Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies
Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies

José Izaguirre III


Courtesy AppointmentPh.D., University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Courses


RHE 321 • Principles Of Rhetoric

43915 • Fall 2021
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM FAC 7
Wr

Examines major terms, issues, and approaches in the discipline of rhetoric and writing. Provides practice in analysis and application.

Goals 

This course will:

  • explore key terms and principles in the discipline of rhetoric and writing;
  • apply these principles and terms in rhetorical analysis and composition;
  • understand the curriculum and the discipline of rhetoric and writing.

Outcomes

Students may:

  • define key terms in the discipline of rhetoric and writing;
  • explain theoretically and/or apply analytically key principles in the discipline of rhetoric and writing;
  • analyze artifacts by applying key principles and terms to specific circumstances and objects;
  • compose persuasive texts or create persuasive artifacts by applying their knowledge of persuasion and argumentation to a specific circumstance, medium, audience, and exigency;
  • creatively and imaginatively explore concepts, terms, figures, and/or practices in the discipline of rhetoric and writing;
  • understand the discipline of rhetoric and writing, having an informed appreciation of its scholarly and practical potential.

RHE 330D • Rhe Of Latinx Social Mvmt

43955 • Fall 2021
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM FAC 7
CDWr

This course provides a rhetorical historical survey of Latinx social movement(s) in the Americas from the 19th to the 21st centuries. Although scholarship has recognized forms of resistance, subversion, protest, and re-existence in Latin America since colonization arrived in the Americas in the fifteenth century, this historical survey will use the conceptual lens of “social movement(s)” to ground our study of the aesthetic and strategic contours of the political (re)imaginings of Latinx persons during the modernity/coloniality era. By analyzing a combination of secondary and primary sources, we will trace and explore the similarities and differences between Latin American social movement rhetorics over time, their poetic (inter)connectedness, and the ways in which (de)coloniality (un)marks their political forms.

 

Although our focus will be on “social movement(s)” and on their rhetorical (re)configurations over time, we will also put our focus on the institutional(ized) forms of power creating and subtending the conditions of social movement rhetorical actions. That is, throughout the course we will also be attending to the ways in which rhetorics from “below” rub up against rhetorics from “above.” In so doing, we will investigate how Latin American rhetorics create and are in tension with intersecting forces of oppression (i.e., race, sexuality, class, (dis)ability) and how their interanimation have influenced one another throughout history.

 

Assignments and Grading

  • Class Participation (10%)
  • Social Movement Blog Post (10%)
  • Reading Reflections (20%)
  • Project Proposal (10%)
  • Annotated Bibliography (10%)
  • Revision Reflections (5%)
  • Final Paper (35%)

 

Texts and Films

  • Acuña, Rodolfo A. Occupied America: A History of Chicanos. 8th ed. Boston: Pearson, 2015.
  • Antebi, Susan, and Beth E. Jörgensen. Libre Acceso: Latin American Literature and Film through Disability Studies. SUNY Press, 2015.
  • Bedolla, Lisa Garcia. Latino Politics. John Wiley & Sons, 2015.
  • Ceresa, Robert M. Cuban American Political Culture and Civic Organizing: Tocqueville in Miami. Springer, 2017.
  • Chavez, Karma R. Queer Migration Politics: Activist Rhetoric and Coalitional Possibilities. University of Illinois Press, 2013.
  • Gómez, Alan Eladio. The Revolutionary Imaginations of Greater Mexico: Chicana/o Radicalism, Solidarity Politics, and Latin American Social Movements. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2016.
  • Harvest of Empire The Untold Story of Latinos in America, 2020. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5gW84cAN2Pw.
  • Inclán, María de la Luz. The Zapatista Movement and Mexico’s Democratic Transition: Mobilization, Success, and Survival. Oxford University Press, 2018.
  • Langer, Erick Detlef, and Elena Muñoz. Contemporary Indigenous Movements in Latin America. Rowman & Littlefield, 2003.
  • Latner, Teishan A. Cuban Revolution in America: Havana and the Making of a United States Left, 1968–1992. UNC Press Books, 2018.
  • Pérez, Emma. The Decolonial Imaginary: Writing Chicanas into History. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999.
  • Rodriguez, Phillip, David Ventura, Alison Sotomayor, Claudio Rocha, and L. L. C. City Projects. The Rise and Fall of the Brown Buffalo. Los Angeles, California: City Projects, LLC, 2018.
  • Rousseau, Stéphanie, and Anahi Morales Hudon. Indigenous Women’s Movements in Latin America: Gender and Ethnicity in Peru, Mexico, and Bolivia. Springer, 2016.
  • Wanzer-Serrano, Darrell. The New York Young Lords and the Struggle for Liberation. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2015.

RHE F321 • Principles Of Rhetoric-Wb

83170 • Summer 2021
Internet; Asynchronous
Wr

The study of rhetoric, one of the original seven Liberal Arts (along with logic, grammar, arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music), has a  long and proud history, stretching back to the 5th century BCE and up to the present day.  Both a productive and interpretive art, it is decidedly cross-disciplinary: the principles of rhetoric (audience, context, kairos, exigency, ethos, pathos, logos, and so forth) are consistently employed, for example, not only in literary analysis but in law, politics, education, science, and religion.

 

This course introduces students to common rhetorical principles and to the disciplinary history of rhetoric and writing studies.  Assignments in the class will offer students the chance to identify and apply these rhetorical principles while composing, interpreting, and presenting “texts”—oral, print, and/or electronic.   The course will meet all necessary requirements to qualify as an SWC/writing flag course.

 

At the end of the term, students should be able to:

(1) Write an effective rhetorical analysis.

(2) Write a responsible argument relevant to a contested issue.

(3) Discourse about some of the major issues in the field (such as: What is the relationship between truth and language? How do technologies of communication affect discourse? What is "good" public argument? What constitutes a quality rhetorical education? and so on.)

(4) Situate the significance of some of the canonical figures in rhetorical studies.

(5) Apply the basic principles of rhetorical study, as mentioned above, to contemporary situations.

RHE 321 • Principles Of Rhetoric-Wb

43715 • Spring 2021
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

The study of rhetoric, one of the original seven Liberal Arts (along with logic, grammar, arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music), has a  long and proud history, stretching back to the 5th century BCE and up to the present day.  Both a productive and interpretive art, it is decidedly cross-disciplinary: the principles of rhetoric (audience, context, kairos, exigency, ethos, pathos, logos, and so forth) are consistently employed, for example, not only in literary analysis but in law, politics, education, science, and religion.

 

This course introduces students to common rhetorical principles and to the disciplinary history of rhetoric and writing studies.  Assignments in the class will offer students the chance to identify and apply these rhetorical principles while composing, interpreting, and presenting “texts”—oral, print, and/or electronic.   The course will meet all necessary requirements to qualify as an SWC/writing flag course.

 

At the end of the term, students should be able to:

(1) Write an effective rhetorical analysis.

(2) Write a responsible argument relevant to a contested issue.

(3) Discourse about some of the major issues in the field (such as: What is the relationship between truth and language? How do technologies of communication affect discourse? What is "good" public argument? What constitutes a quality rhetorical education? and so on.)

(4) Situate the significance of some of the canonical figures in rhetorical studies.

(5) Apply the basic principles of rhetorical study, as mentioned above, to contemporary situations.

RHE 330D • Rhe Latinx Social Mvmt-Wb

43759 • Spring 2021
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

This course provides a rhetorical historical survey of Latinx social movement(s) in the Americas from the 19th to the 21st centuries. Although scholarship has recognized forms of resistance, subversion, protest, and re-existence in Latin America since colonization arrived in the Americas in the fifteenth century, this historical survey will use the conceptual lens of “social movement(s)” to ground our study of the aesthetic and strategic contours of the political (re)imaginings of Latinx persons during the modernity/coloniality era. By analyzing a combination of secondary and primary sources, we will trace and explore the similarities and differences between Latin American social movement rhetorics over time, their poetic (inter)connectedness, and the ways in which (de)coloniality (un)marks their political forms.

 

Although our focus will be on “social movement(s)” and on their rhetorical (re)configurations over time, we will also put our focus on the institutional(ized) forms of power creating and subtending the conditions of social movement rhetorical actions. That is, throughout the course we will also be attending to the ways in which rhetorics from “below” rub up against rhetorics from “above.” In so doing, we will investigate how Latin American rhetorics create and are in tension with intersecting forces of oppression (i.e., race, sexuality, class, (dis)ability) and how their interanimation have influenced one another throughout history.

 

Assignments and Grading

 

Assignment

Grade Percentage

Class Participation

10

Social Movement Blog Post

10

Reading Reflections

20

Project Proposal

10

Annotated Bibliography

10

Revision Reflections

5

Final Paper

35

Total

100%

 

 

Texts and Films

Acuña, Rodolfo A. Occupied America: A History of Chicanos. 8th ed. Boston: Pearson, 2015.

Antebi, Susan, and Beth E. Jörgensen. Libre Acceso: Latin American Literature and Film through Disability Studies. SUNY Press, 2015.

Bedolla, Lisa Garcia. Latino Politics. John Wiley & Sons, 2015.

Ceresa, Robert M. Cuban American Political Culture and Civic Organizing: Tocqueville in Miami. Springer, 2017.

Chavez, Karma R. Queer Migration Politics: Activist Rhetoric and Coalitional Possibilities. University of Illinois Press, 2013.

Gómez, Alan Eladio. The Revolutionary Imaginations of Greater Mexico: Chicana/o Radicalism, Solidarity Politics, and Latin American Social Movements. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2016.

Harvest of Empire The Untold Story of Latinos in America, 2020. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5gW84cAN2Pw.

Inclán, María de la Luz. The Zapatista Movement and Mexico’s Democratic Transition: Mobilization, Success, and Survival. Oxford University Press, 2018.

Langer, Erick Detlef, and Elena Muñoz. Contemporary Indigenous Movements in Latin America. Rowman & Littlefield, 2003.

Latner, Teishan A. Cuban Revolution in America: Havana and the Making of a United States Left, 1968–1992. UNC Press Books, 2018.

Pérez, Emma. The Decolonial Imaginary: Writing Chicanas into History. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999.

Rodriguez, Phillip, David Ventura, Alison Sotomayor, Claudio Rocha, and L. L. C. City Projects. The Rise and Fall of the Brown Buffalo. Los Angeles, California: City Projects, LLC, 2018.

Rousseau, Stéphanie, and Anahi Morales Hudon. Indigenous Women’s Movements in Latin America: Gender and Ethnicity in Peru, Mexico, and Bolivia. Springer, 2016.

Wanzer-Serrano, Darrell. The New York Young Lords and the Struggle for Liberation. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2015.

RHE 321 • Principles Of Rhetoric-Wb

42334 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

The study of rhetoric, one of the original seven Liberal Arts (along with logic, grammar, arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music), has a  long and proud history, stretching back to the 5th century BCE and up to the present day.  Both a productive and interpretive art, it is decidedly cross-disciplinary: the principles of rhetoric (audience, context, kairos, exigency, ethospathoslogos, and so forth) are consistently employed, for example, not only in literary analysis but in law, politics, education, science, and religion.

This course introduces students to common rhetorical principles and to the disciplinary history of rhetoric and writing studies.  Assignments in the class will offer students the chance to identify and apply these rhetorical principles while composing, interpreting, and presenting “texts”—oral, print, and/or electronic.   The course will meet all necessary requirements to qualify as an writing flag course.

At the end of the term, students should be able to:

(1) Write an effective rhetorical analysis.

(2) Write a responsible argument relevant to a contested issue.

(3) Discourse about some of the major issues in the field (such as: What is the relationship between truth and language? How do technologies of communication affect discourse? What is "good" public argument? What constitutes a quality rhetorical education? and so on.)

(4) Situate the significance of some of the canonical figures in rhetorical studies.

(5) Apply the basic principles of rhetorical study, as mentioned above, to contemporary situations.

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