Department of Sociology

Lynette Osborne, PhD


Ph.D., Purdue University

Assistant Professor of Instruction

Contact

Interests


Gender, Education, Women/Minorities in STEM, Deviance, Research Methods/Statistics, Evaluation Research

Courses


SOC 321K • Sociology Of Stem-Wb

43929 • Spring 2022
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

Description

Sociologists empirically study and develop theories about the human social experience. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) play an important role in how we experience our lives. Alarms wake us up. Chemotherapy can help rid bodies of cancer. Cars allow us to move around more efficiently than on foot or by horse and buggy. Birth control pills allow women to prevent pregnancies. In this course we will use sociology lens to gain a deeper appreciation for the persistent challenges in STEM fields. Specifically, we will critically assess power differentials in terms of gender identity, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, (dis)ability, and SES as they relate to various STEM fields. To do this, we’ll:

  1. Discuss how history, social forces, and social institutions work in concert to shape individuals and how individuals shape society;
  2. Understand that what we view as “objective reality” is often constructed and maintained through social interactions;
  3. Begin to understand the value of research-based information in interpretations of complex social problems;
  4. Become familiar with the research methods used by sociologists, and be able to identify reliable research and findings;
  5. Discuss broad trends that influence rates, trends, and decisions made by individuals who have constrained choices;
  6. Use sociology to better explain patterns and issues in STEM

Sociology of STEM is a critical and sociological exploration of STEM. The focus is on understanding the inequalities that exist and persist in the fields of STEM. We will use a sociology lens to explore, for example, sexual harassment of women in science, and read about the treatment of women in entry, lab, and executive positions, despite years of "progress" toward social and occupational equity. Students will explore what an equitable social and work environment would look like given research-based, sociology literature. Students will also produce a sociology-based diversity plan for a STEM organization/company, complete with actionable steps. The diversity plan can take the form of a handbook or class presentation, but is a project that will be submitted, reviewed by the instructor and peers, and revised several times as we discuss new material and related topics in the class.

Required Texts, Online Publications, Articles, and Books (selected chapters) (Complementary videos, new articles, podcasts, and TedTalks will also be used)

Sheibinger, Londa. 2001. Has Feminism Changed Science? Tong, Joyce. Scientific Pioneers: Women Succeeding in Science.

Hanson, Sandra L. Swimming Against the Tide: Minority Women in Science. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2009.

Sexual Harassment in Academic Science, Engineering, and Medicine, https://www.nationalacademies.org/our- work/sexual-harassment-in-academia.

Hanson, Sandra L. Lost Talent: Women in the Sciences. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1996. Perez, Caroline Criado . 2019. Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men.

Sandra L. Hanson and Malgorzata Krywult-Albanska “Access to STEM for Women in Poland and the U.S.” International Journal of Science Education 42 (6) (2020).

Rainey, K., Dancy, M., Mickelson, R. et al. Race and gender differences in how sense of belonging influences decisions to major in STEM. IJ STEM Ed 5, 10 (2018).

Hanson, Sandra L. “STEM Experiences among Latinos and Asian Americans in the U.S.: Generational Change.” Asian Journal of Humanities and the Social Science 6 (4) (August 2018).

Slaton, Amy. 2013. ASEE Annual Conference. Paper ID #7526 Body? What Body? Considering Ability and Disability in STEM Disciplines file:///Users/lynetteosborne/Desktop/WhatBody_final.pdf

Hanson, Sandra L. and Yu Tao. ‘Engineering the Future: African Americans in Doctoral Engineering Programs.” Pp 57-87 in J. Slaughter, Y. Tao, and W. Pearson Jr, Changing the Face of Engineering. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (2015).

Shifrer, Dana. 2016. Problematizing Perceptions of STEM Potential: Differences by Cognitive Disability Status in High School and Postsecondary Educational Outcomes. Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World

Hanson, Sandra L. “Race, Sex, and Perceptions of Asian Americans in Science: Insights from a Survey on Science Experiences of Young Asian Americans.” Race, Gender, and Class 21: 288311 (2014).

Mary Frank Fox, Diana Roldan Rueda, Gerhard Sonnert, Amanda Nabors, and Sarah Bartel. 2021. Publications about Women, Science, and Engineering: Use of Sex and Gender in Titles over a Forty-six-year Period. Science, Technology, & Human Values 1-41.

Hanson, Sandra L. “STEM Degrees and Occupations among Latinos: An Examination of Racial/Ethnic and Gender Variation.” Race, Gender and Class 20 (1-2): 214-31 (2013).

