Slavic and Eurasian Studies

Leslie O'Bell


Other facultyPh.D., Harvard University

Associate Professor, Retired
Leslie O'Bell

Contact

Courses


REE 325 • The Russian Novel-W

44730 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 2.128

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Russian Culture: The Arts

45655 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 103

Please check back for updates.

RUS 412K • Second-Year Russian I

46040 • Fall 2008
Meets MTWTH 10:00AM-11:00AM CAL 419

Добро пожаловать! Welcome to RUS 412! This is the third and final class of the three-semester online sequence. This course is designed to introduce you to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world today. Russian is spoken by more than 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. Now you can speak it, too.

RUS 412 will be conducted entirely online. We will be using a new multi-media curriculum developed at the University of Texas. All course content and materials will be delivered online, and you will not need to purchase additional textbooks. Students will be required to meet as a class, along with the instructor, one hour per week in a virtual classroom.

The pace of Russian 412 is designed to be moderately intensive. Although class meets as a unit only once a week, you should expect to do between 12 and 18 hours of work each week, depending on the types and number of activities assigned. Many of your assignments will require that you work independently a large portion of the time. You can also expect to work with your classmates for various paired conversation activities online.

The general goal of this course is to introduce you to Russian language and culture. We will work towards developing intermediate-range language proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. And since we will be online, you can expect to start learning to navigate the Russian language realm of the Internet. 

This course follows the dates of the regular University of Texas fall semester, August 30 – December 11.

·       TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS:

o   Reliable internet connection - A very strong connection is required for weekly class meetings and strongly recommended for other synchronous interactions and video recordings. Do not expect to be able to use a coffee shop’s connection for these.

o   A  working computer with webcam, microphone, and headphones.

o   Canvas is designed to be compatible with Chrome, so if you are using a web browser other than Chrome, you might not have full functionality in Canvas.  Bottom line, use Chrome as your browser for Canvas.

REE 325 • 19th-C Russian Short Stories-W

46595 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 103

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Pushkin-W

45215 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 103

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • The Russian Novel-W

46410 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 103

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Rus Romance With Shakespeare-W

44450 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 103

Please check back for updates.

RUS 507 • First-Year Russian II

45005 • Spring 2006
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 206

Welcome back to UT and to Russian 507! This course is the continuation of your introduction to

the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world.

Russian is spoken by more that 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional

150 million throughout the world. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the

resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian

Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of

all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! ?????!

 

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic. Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia!

vol. 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009). This packaged set

comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD. Available

at the University Co-op.

 

GRADING

1. Testing: 50%

2. Homework: 25%

3. Participation: 20%

REE 381 • Smnr Rus/E Eur/Eurasn Civ/Cul

44610 • Fall 2005
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM PAR 214

This is the introductory seminar to Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.  It consists of a series of guest lectures by a   diverse cast of CREEES faculty in order to give the students as  broad an overview of the field as possible.

Prerequisites: graduate standing. 

Readings:  Distributed by visiting lecturers a week before each lecture

Grading:   Participation:             10%

              Oral presentation:       40%

               Final research paper:  50%

REE 325 • Pushkin-W

43035 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 103

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • 19th-C Russian Short Stories-W

44025 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A217A

Please check back for updates.

RUS 506 • First-Year Russian I

44525 • Fall 2004
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM MEZ 2.124

Welcome to Russian 506! This course is designed to introduce you to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world – today and over a millennium of history. Russian is spoken by more than 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, Putin – and Medvedev! The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students every year, while in Siberia and the Caspian, oil and petroleum products are produced at a rate that rivals that of the Middle East. As a Member of the Group of Eight, Russia has become in the 21st century a power player in global policy from economics to terrorism to the environment. And, as events last year in North Ossetia and Georgia indicate, Russia remains as unpredictable in the shaping of world affairs as it was during Soviet times. As such, a command of the Russian language is a powerful (and lucrative!) facility in virtually any area of employment, be it government service, business, law, medicine, teaching, engineering, or the military. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! ????? ???! Good luck! 

Course Content: This course is the first semester of first-year Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments. The second course in the first-year sequence is RUS 507.

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! vol. 1,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:

  • Cruise, Edwina. English Grammar for Students of Russian, (Ann Arbor, MI: Olivia and Hill Press, 1993).
  • Garza, Thomas. Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers and Students, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications), 1993.
  • Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).
 

