Department of Sociology

Ari Adut


Ph.D., University of Chicago

Associate Professor
Ari Adut

Contact

Biography


Ari Adut is currently Editor-in-Chief of Sociological Science. His first book, On Scandal: Moral Disturbances in Society, Politics, and Art, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2008. This book received an Honorable Mention for the 2009 Mary Douglas Prize from the American Sociological Association. His second book, Reign of Appearances: The Misery and Splendor of the Public Sphere, also from Cambridge University Press, was published in 2018. Reign of Appearances won the 2020 Theory Prize from the American Sociological Association. Adut is currently writing a book on political violence that proposes a new explanation for the Reign of Terror during the French Revolution. His research has been published in venues such as American Journal of Sociology, Theory and Society, Sociological Theory, and European Journal of Sociology, and it has received support from the Social Science Research Council and the American Council of Learned Societies. Ari Adut holds graduate degrees from the University of Chicago and École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris, and he is a Past Member of Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton.

Courses


SOC 394K • Contemporary Social Theory

44165 • Spring 2022
Meets W 12:00PM-3:00PM RLP 3.106

Description

This course focuses on some of the major concepts and general approaches in contemporary sociological inquiry. It will take the form of class discussion; everybody should come having done the readings and prepared to talk about them. The texts below can be purchased at the University Co-Op bookstore – or elsewhere – on Guadalupe Street. But the library has many of them in electronic form also.

Required Readings

Pierre Bourdieu, Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgment of Taste, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1984.

Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, New York: Vintage Books, 1979.

Erving Goffman, Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, New York: Anchor Books, 1959.

Arlie Hochschild, Commercialization of Intimate Life: Notes from Home and Work, Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003.

Steven Lukes, Power: A Radical View, Palgrave MacMillan, 2004.

Orlando Patterson, Slavery and Social Death, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1984.

Charles Tilly, Durable Inequality, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.

Ann Swidler, Talk of Love: How Culture Matters, Chicago: University of Chicago Press,      2003.

The rest of the material is available on canvas under files or can be found on jstor through UT Library.

Grading Policy

The final grade will be determined i) class participation (10 percent); ii) four one-page memos that should be submitted the morning of the class by 10 AM (10 percent each); iii) a short presentation of the readings of the week (10 percent); and iii) a final 10-page paper due the last day of class (40 percent). The memo should discuss issues, problems, or questions arising from the week’s reading – things that you should also bring up in class. The final paper should address an empirical question of your choosing whose treatment will involve addressing perspectives, readings, issues, or concepts from the class. You should meet with me at least twice in the course of the semester, so that we can talk about your paper. Plus and minus grades will be used in the determination for the final course grade. Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 512-471-6259, http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd.

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

44945 • Fall 2021
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLP 1.106

This course focuses on some of the major theoretical paradigms and concepts in sociological inquiry. It is designed to help you acquire literacy in social theory and develop a sociological imagination. Its format will combine lectures with class discussions; everybody should come having done the daily readings and prepared to talk about them. The following books will be placed on reserve at the PCL library, but they can also be purchased at the University Co-Op bookstore on Guadalupe Street.

Readings

Craig Calhoun et al. (editors), Classical Sociological Theory, London: Blackwell.

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. London: Routledge, 1992.

The rest of the material (the articles and book chapters that are preceded by the * sign in the syllabus) is available in the form of a course pack that you can obtain online at Paradigm copy store. There will be three examinations for this course. Grades will be based according to the following distribution: First Exam: 30%; Second Exam: 40 %; Final Exam: 30%. 

 Grading

You will need to come to class and participate in discussions. Plus and minus grades will be used for final course grades. Smartphones, Texting, Internet, Facebook, etc. are very distracting not only for you, but also for me and your friends; they are thus not permitted in class. Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations. You can take a make-up only if you present a doctor’s report.

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

44950 • Fall 2021
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 1.106

This course focuses on some of the major theoretical paradigms and concepts in sociological inquiry. It is designed to help you acquire literacy in social theory and develop a sociological imagination. Its format will combine lectures with class discussions; everybody should come having done the daily readings and prepared to talk about them. The following books will be placed on reserve at the PCL library, but they can also be purchased at the University Co-Op bookstore on Guadalupe Street.

Readings

Craig Calhoun et al. (editors), Classical Sociological Theory, London: Blackwell.

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. London: Routledge, 1992.