Twine, France Winddance. 2018. Technology's Invisible Women: Black Geek Girls in Silicon Valley and the Failure of Diversity Initiatives. International Journal of Critical Diversity Studies Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 58-79

Hanson, Sandra L. and Emily Gilbert. “Family, Gender, and Science Experiences: The Perspective of Young Asian Americans.” Race, Gender and Class 19 (3-4): 326-347 (2012).

Hanson, Sandra L. ‘Science for All? The Intersection of Gender, Race, and Science.” International Journal of Science in Society 3(2): 113-36. (2012).

 

SOC 366 • Deviance-Wb

44045 • Spring 2022
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

Course Description

This course allows students to examine deviant behavior and its control. Topics include theoretical perspectives, changing societal conceptions of deviance, deviant behavior and identity, and the dynamics of control agencies.

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between formal and informal deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance change over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • explain and apply the functionalist, conflict, and symbolic interactionist approaches to deviance;
  • understand the concepts of social control and normative compliance; and
  • explain how formal social control depends upon informal social

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension and synthesis of challenging materials

Reading Materials:

  • Inderbitzin, Bates, & 2020. Deviance and Social Control: A Sociological Perspective, 3rd Ed. Sage Publishing. ISBN: 9781544395777 (Either the eBook, paperback, or hardback version of the 3rded. is fine)
  • Additional readings are available on Canvas under Pages

Grading

Attendance (10% of total grade)

On several occasions throughout the semester I will take attendance by asking a question(s) during class. Completion of the collected question will earn credit. Failure to complete the collected question will earn no credit. Attend the synchronous class regularly and for the whole class period for the best opportunity to earn attendance points. Everyone gets a free day; however, missing additional days are the student’s responsibility and points will be deducted accordingly without discussion or negotiation.

Writing Assignments (30% of total grade)

On several occasions throughout the semester we will be engaging in activities in class to help solidify knowledge. Students who complete and upload the assignment before class on the assigned day will earn points. There are no make-ups, early, or late opportunities to earn these points so make sure to attend class regularly. If you miss an ICA day, either by choice (e.g., dentist appointment, a shift at work) or by circumstance (e.g., joined the class late, illness, missed flight), use it as your free day. Late assignments are accepted for reduced credit. No explanation or permission needed.

Writing Flag – Book Review

For students who are taking Deviance as a Writing Flag, you’ll be reading a sociology book of your choice, and writing a professional book review. Drafts will be due throughout the semester to hone writing and critical thinking skills. The specific instructions will be provided and discussed in class.

Quizzes (20% of total grade)

Quizzes over the assigned content will be administered during the first 5-ish minutes of each class meeting that a new chapter begins. One quiz score will be dropped, the rest will count for credit. If you miss class or arrive late on a quiz day, please use that as your dropped score. Late quizzes are permitted for knowledge assessment only, not for credit.

Exams (40% of total grade)

Exams will take place on Tuesday of the assigned week and will be available from 8a-8pCT. The structure for the exams is Multiple Choice. Exams will be taken on Canvas using Proctorio Lockdown so please make sure to download the extension from the Secure Exam Proctor (Proctorio) link on the Control Panel in Canvas. Late exams will be scheduled ONLY in the case of an emergency and under the following circumstances: 1) you email must me at least 24 hours prior to the exam AND 2) valid documentation must be provided to support your emergency request. Late exams will be essay format. Note that weddings, family vacations, work, and the like are not valid excuses for missing an exam.

Grading Scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

SOC 366 • Deviance-Wb

44050 • Spring 2022
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM
Internet; Synchronous

Course Description

This course allows students to examine deviant behavior and its control. Topics include theoretical perspectives, changing societal conceptions of deviance, deviant behavior and identity, and the dynamics of control agencies.

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between formal and informal deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance change over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • explain and apply the functionalist, conflict, and symbolic interactionist approaches to deviance;
  • understand the concepts of social control and normative compliance; and
  • explain how formal social control depends upon informal social

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension and synthesis of challenging materials

Reading Materials:

  • Inderbitzin, Bates, & 2020. Deviance and Social Control: A Sociological Perspective, 3rd Ed. Sage Publishing. ISBN: 9781544395777 (Either the eBook, paperback, or hardback version of the 3rded. is fine)
  • Additional readings are available on Canvas under Pages

Grading

Attendance (10% of total grade)

On several occasions throughout the semester I will take attendance by asking a question(s) during class. Completion of the collected question will earn credit. Failure to complete the collected question will earn no credit. Attend the synchronous class regularly and for the whole class period for the best opportunity to earn attendance points. Everyone gets a free day; however, missing additional days are the student’s responsibility and points will be deducted accordingly without discussion or negotiation.

