Slavic and Eurasian Studies

Oksana Lutsyshyna


LecturerPh.D., University of Georgia

Oksana Lutsyshyna

Contact

Interests


Ukrainian and Polish modernisms; poetry; postcolonial theories/decolonization; feminist theories; cultural studies; film studies; language teaching methodology; experiential learning

Biography


Ph.D., Comparative Literature, University of Georgia (2014)
M.A., French, University of South Florida (2006)
M.A., Women's Studies, University of South Florida (2006)
 

Dr. Lutsyshyna's research interests revolve around the issue of metropolitan modernity and Central and Eastern European identity in literature. Her doctoral dissertation is a study of the prose of Bruno Schulz (Poland) in the light of Walter Benjamin’s modernity theories. She is currently working on a book on the discourse of film in the prose of Bruno Schulz and Valerian Pidmohylny (Ukraine). Her second academic book-length project focuses on gendered colonialism and decolonization in the works of contemporary Ukrainian writers. 

Oksana Lutsyshyna's most recent novel Ivan and Phoebe (2019) won two of the most prestigious literary awards in Ukraine, in 2020 and 2021, respectively: the Lviv City of Literature UNESCO Prize and Taras Shevchenko National Prize in fiction. The novel is forthcoming in the English translation by Nina Murray from Deep Vellum Publishing in 2022. Oksana Lutsyshyna's poetry collection, Persephone Blues, in the English translation, was released in 2019 by Arrowsmith. She also translates Ukrainian authors into English in collaboration with Olena Jennings. 

COURSES

Dr. Lutsyshyna teaches undergraduate courses on women's writings from Eastern Europe; Ukrainian Dissent; romance in Soviet film; Chernobyl; graduate seminars on post-Communist protest literature and satire; and various levels of Ukrainian language. 

Courses


REE 302F • Dissent In 20th Cen Ukraine

43055 • Spring 2022
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GEA 127
GC (also listed as C L 305C, EUS 307)

This course will offer a survey of the Ukrainian authors from the 1920s through the present. We will examine the writings from the times of the “Executed Renaissance,” some underground/diaspora literature, and postmodernism. We will focus specifically on works that, in one way or another, challenge the set paradigm of socialist realism, either ethically or aesthetically, by discussing forbidden subjects (famine, religion, Gulag), or even simply accentuating the themes that are not considered “major” (personal life). The goals will include introducing the students to major works by Ukrainian authors, to enhance their knowledge on Eastern Europe in general, and to hone writing skills.

 

Grades:

Exams (2): 30% (15% each)

Reading quizzes (5): 20% (4% each; administered via Canvas) T

wo short papers (2): 30% (15 each)

Presentation: 20 %

REE 325 • Wmn/Resistnc Contemp E Euro

43070 • Spring 2022
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GEA 127
EGCWr (also listed as EUS 347, WGS 340)

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Living A Catastro/Chernobyl

44051 • Fall 2021
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM BUR 134
GC

The Chernobyl catastrophe in the April of 1986 changed the landscape not only in terms of ecology and public health, but also in terms of politics, societal life, and personal awareness. It is argued that Chernobyl catastrophe inspired the breaking of Soviet Union, as the fear of radiation turned out to be stronger than the fear of the totalitarian government. In this class, we will examine the Chernobyl catastrophe, along with some other disasters of the present day, from the point of view of Disaster Studies, analyzing their tragic consequences as well as windows of new opportunities. The class will focus on such skills as independent research, active learning, and digital presentation of content. The work during the course will consist of a debate; group project on assigned topics, dealing with but not limited to the Chernobyl catastrophe and its ramifications; and weekly presentations on the assigned reading materials. 

Grading:

  • Participation: 10%
  • Debate: 30%
  • Group project: 40%
  • Presentation: 20%

REE 386 • Postcom Protest Ukraine/E Eur

44135 • Fall 2021
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM BUR 128

Course description:

 

Post-Communist Protest and Revolution in Ukraine and Eastern Europe 

Since the collapse of communism in the former Soviet Union 1991, a range of protest movements and revolutions have resulted from the tectonic changes, as well as perceived political injustices, of the transition.  As the Iron Curtain parted, the doors opened to a range of grass-root movements, political, social, and artistic.  This course will use a range of literary and non-fiction texts and films to explore such developments in Ukraine, as well as Poland, Belarus, and Russia, and others. The students will have the option of writing their final paper either on a literary problem or on politics. The course will explore the dismantling of the “socialist realism” paradigm in literature and the arts.

 

Required Readings:

 

Ryszard Kapuscinski, Imperium, ISBN-10: 067974780X, ISBN-13:

9780679747802.

Svetlana Alexievich, Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear

Disaster, Picador 2006, ISBN-10: 0312425848, ISBN-13: 978-0312425845.

Tadeusz Konwicki, The Polish Complex, Dalkey Archive Press, 1998, ISBN10:

9781564782014, ASIN: 1564782018.

Yuri Andrukhovych, Recreations, CIUS Press, 1998, ISBN-10: 1895571243

ISBN-13: 978-1895571240.

Oksana Zabuzhko, Your Ad Could Go Here. Amazon Crossing, 2020. ISBN     1542022525.

Serhiy Zhadan, The Orphanage. Yale UP, 2020. ISBN 0300243014.

Vladimir Sorokin, Day of the Oprichnik, Farrar n Straus, 2012, ISBN-10:

0374533105, ISBN-13: 978-0374533106.

Olga Tokarczuk, Flights. Iverhead Books, 2018, ISBN 0525534199.

Anna Starobinets, Look At Him. Slavica Pub, 2020. ISBN 0893575038.

Andrei Codrescu. The Hole in The Flag: A Romanian Exile’s Story of Return and

Revolution. Avon Books 1992. ISBN 038071373 X.

 Alhierd Bacharevic, Alindarka’s Children, Scotland Street Press: Kindle file.