The rest of the material (the articles and book chapters that are preceded by the * sign in the syllabus) is available in the form of a course pack that you can obtain online at Paradigm copy store. There will be three examinations for this course. Grades will be based according to the following distribution: First Exam: 30%; Second Exam: 40 %; Final Exam: 30%. 

 Grading

You will need to come to class and participate in discussions. Plus and minus grades will be used for final course grades. Smartphones, Texting, Internet, Facebook, etc. are very distracting not only for you, but also for me and your friends; they are thus not permitted in class. Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations. You can take a make-up only if you present a doctor’s report.

SOC 394K • Contemporary Social Theory

44455 • Spring 2019
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM RLP 3.106

This course focuses on some of the major theoretical paradigms and concepts in contemporary sociological inquiry. Among the theorists whose works we will consider are: Andrew Abbott, Charles Tilly, Pierre Bourdieu, Erving Goffman, James Coleman, Ann Swidler, Randall Collins, Roger Gould, and Michel Foucault.

I will take the form of class discussion; everybody should come having done the readings and be prepared to talk about them.  Each student will write a paper 12-15 pages due at the end of the semester.  Each student will do one presentation.  All readings for this course are on reserve, but the texts can be purchased at the University Coop.

SOC 340D • Violence

45030 • Spring 2018
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM CLA 3.106
Wr

Description:

This course examines various aspects of violence: its causes, dynamics, and consequences. We will consider the varying frequency of violence across time and space as well as the moral issues around it. The types of violence that we will study include domestic and interpersonal violence, homicide, political violence, ethnic cleansing, punishment, torture, conventional and civil wars, mob violence, and terrorism. This is a 3-hour seminar course that will involve watching of documentaries, class discussions, presentations, and writing.

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

45500 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 1.106

Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to some of the more important theoretical foundations of the discipline of sociology and to current debates in modern social theory. The first part of the course covers select classical theorists. The second part provides an introduction to twentieth-century social theory and critical perspectives on the classical foundations of sociology. The third and final part presents a highly influential response to these challenges by a leading sociological theorist of our day. Throughout the course, the main topics of interest are the rise and transformation of modern society, the changing relationship between the individual and social institutions, the role of social structures and agency in social theory, the role of moral and instrumental action in agency theory, the challenge of critical theory to the social sciences, and contemporary attempts at a critical and multidimensional theory of society.

This course challenges students to think theoretically and critically about society and its material and cultural construction. The readings for the course are difficult but not inaccessible. This course will be fruitful if, and only if, students make a serious commitment to do the reading and to attend class. If this commitment is made, the social world might never look and feel quite the same. At least this is my goal and I aim to deliver.

Grading Policy

Three short papers 75%

Three one to two page memos on reading 15%

Class participation 10%

Short papers: Students must write three papers, each approximately five pages in length. One paper is due for each of the three parts of the course.

Memos: For the first part of the course, I will ask you to write three memos, each approximately one page in length. One memo will be on Karl Marx. The second memo will be on Emile Durkeim. And the final memo is on Max Weber.

Texts

All texts have been ordered through MonkeyWrench Books (110 E. North Loop, Austin, TX 78751; tel. (512) 407-6925)

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Marx-Engels Reader, ed. Robert Tucker, Norton

Emile Durkheim, On Morality and Society, ed. Robert N. Bellah, Chicago

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Roxbury

Georg Simmel, On Individuality and Social Forms, ed. Donald Levine, Chicago

Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents, Norton

Michel Foucault, The Foucault Reader, ed. Paul Rabinow, Pantheon

Jurgen Habermas, Jurgen Habermas on Society and Politics: A Reader, ed. Seidman, Beacon

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

45505 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 1.106

Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to some of the more important theoretical foundations of the discipline of sociology and to current debates in modern social theory. The first part of the course covers select classical theorists. The second part provides an introduction to twentieth-century social theory and critical perspectives on the classical foundations of sociology. The third and final part presents a highly influential response to these challenges by a leading sociological theorist of our day. Throughout the course, the main topics of interest are the rise and transformation of modern society, the changing relationship between the individual and social institutions, the role of social structures and agency in social theory, the role of moral and instrumental action in agency theory, the challenge of critical theory to the social sciences, and contemporary attempts at a critical and multidimensional theory of society.

