Department of Sociology

Jordan Conwell


Ph.D., Northwestern University

Assistant Professor
Jordan Conwell

Contact

  • Office: RLP 2.408F
  • Office Hours: To sign up for Professor Conwell's office hours: https://conwell.youcanbook.me
  • Campus Mail Code: PRC/RLP G1800

Interests


Education; Inequality; Race, Class, and Gender; Income and Wealth; Family

Biography


Jordan Conwell is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and a Faculty Affiliate of the Population Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. His research focuses on racial, social class, and gender inequality in individuals’ and families’ opportunities to become and remain healthy, wealthy, and wise. Much of this work investigates unequal experiences in, and life course socioeconomic returns to, K-12 and higher education. His research appeared in journals including Journal of Marriage and Family, Social Forces, and Sociology of Education and has been funded by Dissertation and Postdoctoral Fellowships from the National Academy of Education/ Spencer Foundation. He completed a Ph.D. in Sociology at Northwestern University in 2017.

Courses


SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

43865 • Spring 2022
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM RLP 0.118
QR MA

Description

Sociologists use statistics (numbers) to describe and analyze social dynamics for topics including, but certainly not limited to, culture, education, the family, inequality, policing and incarceration, social movements, health, politics, and religion – in short, to better understand the large and complex social world around us. This course introduces students to these statistical methods.

We will cover two types of statistics: 1) descriptive statistics, which describe important characteristics of data in a sample, and 2) inferential statistics, which use data from a sample to make informed guesses about important characteristics of a broader population. You will also be introduced to and practice using statistical computing software.

By the end of this course, you will:

  1. Have a basic understanding of common statistical methods used in sociology and the social sciences.
  2. Be prepared for more advanced courses, independent study, and a quantitative Bachelor’s thesis in the field of sociology.
  3. Evaluate statistical claims and evidence, understanding the strengths and limitations of quantitative methods.
  4. Program, interpret, and visualize statistical analysis in the statistical computing program Stata.

The benefits of learnings statistics go well beyond your future coursework in sociology, however. By learning statistics, you will become a more informed consumer of the dizzying variety of ways we all encounter them in everyday life – ranging from politics to public health to sports. Learning statistics could also help you get a job. Employers across many industries and occupations value quantitative reasoning ability and experience with statistical computing. You will gain both in this course!

Quantitative Reasoning Flag

This course carries the Quantitative Reasoning flag. Quantitative Reasoning courses are designed to equip you with skills that are necessary for understanding the types of quantitative arguments you will regularly encounter in your adult and professional life. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your use of quantitative skills to analyze real-world problems.

Required Texts and  Readings

TBD

Grading Policy

Standard grading scale (A-F), based on attendance in lecture and lab sessions, problem sets, quizzes/ tests, and written assignments.

SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

43870 • Spring 2022
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM RLP 0.106
QR MA

Description

Sociologists use statistics (numbers) to describe and analyze social dynamics for topics including, but certainly not limited to, culture, education, the family, inequality, policing and incarceration, social movements, health, politics, and religion – in short, to better understand the large and complex social world around us. This course introduces students to these statistical methods.

We will cover two types of statistics: 1) descriptive statistics, which describe important characteristics of data in a sample, and 2) inferential statistics, which use data from a sample to make informed guesses about important characteristics of a broader population. You will also be introduced to and practice using statistical computing software.

By the end of this course, you will:

  1. Have a basic understanding of common statistical methods used in sociology and the social sciences.
  2. Be prepared for more advanced courses, independent study, and a quantitative Bachelor’s thesis in the field of sociology.
  3. Evaluate statistical claims and evidence, understanding the strengths and limitations of quantitative methods.
  4. Program, interpret, and visualize statistical analysis in the statistical computing program Stata.

The benefits of learnings statistics go well beyond your future coursework in sociology, however. By learning statistics, you will become a more informed consumer of the dizzying variety of ways we all encounter them in everyday life – ranging from politics to public health to sports. Learning statistics could also help you get a job. Employers across many industries and occupations value quantitative reasoning ability and experience with statistical computing. You will gain both in this course!

Quantitative Reasoning Flag

This course carries the Quantitative Reasoning flag. Quantitative Reasoning courses are designed to equip you with skills that are necessary for understanding the types of quantitative arguments you will regularly encounter in your adult and professional life. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your use of quantitative skills to analyze real-world problems.

Required Texts and  Readings

TBD

Grading Policy

Standard grading scale (A-F), based on attendance in lecture and lab sessions, problem sets, quizzes/ tests, and written assignments.

SOC 395L • Race/Class/Gndr Theory/Methods

45049 • Fall 2021
Meets M 12:00PM-3:00PM RLP 3.106

This course provides a graduate-level overview of contemporary sociological research on how race, social class, gender, and other statuses structure social life. The first part of the course will cover theories about these statuses’ individual and joint effects on social experiences and outcomes, as well as epistemological debates about which sociological research methods (qualitative, quantitative, experimental, etc.) are most appropriate for studying these processes. Succeeding weeks will each focus on race, social class, and gender research in a disciplinary subfield, including, but not limited to, education, health, law, work and occupations, and the family. The course will also engage special topics such as the public sociology of race, social class, and gender. Students will be encouraged to develop a proposal for an empirical research project that relates course material to a topic of interest. 

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages



  • Department of Sociology

    The University of Texas at Austin
    305 E 23rd St, A1700
    RLP 3.306
    Austin, TX 78712-1086
    512-232-6300