Department of Psychology
Department of Psychology

Jacqueline Evans


Associate Professor of InstructionPh.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Jacqueline Evans

Contact

Interests


Social neuroendocrinology, individual differences, stress and health, pedagogical tools in psychology

Biography


Jacqueline Evans received her B.A. in Psychology from University of California, Santa Cruz in 2003, and her Ph.D. in Psychology from The University of Texas at Austin in 2011. Her research interests are centered on the social psychophysiology of stress.  Particularly, she is interested in influences of personality, social, neuroendocrine and genetic factors on cortisol hormone response to and recovery from acute stress, and further downstream, the implications for health. Additionally, she is interested in empirically supported tools and strategies for teaching and learning in psychology.

 

Courses


PSY 341K • Health Psychology

42005 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM ETC 2.132
Wr

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 418 • Statistics/Research Design

41585-41590 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM ETC 2.114
IIQRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Hist Of Modern Psychology

41655 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SEA 3.250
EWr

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 418 • Statistics/Research Design

42485-42490 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM SEA 2.108
IIQRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Health Psychology

42565 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM ETC 2.132
Wr

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 418 • Statistics/Research Design

42745-42750 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CMA 3.114
IIQRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Hist Of Modern Psychology

42820 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SEA 3.250
EWr

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 309 • Personality

42632 • Spring 2018
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM BUR 112

Research and theory concerning personality structure, dynamics, development, and assessment. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

42675-42680 • Spring 2018
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM SEA 2.108
IIQRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Health Psychology

42765 • Spring 2018
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM ETC 2.132
Wr

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43050-43055 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM NOA 1.116
QRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43057-43058 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM NOA 1.102
QRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Hist Of Modern Psychology

43153 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SEA 3.250
EWr

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43180-43185 • Spring 2017
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM NOA 1.116
QRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43190-43195 • Spring 2017
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM NOA 1.116
QRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Health Psychology

43260 • Spring 2017
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM SEA 2.108
Wr

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 309 • Personality

43010 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM NOA 1.124

Research and theory concerning personality structure, dynamics, development, and assessment. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 341K • Health Psychology

43145 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM SEA 2.108
Wr

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

42290-42295 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM NOA 1.116
QRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

42300-42305 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 4:00PM-5:00PM NOA 1.116
QRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Health Psychology

42396 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM SEA 2.108
Wr

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 309 • Personality

42200 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM NOA 1.126

Research and theory concerning personality structure, dynamics, development, and assessment. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

42255-42260 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM NOA 1.116
QRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Hist Of Modern Psychology

42315 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SEA 2.108
Wr

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

42520 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM BUR 106

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

42595-42600 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM NOA 1.116
QRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

42605-42610 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 4:00PM-5:00PM NOA 1.116
QRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 309 • Personality

43573 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM BUR 216

Research and theory concerning personality structure, dynamics, development, and assessment. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43645-43650 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM NOA 1.116
QRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Health Psychology

43725 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM SEA 2.108
Wr

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43970-43975 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM NOA 1.116
QRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43980 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM NOA 1.116
QRWr C1

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Hist Of Modern Psychology

44080 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM SEA 2.108
Wr

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43685 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM NOA 1.116
QRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43695 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 4:00PM-5:00PM NOA 1.116
QRWr

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Hist Of Modern Psychology

43785 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM SEA 2.108
Wr C2

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY S301 • Introduction To Psychology

87240 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM NOA 1.116
SB

Instructor: Jacqueline (Rivers) Evans

Instructor Email: Jacqueline@mail.utexas.edu

Prerequisites
A passing score on the reading section of the TASP test.

Course Description
The purpose of this class is to explore the science of psychology from multiple perspectives (e.g., biological, developmental, social, clinical, etc.) with emphasis on the major themes, theories and issues. In addition, you will learn to think critically about research in psychology and to apply research findings to your observations about the behavior of individuals and groups.

Course Requirements
All Psychology 301 students must complete a research requirement by either participating in experimental sessions within the Psychology Dept. or by writing a research paper.

Grading Policy
The course grade will be based on three, 60-point, "hour" in-class examinations, each covering about one-third of the course material. The final exam is optional and will be divided into three, 60-point sections, each representing one-third of the course.  Students who have taken all hour exams may take only one of the three final exam sections in an attempt to raise their score on that section.  Students with excused absences from hour exams may take the corresponding sections of the final exam as a make-up grade.  If a student elects not to take the final the hour exam, their three hour exam scores will remain the same.

The three 60-point exams are worth 30% each (total exam grade will count for 180 points, and 90% of your final course grade). There will also be several writing assignments: 1 journal article summary (2 pages) that is worth 4% (8 points), and 3 thought papers over assigned readings (1 page each) that are worth a total of 6% (12 points) of your final course grade.

Texts
Myers, D. G. EXPLORING PSYCHOLOGY (7th ed.)

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  • Department of Psychology

    The University of Texas at Austin
    SEA 4.208
    108 E. Dean Keeton Stop A8000
    Austin, TX 78712-1043
    512-471-1157