Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies
Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies

Lilia Raquel Rosas


LecturerPh.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Lilia Raquel Rosas

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 471-2465
  • Office: GWB 2.334
  • Office Hours: Wednesday 3:00-4:00 PM, Friday 3:00-4:00 PM
  • Campus Mail Code: F9200

Interests


U.S. West/Borderlands; history of women, gender, and sexuality; history of race, Mexican Americans, and African Americans; Ethnic Studies

Biography


Lilia Raquel Rosas is originally from the San Francisco Bay Area and is the proud daughter of a father, who is a retired cook, former bracero, and a mother, who is a retired domestica. She also calls Austin home and has resided in the southside and eastside for over two decades.

She received a Bachelor of Arts in American Studies from Reed College in Portland, Oregon. After completing her undergraduate studies, she worked as an administrative assistant and teacher for One Stop Immigration, an immigrant rights advocacy organization, in Riverside, California. She moved to Austin to enter the Graduate School at The University of Texas at Austin where she received a Master of Arts in United States History. 

In 2012, she completed her Ph.D. in History at The University of Texas at Austin. Her dissertation, “(De)sexing Prostitution: Sex Work, Reform, and Womanhood in Progressive Texas, 1889-1925,” examines the participation and regulation of African American and ethnic Mexican women in sex work but also the surrounding social movements that converged in Texas in the Progressive Era.  She is the author of several publications, including: the forthcoming, “Creating Queerness for Public Consumption:  An Assessment of the Advocacy of Oprah Winfrey and Cristina Saralegui,” in The Oprah Winfrey Enterprise, edited by Juliet E.K. Walker,  “On Grinding Corn and Plaiting Hair:  Placing Tejanas and Black Texan Women in the Progressive Era, ” in Chican@ Critical Perspectives and Praxis at the Turn of the 21st Century, and “Afterward on Resistencia, Liberación y tapón,” in Memoir of Un Ser Humano: The Life and Times de raúlrsalinas, edited by Louis Mendoza. Her research interests include relational and comparative ethnic and queer studies, with an emphasis on narratives of sexuality. 

Since 2004, Rosas has served as a volunteer and is currently the Executive Director for the nonprofit Red Salmon Arts, which is dedicated to Chicana/o/x, Latina/o/x, and indigenous cultural arts programming.  Additionally, she is one of the caretakers of Resistencia Bookstore, an independent Chicana/o/x, Latina/o/x, Native American bookstore with an over thirty year history in Central Texas. 

Last, Rosas joined the faculty of the Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies at The University of Texas at Austin as a lecturer in 2018. 

Courses


MAS 301 • Intr Mex Amer Latina/O Studies

39545 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM MEZ B0.306
CD SB

FLAGS:   Wr  |  CD  |  II

MAS 311 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

39565 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GEA 127
CD SB (also listed as SOC 308D, WGS 301)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Among the many catalysts that centralized the narratives of Chicanas into the discourse the U.S. Southwest/Mexican Borderlands, the 1971 La Conferencia de Mujeres por la Raza in Houston inspired how Chicanas/Xicanas, xicanindias, mestizas, indigenous, Mexican American, and brown women defined themselves, asserted their roles and identities, and shared their stories. This course privileges the stories, struggles, contestations, imaginations, writings, and accomplishments of Chicanas in the United States in the mid-twentieth and early twentieth-first centuries. Through a close examination of literature, and attention to historical and theoretical materials, we will create a growing understanding of the significance of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, language, spirituality, and citizenship in affecting the daily lives and social worlds of Chicanas. By end of the semester, we will also gain a complex insight into the importance of how Chicana feminism, Xicanisma, intersectionality, migration, borders, and community are formative in the Chicana experience(s).

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will improve their analytical abilities through reading, writing, presenting, and discussing class materials and related literature. As a course within the curriculum of MALS, students will learn about the complexities of the experiences of Chicanas/Xicanas, xicanindias, mestizas, indigenous, Mexican American, and brown women. Ultimately, they will learn to think critically, and develop and defend original arguments, investigate topics within of the scope of Chicana Studies and they will be able to:

Course Goals:

1. Achieve a basic understanding of key concepts, theories, and methods in Chicana feminist thought(s).

2. Analyze a diverse range of texts that portray the experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Chicanas or Mexican American women.

