Department of Philosophy
Department of Philosophy

Julia Driver


ProfessorPHD, Johns Hopkins

Julia Driver

Contact

Interests


Metaethics, Normative Ethics, Value Theory

Courses


PHL 385 • Metaethics

41475 • Spring 2022
Meets TH 12:30PM-3:30PM WAG 310

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor or instructor required.

Course Description

In this seminar, we will look at competing theories of practical reasons, practical reasoning, and the role reasons play in views about normativity.  Beginning with early work on practical reasons by philosophers such as Michael Bratman and David Velleman, we will work our way through some contemporary views about practical reasons and practical reasoning and end by examining arguments for and against reasons-first accounts of normativity. 

Throughout the semester, we will also discuss how to write for publication, framing a philosophical project, and becoming a good editor of one’s own writing.

Grading Policy:

Term paper, with draft submitted prior to final version.

Texts:

Selected articles and excerpts (additional readings TBD)

Michael Bratman, Intention, Plans, and Practical Reason (excerpts)

J. David Velleman, “Practical Reflection”

This seminar satisfies the ETHICS requirement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Julia Markovits, Moral Reason (excerpts)

Sarah Buss, “What Practical Reasoning Must Be If We Act for Our Own Reasons”

Mark Schroeder, Slave of the Passions (selections) and Reasons First (selections)

Chris Howard, “The Fundamentality of Fit”

 

 

PHL 322K • History Of Ethics

42410 • Fall 2021
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 1.216
Wr

This course examines the development of ethical theory from Aristotle to Philippa Foot.  The philosophers to be focused on are Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, David Hume, Richard Price, Immanuel Kant, John Stuart Mill, W. D. Ross, Elizabeth Anscombe, and Philippa Foot.  We begin with Virtue Ethics, and proceed through various versions of Deontological and Consequentialist approaches to ethics, and end, again, with Virtue Ethics. We will be discussing the contrasts and connections between each of these thinkers and their views on normative ethics and moral psychology.

PHL 325K • Ethical Theories

42460 • Fall 2021
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 208
EWr

This course will consider three classic moral theories in detail, those
of J. S. Mill, W. D. Ross and I. Kant – otherwise known as Utilitarianism, Intuitionism and
Kantianism. We will do this by studying one classic text by each author in detail.

PHL 365 • Moral Responsibility-Wb

42200 • Spring 2021
Meets W 1:00PM-2:30PM
Internet; Synchronous

This course explores how the issue of moral responsibility has been approached since Peter Strawson’s “Freedom and Resentment."  Strawson held that moral responsibility is established via our critical practices which involve “reactive attitudes” -- that is, attitudes directed towards the wills of other moral agents.  For example, if someone steps on my foot intentionally, then the apt response is one of resentment -- and this is holding them responsible for having stepped on my foot.  If, on the other hand, the person was shoved and accidentally stepped on my foot, resentment would not be apt, it would not be apt to hold the person responsible since there quality of the will was not bad.  The revolutionary nature of Strawson's article is that it asks us to consider whether or not we would change any of this if it turned out determininsim, or the view that all events, including human actions, are caused, were true.  He argues that determinism is a purely theoretical issue, whereas holding responsible is entirely a practical issue.  And, it's justification does not rely on the truth of determinism.  Instead, the justification is provided by the practical considerations of how our lives are benefited by taking these reactive attitudes towards  others, and holding them responsible.  We then consider the development of this literature across practices such as apology and forgiveness.

PHL 304 • Contemporary Moral Problems

41095 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 101
E

This course considers moral problems that are controversial today and the way that different ethical theories recommend that we approach these problems.  We will be discussing:  Balancing Liberty and Well-Being, Cloning and other forms of Genetic Engineering, Human Enhancement, Limits on what can be sold, Mass Incarceration, Immigration and Global Poverty, Artificial Intelligence, Animal Rights, Climate Change, and Killing.

PHL 322K • History Of Ethics

41300 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 208
Wr

This course examines the development of ethical theory from Aristotle to Philippa Foot.  The philosophers to be focused on are Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, David Hume, Richard Price, Immanuel Kant, John Stuart Mill, W. D. Ross, Elizabeth Anscombe, and Philippa Foot.  We begin with Virtue Ethics, and proceed through various versions of Deontological and Consequentialist approaches to ethics, and end, again, with Virtue Ethics. We will be discussing the contrasts and connections between each of these thinkers and their views on normative ethics and moral psychology.

PHL 398T • Supv Teaching In Philosophy

41154 • Fall 2019
Meets TH 12:30PM-3:30PM WAG 310

Restricted to Philosophy Graduate Students.

Prerequisites

Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Students may register for this course as many as four times, but only three semester hours of credit in this course may be applied toward a graduate degree

Course Description

This seminar, required for the PhD in philosophy, prepares students to teach and to finish the PhD with a teaching portfolio that includes syllabi for courses at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Grading

The grade will be based on the following items:

Course Syllabi (2 introductory, 2 upper-division, 1 graduate) 50%

A Statement of Teaching Philosophy 10%

Teaching Observation Reports (2) 20%

Participation 20%

Texts

Readings will be made available online.

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