This course challenges students to think theoretically and critically about society and its material and cultural construction. The readings for the course are difficult but not inaccessible. This course will be fruitful if, and only if, students make a serious commitment to do the reading and to attend class. If this commitment is made, the social world might never look and feel quite the same. At least this is my goal and I aim to deliver.

Grading Policy

Three short papers 75%

Three one to two page memos on reading 15%

Class participation 10%

Short papers: Students must write three papers, each approximately five pages in length. One paper is due for each of the three parts of the course.

Memos: For the first part of the course, I will ask you to write three memos, each approximately one page in length. One memo will be on Karl Marx. The second memo will be on Emile Durkeim. And the final memo is on Max Weber.

Texts

All texts have been ordered through MonkeyWrench Books (110 E. North Loop, Austin, TX 78751; tel. (512) 407-6925)

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Marx-Engels Reader, ed. Robert Tucker, Norton

Emile Durkheim, On Morality and Society, ed. Robert N. Bellah, Chicago

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Roxbury

Georg Simmel, On Individuality and Social Forms, ed. Donald Levine, Chicago

Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents, Norton

Michel Foucault, The Foucault Reader, ed. Paul Rabinow, Pantheon

Jurgen Habermas, Jurgen Habermas on Society and Politics: A Reader, ed. Seidman, Beacon

SOC 394K • Sociology Of Culture

45610 • Fall 2017
Meets T 6:00PM-9:00PM CLA 3.106

This course focuses on some of the major theoretical paradigms and concepts in contemporary sociological inquiry. Among the theorists whose works we will consider are: Andrew Abbott, Charles Tilly, Pierre Bourdieu, Erving Goffman, James Coleman, Ann Swidler, Randall Collins, Roger Gould, and Michel Foucault.

I will take the form of class discussion; everybody should come having done the readings and be prepared to talk about them.  Each student will write a paper 12-15 pages due at the end of the semester.  Each student will do one presentation.  All readings for this course are on reserve, but the texts can be purchased at the University Coop.

SOC 394K • Contemporary Social Theory

45655 • Spring 2017
Meets W 6:00PM-9:00PM CLA 3.106

This course focuses on some of the major theoretical paradigms and concepts in contemporary sociological inquiry. Among the theorists whose works we will consider are: Andrew Abbott, Charles Tilly, Pierre Bourdieu, Erving Goffman, James Coleman, Ann Swidler, Randall Collins, Roger Gould, and Michel Foucault.

I will take the form of class discussion; everybody should come having done the readings and be prepared to talk about them.  Each student will write a paper 12-15 pages due at the end of the semester.  Each student will do one presentation.  All readings for this course are on reserve, but the texts can be purchased at the University Coop.

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

45505 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 1.106

Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to some of the more important theoretical foundations of the discipline of sociology and to current debates in modern social theory. The first part of the course covers select classical theorists. The second part provides an introduction to twentieth-century social theory and critical perspectives on the classical foundations of sociology. The third and final part presents a highly influential response to these challenges by a leading sociological theorist of our day. Throughout the course, the main topics of interest are the rise and transformation of modern society, the changing relationship between the individual and social institutions, the role of social structures and agency in social theory, the role of moral and instrumental action in agency theory, the challenge of critical theory to the social sciences, and contemporary attempts at a critical and multidimensional theory of society.

This course challenges students to think theoretically and critically about society and its material and cultural construction. The readings for the course are difficult but not inaccessible. This course will be fruitful if, and only if, students make a serious commitment to do the reading and to attend class. If this commitment is made, the social world might never look and feel quite the same. At least this is my goal and I aim to deliver.

Grading Policy

Three short papers 75%

Three one to two page memos on reading 15%

Class participation 10%

Short papers: Students must write three papers, each approximately five pages in length. One paper is due for each of the three parts of the course.

Memos: For the first part of the course, I will ask you to write three memos, each approximately one page in length. One memo will be on Karl Marx. The second memo will be on Emile Durkeim. And the final memo is on Max Weber.