Grading:

 

Presentation:                             15%

Participation:                             10%

Short papers (2):                       30%

Term (final) paper prospectus:    10%

Term (final) paper:                     35%

 

Total:                                        100%

UKR 308 • Ukrainian For Slavc Lrner I-Wb

44545 • Fall 2021
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM
Internet; Synchronous

Course description:

This course is an introduction to the Ukrainian language for those who already have a background in one or more Slavic languages. In this course, we will focus on developing basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, as well as covering grammar fundamentals. We will also use the language to explore aspects of Ukrainian culture, media, and daily life. 

 

Texts and platforms:

 

Yuri Shevchuk, Beginner’s Ukrainianhttps://www.amazon.com/Beginners-Ukrainian-Interactive-Online-Workbook/dp/0781813247 (Links to an external site.)

Course materials/readings of fiction and non-fiction, exercises, poems, etc. Distributed in class.

Yabluko. Elementary Ukrainian. Lviv 2015. (provided via Canvas)

Website Flipgrid: TBA

Grading:

  • Oral exams  (2)                                            20%
  • In-class written exams  (2)                            20%
  • Classwork                                                    10%
  • Homework /recorded videos, via Flipgrid         30%
  • Final presentation                                         20%

 

Total:                                                                  100%

 

Oral exam 1: interview of the student by the instructor (questions provided)

Oral exam 2: interview about a specific event (instructions provided)

Written exams: test grammar, vocabulary, spelling

Final presentation: tackles any aspect of life or culture, requires slides

Classwork: engaging in readings and exercises in class

Flipgrid: specific instructions to follow

REE 302F • Dissent In 20th Cen Ukr-Wb

43855 • Spring 2021
Meets T 12:30PM-2:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
GC (also listed as C L 305C, EUS 307)

This course will offer a survey of the Ukrainian authors from the 1920s through the present. We will examine the writings from the times of the “executed renaissance,” underground literature, and postmodernism. We will focus specifically on works that, in one way or another, challenge the set paradigm of socialist realism, either ethically or aesthetically, by discussing forbidden subjects (famine, religion, Gulag), or even simply accentuating the themes that are not considered “major” (personal life). Book excerpts and articles will supplement literary works, to enable better understanding of the historical context.

Grading:

  • Exams (2): 30% (15 each)
  • Short papers (2): 20% (10 each)
  • Participation: 10%
  • Term (final) paper prospectus: 5%
  • Term (final) paper: 25%
  • Presentation: 10 %

REE 325 • Wmn/Resstnc Cntmp E Euro-Wb

42470 • Fall 2020
Meets T 9:30AM-11:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
EGCWr (also listed as EUS 347, WGS 340)

Please check back for updates.

REE 302 • Dissent 20th-Cent Ukraine

43005 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GEA 127
GC (also listed as C L 305, EUS 307)

Description:

This course will offer a survey of the Ukrainian authors from the 1920s through the present. We will examine the writings from the times of the “executed renaissance,” underground literature, and postmodernism. We will focus specifically on works that, in one way or another, challenge the set paradigm of socialist realism, either ethically or aesthetically, by discussing forbidden subjects (famine, religion, Gulag), or even simply accentuating the themes that are not considered “major” (personal life). Book excerpts and articles will supplement literary works, to enable better understanding of the historical context.

 

Grading:

Presentation:  20%

Participation: 10%

Short papers (2): 30%

Term (final) paper prospectus: 15%

Term (final) paper: 25%

REE 325 • Wmn/Resistnc Contemp E Euro

43030 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GEA 127
GC (also listed as EUS 347, WGS 340)

Description

This course will examine works of a number of Eastern European women writers such as Olga Tokarczuk (Poland), Svetlana Alexievich (Belarus), Oksana Zabuzhko (Ukraine), Dubravka Ugresic (Croatia), Herta Muller (Romania – Germany), Sofi Oksanen (Finland), and Ludmila Petrushevskaya (Russia), and trace their role and involvement in resisting not only political regimes but also gender-based oppression. We will also read supplemental articles, interviews, and secondary sources to provide a general understanding of contemporary politics and ethnic conflict as well as gender roles in Easter Europe. Through class discussion, students will discuss the many forms and repercussions of women’s resistance to recent issues and events within this strategic region.

 

Grading

Journals, 1-2 page long, on authors of choice (4) 20%

To in-class exams 20%

Final paper (may be based on one of the journals) 30%

Presentation 20%

Participation 10%

SEL 330 • Ukrainian For Slavic Lrn II

43475 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CAL 21

Please check back for updates.

REE 302D • Russian Icons/Propaganda

42725 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CBA 4.344
GC (also listed as R S 315K)

Description: “Russian Icons & Propaganda” is a course about signs, symbols, and the contexts that give them meaning. The particular types of signs and symbols that we examine in this lower division course are religious iconography and political propaganda. Our exploration involves many of the sites where these images are found (e.g. cathedrals, public spaces, private homes, etc.) and many of the various media in which they occur (e.g. paintings, posters, sculpture, television, film, etc.). While it would certainly be possible to study icons and propaganda separately, these two sets of symbols share a context that allows us to consider them together: Russia. Without a context, symbols are just pictures – maybe not even that! Within a context, however, they function in many of the same ways that language does. Signs and symbols convey meaning, and as with language, the more developed the system, the more information it is possible for them to convey. As we discover through the course, the “languages” of Russian icons and of propaganda are quite developed and very much alive. Moreover, the amount of overlap between them might seem surprising… but it shouldn’t. The reason for this is that the imagery – the “language” – of Russian propaganda often borrowed from the already-existing symbolism of Russian religious iconography. And while the signs and symbols of Russian propaganda have since developed along their own paths, they still have much in common. In many ways, to understand one of these symbolic systems is to understand them both.

