics will include earth shape, gravitational and magnetic fields, map projections, coordinate systems, surveying and navigation, measurements and errors, spatial statistics, and spatial analysis.

Classes will consist of lectures and discussions of the readings. Students will complete ten exercises, a mid-term examination and a final examination. In addition to the lecture, this class has a lab section.

GRG 310C • Spatial Data And Analysis

36890 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 1.402

This is an entry level course that will prepare the student for higher level courses in geographic methods and techniques. The course content consists of a series of modules designed to cover topics common to courses in Cartography, Geographic Information Science, Field Techniques, and Remote Sensing of the Environment.

We will examine quantitative and qualitative methods of sampling, representing, classifying, and analyzing geographic phenomena. We will examine conceptions of temporal and spatial scale, location, distance and direction, and examine a broad range of geographic research methods. Specific topics will include earth shape, gravitational and magnetic fields, map projections, coordinate systems, surveying and navigation, measurements and errors, spatial statistics, and spatial analysis.

Classes will consist of lectures and discussions of the readings. Students will complete ten exercises, a mid-term examination and a final examination.

GRG 390K • Issues In Geography

37325 • Fall 2016
Meets T 4:00PM-7:00PM CLA 3.710

Examines the history, philosophy, and ontology of geography, including its various subfields.
Required of all first-year graduate students in geography.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geography, or graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.
 

 

GRG 396T • Enviro Hydrology & Society

36585 • Fall 2015
Meets T 4:00PM-7:00PM CLA 3.106

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic.

Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

GRG 390K • Issues In Geography

37695 • Fall 2014
Meets TH 4:00PM-7:00PM CLA 3.710

Examines the history, philosophy, and ontology of geography, including its various subfields. Required of all first-year graduate students in geography.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geography, or graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

Recent Research News


https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/public-affairs/news/ancient-maya-canals-and-fields-show-early-and-extensive-impacts-on-tropical-forests

T. Beach, S. Luzzadder-Beach, S. Krause, T. Guderjan, F. Valdez, Jr., J. C. Fernandez-Diaz, S. Eshleman, C. Doyle. 2019. “Ancient Maya wetland fields revealed under tropical forest canopy from laser scanning and multiproxy evidence.”  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 116(43):21469–21477. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1910553116. https://www.pnas.org/content/116/43/21469.short?rss=1

Press Sources covering 10/22/19 PNAS paper: https://pnas.altmetric.com/details/67880504


  • Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
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    2300 Red River Street D0800
    Austin, Texas 78712