Department of Rhetoric & Writing
Department of Rhetoric & Writing

Krzysztof Piekarski


LecturerPhD, University of Texas at Austin

Contact

Interests


Zen, Transformation of Consciousness, Animals and Spiritual Ecology

Biography


Read more here: www.characterbydesign.org

Courses


RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of The Wire

42790 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM FAC 7
Wr

“It ain’t about right, it’s about Money” ~ The Wire

The art and craft of criticism goes beyond telling others whether you liked or disliked a book or movie or tv show. The aim is to provide the reader with hard-won insights into the meanings, values, and consequences of what they’ve experienced. In this sense, intelligent criticism corroborates with the original work of art to make it even more impactful. Attaining insights, however, requires following a difficult process of thinking called the analytical method that is rarely taught because thinking is hard.

This class will introduce students to the theory and practice of the analytic method by watching some of the greatest television shows of all time––reading criticism as models of intelligent viewing, thinking, and writing, and using what we learn to write our own collection of criticism about The Wire.

The Wire will be a central focus for the duration of the class because of its complexity and dramatization of many of our most urgent social, political, educational, and economic issues. Even though it ran on HBO from 2002-2008, over ten years later its insights into how urban systems work to argue in favor of those in power is essential watching and thinking for everyone interested in social reform, justice, corruption, inequality, and a deeper understanding of the forces that act upon all modern humans. So even though it might ostensibly look like a tv show about cops chasing drug dealers, its scope is far wider and more impactful than any other television show before or since. This course will teach you how to think hard and write skillfully about complex and polarizing issues.

Course Materials

  • Better Living Through Criticism ~A.O. Scott
  • I Like to Watch ~ Arguing My Way Through the TV Revolution
  • Mad Men Carousel: The Complete Critical Companion
  • Writing Analytically ~David Rosenwasser
  • The Wire: Seasons 1,2,3,4,5
  • Mad Men: Season 1
  • The Sopranos: Season 1
  • Additional TV episodes and critical essays TBD

Grades

  • 40% Class participation
  • 25% Papers
  • 25% Quizzes
  • 10% Editing/Peer Review Assignments 

RHE 330E • Nonargumntatv Rhet In Zen

42920 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM FAC 7
Wr

“Don’t go searching for the Truth. Just let go of your opinion.” ~ Hsin Shin Ming

American rhetoric is strongly grounded in argument and persuasion, and infused with judgments of good and bad, right and wrong. This is true not only for public discourse in the media, academic discourse in schools, and professional writing and speaking, it is also true in everyday conversation. We are constantly trying to convince someone of our judgments, or that something or someone is good or bad, right or wrong—a restaurant, a movie, a car, a teacher. Everything is evaluated and every conversation is full of assertions of value. But what if there were a different, equally “real” way to talk about the world and each other that didn’t create antagonistic relationships? What if we believed that each person is capable of waking up to the reality around her, and responding appropriately, without being converted to some position or belief? What kind of language would we use, and how would we use it?

Zen training begins by kicking the props out of our customary ways of understanding and talking. It subverts value distinctions, challenges our habitual ways of expressing ourselves, and denies the superiority of rationalist, linear logic. It does not do this merely to "deconstruct" language, or to tear down all meaning. It has a radical project of waking us up out of the trance we create for ourselves and others through our habitual uses of language. This class will explore how contradiction, negation, story, surprise, gesture, and silence are used in Zen training as resources for awakening to reality, rather than as assertions or arguments about it. The cryptic pronouncements of Zen masters seem impenetrable. They appear to defy our western rhetorical traditions that depend on logic and formal reasoning as the key to building knowledge. Zen teachers complicate the issue by insisting that language is only "the finger pointing at the moon, not the moon itself." If you have ever tried to write about a meaningful experience, you will recognize the problematic relationship between language and reality. This course engages students in exploring the surprising uses of language and image to create meaning in Zen tradition and practice. 

Students do not need any prior experience or knowledge of Zen rhetoric or Zen practices. The first part of the class will provide background on Zen concepts including ethical precepts and koans, then consider the emergence of the American Zen rhetorical tradition. This class is not an introduction to Zen practice, but rather an exploration of an alternative rhetoric, a different method of using language to construct meaning and shape relationships that help foster care and respect rather than antagonism and aggression.