REE 325 • The Russian Novel-W

41455 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 103

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Rus Romance With Shakespeare-W

42605 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CAL 22

Please check back for updates.

RUS 506 • First-Year Russian I

42970 • Fall 2003
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 308

Welcome to Russian 506! This course is designed to introduce you to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world – today and over a millennium of history. Russian is spoken by more than 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, Putin – and Medvedev! The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students every year, while in Siberia and the Caspian, oil and petroleum products are produced at a rate that rivals that of the Middle East. As a Member of the Group of Eight, Russia has become in the 21st century a power player in global policy from economics to terrorism to the environment. And, as events last year in North Ossetia and Georgia indicate, Russia remains as unpredictable in the shaping of world affairs as it was during Soviet times. As such, a command of the Russian language is a powerful (and lucrative!) facility in virtually any area of employment, be it government service, business, law, medicine, teaching, engineering, or the military. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! ????? ???! Good luck! 

Course Content: This course is the first semester of first-year Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments. The second course in the first-year sequence is RUS 507.

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! vol. 1,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:

  • Cruise, Edwina. English Grammar for Students of Russian, (Ann Arbor, MI: Olivia and Hill Press, 1993).
  • Garza, Thomas. Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers and Students, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications), 1993.
  • Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).
 

REE 325 • Pushkin-W

41740 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 308

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • 19th-C Russian Short Stories-W

42435 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BAT 105

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Russian Culture: The Arts

41560 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 130

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • The Russian Novel-W

41580 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 103

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Rus Romance With Shakespeare-W

42585 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BAT 215

Please check back for updates.

REE 385 • Traditions Of Russian Poetry

42675 • Fall 2001
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM CAL 422

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Russian 19th-C Masterpieces-W

41250 • Spring 2001
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 130

Please check back for updates.

RUS 507 • First-Year Russian II

41585 • Spring 2001
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 4.120

Welcome back to UT and to Russian 507! This course is the continuation of your introduction to

the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world.

Russian is spoken by more that 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional

150 million throughout the world. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the

resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian

Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of

all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! ?????!

 

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic. Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia!

vol. 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009). This packaged set

comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD. Available

at the University Co-op.

 

GRADING

1. Testing: 50%

2. Homework: 25%

3. Participation: 20%

RUS 506 • First-Year Russian I

42635 • Fall 2000
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM MEZ 210

Welcome to Russian 506! This course is designed to introduce you to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world – today and over a millennium of history. Russian is spoken by more than 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, Putin – and Medvedev! The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students every year, while in Siberia and the Caspian, oil and petroleum products are produced at a rate that rivals that of the Middle East. As a Member of the Group of Eight, Russia has become in the 21st century a power player in global policy from economics to terrorism to the environment. And, as events last year in North Ossetia and Georgia indicate, Russia remains as unpredictable in the shaping of world affairs as it was during Soviet times. As such, a command of the Russian language is a powerful (and lucrative!) facility in virtually any area of employment, be it government service, business, law, medicine, teaching, engineering, or the military. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! ????? ???! Good luck! 

Course Content: This course is the first semester of first-year Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments. The second course in the first-year sequence is RUS 507.

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! vol. 1,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:

  • Cruise, Edwina. English Grammar for Students of Russian, (Ann Arbor, MI: Olivia and Hill Press, 1993).
  • Garza, Thomas. Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers and Students, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications), 1993.
  • Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).
 

Undergraduate Courses


RUS 356/REE 325 1-The Russian Novel-W

Course Description

Not all classic Russian novels top 500 pages.  Saving these giants for another time,

we will explore the wealth of the novel in Russia, from the unconventional beginnings of the tradition to its picturesque disintegration with the approach of modernism and the revolution.  One of our novels contains a bomb ticking quietly in a sardine can.  In one of them the hero literally blows his opponent away in a duel.  There is philosophy, poetry, comedy and apocalypse.

 Format:  informal lecture and discussion.  Emphasis is on the texts themselves, their significance in Russian culture and in human experience.

 Course requirements:  three essays, thought papers rather than research assignments

(6 pages each, typewritten), spaced at equal intervals over the term.  At least one paper shall be written before the Spring Break.  Papers will be read with interest and returned with comments both about the writing and what the writer wanted to say.  Revision or resubmission will be permitted for at least one paper, with the instructor’s permission.  All written work shall be the student’s own work prepared without unauthorized assistance.  Two examinations.

Satisfies the substantial writing component requirement.

All readings in English.