The symbolism of Russian Orthodox iconography reached its impressive capacity to convey meaning in part because of a need to teach often complicated religious ideas to illiterate peasants before (and even during) the twentieth century. By pulling heavily from a system of symbols that the Russian masses already understood, propagandists were able to enter the scene with symbolically sophisticated messages that their intended audience could already read. In this course students learn to read the signs and symbols of icons and propaganda in their Russian context. From subway ceilings to cathedral walls, living room shrines to murals on municipal buildings, and kids’ cartoons to epic film, students will engage with the both the symbols and their contexts using basic semiotic (symbols) and discursive (contextual) techniques for analyzing and interpreting meaning in these two fascinating and surprisingly similar systems of representation.

Grading:

  • 4 short mid-unit online quizzes 5% each
  • 4 unit tests 15% each
  • Group project proposal 5%
  • Peer evaluations of group projects 5%
  • Final group project 10%

Required Texts:

 Bonnell, Victoria E. Iconography of Power: Soviet Political Posters under Lenin and Stalin. Berkeley [u.a.: Univ. of California Press, 2007.

Hall, Stuart, Jessica Evans, and Sean Nixon. Representation: Edited by Stuart Hall, Jessie Evans and Sean Nixon. London: Sage Publications, 2013.

Stanley, Jason. How Propaganda Works. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017.

Tarasov, O I. U, and R R. Milner-Gulland. Icon and Devotion: Sacred Spaces in Imperial Russia. London: Reaktion Books, 2014.

REE 386 • Satire And Politics

42795 • Fall 2019
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM RLP 0.124

Description:

This course will focus on contemporary novels from Eastern Europe, namely, Yuri Andrukhovych’s The Moscoviad (Ukraine), Dorota Maslowska’s Snow White and Russian Red (Poland), Alisa Ganieva’s The Mountain and The Wall (Russia, Dagestan), Oleg Kashin’s Fardwor, Russia! –A Fantastical Tale of Life Under Putin (Russia), Maja Novak’s The Feline Plague (Slovenia), Dan Lungu’s I Am an Old Commie! (Romania), Andrei Kurkov’s Death and the Penguin (Ukraine), Christian Kracht’s Imperium: A Fiction of the South Seas (Germany).

We will explore several brilliant and fun contemporary novels from different Eastern European contexts. In these works, featuring comedy or satire, real events and political themes are often intertwined with fantastical, humorous, and, at times, grotesque elements. However, they are all united by the main theme: an attempt to make sense of the overwhelming circumstances of history or of today’s world. We will also consider several secondary sources, TBA, dealing with either a particular author or a particular country that is featured in one of the novels – Russia/Dagestan, Ukraine, the Balkans, Romania, and Poland. This will be done in order to provide meaningful contexts, national, historical, or political, of the works we will be reading, and also to assist with developing ideas for our writing projects.

Readings:

 Yuri Andrukhovych The Moscoviad , Spuyten Duyvil ISBN-10 1933132523
 Dorota Maslowska Snow White and Russian Red, Grove Press, ISBN-10 0802170013
 Alisa Ganieva The Mountain and The Wall, Deep Vellum Publishing, ISBN-10 1941920152
 Oleg Kashin Fardwor, Russia! –A Fantastical Tale of Life Under Putin, Restless Books, ISBN-10 1632060396
 Oleg Kashin’s Fardwor, Russia! –A Fantastical Tale of Life Under Putin (Russia)
 Maja Novak’s The Feline Plague (Slovenia)
 Dan Lungu’s I Am an Old Commie! (Romania) DocuSign Envelope ID: 0E0D248B-456A-4E76-BA50-24F6AB1FF3F7
 Andrei Kurkov’s Death and the Penguin (Ukraine)

Grading:
 4 journals (of select novels): 20% (5 % each)
 2 short annotations: 10% (5% each)
 2 short papers (2 pgs) with peer review (15% each) o 1 st draft - 10 % (5 each) o 2 nd draft - 10 % (5 each) o 3 rd draft - 10 % (5 each)
 Final paper 30%
 Participation : 5%
 Providing peer feedback: 5%

SEL 330 • Ukrainian For Slavic Lrn I

43190 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 478

Course description:

This is an introductory course of the Ukrainian language for the learners who already have a very basic background in one of more Slavic languages, can read Cyrillic, and are familiar with some grammatical concepts. Drawing on the knowledge, no mater how basic, that the learners already possess, we will focus on developing the four skills – listening, speaking, reading and writing, as well as work on grammar. We will also integrate crucial information on the Ukrainian culture and life.

Texts:

 Yabluko. Elementary Ukrainian. Lviv 2015.

 (Reference: Yuri Shevchuk, Beginner’s Ukrainian).

 Course materials/readings of fiction and non-fiction, exercises, poems, etc. Distributed in class.

Grading:

 Two oral exams 20%

 Two in-class written exams 20%

 Reading assignments, vocabulary work 30%

 Culture presentation 20%

 Participation

REE 325 • Youth/Pol/Soc Media Ukraine

43594 • Spring 2019
Meets M 5:00PM-6:30PM BUR 480
GC

Please check back for updates.

RUS 611C • Intensive Russian II

43855 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM BUR 228

This course is the second semester of intensive Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed both through workbook home assignments and brief reviews and summaries of your reading material. 

 

The entire second-year sequence is covered in one semester.

We will cover all of the basic textbook, Units One through Unit Ten, plus an introductory unit, in the textbook, spending about seven class days on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop your reading skills through both in-class reading assignments, and individual “free reading” based on a text of your choosing. Portfolio exercises will continue to develop your computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functionally proficient and competitive in the language, as well as chronicle your progress in your independent reading project throughout the course. 

SEL 330 • Ukrainian For Slavic Lrn II

43979 • Spring 2019

Please check back for updates.