Grading Policy: Grades in this course are determined on the basis of the Learning Record, which accompanies a portfolio of work presented at the midterm and at the end of the course. These portfolios present a selection of student work, both formal and informal, completed during the semester, ongoing observations about student learning, and analysis of student work and interpretations with respect to the student's development across five dimensions of learning: confidence and independence, knowledge and understanding, skills and strategies, use of prior and emerging experience, and reflectiveness. This development centers around the major strands of work in the course: rhetoric and composition, research, technology, and collaboration. The criteria for grades are posted at the Learning Record web site. Please also notice the RHE policy on absences, which can affect your grade. Three unexcused absences will lower your final grade, four unexcused absences results in automatic failure of the course.

Texts

Joko Beck, Everyday Zen; Perle Besserman and Manfred Steger, Zen Radicals, Rebels, and Reformers; Norman Fischer and Susan moon, What is Zen?; Mu Soeng, Trust in Mind; Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind; John Tarrant, Bring be the Rhinoceros; Brad Warner, Hardcore Zen: Punk Rock, Monster Movies, & the Truth about Reality; Dale Wright, Philosophical Meditation on Zen Buddhism; 

RHE 330E • Nonargumntatv Rhet In Zen

42630 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM FAC 7
Wr

“Don’t go searching for the Truth. Just let go of your opinion.” ~ Hsin Shin Ming

American rhetoric is strongly grounded in argument and persuasion, and infused with judgments of good and bad, right and wrong. This is true not only for public discourse in the media, academic discourse in schools, and professional writing and speaking, it is also true in everyday conversation. We are constantly trying to convince someone of our judgments, or that something or someone is good or bad, right or wrong—a restaurant, a movie, a car, a teacher. Everything is evaluated and every conversation is full of assertions of value. But what if there were a different, equally “real” way to talk about the world and each other that didn’t create antagonistic relationships? What if we believed that each person is capable of waking up to the reality around her, and responding appropriately, without being converted to some position or belief? What kind of language would we use, and how would we use it?

Zen training begins by kicking the props out of our customary ways of understanding and talking. It subverts value distinctions, challenges our habitual ways of expressing ourselves, and denies the superiority of rationalist, linear logic. It does not do this merely to "deconstruct" language, or to tear down all meaning. It has a radical project of waking us up out of the trance we create for ourselves and others through our habitual uses of language. This class will explore how contradiction, negation, story, surprise, gesture, and silence are used in Zen training as resources for awakening to reality, rather than as assertions or arguments about it. The cryptic pronouncements of Zen masters seem impenetrable. They appear to defy our western rhetorical traditions that depend on logic and formal reasoning as the key to building knowledge. Zen teachers complicate the issue by insisting that language is only "the finger pointing at the moon, not the moon itself." If you have ever tried to write about a meaningful experience, you will recognize the problematic relationship between language and reality. This course engages students in exploring the surprising uses of language and image to create meaning in Zen tradition and practice. 

Students do not need any prior experience or knowledge of Zen rhetoric or Zen practices. The first part of the class will provide background on Zen concepts including ethical precepts and koans, then consider the emergence of the American Zen rhetorical tradition. This class is not an introduction to Zen practice, but rather an exploration of an alternative rhetoric, a different method of using language to construct meaning and shape relationships that help foster care and respect rather than antagonism and aggression.

Grading Policy: Grades in this course are determined on the basis of the Learning Record, which accompanies a portfolio of work presented at the midterm and at the end of the course. These portfolios present a selection of student work, both formal and informal, completed during the semester, ongoing observations about student learning, and analysis of student work and interpretations with respect to the student's development across five dimensions of learning: confidence and independence, knowledge and understanding, skills and strategies, use of prior and emerging experience, and reflectiveness. This development centers around the major strands of work in the course: rhetoric and composition, research, technology, and collaboration. The criteria for grades are posted at the Learning Record web site. Please also notice the RHE policy on absences, which can affect your grade. Three unexcused absences will lower your final grade, four unexcused absences results in automatic failure of the course.