Texts

All texts have been ordered through MonkeyWrench Books (110 E. North Loop, Austin, TX 78751; tel. (512) 407-6925)

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Marx-Engels Reader, ed. Robert Tucker, Norton

Emile Durkheim, On Morality and Society, ed. Robert N. Bellah, Chicago

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Roxbury

Georg Simmel, On Individuality and Social Forms, ed. Donald Levine, Chicago

Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents, Norton

Michel Foucault, The Foucault Reader, ed. Paul Rabinow, Pantheon

Jurgen Habermas, Jurgen Habermas on Society and Politics: A Reader, ed. Seidman, Beacon

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

45510 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 1.106

Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to some of the more important theoretical foundations of the discipline of sociology and to current debates in modern social theory. The first part of the course covers select classical theorists. The second part provides an introduction to twentieth-century social theory and critical perspectives on the classical foundations of sociology. The third and final part presents a highly influential response to these challenges by a leading sociological theorist of our day. Throughout the course, the main topics of interest are the rise and transformation of modern society, the changing relationship between the individual and social institutions, the role of social structures and agency in social theory, the role of moral and instrumental action in agency theory, the challenge of critical theory to the social sciences, and contemporary attempts at a critical and multidimensional theory of society.

This course challenges students to think theoretically and critically about society and its material and cultural construction. The readings for the course are difficult but not inaccessible. This course will be fruitful if, and only if, students make a serious commitment to do the reading and to attend class. If this commitment is made, the social world might never look and feel quite the same. At least this is my goal and I aim to deliver.

Grading Policy

Three short papers 75%

Three one to two page memos on reading 15%

Class participation 10%

Short papers: Students must write three papers, each approximately five pages in length. One paper is due for each of the three parts of the course.

Memos: For the first part of the course, I will ask you to write three memos, each approximately one page in length. One memo will be on Karl Marx. The second memo will be on Emile Durkeim. And the final memo is on Max Weber.

Texts

All texts have been ordered through MonkeyWrench Books (110 E. North Loop, Austin, TX 78751; tel. (512) 407-6925)

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Marx-Engels Reader, ed. Robert Tucker, Norton

Emile Durkheim, On Morality and Society, ed. Robert N. Bellah, Chicago

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Roxbury

Georg Simmel, On Individuality and Social Forms, ed. Donald Levine, Chicago

Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents, Norton

Michel Foucault, The Foucault Reader, ed. Paul Rabinow, Pantheon

Jurgen Habermas, Jurgen Habermas on Society and Politics: A Reader, ed. Seidman, Beacon

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

46315 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 1.106

Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to some of the more important theoretical foundations of the discipline of sociology and to current debates in modern social theory. The first part of the course covers select classical theorists. The second part provides an introduction to twentieth-century social theory and critical perspectives on the classical foundations of sociology. The third and final part presents a highly influential response to these challenges by a leading sociological theorist of our day. Throughout the course, the main topics of interest are the rise and transformation of modern society, the changing relationship between the individual and social institutions, the role of social structures and agency in social theory, the role of moral and instrumental action in agency theory, the challenge of critical theory to the social sciences, and contemporary attempts at a critical and multidimensional theory of society.

This course challenges students to think theoretically and critically about society and its material and cultural construction. The readings for the course are difficult but not inaccessible. This course will be fruitful if, and only if, students make a serious commitment to do the reading and to attend class. If this commitment is made, the social world might never look and feel quite the same. At least this is my goal and I aim to deliver.

Grading Policy

Three short papers 75%

Three one to two page memos on reading 15%

Class participation 10%

Short papers: Students must write three papers, each approximately five pages in length. One paper is due for each of the three parts of the course.

Memos: For the first part of the course, I will ask you to write three memos, each approximately one page in length. One memo will be on Karl Marx. The second memo will be on Emile Durkeim. And the final memo is on Max Weber.

Texts

All texts have been ordered through MonkeyWrench Books (110 E. North Loop, Austin, TX 78751; tel. (512) 407-6925)

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Marx-Engels Reader, ed. Robert Tucker, Norton

Emile Durkheim, On Morality and Society, ed. Robert N. Bellah, Chicago

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Roxbury

Georg Simmel, On Individuality and Social Forms, ed. Donald Levine, Chicago

Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents, Norton

Michel Foucault, The Foucault Reader, ed. Paul Rabinow, Pantheon

Jurgen Habermas, Jurgen Habermas on Society and Politics: A Reader, ed. Seidman, Beacon

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

46320 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 1.106

Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to some of the more important theoretical foundations of the discipline of sociology and to current debates in modern social theory. The first part of the course covers select classical theorists. The second part provides an introduction to twentieth-century social theory and critical perspectives on the classical foundations of sociology. The third and final part presents a highly influential response to these challenges by a leading sociological theorist of our day. Throughout the course, the main topics of interest are the rise and transformation of modern society, the changing relationship between the individual and social institutions, the role of social structures and agency in social theory, the role of moral and instrumental action in agency theory, the challenge of critical theory to the social sciences, and contemporary attempts at a critical and multidimensional theory of society.

