Slavic and Eurasian Studies

Evgenia Wilkins


LecturerPh.D., University of Texas at Austin

Evgenia Wilkins

Contact

  • Phone: 5124714056
  • Office: BUR 482
  • Office Hours: Fall 2020: M 4-5, Thu 12.15 - 1.15 pm and/or by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: F3600

Interests


Intercultural Competence, Metadiscourse, interaction, conversation analysis, study abroad, discourse analysis, the use of technology in language classes

Biography


After completing my BA (The Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia) and MA (St Petersburg State University) I taught Russian as a foreign language to college students for several years in Russia.

In 2009, I entered the graduate program at UT Austin. From 2013 to 2016, I worked as an instructor for the Russian Flagship Program at Portland State University. Currently, I am teaching intensive Russian as well as the second-year non-intensive course. 

My dissertation explores the use of metadiscourse in L2 speaking. My research interests include development of L2 interactional competence, cross-cultural aspects of intercorporeality, and the impact of study abroad on the intercorporeal repertoire. I am currently researching the use of clicks in L2 presentational mode. I am interested in discourse and conversation analysis.

Courses


REE 345 • Enviro Stds In Siberia-Rus

43905 • Spring 2021
GC (also listed as ANT 324L)

Please check back for updates.

RUS 407 • First-Year Russian II-Wb

44175 • Spring 2021
Meets W 11:00AM-12:00PM
Internet; Synchronous

Russian 407 is the second of a three-semester online course designed to introduce you to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world today. Russian is spoken by more than 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. Now you can speak it, too.

Course meets January 16-May 4. This course will be conducted entirely online, using a new multi-media curriculum developed at The University of Texas. All course content and materials will be delivered online and you will not need to purchase additional textbooks. Students will be required to meet as a class, along with the instructor, one hour per week in a virtual classroom (Wednesdays, 9-10am CST).

The pace of Russian 407 is designed to be moderately intensive. Although class meets only once a week, you should expect to do between 12 and 18 hours of work each week, depending on the types and number of activities assigned. Your assignments will require you to work independently a large portion of the time, but you can also expect to work with your classmates on various communication activities, including video recording conversations in Russian. Our goal is to introduce you to Russian language and culture and, by doing so, help you develop functional proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Additionally, we will be online, so you can expect to start learning to navigate the Russian language realm of the Internet, which is truly an entirely other world, replete its own social media, search engines and shopping hotspots.

RUS 322C • Inter Russian Thru Convrstn-Wb

44195 • Spring 2021
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM
Internet; Synchronous

Based on the communicative-function approach to language, the course aims to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with special emphasis on oral expression. The films and textbook exercises will serve as a springboard in class discussions. Speaking skills will be developed through oral presentations, partner work, and class discussions of various topics. The course is conducted in Russian. Taken together with RUS 322W, RUS 322C "Intermediate Russian through Conversation" aims to bring students' proficiency to level to on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

RUS 601C • Intensive Russian I-Wb

42770 • Fall 2020
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM
Internet; Synchronous

Course Description:

An intensive Russian language instruction course developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed primarily through workbook and computer-based home assignments.  We will cover all of Volumes One and Two of the textbooks, Units One through Unit Fourteen in the textbooks, spending about one week on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functional and competitive in the language.

The entire first-year sequence is covered in one semester.

Readings:

Textbook: 

• Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! 2nd ed., vols. 1 and 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008 and 2009). These packaged sets comprise two basic textbooks, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and two DVDs. Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:           

  • Russian/English Dictionary
  • Gerhart, G., The Russian’s World, Orlando: Houghton Mifflin, 1994.
  • Garza, T., Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers  and Students, Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications, 1993.