Texts

Joko Beck, Everyday Zen; Perle Besserman and Manfred Steger, Zen Radicals, Rebels, and Reformers; Norman Fischer and Susan moon, What is Zen?; Mu Soeng, Trust in Mind; Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind; John Tarrant, Bring be the Rhinoceros; Brad Warner, Hardcore Zen: Punk Rock, Monster Movies, & the Truth about Reality; Dale Wright, Philosophical Meditation on Zen Buddhism; 

RHE S330E • Nonargumntatv Rhet In Zen

83426 • Summer 2019
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 308
Wr

“Don’t go searching for the Truth. Just let go of your opinion.” ~ Hsin Shin Ming

American rhetoric is strongly grounded in argument and persuasion, and infused with judgments of good and bad, right and wrong. This is true not only for public discourse in the media, academic discourse in schools, and professional writing and speaking, it is also true in everyday conversation. We are constantly trying to convince someone of our judgments, or that something or someone is good or bad, right or wrong—a restaurant, a movie, a car, a teacher. Everything is evaluated and every conversation is full of assertions of value. But what if there were a different, equally “real” way to talk about the world and each other that didn’t create antagonistic relationships? What if we believed that each person is capable of waking up to the reality around her, and responding appropriately, without being converted to some position or belief? What kind of language would we use, and how would we use it?

Zen training begins by kicking the props out of our customary ways of understanding and talking. It subverts value distinctions, challenges our habitual ways of expressing ourselves, and denies the superiority of rationalist, linear logic. It does not do this merely to "deconstruct" language, or to tear down all meaning. It has a radical project of waking us up out of the trance we create for ourselves and others through our habitual uses of language. This class will explore how contradiction, negation, story, surprise, gesture, and silence are used in Zen training as resources for awakening to reality, rather than as assertions or arguments about it. The cryptic pronouncements of Zen masters seem impenetrable. They appear to defy our western rhetorical traditions that depend on logic and formal reasoning as the key to building knowledge. Zen teachers complicate the issue by insisting that language is only "the finger pointing at the moon, not the moon itself." If you have ever tried to write about a meaningful experience, you will recognize the problematic relationship between language and reality. This course engages students in exploring the surprising uses of language and image to create meaning in Zen tradition and practice. 

Students do not need any prior experience or knowledge of Zen rhetoric or Zen practices. The first part of the class will provide background on Zen concepts including ethical precepts and koans, then consider the emergence of the American Zen rhetorical tradition. This class is not an introduction to Zen practice, but rather an exploration of an alternative rhetoric, a different method of using language to construct meaning and shape relationships that help foster care and respect rather than antagonism and aggression.

Grading Policy: Grades in this course are determined on the basis of the Learning Record, which accompanies a portfolio of work presented at the midterm and at the end of the course. These portfolios present a selection of student work, both formal and informal, completed during the semester, ongoing observations about student learning, and analysis of student work and interpretations with respect to the student's development across five dimensions of learning: confidence and independence, knowledge and understanding, skills and strategies, use of prior and emerging experience, and reflectiveness. This development centers around the major strands of work in the course: rhetoric and composition, research, technology, and collaboration. The criteria for grades are posted at the Learning Record web site. Please also notice the RHE policy on absences, which can affect your grade. Three unexcused absences will lower your final grade, four unexcused absences results in automatic failure of the course.

Texts

Joko Beck, Everyday Zen; Perle Besserman and Manfred Steger, Zen Radicals, Rebels, and Reformers; Norman Fischer and Susan moon, What is Zen?; Mu Soeng, Trust in Mind; Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind; John Tarrant, Bring be the Rhinoceros; Brad Warner, Hardcore Zen: Punk Rock, Monster Movies, & the Truth about Reality; Dale Wright, Philosophical Meditation on Zen Buddhism; 

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Animals

43325 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 104
Wr

We share this planet with many different kinds of beings we call animals, often forgetting that we are animals ourselves. But the kinds of creatures we call “animals” are different from us in a fundamental way: they have an extremely difficult time writing about and representing themselves. Maybe they lack the opposable thumbs? Maybe they never learned to speak? Maybe they would prefer to keep silent?

Regardless of the reason, homo sapiens have made it their job to speak for animals: sometimes on their behalf, sometimes not so much. Our semester-long exploration will focus on the different ways humans represent animals and all the ethical, political, philosophical, scientific and artistic reasons and repercussions for doing so. We will venture forth across different genres––movies, books, essays, philosophical treatises, documentaries, and poetry––to understand how the way we represent animals affects what we think of them and, as Sacha Baron Cohen once asked, to better understand “What is animals for?” In doing so, we will learn how arguments are structured, to what effect, and, more profoundly, to better understand ourselves.