3. Identify and discuss the significance of these diverse experiences, perspectives, and expressions that exist among Chicanas.

4. Use and prioritize the analytical lenses of gender and sexuality, along with race, ethnicity, class, religion, region, language, and so on, to understand the identity formations, subjectivities, and the multiple oppressions confronted by Chicanas or Mexican American women.

MAS 311 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

39570 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GEA 127
CD SB (also listed as SOC 308D, WGS 301)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Among the many catalysts that centralized the narratives of Chicanas into the discourse the U.S. Southwest/Mexican Borderlands, the 1971 La Conferencia de Mujeres por la Raza in Houston inspired how Chicanas/Xicanas, xicanindias, mestizas, indigenous, Mexican American, and brown women defined themselves, asserted their roles and identities, and shared their stories. This course privileges the stories, struggles, contestations, imaginations, writings, and accomplishments of Chicanas in the United States in the mid-twentieth and early twentieth-first centuries. Through a close examination of literature, and attention to historical and theoretical materials, we will create a growing understanding of the significance of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, language, spirituality, and citizenship in affecting the daily lives and social worlds of Chicanas. By end of the semester, we will also gain a complex insight into the importance of how Chicana feminism, Xicanisma, intersectionality, migration, borders, and community are formative in the Chicana experience(s).

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will improve their analytical abilities through reading, writing, presenting, and discussing class materials and related literature. As a course within the curriculum of MALS, students will learn about the complexities of the experiences of Chicanas/Xicanas, xicanindias, mestizas, indigenous, Mexican American, and brown women. Ultimately, they will learn to think critically, and develop and defend original arguments, investigate topics within of the scope of Chicana Studies and they will be able to:

Course Goals:

1. Achieve a basic understanding of key concepts, theories, and methods in Chicana feminist thought(s).

2. Analyze a diverse range of texts that portray the experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Chicanas or Mexican American women.

3. Identify and discuss the significance of these diverse experiences, perspectives, and expressions that exist among Chicanas.

4. Use and prioritize the analytical lenses of gender and sexuality, along with race, ethnicity, class, religion, region, language, and so on, to understand the identity formations, subjectivities, and the multiple oppressions confronted by Chicanas or Mexican American women.

MAS F319 • Mexican Amer Womn 1910-Pres

82515 • Summer 2019
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GEA 114
CD HI (also listed as HIS F317L, WGS F301)

The 1917 Bath Riots of El Paso, led by seventeen-year old Carmelita Torres, is a watershed moment in the history of ethnic Mexican women. Illustrating the intersection between the local and global, we learn how Mexicanas demanded their rights over their own bodies, and asserted dignity and respect in the backdrop of the la frontera and the Revolution of 1910. Through this course, we will comprehensively examine the history of ethnic Mexican women in the United States in the twentieth century. Beginning with the Mexican Revolution, which led to the first major migration of Mexicans to the United States, we will study the lives and roles of ethnic Mexican, (me)Xicanas, Chicanas, xicanindias, mestizas, indigenous, Mexican American, and brown women within the U.S., and along the U.S.-Mexican borderlands. We also will explore how gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, language, spirituality, and citizenship shaped their experiences, and how the writing of their history has changed in the last one hundred years.

MAS 314 • Mexican American Lit And Cul

40325 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM GEA 127
CDWr

Description:  Gloria Anzaldúa famously called the border between México and the United States a “1,950 mile-long open wound,” “una herida abierta,” where “a third country—a border culture” has arisen on either side of the Rio Grande/Río Bravo and beyond.  In this course, we will traverse the borders of language(s), geography, history, and identity negotiated by Mexican-American artists from Texas in a variety of literary genres, visual art, and film.  Our methods will be intersectional—attending to class, gender, sexuality, religion, etc., in addition to race—as we explore these (re)definitions of what it means to be, in Cherríe Moraga’s words, American “con acento.”

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts:  Anzaldúa, Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza (nonfiction, memoir, theory); Alonzo, Jotos del Barrio (play); Silva, Flesh to Bone (short stories).