RUS 601C • Intensive Russian I

44240 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM RLP 0.106

Course Description:

An intensive Russian language instruction course developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed primarily through workbook and computer-based home assignments.  We will cover all of Volumes One and Two of the textbooks, Units One through Unit Fourteen in the textbooks, spending about one week on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functional and competitive in the language.

The entire first-year sequence is covered in one semester.

Readings:

Textbook: 

• Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! 2nd ed., vols. 1 and 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008 and 2009). These packaged sets comprise two basic textbooks, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and two DVDs. Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:           

  • Russian/English Dictionary
  • Gerhart, G., The Russian’s World, Orlando: Houghton Mifflin, 1994.
  • Garza, T., Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers  and Students, Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications, 1993.

Grading:

There are five components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1.  Testing:  35%

Unit tests: 15%

Final exam: 20%

2.  Homework:  15% 

3.  Participation:  15% 

4.  Portfolio:  15%

5.  Oral Presentation:  20%

SEL 330 • Ukrainian For Slavic Lrn I

44452 • Fall 2018

Please check back for updates.

REE 302 • Dissent 20th-Cent Ukraine

44105 • Spring 2018
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM JES A215A
GC (also listed as C L 305, EUS 307)

Description:

This course will offer a survey of the Ukrainian authors from the 1920s through the present. We will examine the writings from the times of the “Executed Renaissance,” underground literature, and postmodernism. We will focus specifically on works that, in one way or another, challenge the set paradigm of socialist realism, either ethically or aesthetically, by discussing forbidden subjects (famine, religion, Gulag), or even simply accentuating the themes that are not considered “major” (personal life). Book excerpts and articles will supplement literary works, to enable better understanding of the historical context.

 

Readings:

Conflict and Chaos: Desperate Times. Trilogy of Selected Prose, Volume 3. Language Lantern, 2010.

Stories from the Ukraine. Transl. and ed. George Luckyj.

Dovzhenko, Oleksandr. “Zemlia” (“The Land”) Film.

Tychyna, Pavlo. Selected poems. Transl. Michael Naydan.

Semenko, Mykhayl. Selected poems.

Teliha, Olena. Selected poems.

Snyder, Timothy. Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin. Vasic Books, 2012. (excerpts on famine)

Bahriany, Ivan. The Hunters and the Hunted. A novel.

Stus, Vasyl. Selected Poems.

Paradhanov, Serhii. “Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors.” Film.

From Three Worlds: New Writing from Ukraine. Eds. Ed Hogan and Askold Melnyczuk. (Valeri Shevchuk, Yuri Vynnychuk, Oksana Zabuzhko, Yevhen Pashkovsky, others).

Andrukhovych, Yuri. Recreations. A novel. Trans. Marko Pavlyshyn.

Zabuzhko, Oksana. Girls. Transl. Askold Melnyczuk.

The Art of the Maidans. Selected poems, stories and articles. 

 

Grading:

Presentation:  20%

Participation: 10%

Short papers (2): 30%

Term (final) paper prospectus: 15%

Term (final) paper: 25%

REE 386 • Postcom Protest Ukraine/E Eur

44185 • Spring 2018
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM CMA 3.134

Since the collapse of communism in the former Soviet Union 1991, a range of protest movements and revolutions have resulted from the tectonic changes, as well as perceived political injustices, of the transition.  As the Iron Curtain parted, the doors opened to a number of changes, political, social, and artistic.  This course will use a range of literary and non-fiction texts and films to explore such developments in Ukraine, as well as Poland, Belarus, Russia, and some other countries. It will examine, for example, new women’s rights movements, LGBT rights movements, and others. Finally, the course will explore the dismantling of the “socialist realism” paradigm in literature and the arts in what some have termed the “post-colonial” states of the former Soviet Union.

 

Texts 

Andrukhovych, Yuri. The Moscoviad. Spuyten, 2009. 

Babina, Natalka. Down Among the Fishes. Glagoslav, 2014. 

Maslowska, Dorota. Snow White and Russian Red. Grove Press, 2005. 

Pavlychko, Solomea. Letters from Kiev. CIUS, 1992. 

Viets, Susan. Picnic at the Iron Curtain: From the Fall of the Berlin Wall to Ukraine's Orange Revolution. Delfryn, 2012. 

Gender, Politics, and Society in Ukraine. Ed. Olena Hankivsky. U Toronto Press, 2012. 

Selected essays and films by Ukrainian, Russian, Belarusian, and Polish authors. 

SEL 330 • Ukrainian For Slavic Lrn II

44620 • Spring 2018
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM CMA 3.108

Course description:

 

This is the second part of the introductory course of the Ukrainian language for the learners who already have a very basic background in one of more Slavic languages. In the course, we will continue to work on basic skills, such as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and also grammar. In addition to basic textbook exercises and speaking assignments, the students will work on reading authentic texts and writing responses to them. The course will combine the content-based approach with interactive perspective. We will also continue to integrate crucial information on the Ukrainian culture and life.

Texts:

  • Yabluko. Elementary Ukrainian. Lviv 2015.
  • (Reference: Yuri Shevchuk, Beginner’s Ukrainian).
  • Course materials/readings of fiction and non-fiction, exercises, poems, etc. Distributed in class.

Grading:

 

  • Two oral exams                                                                                          20%
  • Two in-class written exams                                                                     20%
  • Reading assignments, vocabulary work                                     20%
  • Essays                                                                                                          20%
  • Culture presentation                                                                                10%
  • Participation                                                                                               10%

REE 301 • Intro Rus/E Eur/Eurasn Stds

44520 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 136
GC (also listed as HIS 306N)

Why did communism collapse? Are we in another Cold War? Is Putin the next Stalin? This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to these and other key issues, topics, and events that are central to the field of Russian, Eastern European, and Eurasian Studies. It features frequent UT faculty guest speakers from across the university with diverse disciplinary specialities including History, Slavic languages and literature, Anthropology, Geography, Political Science, and Ethnomusicology. The course format consists of lectures, discussion, and frequent interactive, student­driven exercises and projects. This is a core course required for a degree in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, and it carries a global studies flag.