Assignments and Grading Policy: 

  • Daily Upkeep of learning record based on observations and reflections Midterm self-reflection evaluation
  • Final self-reflection evaluation
  • Class Participation
  • Quizzes
  • Rhetorical analysis mini papers (500 words in length)
  • Argument Paper, ongoing edits and publication ~5,000 words

Grades in this course are determined on the basis of the Learning Record, which accompanies a portfolio of work presented at the midterm and at the end of the course. Please see http://www.learningrecord.org. These portfolios present a selection of student work, both formal and informal, completed during the semester, ongoing observations about student learning, and analysis of student work and interpretations with respect to the student's development across five dimensions of learning: confidence and independence, knowledge and understanding, skills and strategies, use of prior and emerging experience, creativity and reflectiveness. This development centers around the major strands of work in the course: rhetoric and composition, research, technology, and collaboration. The criteria for grades are posted at the Learning Record web site. Please also notice the RHE policy on absences, which can affect your grade. Three unexcused absences will lower your final grade, four unexcused absences results in automatic failure of the course.

 

Texts 

  • A More Beautiful Question ~Warren Berger
  • Several Short Sentences About Writing ~Verlyn Klinkenborg Selected Essays of E.B. White
  • Other Minds: The Octopus, The Sea, and the Deep Origins of Consciousness ~Peter Godfrey-Smith
  • How to Be a Good Creature: A memoir in Thirteen Animals ~Sy Montgomery
  • A Plea for The Animals: The Moral, Philosophical and Evolutionary Imperative to Treat All Beings with Compassion ~Matthieu Ricard
  • Eating Animals ~Jonathan Safran Foer
  • Animal Rights: Current Debates and New Directions ~ Sunstein and Nussbaum
  • The Gospel of Kindness: Animal Welfare and the Making of Modern America ~Janet Davis
  • Becoming Animal: An Earthly Cosmology ~ David Abram
  • The Bonobo and the Atheist: In search of Humanism Among the Primates ~Frans de Waal
  • Dog Songs ~Mary Oliver
  • H is for Hawk ~Helen Macdonald
  • Koko ~ Barbet Schroeder
  • Bambi ~David Hand
  • Buck ~ Cindy Meehl
  • Jane ~Brett Morgen
  • Grizzly Man ~ Werner Herzog
  • Ashes and Snow ~ Gregory Colbert

 

RHE 330E • Nonargumntatv Rhet In Zen

43490 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 104
Wr

“Don’t go searching for the Truth. Just let go of your opinion.” ~ Hsin Shin Ming

American rhetoric is strongly grounded in argument and persuasion, and infused with judgments of good and bad, right and wrong. This is true not only for public discourse in the media, academic discourse in schools, and professional writing and speaking, it is also true in everyday conversation. We are constantly trying to convince someone of our judgments, or that something or someone is good or bad, right or wrong—a restaurant, a movie, a car, a teacher. Everything is evaluated and every conversation is full of assertions of value. But what if there were a different, equally “real” way to talk about the world and each other that didn’t create antagonistic relationships? What if we believed that each person is capable of waking up to the reality around her, and responding appropriately, without being converted to some position or belief? What kind of language would we use, and how would we use it?

Zen training begins by kicking the props out of our customary ways of understanding and talking. It subverts value distinctions, challenges our habitual ways of expressing ourselves, and denies the superiority of rationalist, linear logic. It does not do this merely to "deconstruct" language, or to tear down all meaning. It has a radical project of waking us up out of the trance we create for ourselves and others through our habitual uses of language. This class will explore how contradiction, negation, story, surprise, gesture, and silence are used in Zen training as resources for awakening to reality, rather than as assertions or arguments about it. The cryptic pronouncements of Zen masters seem impenetrable. They appear to defy our western rhetorical traditions that depend on logic and formal reasoning as the key to building knowledge. Zen teachers complicate the issue by insisting that language is only "the finger pointing at the moon, not the moon itself." If you have ever tried to write about a meaningful experience, you will recognize the problematic relationship between language and reality. This course engages students in exploring the surprising uses of language and image to create meaning in Zen tradition and practice. 