Grading:

There are five components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1.  Testing:  35%

Unit tests: 15%

Final exam: 20%

2.  Homework:  15% 

3.  Participation:  15% 

4.  Portfolio:  15%

5.  Oral Presentation:  20%

RUS 322C • Inter Russian Thru Convrstn-Wb

42795 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM
Internet; Synchronous

Based on the communicative-function approach to language, the course aims to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with special emphasis on oral expression. The films and textbook exercises will serve as a springboard in class discussions. Speaking skills will be developed through oral presentations, partner work, and class discussions of various topics. The course is conducted in Russian. Taken together with RUS 322W, RUS 322C "Intermediate Russian through Conversation" aims to bring students' proficiency to level to on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

RUS F322W • Inter Russian Thru Writing

82279 • Summer 2020
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM
Two-way Interactive Video

Based on the communicative-function approach to language, the course aims to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with special emphasis on written expression. The textbook will provide topics and vocabulary for essays and review of Russian grammar. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media. By the end of the course, the students would have created a collection of essays on real-life topics. The course is conducted in Russian. Taken together with RUS 322C, RUS 322W "Intermediate Russian through Writing" aims to bring students' proficiency to level to on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

RUS S322C • Inter Russian Thru Convrstn

82291 • Summer 2020
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM
Two-way Interactive Video

Based on the communicative-function approach to language, the course aims to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with special emphasis on oral expression. The films and textbook exercises will serve as a springboard in class discussions. Speaking skills will be developed through oral presentations, partner work, and class discussions of various topics. The course is conducted in Russian. Taken together with RUS 322W, RUS 322C "Intermediate Russian through Conversation" aims to bring students' proficiency to level to on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

RUS 611C • Intensive Russian II

43320 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM RLP 0.118

This course is the second semester of intensive Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed both through workbook home assignments and brief reviews and summaries of your reading material. 

 

The entire second-year sequence is covered in one semester.

We will cover all of the basic textbook, Units One through Unit Ten, plus an introductory unit, in the textbook, spending about seven class days on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop your reading skills through both in-class reading assignments, and individual “free reading” based on a text of your choosing. Portfolio exercises will continue to develop your computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functionally proficient and competitive in the language, as well as chronicle your progress in your independent reading project throughout the course. 

RUS 322C • Inter Russian Thru Convrstn

43330 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PMA 5.112

Based on the communicative-function approach to language, the course aims to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with special emphasis on oral expression. The films and textbook exercises will serve as a springboard in class discussions. Speaking skills will be developed through oral presentations, partner work, and class discussions of various topics. The course is conducted in Russian. Taken together with RUS 322W, RUS 322C "Intermediate Russian through Conversation" aims to bring students' proficiency to level to on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

RUS 601C • Intensive Russian I

43020 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM RLP 0.106

Course Description:

An intensive Russian language instruction course developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed primarily through workbook and computer-based home assignments.  We will cover all of Volumes One and Two of the textbooks, Units One through Unit Fourteen in the textbooks, spending about one week on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functional and competitive in the language.

The entire first-year sequence is covered in one semester.

Readings:

Textbook: 

• Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! 2nd ed., vols. 1 and 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008 and 2009). These packaged sets comprise two basic textbooks, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and two DVDs. Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:           

  • Russian/English Dictionary
  • Gerhart, G., The Russian’s World, Orlando: Houghton Mifflin, 1994.
  • Garza, T., Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers  and Students, Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications, 1993.

Grading:

There are five components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1.  Testing:  35%

Unit tests: 15%

Final exam: 20%

2.  Homework:  15% 

3.  Participation:  15% 

4.  Portfolio:  15%

5.  Oral Presentation:  20%

RUS 322C • Inter Russian Thru Convrstn

43040 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM RLP 1.102

Based on the communicative-function approach to language, the course aims to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with special emphasis on oral expression. The films and textbook exercises will serve as a springboard in class discussions. Speaking skills will be developed through oral presentations, partner work, and class discussions of various topics. The course is conducted in Russian. Taken together with RUS 322W, RUS 322C "Intermediate Russian through Conversation" aims to bring students' proficiency to level to on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

RUS 611C • Intensive Russian II

43860 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM BUR 228

This course is the second semester of intensive Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed both through workbook home assignments and brief reviews and summaries of your reading material. 

 

The entire second-year sequence is covered in one semester.