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 formal writing assignments, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted (70% of the final grade in total).  Excluding the final project (critical or creative), the second assignment may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor.  Students will also have the opportunity to practice writing in a variety of other genres, including reading journals (or the occasional quiz), creative writing exercises, and in-class presentations (30% of the final grade).

MAS 314 • Mexican American Lit And Cul

40330 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GEA 127
CDWr

Description:  Gloria Anzaldúa famously called the border between México and the United States a “1,950 mile-long open wound,” “una herida abierta,” where “a third country—a border culture” has arisen on either side of the Rio Grande/Río Bravo and beyond.  In this course, we will traverse the borders of language(s), geography, history, and identity negotiated by Mexican-American artists from Texas in a variety of literary genres, visual art, and film.  Our methods will be intersectional—attending to class, gender, sexuality, religion, etc., in addition to race—as we explore these (re)definitions of what it means to be, in Cherríe Moraga’s words, American “con acento.”

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts:  Anzaldúa, Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza (nonfiction, memoir, theory); Alonzo, Jotos del Barrio (play); Silva, Flesh to Bone (short stories).

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 formal writing assignments, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted (70% of the final grade in total).  Excluding the final project (critical or creative), the second assignment may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor.  Students will also have the opportunity to practice writing in a variety of other genres, including reading journals (or the occasional quiz), creative writing exercises, and in-class presentations (30% of the final grade).

MAS 374 • Latinx Sexualities

40408 • Spring 2019
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM PAR 103
CDIIWr (also listed as AFR 372C, AMS 370, WGS 335)

Description
The publishing of Compañeras: Latina Lesbians in 1987 represents a pathbreaking disruption, which works to humanize, demystify, and complicate the narratives of Latina sexualities at the height of the AIDS pandemic. Told from multiple perspectives by intermingling the voices of scholars, writers, poets, and truth-tellers, this text is still a testament to the stories we must continue to research and analyze to underscore the nuances of Latin@/x racialized sexual formations. In this course, students will chart and examine Latinx Sexualities from a historical perspective to comprehend the social, cultural, political, and economic factors, which have shaped these experiences. We also will challenge the simplistic and monolithic notions of sexualities that have plagued dominant discourses about Latinx sexuality. Finally, we will evaluate and reflect upon how Latin@/x communities (across sexualities, queerness, and heternormativity) have defined themselves, resisted repression(s), and participated in their own emancipation of identities, expressions, and desires from their perspectives as indigenous, Afrolatin@/x, and (me)Xican@/x peoples.

Readings (Selections):

  • Asencio, Marysol, ed. Latina/o Sexualities: Probing Powers, Passions, Practices, and Policies. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2010.
  • Escobedo, Elizabeth Rachel. From Coveralls to Zoot Suits: The Lives of Mexican American Women on the World War II Home Front. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2015.
  • Findlay, Eileen J. Suárez. Imposing Decency: The Politics of Sexuality and Race in Puerto Rico, 1870-1920. Durham: Duke University Press, 1999.
  • Glave, Thomas, ed. Our Caribbean: A Gathering of Lesbian and Gay Writing from the Antilles. Durham: Duke University Press, 2008.

Course Requirements:

  • Attendance and Participation 15%
  • Reading Journal 10%
  • Reflection Essay 10%
  • Research Proposal and Bibliography 5%
  • Oral Presentation 20%
  • Rough Draft of Final Paper/Project 10%
  • Final Paper/Project 30%

MAS 311 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

40525 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 101
CD SB (also listed as AMS 315, SOC 308D, WGS 301)

Description:

The purpose of this course is to examine the various experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Chicanas in the United States. This involves examining the meaning and history of the term, “Chicana” as it was applied to and incorporated by Mexican American women during the Chicano Movement in areas of the Southwest United States, such as Texas and California. We will also explore what it means to be Chicana in the United States today. The course will begin with a historical overview of Mexican American women's experiences in the United States, including the emergence of Chicana feminism. We will discuss central concepts of Chicana feminism and attempt to understand how those concepts link to everyday lived experiences. Specifically, the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, and class will be key as we discuss issues that have been significant in the experiences and self-identification of Chicanas, such as: family, gender, sexuality, religion/spirituality, education, language, labor, and political engagement. We will be engaging in interdisciplinary analysis not only concerning cultural traditions, values, belief systems, and symbols but also in relation to the expressive culture of Chicanas, including folk and religious practices, literature and poetry, the visual arts, and music. Finally, we will examine media representations of Chicanas through critical analyses of film. By the end of this course, it is my hope that you will not only be more critical readers and thinkers, but that you will also be able to apply themes and elements from the readings and discussions to your understanding of your own experiences.