This course challenges students to think theoretically and critically about society and its material and cultural construction. The readings for the course are difficult but not inaccessible. This course will be fruitful if, and only if, students make a serious commitment to do the reading and to attend class. If this commitment is made, the social world might never look and feel quite the same. At least this is my goal and I aim to deliver.

Grading Policy

Three short papers 75%

Three one to two page memos on reading 15%

Class participation 10%

Short papers: Students must write three papers, each approximately five pages in length. One paper is due for each of the three parts of the course.

Memos: For the first part of the course, I will ask you to write three memos, each approximately one page in length. One memo will be on Karl Marx. The second memo will be on Emile Durkeim. And the final memo is on Max Weber.

Texts

All texts have been ordered through MonkeyWrench Books (110 E. North Loop, Austin, TX 78751; tel. (512) 407-6925)

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Marx-Engels Reader, ed. Robert Tucker, Norton

Emile Durkheim, On Morality and Society, ed. Robert N. Bellah, Chicago

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Roxbury

Georg Simmel, On Individuality and Social Forms, ed. Donald Levine, Chicago

Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents, Norton

Michel Foucault, The Foucault Reader, ed. Paul Rabinow, Pantheon

Jurgen Habermas, Jurgen Habermas on Society and Politics: A Reader, ed. Seidman, Beacon

SOC 394K • Sociology Of Culture

46430 • Fall 2014
Meets T 6:00PM-9:00PM CLA 3.106

Course Description

This course focuses on some of the major theoretical paradigms and concepts in contemporary sociological inquiry. Among the theorists whose works we will consider are: Andrew Abbott, Charles Tilly, Pierre Bourdieu, Erving Goffman, James Coleman, Ann Swidler, Randall Collins, Roger Gould, and Michel Foucault.

I will take the form of class discussion; everybody should come having done the readings and be prepared to talk about them.  Each student will write a paper 12-15 pages due at the end of the semester.  Each student will do one presentation.  All readings for this course are on reserve, but the texts can be purchased at the University Coop.

SOC 394K • Current Debates

46620 • Spring 2014
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM CLA 3.106

 

Description:

This course focuses on some of the major theoretical paradigms and concepts in contemporary sociological inquiry. Among the theorists whose works we will consider are: Andrew Abbott, Charles Tilly, Pierre Bourdieu, Erving Goffman, James Coleman, Ann Swidler, Randall Collins, Roger Gould, and Michel Foucault.

I will take the form of class discussion; everybody should come having done the readings and be prepared to talk about them.  Each student will write a paper 12-15 pages due at the end of the semester.  Each student will do one presentation.  All readings for this course are on reserve, but the texts can be purchased at the University Coop.

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

46285 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 1.104

Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to some of the more important theoretical foundations of the discipline of sociology and to current debates in modern social theory. The first part of the course covers select classical theorists. The second part provides an introduction to twentieth-century social theory and critical perspectives on the classical foundations of sociology. The third and final part presents a highly influential response to these challenges by a leading sociological theorist of our day. Throughout the course, the main topics of interest are the rise and transformation of modern society, the changing relationship between the individual and social institutions, the role of social structures and agency in social theory, the role of moral and instrumental action in agency theory, the challenge of critical theory to the social sciences, and contemporary attempts at a critical and multidimensional theory of society.

This course challenges students to think theoretically and critically about society and its material and cultural construction. The readings for the course are difficult but not inaccessible. This course will be fruitful if, and only if, students make a serious commitment to do the reading and to attend class. If this commitment is made, the social world might never look and feel quite the same. At least this is my goal and I aim to deliver.

Grading Policy

Three short papers 75%

Three one to two page memos on reading 15%

Class participation 10%

Short papers: Students must write three papers, each approximately five pages in length. One paper is due for each of the three parts of the course.

Memos: For the first part of the course, I will ask you to write three memos, each approximately one page in length. One memo will be on Karl Marx. The second memo will be on Emile Durkeim. And the final memo is on Max Weber.

