Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies
Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies

Maria Cotera


Associate ProfessorPh.D., Stanford University

Maria Cotera

Contact

Interests


Chicana Feminisms, US-Third World Feminisms, Latina/o Studies, Comparative Race and Ethnicity, digital humanities, public humanities, intellectual history, early twentieth century anthropology and folklore

Biography


Maria Cotera holds a PhD from Stanford University’s Program in Modern Thought, and an MA in English from the University of Texas. She is currently an associate professor in the Mexican American and Latino Studies Department at the University of Texas. Cotera's first book, Native Speakers: Ella Deloria, Zora Neale Hurston, Jovita González, and the Poetics of Culture, (University of Texas Press, 2008) received the Gloria Anzaldúa book prize for 2009 from the National Women's Studies Association (NWSA). Her edited volume (with Dionne Espinoza and Maylei Blackwell), Chicana Movidas: New Narratives of Feminism and Activism in the Movement Era (University of Texas Press, 2018) has been adopted in courses across the country. Professor Cotera is currently working on the Chicana por mi Raza Digital Memory Project, an online interactive archive of oral histories and material culture documenting Chicana Feminist praxis from 1965-1985. She is the lead curator for two public history exhibits: Las Rebeldes: Stories of Strength and Struggle in southeast Michigan (2013) and Chicana Fotos: Nancy DeLos Santos (2017). Cotera has served on the National Council for the American Studies Association (2007-2010), the governing board of the Latina/o Studies Association (2014-2015), the program committee for the National Women’s Studies Association (2017-2018), and the Arte Público Recovery Project Governing Board (2018-present).

Courses


MAS 319 • Latinx Digital Worlds

39865 • Spring 2022
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM PMA 5.120
CD

Over the last decade, new social media platforms and digital tools have enabled a resurgence of identitarian, anti-racist, feminist, and queer mobilizations online that have transformed digital space into deeply contested public square.  This course explores how Latinx communities—traditionally figured as on the wrong side of the “digital divide”—have embraced, mobilized, and sometimes usurped these digital tools and spaces to forge community and create new forms of culture, memory, and activism. Over the course of the semester, we will examine a wide array of digital modalities from social media to digital art, memory, and activism, with an aim to better understand how Latinx publics are forged online. We will pay particular attention to the different ways in which the Latinx diaspora (across and within the U.S. Mexico and Latin America) have used digital tools to build community across transnational borders, claim belonging, and decolonize digital culture.

 

Readings:

  • Algorithms of Oppression, Safiya Noble
  • Digital Media and Latino Families, Bruce Fuller, José Ramón Lizárraga, James H. Gray
  • The Digital Edge: How Black and Latino Youth Navigate Digital Inequality

Course Reader: Selected Essays

MAS 392 • Excavating Chicana Feminisms

40005 • Spring 2022
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM GDC 2.402
(also listed as WGS 393)

Please check back for updates.

MAS 319 • Latinx Digital Worlds

40850 • Fall 2021
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GAR 0.132
CD

Over the last decade, new social media platforms and digital tools have enabled a resurgence of identitarian, anti-racist, feminist, and queer mobilizations online that have transformed digital space into deeply contested public square.  This course explores how Latinx communities—traditionally figured as on the wrong side of the “digital divide”—have embraced, mobilized, and sometimes usurped these digital tools and spaces to forge community and create new forms of culture, memory, and activism. Over the course of the semester, we will examine a wide array of digital modalities from social media to digital art, memory, and activism, with an aim to better understand how Latinx publics are forged online. We will pay particular attention to the different ways in which the Latinx diaspora (across and within the U.S. Mexico and Latin America) have used digital tools to build community across transnational borders, claim belonging, and decolonize digital culture.

MAS 337C • Chicana Feminisms

40870 • Fall 2021
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM BIO 301
CD (also listed as WGS 340)

Emerging out of the social protest movements of the 1960’s, Chicana Feminists offered an alternative mapping of feminist literary and political thought with the issues of gender, race, and sexuality as their primary concerns. In this course, we will examine what constitutes Chicana Feminism in its multiple incarnations, both historically and epistemologically. Tracing Chicana feminist theory as it broke off from Chicano nationalist politics of the 1960’s, to a politics that is concerned with practices of communal feminism that encompasses men and women of the working classes, we will examine how it has shifted and changed over time. We will also look at how Chicana feminist thought breaks with and intersects with Euro-American or European models of feminism. In addition, we will examine the ways in which Chicana Feminists have moved towards a more third-world and/or transnational model of feminism that takes into account the inequities that exist between first and third world subjects. Through the study of essays, history, archives, performance, and literatures that engage feminism, we will discuss how material conditions, spirituality, gender inequality, class inequality, racial inequality, and questions of sexuality allow Chicana women to engage in activities that we might understand as feminist.

MAS 319 • Latinx Digital Worlds

40660 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 0.102
Hybrid/Blended
CD

Over the last decade, new social media platforms and digital tools have enabled a resurgence of identitarian, anti-racist, feminist, and queer mobilizations online that have transformed digital space into deeply contested public square.  This course explores how Latinx communities—traditionally figured as on the wrong side of the “digital divide”—have embraced, mobilized, and sometimes usurped these digital tools and spaces to forge community and create new forms of culture, memory, and activism. Over the course of the semester, we will examine a wide array of digital modalities from social media to digital art, memory, and activism, with an aim to better understand how Latinx publics are forged online. We will pay particular attention to the different ways in which the Latinx diaspora (across and within the U.S. Mexico and Latin America) have used digital tools to build community across transnational borders, claim belonging, and decolonize digital culture.

MAS 337C • Chicana Feminisms

40675 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CMA 2.306
Hybrid/Blended
CD (also listed as WGS 340)

Emerging out of the social protest movements of the 1960’s, Chicana Feminists offered an alternative mapping of feminist literary and political thought with the issues of gender, race, and sexuality as their primary concerns. In this course, we will examine what constitutes Chicana Feminism in its multiple incarnations, both historically and epistemologically. Tracing Chicana feminist theory as it broke off from Chicano nationalist politics of the 1960’s, to a politics that is concerned with practices of communal feminism that encompasses men and women of the working classes, we will examine how it has shifted and changed over time. We will also look at how Chicana feminist thought breaks with and intersects with Euro-American or European models of feminism. In addition, we will examine the ways in which Chicana Feminists have moved towards a more third-world and/or transnational model of feminism that takes into account the inequities that exist between first and third world subjects. Through the study of essays, history, archives, performance, and literatures that engage feminism, we will discuss how material conditions, spirituality, gender inequality, class inequality, racial inequality, and questions of sexuality allow Chicana women to engage in activities that we might understand as feminist.

Curriculum Vitae


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