REE 325 • Women/Resistnc Contemp E Euro

44545 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GEA 127
GC (also listed as EUS 347, WGS 340)

Course description:

This course will examine works of a number of Eastern European women writers, such as Olga Tokarczuk (Poland), Svetlana Alexievich (Belarus), Oksana Zabuzhko (Ukraine), Dubravka Ugresic (Croatia), Herta Muller (Romania – Germany), Sofi Oksanen (Finland), and Ludmila Petrushevskaya (Russia), and trace their role and involvement in resisting not only political regimes but also gender-based oppression. We will also read supplemental articles, interviews, and secondary sources to provide a general understanding of contemporary politics and ethnic conflict as well as gender roles in Eastern Europe. Through class discussion, students will discuss the many forms and repercussions of women's resistance to recent issues and events within this strategic region. 

Readings:

  • Muller, Herta. The Land of Green Plums. Transl. Michael Hofmann. Picador, 2010. ISBN-10: 0312429940
  • Alexievich, Svetlana. Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear 
  • Disaster. Trans. Keith Gessen. Picador, 2006. ISBN-10: 0312425848.
  • Oksanen, Sofi. Purge. Trans. Lola Rogers. Grove Press, 2010. ISBN-10: 0802170773.
  • Petrushevskaya, Ludmila. There Once Lived a Woman Who Tried to Kill Her Neighbor’s Baby: Scary Fairy Tales. Trans. Keith Gessen. Penguin, 2009. ISBN-10: 0143114662.
  • Tokarczuk, Olga. Primeval and Other Times. Trans. Antonia Lloyd-Jones. Twisted Spoon Press, 2010. ISBN-10: 8086264351.
  • Ugresic, Dubravka. The Culture of Lies: Antipolitical Essays. Penn State UP, 1998. ISBN-10: 027101847X.
  • Ugresic, Dubravka. Thank You for Not Reading. Dalkey Archive Press, 2003. ISBN-10: 1564782980
  • Zabuzhko, Oksana. Fieldwork in Ukrainian Sex. Trans. Halyna Hryn. AmazonCrossingEnglish, 2011. ISBN-10:1611090083.

Grading:

Journals, 1-2 page long, on authors of choice (4): 20 %

To in-class exams: 20 %

Final paper (may be based on one of the journals): 30 %

Presentation: 20%

Participation:10%­

SEL 330 • Ukrainian For Slavic Lrn I

45085 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM ETC 2.102

Course description:

This is an introductory course of the Ukrainian language for the learners who already have a very basic background in one of more Slavic languages, can read Cyrillic, and are familiar with some grammatical concepts. Drawing on the knowledge, no mater how basic, that the learners already possess, we will focus on developing the four skills – listening, speaking, reading and writing, as well as work on grammar. We will also integrate crucial information on the Ukrainian culture and life.

Texts:

  • Yabluko. Elementary Ukrainian. Lviv 2015.
  • (Reference: Yuri Shevchuk, Beginner’s Ukrainian).
  • Course materials/readings of fiction and non-fiction, exercises, poems, etc. Distributed in class.

Grading:

 

  • Two oral exams                                                                                            20%
  • Two in-class written exams                                                             20%
  • Reading assignments, vocabulary work                                            30%
  • Culture presentation                                                                         20%
  • Participation                                                                                     10%

REE 386 • Postcom Protest Ukraine/E Eur

44700 • Spring 2017
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM CLA 0.108
(also listed as WGS 393)

Since the collapse of communism in the former Soviet Union 1991, a range of protest movements and revolutions have resulted from the tectonic changes, as well as perceived political injustices, of the transition.  As the Iron Curtain parted, the doors opened to a number of changes, political, social, and artistic.  This course will use a range of literary and non-fiction texts and films to explore such developments in Ukraine, as well as Poland, Belarus, Russia, and some other countries. It will examine, for example, new women’s rights movements, LGBT rights movements, and others. Finally, the course will explore the dismantling of the “socialist realism” paradigm in literature and the arts in what some have termed the “post-colonial” states of the former Soviet Union.

 

Texts 

Andrukhovych, Yuri. The Moscoviad. Spuyten, 2009. 

Babina, Natalka. Down Among the Fishes. Glagoslav, 2014. 

Maslowska, Dorota. Snow White and Russian Red. Grove Press, 2005. 

Pavlychko, Solomea. Letters from Kiev. CIUS, 1992. 

Viets, Susan. Picnic at the Iron Curtain: From the Fall of the Berlin Wall to Ukraine's Orange Revolution. Delfryn, 2012. 

Gender, Politics, and Society in Ukraine. Ed. Olena Hankivsky. U Toronto Press, 2012. 

Selected essays and films by Ukrainian, Russian, Belarusian, and Polish authors. 

SEL 611C • Intensive Ukrainian II

45125 • Spring 2017
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM BUR 128

This course is an equivalent of two semesters of Intermediate Ukrainian. In this course, we will continually focus on developing basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. We will also use the language to explore aspects of Ukrainian culture, media, and daily life. There will a portfolio of exercises/tasks due at the end, via online platforms, and also a reading project, where you select a book or a set of readings to complete and to be written about at the end.

  

Grading:

Reading project                       25%

Two in-class written exams 20%

Portfolio                                 25%

Homework                                 10%

Oral exam                                 10%

Participation                          10%

REE 325 • Women/Resistnc Contemp E Euro

44540 • Fall 2016
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM WEL 4.224
GC (also listed as EUS 347, WGS 340)

Course description:

This course will examine works of a number of Eastern European women writers, such as Olga Tokarczuk (Poland), Svetlana Alexievich (Belarus), Oksana Zabuzhko (Ukraine), Dubravka Ugresic (Croatia), Herta Muller (Romania – Germany), Sofi Oksanen (Finland), and Ludmila Petrushevskaya (Russia), and trace their role and involvement in resisting not only political regimes but also gender-based oppression. We will also read supplemental articles, interviews, and secondary sources to provide a general understanding of contemporary politics and ethnic conflict as well as gender roles in Eastern Europe. Through class discussion, students will discuss the many forms and repercussions of women's resistance to recent issues and events within this strategic region. 