Texts

All texts have been ordered through MonkeyWrench Books (110 E. North Loop, Austin, TX 78751; tel. (512) 407-6925)

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Marx-Engels Reader, ed. Robert Tucker, Norton

Emile Durkheim, On Morality and Society, ed. Robert N. Bellah, Chicago

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Roxbury

Georg Simmel, On Individuality and Social Forms, ed. Donald Levine, Chicago

Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents, Norton

Michel Foucault, The Foucault Reader, ed. Paul Rabinow, Pantheon

Jurgen Habermas, Jurgen Habermas on Society and Politics: A Reader, ed. Seidman, Beacon

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

46290 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.128

Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to some of the more important theoretical foundations of the discipline of sociology and to current debates in modern social theory. The first part of the course covers select classical theorists. The second part provides an introduction to twentieth-century social theory and critical perspectives on the classical foundations of sociology. The third and final part presents a highly influential response to these challenges by a leading sociological theorist of our day. Throughout the course, the main topics of interest are the rise and transformation of modern society, the changing relationship between the individual and social institutions, the role of social structures and agency in social theory, the role of moral and instrumental action in agency theory, the challenge of critical theory to the social sciences, and contemporary attempts at a critical and multidimensional theory of society.

This course challenges students to think theoretically and critically about society and its material and cultural construction. The readings for the course are difficult but not inaccessible. This course will be fruitful if, and only if, students make a serious commitment to do the reading and to attend class. If this commitment is made, the social world might never look and feel quite the same. At least this is my goal and I aim to deliver.

Grading Policy

Three short papers 75%

Three one to two page memos on reading 15%

Class participation 10%

Short papers: Students must write three papers, each approximately five pages in length. One paper is due for each of the three parts of the course.

Memos: For the first part of the course, I will ask you to write three memos, each approximately one page in length. One memo will be on Karl Marx. The second memo will be on Emile Durkeim. And the final memo is on Max Weber.

Texts

All texts have been ordered through MonkeyWrench Books (110 E. North Loop, Austin, TX 78751; tel. (512) 407-6925)

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Marx-Engels Reader, ed. Robert Tucker, Norton

Emile Durkheim, On Morality and Society, ed. Robert N. Bellah, Chicago

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Roxbury

Georg Simmel, On Individuality and Social Forms, ed. Donald Levine, Chicago

Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents, Norton

Michel Foucault, The Foucault Reader, ed. Paul Rabinow, Pantheon

Jurgen Habermas, Jurgen Habermas on Society and Politics: A Reader, ed. Seidman, Beacon

SOC 394K • Sociology Of Culture

46395 • Fall 2013
Meets T 6:00PM-9:00PM CLA 0.124

Course Description

This course focuses on some of the major theoretical paradigms and concepts in contemporary sociological inquiry. Among the theorists whose works we will consider are: Andrew Abbott, Charles Tilly, Pierre Bourdieu, Erving Goffman, James Coleman, Ann Swidler, Randall Collins, Roger Gould, and Michel Foucault.

I will take the form of class discussion; everybody should come having done the readings and be prepared to talk about them.  Each student will write a paper 12-15 pages due at the end of the semester.  Each student will do one presentation.  All readings for this course are on reserve, but the texts can be purchased at the University Coop.

SOC 394K • Contemporary Soc Theory

45970 • Spring 2013
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM CLA 1.302A

This course focuses on some of the major theoretical paradigms and concepts in contemporary sociological inquiry. Among the theorists whose works we will consider are: Andrew Abbott, Charles Tilly, Pierre Bourdieu, Erving Goffman, James Coleman, Ann Swidler, Randall Collins, Roger Gould, and Michel Foucault.

I will take the form of class discussion; everybody should come having done the readings and be prepared to talk about them.  Each student will write a paper 12-15 pages due at the end of the semester.  Each student will do one presentation.  All readings for this course are on reserve, but the texts can be purchased at the University Coop.

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

45670 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 224

Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to some of the more important theoretical foundations of the discipline of sociology and to current debates in modern social theory. The first part of the course covers select classical theorists. The second part provides an introduction to twentieth-century social theory and critical perspectives on the classical foundations of sociology. The third and final part presents a highly influential response to these challenges by a leading sociological theorist of our day. Throughout the course, the main topics of interest are the rise and transformation of modern society, the changing relationship between the individual and social institutions, the role of social structures and agency in social theory, the role of moral and instrumental action in agency theory, the challenge of critical theory to the social sciences, and contemporary attempts at a critical and multidimensional theory of society.