We will cover all of the basic textbook, Units One through Unit Ten, plus an introductory unit, in the textbook, spending about seven class days on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop your reading skills through both in-class reading assignments, and individual “free reading” based on a text of your choosing. Portfolio exercises will continue to develop your computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functionally proficient and competitive in the language, as well as chronicle your progress in your independent reading project throughout the course. 

RUS 322W • Inter Russian Thru Writing

43865 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM CMA 5.190

Based on the communicative-function approach to language, the course aims to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with special emphasis on written expression. The textbook will provide topics and vocabulary for essays and review of Russian grammar. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media. By the end of the course, the students would have created a collection of essays on real-life topics. The course is conducted in Russian. Taken together with RUS 322C, RUS 322W "Intermediate Russian through Writing" aims to bring students' proficiency to level to on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

RUS 601C • Intensive Russian I

44245 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM RLP 1.102

Course Description:

An intensive Russian language instruction course developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed primarily through workbook and computer-based home assignments.  We will cover all of Volumes One and Two of the textbooks, Units One through Unit Fourteen in the textbooks, spending about one week on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functional and competitive in the language.

The entire first-year sequence is covered in one semester.

Readings:

Textbook: 

• Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! 2nd ed., vols. 1 and 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008 and 2009). These packaged sets comprise two basic textbooks, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and two DVDs. Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:           

  • Russian/English Dictionary
  • Gerhart, G., The Russian’s World, Orlando: Houghton Mifflin, 1994.
  • Garza, T., Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers  and Students, Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications, 1993.

Grading:

There are five components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1.  Testing:  35%

Unit tests: 15%

Final exam: 20%

2.  Homework:  15% 

3.  Participation:  15% 

4.  Portfolio:  15%

5.  Oral Presentation:  20%

RUS 322C • Inter Russian Thru Convrstn

44260 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 310

Based on the communicative-function approach to language, the course aims to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with special emphasis on oral expression. The films and textbook exercises will serve as a springboard in class discussions. Speaking skills will be developed through oral presentations, partner work, and class discussions of various topics. The course is conducted in Russian. Taken together with RUS 322W, RUS 322C "Intermediate Russian through Conversation" aims to bring students' proficiency to level to on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

RUS 611C • Intensive Russian II

44410 • Spring 2018
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BUR 228

This course is the second semester of intensive Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed both through workbook home assignments and brief reviews and summaries of your reading material. 

 

The entire second-year sequence is covered in one semester.

We will cover all of the basic textbook, Units One through Unit Ten, plus an introductory unit, in the textbook, spending about seven class days on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop your reading skills through both in-class reading assignments, and individual “free reading” based on a text of your choosing. Portfolio exercises will continue to develop your computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functionally proficient and competitive in the language, as well as chronicle your progress in your independent reading project throughout the course. 

RUS 312L • Second-Year Russian II

44425 • Spring 2018
Meets MTWTH 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ B0.302

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by theAmerican Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

RUS 507 • First-Year Russian II

44915 • Spring 2017
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM BUR 228

Welcome back to UT and to Russian 507! This course is the continuation of your introduction to

the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world.

Russian is spoken by more that 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional

150 million throughout the world. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the

resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian

Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of

all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! ?????!

 

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic. Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia!

vol. 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009). This packaged set

comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD. Available

at the University Co-op.

 

GRADING

1. Testing: 50%

2. Homework: 25%

3. Participation: 20%

RUS 506 • First-Year Russian I

44850 • Fall 2016
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM BUR 128

Welcome to Russian 506! This course is designed to introduce you to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world – today and over a millennium of history. Russian is spoken by more than 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, Putin – and Medvedev! The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students every year, while in Siberia and the Caspian, oil and petroleum products are produced at a rate that rivals that of the Middle East. As a Member of the Group of Eight, Russia has become in the 21st century a power player in global policy from economics to terrorism to the environment. And, as events last year in North Ossetia and Georgia indicate, Russia remains as unpredictable in the shaping of world affairs as it was during Soviet times. As such, a command of the Russian language is a powerful (and lucrative!) facility in virtually any area of employment, be it government service, business, law, medicine, teaching, engineering, or the military. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! ????? ???! Good luck! 