Readings:

  • Muller, Herta. The Land of Green Plums. Transl. Michael Hofmann. Picador, 2010. ISBN-10: 0312429940
  • Alexievich, Svetlana. Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear 
  • Disaster. Trans. Keith Gessen. Picador, 2006. ISBN-10: 0312425848.
  • Oksanen, Sofi. Purge. Trans. Lola Rogers. Grove Press, 2010. ISBN-10: 0802170773.
  • Petrushevskaya, Ludmila. There Once Lived a Woman Who Tried to Kill Her Neighbor’s Baby: Scary Fairy Tales. Trans. Keith Gessen. Penguin, 2009. ISBN-10: 0143114662.
  • Tokarczuk, Olga. Primeval and Other Times. Trans. Antonia Lloyd-Jones. Twisted Spoon Press, 2010. ISBN-10: 8086264351.
  • Ugresic, Dubravka. The Culture of Lies: Antipolitical Essays. Penn State UP, 1998. ISBN-10: 027101847X.
  • Ugresic, Dubravka. Thank You for Not Reading. Dalkey Archive Press, 2003. ISBN-10: 1564782980
  • Zabuzhko, Oksana. Fieldwork in Ukrainian Sex. Trans. Halyna Hryn. AmazonCrossingEnglish, 2011. ISBN-10:1611090083.

Grading:

Journals, 1-2 page long, on authors of choice (4): 20 %

To in-class exams: 20 %

Final paper (may be based on one of the journals): 30 %

Presentation: 20%

Participation:10%­

SEL 601C • Intensive Ukrainian I

45055 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM CMA 3.108

Course description:

This course is an introduction to the Ukrainian language. In this course, we will focus on developing basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, as well as covering grammar fundamentals. We will also use the language to explore aspects of Ukrainian culture, media, and daily life. 

The material covered during one semester will correspond to the material covered during two semesters of non-intensive study.

  

Text:

Rozmovliaimo! (Let’s Talk!): A Basic Ukrainian Course with Polylogs, Grammar, and Conversation Lessons. R. Delossa, R. R. Koropeckyj, et al. Slavica Pub., 2005. ISBN-13: 978-0893573195.

Course packet. TBA.

 

Grading:

  • Two oral exams                     20%
  • Two in-class written exams     30%
  • Homework                             25%
  • Culture presentation               15%
  • Participation                          10%

REE 302 • Dissent 20th-Cent Ukraine

43710 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM BIO 301
GC (also listed as C L 305, EUS 307)

Description:

This course will offer a survey of the Ukrainian authors from the 1920s through the present. We will examine the writings from the times of the “Executed Renaissance,” underground literature, and postmodernism. We will focus specifically on works that, in one way or another, challenge the set paradigm of socialist realism, either ethically or aesthetically, by discussing forbidden subjects (famine, religion, Gulag), or even simply accentuating the themes that are not considered “major” (personal life). Book excerpts and articles will supplement literary works, to enable better understanding of the historical context.

 

Readings:

Conflict and Chaos: Desperate Times. Trilogy of Selected Prose, Volume 3. Language Lantern, 2010.

Stories from the Ukraine. Transl. and ed. George Luckyj.

Dovzhenko, Oleksandr. “Zemlia” (“The Land”) Film.

Tychyna, Pavlo. Selected poems. Transl. Michael Naydan.

Semenko, Mykhayl. Selected poems.

Teliha, Olena. Selected poems.

Snyder, Timothy. Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin. Vasic Books, 2012. (excerpts on famine)

Bahriany, Ivan. The Hunters and the Hunted. A novel.

Stus, Vasyl. Selected Poems.

Paradhanov, Serhii. “Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors.” Film.

From Three Worlds: New Writing from Ukraine. Eds. Ed Hogan and Askold Melnyczuk. (Valeri Shevchuk, Yuri Vynnychuk, Oksana Zabuzhko, Yevhen Pashkovsky, others).

Andrukhovych, Yuri. Recreations. A novel. Trans. Marko Pavlyshyn.

Zabuzhko, Oksana. Girls. Transl. Askold Melnyczuk.

The Art of the Maidans. Selected poems, stories and articles. 

 

Grading:

Presentation:  20%

Participation: 10%

Short papers (2): 30%

Term (final) paper prospectus: 15%

Term (final) paper: 25%

REE 325 • Women/Resistnc Contemp E Euro

43765 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BUR 228
GC (also listed as EUS 347, WGS 340)

FLAGS:   GC

Course description:

This course will examine works of a number of Eastern European women writers, such as Olga Tokarczuk (Poland), Svetlana Alexievich (Belarus), Oksana Zabuzhko (Ukraine), Dubravka Ugresic (Croatia), Herta Muller (Romania – Germany), Sofi Oksanen (Finland), and Ludmila Petrushevskaya (Russia), and trace their role and involvement in resisting not only political regimes but also gender-based oppression. We will also read supplemental articles, interviews, and secondary sources to provide a general understanding of contemporary politics and ethnic conflict as well as gender roles in Eastern Europe. Through class discussion, students will discuss the many forms and repercussions of women's resistance to recent issues and events within this strategic region. 

Readings:

Muller, Herta. The Land of Green Plums. Transl. Michael Hofmann. Picador, 2010.

ISBN-10: 0312429940

Alexievich, Svetlana. Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear

Disaster. Trans. Keith Gessen. Picador, 2006. ISBN-10: 0312425848.