Students do not need any prior experience or knowledge of Zen rhetoric or Zen practices. The first part of the class will provide background on Zen concepts including ethical precepts and koans, then consider the emergence of the American Zen rhetorical tradition. This class is not an introduction to Zen practice, but rather an exploration of an alternative rhetoric, a different method of using language to construct meaning and shape relationships that help foster care and respect rather than antagonism and aggression.

Grading Policy: Grades in this course are determined on the basis of the Learning Record, which accompanies a portfolio of work presented at the midterm and at the end of the course. These portfolios present a selection of student work, both formal and informal, completed during the semester, ongoing observations about student learning, and analysis of student work and interpretations with respect to the student's development across five dimensions of learning: confidence and independence, knowledge and understanding, skills and strategies, use of prior and emerging experience, and reflectiveness. This development centers around the major strands of work in the course: rhetoric and composition, research, technology, and collaboration. The criteria for grades are posted at the Learning Record web site. Please also notice the RHE policy on absences, which can affect your grade. Three unexcused absences will lower your final grade, four unexcused absences results in automatic failure of the course.

Texts

Joko Beck, Everyday Zen; Perle Besserman and Manfred Steger, Zen Radicals, Rebels, and Reformers; Norman Fischer and Susan moon, What is Zen?; Mu Soeng, Trust in Mind; Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind; John Tarrant, Bring be the Rhinoceros; Brad Warner, Hardcore Zen: Punk Rock, Monster Movies, & the Truth about Reality; Dale Wright, Philosophical Meditation on Zen Buddhism; 

RHE 330E • Nonargumntatv Rhet In Zen

43806 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 104
Wr

“Don’t go searching for the Truth. Just let go of your opinion.” ~ Hsin Shin Ming

American rhetoric is strongly grounded in argument and persuasion, and infused with judgments of good and bad, right and wrong. This is true not only for public discourse in the media, academic discourse in schools, and professional writing and speaking, it is also true in everyday conversation. We are constantly trying to convince someone of our judgments, or that something or someone is good or bad, right or wrong—a restaurant, a movie, a car, a teacher. Everything is evaluated and every conversation is full of assertions of value. But what if there were a different, equally “real” way to talk about the world and each other that didn’t create antagonistic relationships? What if we believed that each person is capable of waking up to the reality around her, and responding appropriately, without being converted to some position or belief? What kind of language would we use, and how would we use it?

Zen training begins by kicking the props out of our customary ways of understanding and talking. It subverts value distinctions, challenges our habitual ways of expressing ourselves, and denies the superiority of rationalist, linear logic. It does not do this merely to "deconstruct" language, or to tear down all meaning. It has a radical project of waking us up out of the trance we create for ourselves and others through our habitual uses of language. This class will explore how contradiction, negation, story, surprise, gesture, and silence are used in Zen training as resources for awakening to reality, rather than as assertions or arguments about it. The cryptic pronouncements of Zen masters seem impenetrable. They appear to defy our western rhetorical traditions that depend on logic and formal reasoning as the key to building knowledge. Zen teachers complicate the issue by insisting that language is only "the finger pointing at the moon, not the moon itself." If you have ever tried to write about a meaningful experience, you will recognize the problematic relationship between language and reality. This course engages students in exploring the surprising uses of language and image to create meaning in Zen tradition and practice. 

Students do not need any prior experience or knowledge of Zen rhetoric or Zen practices. The first part of the class will provide background on Zen concepts including ethical precepts and koans, then consider the emergence of the American Zen rhetorical tradition. This class is not an introduction to Zen practice, but rather an exploration of an alternative rhetoric, a different method of using language to construct meaning and shape relationships that help foster care and respect rather than antagonism and aggression.

Grading Policy: Grades in this course are determined on the basis of the Learning Record, which accompanies a portfolio of work presented at the midterm and at the end of the course. These portfolios present a selection of student work, both formal and informal, completed during the semester, ongoing observations about student learning, and analysis of student work and interpretations with respect to the student's development across five dimensions of learning: confidence and independence, knowledge and understanding, skills and strategies, use of prior and emerging experience, and reflectiveness. This development centers around the major strands of work in the course: rhetoric and composition, research, technology, and collaboration. The criteria for grades are posted at the Learning Record web site. Please also notice the RHE policy on absences, which can affect your grade. Three unexcused absences will lower your final grade, four unexcused absences results in automatic failure of the course.