Readings:

Anzaldúa, Gloria and Moraga, Cherríe eds. (2015) This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color.

 Anzaldúa, Gloria (2015) Light in the Dark Luz en lo Oscuro: Rewriting Identity,  Spirituality, Reality.

MAS 314 • Mexican American Lit And Cul

40530 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.206
CDWr

Description:  Gloria Anzaldúa famously called the border between México and the United States a “1,950 mile-long open wound,” “una herida abierta,” where “a third country—a border culture” has arisen on either side of the Rio Grande/Río Bravo and beyond.  In this course, we will traverse the borders of language(s), geography, history, and identity negotiated by Mexican-American artists from Texas in a variety of literary genres, visual art, and film.  Our methods will be intersectional—attending to class, gender, sexuality, religion, etc., in addition to race—as we explore these (re)definitions of what it means to be, in Cherríe Moraga’s words, American “con acento.”

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts:  Anzaldúa, Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza (nonfiction, memoir, theory); Alonzo, Jotos del Barrio (play); Silva, Flesh to Bone (short stories).

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 formal writing assignments, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted (70% of the final grade in total).  Excluding the final project (critical or creative), the second assignment may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor.  Students will also have the opportunity to practice writing in a variety of other genres, including reading journals (or the occasional quiz), creative writing exercises, and in-class presentations (30% of the final grade).

MAS 374 • Tejana Cultural Studies

40593 • Fall 2018
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM CAL 419
CDIIWr (also listed as AMS 370, WGS 340)

Course Description:

With the publication of Entre Guadalupe y Malinche, editors Inés Hernández-Ávila and Norma Elia Cantú solidify their mandate to legitimize Tejan@/x Studies as an arena worthy of ongoing research, study, and comprehension. Furthermore, they center the narratives of Tejanas as a necessary part of the conversation to understand this emergent field of inquiry and integral to Chicana Studies. In this course, we investigate the history of Tejanas to reaffirm and reclaim their place and role in the histories of Native Americans, woman, Chican@/xs, Greater Mexico, and the United States. We will further explore how transfronterizismo and transregionalism complicate this history. Last, we will contemplate how their stories are fundamental to illuminating the struggles, resistance, and liberation of Chicanas, xicanindias, mestizas, and afromexicanas from precontact to decolonization.

 

Readings:

Acosta, Teresa Palomo and Ruthe Winegarten. Las Tejanas: 300 Years of History. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2003.

Brown, Ariana. Three-headed Serpent: Digital Chapbook. 2016.

González, Gabriela. Redeeming La Raza: Transborder Modernity, Race, Respectability, and Rights. New York: Oxford University, 2018.

Hernández-Ávila, Inés and Normal Elia Cantú, eds. Entre Guadalupe y Malinche: Tejanas in Literature and Art. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2016.

Nájera, Jennifer R. The Borderlands of Race: Mexican Segregation in A South Texas Town. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2015.

Orozco, Cynthia E. No Mexicans, Women, or Dogs Allowed: The Rise of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2009.

Pérez, Emma. Forgetting the Alamo, or, Blood. Memory: A Novel. Austin: University of. Texas Press, 2009. Vargas, Deborah R. Dissonant Divas in Chicana Music: The Limits of La Onda. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012.

 

Grading:

  • Attendance and Participation 15%
  • Reading Journal 10%
  • Research Proposal and Bibliography 5%
  • Primary Document Analysis 10%
  • Rough Draft of Final Paper 10%
  • Oral Presentation 20%
  • Final Paper 30%

Curriculum Vitae


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