Oksanen, Sofi. Purge. Trans. Lola Rogers. Grove Press, 2010. ISBN-10: 0802170773.

Petrushevskaya, Ludmila. There Once Lived a Woman Who Tried to Kill Her

Neighbor’s Baby: Scary Fairy Tales. Trans. Keith Gessen. Penguin, 2009. ISBN-10: 0143114662.

Tokarczuk, Olga. Primeval and Other Times. Trans. Antonia Lloyd-Jones. Twisted

Spoon Press, 2010. ISBN-10: 8086264351.

Ugresic, Dubravka. The Culture of Lies: Antipolitical Essays. Penn State UP, 1998.

ISBN-10: 027101847X.

Ugresic, Dubravka. Thank You for Not Reading. Dalkey Archive Press, 2003. ISBN-

10: 1564782980

Zabuzhko, Oksana. Fieldwork in Ukrainian Sex. Trans. Halyna Hryn.

AmazonCrossingEnglish, 2011. ISBN-10: 1611090083.

Grading:

Journals, 1-2 page long, on authors of choice (4)             20 %

To in-class exams                                                                   20 %

Final paper (may be based on one of the journals)           30 %

Presentation                                                                             20%

Participation                                                                             10%­

REE 386 • Postcom Protest Ukraine/E Eur

43834 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CMA 3.134
(also listed as WGS 393)

Since the collapse of communism in the former Soviet Union 1991, a range of protest movements and revolutions have resulted from the tectonic changes, as well as perceived political injustices, of the transition.  As the Iron Curtain parted, the doors opened to a number of changes, political, social, and artistic.  This course will use a range of literary and non-fiction texts and films to explore such developments in Ukraine, as well as Poland, Belarus, Russia, and some other countries. It will examine, for example, new women’s rights movements, LGBT rights movements, and others. Finally, the course will explore the dismantling of the “socialist realism” paradigm in literature and the arts in what some have termed the “post-colonial” states of the former Soviet Union.

 

Texts 

Andrukhovych, Yuri. The Moscoviad. Spuyten, 2009. 

Babina, Natalka. Down Among the Fishes. Glagoslav, 2014. 

Maslowska, Dorota. Snow White and Russian Red. Grove Press, 2005. 

Pavlychko, Solomea. Letters from Kiev. CIUS, 1992. 

Viets, Susan. Picnic at the Iron Curtain: From the Fall of the Berlin Wall to Ukraine's Orange Revolution. Delfryn, 2012. 

Gender, Politics, and Society in Ukraine. Ed. Olena Hankivsky. U Toronto Press, 2012. 

Selected essays and films by Ukrainian, Russian, Belarusian, and Polish authors. 

SEL 506 • First-Year Ukrainian I

44276 • Fall 2015
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM CMA 3.108

Course description:

This course is an introduction to the Ukrainian language. In this course, we will focus on developing basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, as well as covering grammar fundamentals. We will also use the language to explore aspects of Ukrainian culture, media, and daily life.

 

Text:

Rozmovliaimo! (Let’s Talk!): A Basic Ukrainian Course with Polylogs, Grammar, and Conversation Lessons. R. Delossa, R. R. Koropeckyj, et al. Slavica Pub., 2005. ISBN-13: 978-0893573195.

 

Grading:

Two oral exams                    20%

Two in-class written exams     30%

Homework                           25%

Culture presentation              15%

Participation                         10%

Anthologies


Selected Ukrainian Anthologies:

Poems in Az, dva, try: dvanadciat: lyst u pliashci (One, two, three: twelve; a message in the bottle). An Anthology of the Ukrainian Writers Living Abroad. Lviv: Piramida, 2010.

Novel excerpt in Shchodennyky bizhencia (Diaries of a Displaced Person): Contemporary Transcarpathian Prose. Ed. Andrei Kurkov. Kyiv, 2010.

Poems in Dzhynsove pokolinnia-2. Mukachevo: Vezha, 2008.

Poems in Dzhynsove pokolinnia (The Jeans Generation): an Anthology. Mukachevo: Vezha, 2007.

Four short stories in Neznayoma: Anthology of Ukrainian Women’s Prose and Essays. Lviv: Piramida, 2005.

Poems in Anthology of Contemporary Transcarpathian Women’s Poerty. Uzhhorod: Mystecka liniya, 2002.

Poems in Anthology of the Ukrainian Poetry of the Second half of the 20th Century. Kyiv: Granoslov, 2001.

Poems in Transcarpathian Poetry of the 20th Century. Uzhhorod: Zakarpattya, 2001.

 

Translations


Selected Translations
 
Ukrainian Poetry in Translation. 20 Ukrainian poets. Transl. by Oksana Lutsyshyna and Olena Jennings. Spoke 7, July 2020, pp. 123-156.
 
Absolute Zero. Artem Chekh, a book of short stories. Transl. by  Olena Jennings and Oksana Lutsyshyna. Glagoslav: London, 2020.
 
Artem Chekh, short stories. In collaboration with Olena Jennings.
Consequence Magazine, Vol. 11, 2019.
 
Kateryna Kalytko, poems. In Words for War: New Poems from Ukraine, an
anthology, eds. Oksana Maksymchuk and Max Rosochinsky. Boston: Academic
Studies Press. 61-70, 2017.
 
Marianna Kiyanovska, poems. In collaboration with Daniel Belgrad and Kevin
Vaughn. St. Petersburg Review, #7, 2015.
 
Bohdana Matiyash, “conversations with god: poems 2, 7, 10, 17, 21, 27.”
Ukrainian Literature: a Journal of Translation, Volume 3, 2011. 47-52.
 
Vasyl Makhno “The Head of an Elephant:” an essay. In collaboration with Daniel
Belgrad. PostRoad Magazine, #19, 2010. Pp. 153-162.
 