Texts

Joko Beck, Everyday Zen; Perle Besserman and Manfred Steger, Zen Radicals, Rebels, and Reformers; Norman Fischer and Susan moon, What is Zen?; Mu Soeng, Trust in Mind; Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind; John Tarrant, Bring be the Rhinoceros; Brad Warner, Hardcore Zen: Punk Rock, Monster Movies, & the Truth about Reality; Dale Wright, Philosophical Meditation on Zen Buddhism; 

E 314L • Reading Poetry

34825 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM GAR 0.128
Wr

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Course Description:

      For poetry makes nothing happen: it survives

     In the valley of its making where executives

     Would never want to tamper, flows on south

     From ranches of isolation and the busy griefs,

     Raw towns that we believe and die in; it survives,

     A way of happening, a mouth. ~ Auden

 

What is poetry? Once we figure that out, perhaps the better question will reveal itself: why should we devote time to reading it and even memorizing it? What does poetry offer us as creatures of consciousness that other disciplines don’t? Are there rules for poetry or is it something we write when we feel particularly full of emotion? Is there space enough for it in 2010 or is it an antiquated craft no longer in tune with our times? Can it, despite Auden’s declaration, make something happen?

This course helps students prepare for upper-division English classes by focusing on close reading and critical writing, and by introducing formal, historical, and cultural approaches to literary texts: Students will learn how to read deeply within the structural and formal confines of the poem and then will add to that depth of analysis by researching historical and cultural forces acting on the poems. These skills are the foundation of doing advanced work in the English literature discipline. The course will also introduce students to the online Oxford English Dictionary and other important library resources.

Texts: Best Words, Best Order ~ Stephen Dobyns; The Modern Element: Essays on Contemporary Poetry ~ Adam Kirsch; The Necessary Angel: Essays on Reality and the Imagination ~ Wallace Stevens; Rules of the Dance: A Handbook for Writing and Reading Metrical Verse ~ Mary Oliver; A course packet of selected poetry.

Grading: Work for the course will include: Short Quizzes; Memorization exercises; Original poem compositions; two close reading essays; a longer analytical essay and a class presentation. Grades will be determined through the use of the online learning record assessment portfolio. See: http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/~syverson/olr/intro.html.

E 314L • Reading Poetry

33870 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 2.210
Wr

Course Description:

      For poetry makes nothing happen: it survives

     In the valley of its making where executives

     Would never want to tamper, flows on south

     From ranches of isolation and the busy griefs,

     Raw towns that we believe and die in; it survives,

     A way of happening, a mouth. ~ Auden

 

What is poetry? Once we figure that out, perhaps the better question will reveal itself: why should we devote time to reading it and even memorizing it? What does poetry offer us as creatures of consciousness that other disciplines don’t? Are there rules for poetry or is it something we write when we feel particularly full of emotion? Is there space enough for it in 2010 or is it an antiquated craft no longer in tune with our times? Can it, despite Auden’s declaration, make something happen? This course helps students prepare for upper-division English classes by focusing on close reading and critical writing, and by introducing formal, historical, and cultural approaches to literary texts: Students will learn how to read deeply within the structural and formal confines of the poem and then will add to that depth of analysis by researching historical and cultural forces acting on the poems. These skills are the foundation of doing advanced work in the English literature discipline. The course will also introduce students to the online Oxford English Dictionary and other important library resources.

Texts: Best Words, Best Order ~ Stephen Dobyns; The Modern Element: Essays on Contemporary Poetry ~ Adam Kirsch; The Necessary Angel: Essays on Reality and the Imagination ~ Wallace Stevens; Rules of the Dance: A Handbook for Writing and Reading Metrical Verse ~ Mary Oliver; A course packet of selected poetry.

Grading: Work for the course will include: Short Quizzes; Memorization exercises; Original poem compositions; two close reading essays; a longer analytical essay and a class presentation. Grades will be determined through the use of the online learning record assessment portfolio. See: http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/~syverson/olr/intro.html.

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.   

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages