Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies
Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies

Mirasol Enriquez


LecturerPh. D., University of California, Los Angeles,

Mirasol Enriquez

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Biography


Mirasol Enríquez, Lecturer in Mexican American and Latina/o Studies, is a film and media scholar and video editor who has devoted her career to community building through film and the other arts.

She holds a Ph.D. in Cinema and Media Studies from UCLA, an M.A. in Cinema Studies from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, and a B.A. in Feminist Studies from Stanford University. She has previously served as a Research Scholar for the UCLA Center for the Study of Women and her scholarship focuses on Latina producers of feature films, media production culture, and representations of race and gender in media. Her article, "Josey Faz: Traces of a Tejana in Chicana/o Film History," is forthcoming in the Journal of Cinema and Media Studies (Summer 2020). Mirasol is a guest curator for the Cine Las Americas Hecho en Tejas program and has served the Austin film community as Director of Community Media at the Austin Film Society (AFS), where she oversaw the education programs and spearheaded the Community Media initiative at Austin Public, the community media center AFS manages for the city of Austin.

Courses


MAS 374 • Latina Feminisms And Media

39394 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CMA 3.124
CD (also listed as WGS 340)

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Chicana/O Film

40034 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 2.128
CD (also listed as RTF 359)

This course will investigate representations of Chicanos/as, both on-screen and behind the scenes of U.S. films. We will begin with a brief overview of representations of Mexicans/Mexican-Americans in U.S. film from the silent era through the 1960s. The remainder of the class will focus on films made by, for, and about Chicanos/as and Mexican-Americans from the Chicano Movement of the 1960s/70s to the present day. Feature-length, short, experimental, narrative, and documentary films from the first, second, and third waves of Chicano cinema will be examined. While the majority of the texts we will be looking at were made by Chicano/a filmmakers, we will also examine key works by non-Chicano filmmakers who have made significant contributions to the representation of Chicanos/as on film. We will consider historical, economic, industrial, social, and political factors affecting Chicanos/as access to and participation in the film industry, as well as their representation on-screen. Manifestations of gender bias in the Chicano movement, film industry, and writing of film history will be of particular interest, as will the following themes: film as a tool for social change; the construction of individual, ethnic, and national identity; the intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality; the politics of representation; the commodification of Latinidad; cultures of production; and issues of authorship and creative control.

MAS 374 • Latinx Media/Arts/Activism

40044 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CAL 221
CD (also listed as RTF 365)

This course will investigate the ways in which Latinx activists use mainstream, alternative, legacy and new media, as well as other visual and performing arts to effect social and political change. We will investigate where/how the creative practices of socially/politically engaged artists intersect with the strategies and tactics that social movements employ to mobilize support and achieve their goals. Historical and contemporary examples of activism from the 1960s to the present day will illustrate the ways in which collective action can be facilitated through the use of media and the arts, and we will consider the ways in which the internet has provided new opportunities for connective action via social media networks that amplify the voices of underrepresented populations. Students will engage with a variety of materials, including scholarly articles and texts by artists and activists who have effected/are effecting change “on the ground," and consider how they shape and reflect the discourse around social and political issues in the United States. Students will also participate in critiques of various social movements’ utilization of activist media and art via personal blogs and the development of group projects. Some examples of topics we will explore throughout the semester include (but are not limited to): the Nuyorican Poets cafe, El Teatro Campesino, documentary film, political posters, Las Mujeres Muralistas, Ana Mendieta, the Zapatistas, Mujeres de Maiz, DREAMers and immigrant rights, storytelling for advocacy, Ricardo Dominguez and tactical media, the poetry of raúlsalinas, neoliberalism, globalization, Latin American solidarity, community building, radio activism, protest music, DIY activism, and zines.

MAS 374 • Latina Filmmakers

40070 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GWB 1.130
CD (also listed as RTF 359, WGS 340)

This course is focused on the history of U.S.-based Latina filmmakers (primarily directors, producers, and screenwriters) and the images they have created. The class will begin with a brief examination of early representations of Latinas in Hollywood film. The remainder of the semester will be spent investigating Latinas’ points of entry into the film industry while interrogating traditional notions of authorship that have relegated their labor and creative contributions to the margins of film history. Students will view short, experimental, documentary, and feature-length films and videos made by U.S.-based Latinas from the 1960s onward, and consider how the filmmakers have (and/or have not) been able to subvert stereotypes as they have gained increasing amounts of control over their own images, particularly since the 1990s. Central to the discussion will be the ways in which the Latina body, marked by race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality, is used to produce meaning about Latinidad in the United States, as well as how those conceptions have shifted over time. Themes of particular interest include issues related to authorship and creative control, personal, ethnic, and national identity, and the commodification of Latinidad. 

MAS 374 • Latinx Media/Arts/Activism

39655 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 308
CD (also listed as RTF 365)

This course will investigate the ways in which Latinx activists use mainstream, alternative, legacy and new media, as well as other visual and performing arts to effect social and political change. We will investigate where/how the creative practices of socially/politically engaged artists intersect with the strategies and tactics that social movements employ to mobilize support and achieve their goals. Various historical and contemporary examples of activism from the 1960s to the present day will illustrate the ways in which collective action can be facilitated through the use of media and the arts, and we will consider the ways in which the internet has provided new opportunities for connective action via social media networks that amplify the voices of underrepresented populations. Students will engage with scholarly literature and primary source materials such as newspaper articles that shape and reflect discourse around various contemporary issues, and texts by artists and activists who have effected/are effecting change “on the ground.” Students will also participate in critiques of various social movements’ utilization of activist media and art via personal blogs and the development of group projects. Some examples of topics we will explore throughout the semester include (but are not limited to): the Chicano civil rights movement, El Teatro Campesino, the Zapatistas, gentrification, documentary film, body positivity, Mujeres de Maiz, street art, Colectivo Moriviví, DREAMers and immigrant rights, storytelling for advocacy, protest music, neoliberalism, globalization, local and transnational community building, youth movements, radio activism, DIY activism, and zines.

MAS 374 • Chicana/O Film

39660 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.216
CD (also listed as RTF 359)

This course will investigate representations of Chicanos/as, both on-screen and behind the scenes of U.S. films. We will begin with a brief overview of representations of Mexicans/Mexican-Americans in U.S. film from the silent era through the 1960s. The remainder of the class will focus on films made by, for, and about Chicanos/as and Mexican-Americans from the Chicano Movement of the 1960s/70s to the present day. Feature-length, short, experimental, narrative, and documentary films from the first, second, and third waves of Chicano cinema will be examined. While the majority of the texts we will be looking at were made by Chicano/a filmmakers, we will also examine key works by non-Chicano filmmakers who have made significant contributions to the representation of Chicanos/as on film. We will consider historical, economic, industrial, social, and political factors affecting Chicanos/as access to and participation in the film industry, as well as their representation on-screen. Manifestations of gender bias in the Chicano movement, film industry, and writing of film history will be of particular interest, as will the following themes: film as a tool for social change; the construction of individual, ethnic, and national identity; the intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality; the politics of representation; the commodification of Latinidad; cultures of production; and issues of authorship and creative control.

MAS 374 • Transnatl Latinx Pop Culture

39664 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ B0.302
CD (also listed as LAS 328, WGS 340)

Please check back for updates.

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