Vasyl Makhno. “Passport:” an essay. In collaboration with Daniel Belgrad.
Absinthe: New European Writing, #12, 2009. Pp. 53-64.
 

Fiction and Poetry


Ivan and Phoebe. A novel. Transl. by Nina Murray. Forthcoming from Deep Vellum Publishing, 2022.

Poems forthcoming in the English translation by Olena Jennings in Ukrainian Literature: a Journal of Translation, 2021.
 
An excerpt from the novel Ivan and Phoebe. Transl. by Reilly Costigan and Isaac
Wheeler. Harriman Magazine: Spring 2020.
 
Persephone Blues. Poems, in translation by Olena Jennings, Askold Melnyczuk, Oksana Maksymchuk. Boston: Arrowsmith, 2019.
 
Ivan i Feba (Ivan and Phoebe). A novel. Lviv, Ukraine: Old Lion Publishers, 2019.
 
Virshi Felitsyty (Felicity’s Poems). A collection of poems. Lviv, Ukraine: Old Lion Publishers, 2018.
 
Poems in: Words for War: New Poems from Ukraine, an anthology, eds. Oksana
Maksymchuk and Max Rosochinsky. In translation into English. Boston: Academic Studies Press. 77-83.
 
Lubovne zhytya. (Love Life). A novel. Lviv, Ukraine: Old Lion Publishers, 2015.
 
Ja sluxaju pisniu Ameryky (I Am Listening to the Song of America). A collection
of poems. Lviv, Ukraine: Old Lion Publishers, 2010.
 
Sontse tak ridko zahodyt (The Sun Seldom Sets). A novel. Kyiv, Ukraine: Fakt, 2007.
 
Ne chervonijuchy (Without Blushing). A collection of short stories. Kyiv, Ukraine: Fakt, 2007.
 
Orfey Velykyi (Orpheus the Great). A collection of poems. Paris-Lviv-Tsvikau: Zerna, 1999.
 
Usvidomlena nich (Aware of the Night). A collection of poems. Kyiv, Ukraine: Hranoslov, 1997.
 
 

Academic Publications


Peer-Review Journals

under review        

The Flâneur in Valerian Pidmohylny’s novel The City

in submission       

Decolonizing the Mind, Writing the Body: The Postcolonial Female Experience in the Works of Assja Djebar (Algeria) and Oksana Zabuzhko (Ukraine).

Writing the “Topography of the Night:" The Chronotope of Change and Transition in Bruno Schulz ‘s Prose.

The Monsters of Modernity: Bruno Schulz's Cerberus and H. P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu.

Critical Articles

The Zelensky Phenomenon: Youth, Social Media, and Political Engagement in Ukraine. In collaboration with Mary Neuburger, Lauren Nyquist, Maya Patel, Matthew Orr, Matt Maldonaldo, Milena Djordjevic-Kisacanin, and Abigail Kuchek. Newsletter of Precarpathian University. Political science / Vasyl Stefanyk Precarpathian National University. Ivano-Frankivsk: Play, Іssue 14.  2020. P.258-275.

A critical introduction to translations of 20 Ukrainian poets. In collaboration with Olena  Jennings. Spoke 7. July 2020, pp. 115-122.

Toni Morrison’s Sula: Queering Binaries, Uniting Traditions. Contemporary Studies In Foreign Philology: No 18, 2020, pp. 239-249.

The Unmaking of the Soviet World: The “Other” Body in the Works of Svetlana Alexievich. Volume on Alexievich, Layman Poupard Publisher, 2017.

Translation Feature: Contemporary Ukrainian Poets. An Introduction. In collaboration with Olena Jennings. The Wolf: 23, 2010, pp. 40-42.

Hyperbolization in Ukrainian Fairy Tales and Their English Translations. In: Identity, Culture, and Language Learning. Ed. Pavel Sysoyev. University of Iowa: CREEES, 2002, pp. 112-120.

Conference Volumes

Grotesk ta obraz potvory u Bruno Schulza i Havarda Filipa Lavkrafta: “Tserber-partiyets’” i “Cthulhu-inoplanetyanyn”. (Grotesque and the Image of a Monster in the Works of Bruno Schulz and H. P. Lovecraft: “Cerberus” and Cthulhu). Conference Proceedings, the 7th Bruno Schulz Festival Conference, Drohobych: Kolo, 2017. 776-788.

Zhinka-molokh" jak dialektychnyj obraz: modernist', Bruno Schul'z i "Tvir pro pasazhi" Val'tera Benjamina.” (Female Moloch as a Dialectical Image in the Works of Bruno Schulz and Walter Benjamin). Conference Proceedings, the 5th Bruno Schulz International Festival Conference, Drohobych: Kolo, 2014. 535-557.

Book Reviews

The Post-Chornobyl Library: Ukrainian Postmodernism of the 1990s. TamaraHundorova. Transl. Sergiy Yakovenko. Academic Studies Press, 2019. A review in East/West: Journal of Ukrainian Studies, 2021.

Twelve Circles, by Yuri Andrukhovych. Trans. Vitaly Chernetsky. New York:Spuyten Duyvil, 2015. A review in SEEJ, Vol 62 (2), 2018.

An Anthology of Modern Ukrainian Drama. Larissa M. L. Zaleska Onyshkevych, comp. and ed. Edmonton: CIUS Press, 2012. A review in East/West: Journal of Ukrainian Studies, Vol 5 no. 2, 2018.

Winter Letters and Other Poems, by Vasyl Makhno. Trans. Oleh Popovych. New York: Spuyten Duyvil, 2011. A Review, in “Future of the Past: New Perspectives on Ukrainian History,” ed. Serhii Plokhy, special issue, Harvard Ukrainian Studies 34, 2015-2016, pp. 550-52.

 


  •   Map
  • Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies

    The University of Texas at Austin
    2505 University Avenue, Stop F3600
    Burdine Hall 452
    Austin, TX 78712
    512–471–3607