Course Content: This course is the first semester of first-year Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments. The second course in the first-year sequence is RUS 507.

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! vol. 1,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:

  • Cruise, Edwina. English Grammar for Students of Russian, (Ann Arbor, MI: Olivia and Hill Press, 1993).
  • Garza, Thomas. Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers and Students, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications), 1993.
  • Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).
 

RUS 507 • First-Year Russian II

44950 • Spring 2012
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:00AM JES A218A

Welcome back to UT and to Russian 507! This course is the continuation of your introduction to

the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world.

Russian is spoken by more that 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional

150 million throughout the world. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the

resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian

Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of

all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! ?????!

 

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic. Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia!

vol. 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009). This packaged set

comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD. Available

at the University Co-op.

 

GRADING

1. Testing: 50%

2. Homework: 25%

3. Participation: 20%

RUS 506 • First-Year Russian I

44785 • Fall 2011
Meets MTWTHF 12:00PM-1:00PM CBA 4.344

Course Description:

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! vol. 1,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:

• Cruise, Edwina. English Grammar for Students of Russian, (Ann Arbor, MI: Olivia and Hill Press, 1993).

• Garza, Thomas. Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers and Students, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications), 1993.

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

Welcome to Russian 506! This course is designed to introduce you to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world – today and over a millennium of history. Russian is spoken by more than 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, Putin – and Medvedev! The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students every year, while in Siberia and the Caspian, oil and petroleum products are produced at a rate that rivals that of the Middle East. As a Member of the Group of Eight, Russia has become in the 21st century a power player in global policy from economics to terrorism to the environment. And, as events last year in North Ossetia and Georgia indicate, Russia remains as unpredictable in the shaping of world affairs as it was during Soviet times. As such, a command of the Russian language is a powerful (and lucrative!) facility in virtually any area of employment, be it government service, business, law, medicine, teaching, engineering, or the military. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! ????? ???! Good luck! 

I.            General

Course Content: This course is the first semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.  We will cover Units One through Unit Six in the textbook (Vol. 1), spending about two weeks on each unit.

Attendance Policy: You are expected to attend daily classes regularly, participate actively in class, do all assigned coursework, and take all exams.  You will be allowed a maximum of five (5) absences, excused or otherwise, during the semester.  Each absence beyond the fifth shall result in the lowering of your final course grade by a diacritic (a B+ goes to a B, a B to a B-, etc.). A student shall be considered absent after 15 minutes have elapsed from the beginning of class and the student has failed to arrive. 

 

Tardiness: You are to arrive to class on time. Students who arrive after class has begun shall incur a tardy. A total of three (3) tardies shall be equivalent to one (1) absence and shall count towards the five absences allowed each student. Students are expected to be aware of their own accumulated absences and tardies. Although the instructor will maintain daily records of attendance, he/she will not update students on the status of their attendance unless otherwise requested.

Course Requirements: A Course Syllabus for the entire semester, briefly describing goals and in-class activities, is found on pp. xiii - xx in your Textbook. Corresponding homework assignments for each daily class meeting are found in the Workbook. PREPARING AND HANDING IN DAILY HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS IS ESSENTIAL TO PASS THE COURSE!  This means that you should go over and be familiar with this material (or prepare relevant questions) in advance of class. Note that Days Eight and Nine in the syllabus are combined into ONE review day for us.  You are also responsible for learning all of the words and expressions contained in the texts and exercises covered in the Course Syllabus which appear in non-italic type in the vocabulary lists at the end of each unit.  You should plan to spend about two hours of preparation for each hour in the classroom.  If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to contact your instructor or another student and find out what was covered and make up the missed work. 

Technology Policy:  Students should turn off all cell phones and pagers before class begins.  Texting or taking/making calls during class is unacceptable and shall reflect poorly on students' participation grade. Although many students prefer to take notes on a computer, a language class is generally not conducive to this type of note taking.  Please refrain from using a computer during class unless you have sought and received the express consent of the instructor. 

Special Accommodations: If you have extenuating physical circumstances, all instructors in the Slavic Department will make themselves available to discuss appropriate academic accommodations that you may require as a student with a disability.  Before course accommodations will be made, students may be required to provide documentation to the Office of the Dean of Students -- Services for Students with Disabilities.

 Testing:  There will be six in-class one-hour tests and a final examination for this course.  The in-class tests, each covering one unit, will be given on September 16, September 30, October 14, October 28, November 11, and November 29. A comprehensive final exam will be given during the University's exam period between December 8 and 15, 2010.

 

II. Grading

There are three components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1.  Testing:  55%

In-class tests: 25%

Final exam: 30%

Because of the time constraints and pace of this course, make-ups on any of the tests will be given only in unusual cases with extenuating circumstances.

2.  Homework:  30%

Written homework or in-class quizzes (e.g., vocabulary, grammar checks, etc.) will be graded on a credit (4) / no credit (7) basis.  All assignments from the Workbook must be turned in on the class day after being assigned; a "no credit" assignment may be resubmitted for credit on the following day after being returned to the student.  Your homework grade will be the percentage of "credit" assignments you submit during the term.

3.  Participation:  15%

 

Your instructor determines this component as a reflection of your overall preparedness and performance in class; it is NOT merely an attendance grade.  You are expected to a) attend class daily, b) prepare assigned material in advance for each class, and c) respond in class with reasonable accuracy and, of course, enthusiasm.  

The result of these calculations will be on a number on a scale of 0-100.  This numerical grade will be converted to a letter grade as follows:

98 – 100 = A+

94 – 97 = A

90 – 93 = A-

88 – 89 = B+

84 – 87 = B

80 – 83 = B-

78 – 79 = C+

74 – 77 = C

70 – 73 = C-

68 – 69 = D+

64 – 67 = D

60 – 63 = D-

59 and below = F

III. Supplementary Materials

Your Textbook comes with an audio CD and a DVD that correspond to many of the exercises in each unit, indicated by a "cassette" and "camera" symbol, respectively.  You will greatly enhance your own listening comprehension of Russian by downloading and using these media in your iPod or home/car stereo as often as possible.  If you prefer to use the media on campus, there are

facilities available in several locations, such as the Perry Castañeda Library and Flawn Academic Center. In addition, the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies also has in Calhoun 422 a collection of both classic and very recent DVDs with movies, music, speeches and documentaries from and about Russia and the former Soviet states.  These DVDs are interesting from both a cultural and purely entertainment point of view.  Many of the DVDs have both English subtitles (which can help you build your confidence and facility in hearing spoken Russian and deriving meaning), and some also have Russian subtitles, which are a real benefit to building listening comprehension as you gain a larger vocabulary and fluency. These may be checked out for home viewing; see your instructor for suggestions.  

RUS S412L • Second-Year Russian II

88385 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:30AM PMA 5.112

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages.

Course Requirements: You are expected to attend classes regularly, participate actively in class, do all assigned coursework (written, oral, and preparatory), and take all exams.  An outline of each unit, listing video episodes (found on the DVD), communicative goals, lexical fields, and grammatical topics, is found on pp. vii-xvii of your textbook. An overview of our schedule this semester is given (with dates of exams) is given on p. 5 of this syllabus. The homework assignments are found in the workbook and, for aural work, on the CDs (as well as on the website http://www.livefromrussia.org). We are going to work in group on the Black Board. Every week your group will be assigned a new task. Guidelines will be posted on BB on week before the assignment is due.

If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to contact your instructor or another student, find out what was covered, and make up the missed work.

In order to do well in this (or any) language class, you must:

Read this syllabus!

Attend class regularly, participate actively, and take notes.

Prepare for each class in advance so that you are familiar with what will be covered that day.

Learn all of the words and expressions which appear in the vocabulary list at the end of each unit covered; these words are utilized in the chapter material. 

Review material specified in the homework assignments and submit written homework on time.

Spend about two hours of preparation for each hour in the classroom. 

Take all exams as scheduled.

Accommodations for disabilities: Any student with a documented disability (physical or cognitive) who requires academic accommodations should contact the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259 (voice) or 471-4641 (TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing) as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining authorized accommodations.

Electronic devices. Please ensure that your cell phone and any other electronic devices are off and out-of-sight throughout the class period. Laptop computers may be utilized during class ONLY for class-related purposes and ONLY with the permission of the instructor. Failure to observe these courtesies will be reflected in your class participation grade.

II. GRADING

There are three components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1. Testing: 50%

In-class tests: 30% Final exam: 15%.  Oral proficiency exam: 5%

There are no make-ups on in-class tests or on the final. If you must miss an exam, contact your instructor as soon as you can. Any accommodations will require documentation of the reason for your absence; otherwise a zero will be recorded. 

2. Homework: 25%+10%

Written homework or in-class quizzes (e.g., vocabulary, grammar checks, etc.) will be graded on a credit/no credit basis. An assignment for which you are not awarded credit may be resubmitted for credit on the following class day. Your homework grade will be the percentage of assignments for which you receive credit.

On Monday in class your group will receive an assignment for the BB work. First posting is due on Friday, 6 p.m. Second posting is due on Sunday that week 10 p.m.

3. Participation: 15%

This grade is determined by your instructor as a reflection of your overall preparedness and performance in class. 

You are expected to a) attend class daily, b) prepare assigned material in advance for each class, and c) respond in class with reasonable accuracy, relevance, and enthusiasm.

Attendance will be recorded by your instructor. While there is no direct, automatic penalty for absences (however, if there is more than 5 unexcused absences, instructor is required to fill out “absence report and submit it to the dean’s office), your attendance record will be reflected in your participation grade: if you aren’t present, you can’t participate.

The result of these calculations will be on a number on a scale of 0-100.  Plus/minus grading will apply. This numerical grade will be converted to a letter grade as follows:

98 – 100 = A+

78 – 79 = C+

94 – 97 = A

74 – 77 = C

90 – 93 = A-

70 – 73 = C-

88 – 89 = B+

68 – 69 = D+

84 – 87 = B

64 – 67 = D

80 – 83 = B-

60 – 63 = D-

59 and below = F

An Incomplete will be granted only under the direst of circumstances (e.g., an unexpected family or health crisis preventing you from continuing your academic work) and you will be asked to substantiate any such circumstances. 

These rules will be strictly observed by your instructor.

III. RESOURCES

Your Textbook comes with two CDs and a DVD that accompany the exercises in each unit, indicated by a "cassette" and "camera" symbol, respectively.  You will greatly enhance your listening comprehension of Russian by using these resources as often as indicated in the book and as possible.  The Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies, Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, and Audio-Visual Library of the General Libraries have extensive collections of recordings that may be checked out for home viewing.  There are vast resources on the Web as well. For example, you can take a look at my blog http://teachl2memo.blogspot.com/, where I collect resources for learners of Russian of different levels. If you have any good finds, let your instructor know. 

Remember to come at least once to the Russian Table, which is held on Fridays and provides you with more opportunities to carry out activities in Russian not associated with your class.

RUS 412L • Second-Year Russian II

45530 • Spring 2011
Meets MTWTH 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 208

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by theAmerican Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

RUS 412K • Second-Year Russian I

44890 • Fall 2010
Meets MTWTH 10:00AM-11:00AM CAL 419

Course Description

This course is the third semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily thorough workbook home assignments. 

Texts:

Russian Stage 2, Welcome Back. Martin-Zaitseiv

Requirements and Grading

In-class tests                     30%

Final Exam                        30%

Homework                        25%

Participation                      15%

Prerequisites: RUS 804, 507, 507T, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.


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    The University of Texas at Austin
    2505 University Avenue, Stop F3600
    Burdine Hall 452
    Austin, TX 78712
    512–471–3607