This course challenges students to think theoretically and critically about society and its material and cultural construction. The readings for the course are difficult but not inaccessible. This course will be fruitful if, and only if, students make a serious commitment to do the reading and to attend class. If this commitment is made, the social world might never look and feel quite the same. At least this is my goal and I aim to deliver.

Grading Policy

Three short papers 75%

Three one to two page memos on reading 15%

Class participation 10%

Short papers: Students must write three papers, each approximately five pages in length. One paper is due for each of the three parts of the course.

Memos: For the first part of the course, I will ask you to write three memos, each approximately one page in length. One memo will be on Karl Marx. The second memo will be on Emile Durkeim. And the final memo is on Max Weber.

Texts

All texts have been ordered through MonkeyWrench Books (110 E. North Loop, Austin, TX 78751; tel. (512) 407-6925)

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Marx-Engels Reader, ed. Robert Tucker, Norton

Emile Durkheim, On Morality and Society, ed. Robert N. Bellah, Chicago

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Roxbury

Georg Simmel, On Individuality and Social Forms, ed. Donald Levine, Chicago

Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents, Norton

Michel Foucault, The Foucault Reader, ed. Paul Rabinow, Pantheon

Jurgen Habermas, Jurgen Habermas on Society and Politics: A Reader, ed. Seidman, Beacon

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

45675 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 201

Description:

This course focuses on some of the major theoretical paradigms and concepts in sociological inquiry.  Its format will combine lectures with class discussions; everybody should come having done the daily readings and prepared to talk about the material.

Texts:

Craig Calhoun et al. (editors), Classical Sociological Theory, London: Blackwell, 2002

Erving Goffman, Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, New York: Anchor Books, 1959

Mancur Olson, The Logic of Collective Action, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1965

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, London: Routledge, 1992

Grading and Requirements:

First Exam 30%

Second Exam 40%

Final Exam 30%

SOC 394K • Sociology Of Culture

45765 • Fall 2012
Meets T 6:00PM-9:00PM BUR 231

This course is an overview of some of the major contemporary research in the sociology of culture. Among the themes we will discuss: meaning systems and their transformations; symbolic nature of consumption; relationship between culture and social stratification; cultural bases of power; culture industry; and sociology of the arts.

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

45670 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 116

Description:

This course focuses on some of the major theoretical paradigms and concepts in sociological inquiry.  Its format will combine lectures with class discussions; everybody should come having done the daily readings and prepared to talk about the material.

Texts:

Craig Calhoun et al. (editors), Classical Sociological Theory, London: Blackwell, 2002

Erving Goffman, Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, New York: Anchor Books, 1959

Mancur Olson, The Logic of Collective Action, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1965

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, London: Routledge, 1992

Grading and Requirements:

First Exam 30%

Second Exam 40%

Final Exam 30%

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

45490 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 134

Description:

This course focuses on some of the major theoretical paradigms and concepts in sociological inquiry.  Its format will combine lectures with class discussions; everybody should come having done the daily readings and prepared to talk about the material.

Texts:

Craig Calhoun et al. (editors), Classical Sociological Theory, London: Blackwell, 2002

Erving Goffman, Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, New York: Anchor Books, 1959

Mancur Olson, The Logic of Collective Action, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1965

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, London: Routledge, 1992

Grading and Requirements:

First Exam 30%

Second Exam 40%

Final Exam 30%

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

46215 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 116

This course focuses on some of the major theoretical paradigms and concepts in sociological inquiry.

SOC 394K • Current Debates

46320 • Spring 2011
Meets TH 3:00PM-6:00PM BUR 214

This course focuses on some of the major theoretical paradigms and concepts in contemporary sociological inquiry. Among the theorists whose works we will consider are: Andrew Abbott, Charles Tilly, Pierre Bourdieu, Erving Goffman, James Coleman, Ann Swidler, Randall Collins, Roger Gould, and Michel Foucault.

I will take the form of class discussion; everybody should come having done the readings and be prepared to talk about them.  Each student will write a paper 12-15 pages due at the end of the semester.  Each student will do one presentation.  All readings for this course are on reserve, but the texts can be purchased at the University Coop.

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

45660 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 134


Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and six semester hours of coursework in sociology or consent of instructor.

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages



  • Department of Sociology

    The University of Texas at Austin
    305 E 23rd St, A1700
    RLP 3.306
    Austin, TX 78712-1086
    512-232-6300