Writing Assignments (30% of total grade)

On several occasions throughout the semester we will be engaging in activities in class to help solidify knowledge. Students who complete and upload the assignment before class on the assigned day will earn points. There are no make-ups, early, or late opportunities to earn these points so make sure to attend class regularly. If you miss an ICA day, either by choice (e.g., dentist appointment, a shift at work) or by circumstance (e.g., joined the class late, illness, missed flight), use it as your free day. Late assignments are accepted for reduced credit. No explanation or permission needed.

Quizzes (20% of total grade)

Quizzes over the assigned content will be administered during the first 5-ish minutes of each class meeting that a new chapter begins. One quiz score will be dropped, the rest will count for credit. If you miss class or arrive late on a quiz day, please use that as your dropped score. Late quizzes are permitted for knowledge assessment only, not for credit.

Exams (40% of total grade)

Exams will take place on Tuesday of the assigned week and will be available from 8a-8pCT. The structure for the exams is Multiple Choice. Exams will be taken on Canvas using Proctorio Lockdown so please make sure to download the extension from the Secure Exam Proctor (Proctorio) link on the Control Panel in Canvas. Late exams will be scheduled ONLY in the case of an emergency and under the following circumstances: 1) you email must me at least 24 hours prior to the exam AND 2) valid documentation must be provided to support your emergency request. Late exams will be essay format. Note that weddings, family vacations, work, and the like are not valid excuses for missing an exam.

Grading Scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

SOC 327M • Social Research Methods

44870 • Fall 2021
Meets T 11:00AM-12:00PM
Hybrid/Blended
IIQRWr

This course will center on the topic of research methods and data analysis associated with gender and human sexual behavior for the purposes of prediction, explanation and decision-making. Students will be exposed to the process of quantitative and qualitative research including development of research questions, variables for investigation, conducting a content analysis, development of a database, and using basic statistics to answer hypotheses. We will be engaging in a project so students get experience developing gathering data tools. 

Grading and Requirements:

How to Earn Points:

  1. Quizzes – 50 (5 points each)

Quizzes over the readings/assignments will be administered during the first 5 minutes of each class meeting that a chapter begins (as designated by an * on the schedule). There will be 11 quizzes, 10 count for credit so no late or early quizzes are offered for any reason. If you miss class or arrive late on a quiz day, please to use that as your dropped score. No early or late quizzes will be offered for any reason.

  1. Homework/Activities – 100 (weighted)

Homework assignments and/or in-class activities are geared to help students master concepts. HW must be turned in at the beginning of class to earn credit. Arriving to class after HW collection or not uploading HW to Canvas (when appropriate) will result in a zero for the assignment. Note that late assignments are not accepted for credit, but all assignments in this course are required. Assignments are not accepted via email. Attendance and participation in the in-class activities is required to earn credit. If you miss a HW or in-class activity, take the first one as your drop option; any others missed will result in a reduced course score.

  1. Exams - 150 (50 points each)

Each exam is worth 10% of the total points for the course. Exams will take place during the normally scheduled class time. Late exams will be scheduled ONLY in the case of an emergency and under the following circumstances: 1) you email must me at least 24 hours prior to the exam AND 2) valid documentation must be provided to support your emergency request. Note that weddings, family vacations, work, and the like are not valid excuses for missing an exam.

  1. Methods Section - 100 (50 points each)

We will be engaging in a project so students get experience developing gathering data tools. The specific instructions for this semester-long project will be provided and discussed in class.

SOC 327M • Social Research Methods

44875 • Fall 2021
Meets T 9:30AM-10:30AM
Hybrid/Blended
IIQRWr

This course will center on the topic of research methods and data analysis associated with gender and human sexual behavior for the purposes of prediction, explanation and decision-making. Students will be exposed to the process of quantitative and qualitative research including development of research questions, variables for investigation, conducting a content analysis, development of a database, and using basic statistics to answer hypotheses. We will be engaging in a project so students get experience developing gathering data tools. 

Grading and Requirements:

How to Earn Points:

  1. Quizzes – 50 (5 points each)

Quizzes over the readings/assignments will be administered during the first 5 minutes of each class meeting that a chapter begins (as designated by an * on the schedule). There will be 11 quizzes, 10 count for credit so no late or early quizzes are offered for any reason. If you miss class or arrive late on a quiz day, please to use that as your dropped score. No early or late quizzes will be offered for any reason.

  1. Homework/Activities – 100 (weighted)

Homework assignments and/or in-class activities are geared to help students master concepts. HW must be turned in at the beginning of class to earn credit. Arriving to class after HW collection or not uploading HW to Canvas (when appropriate) will result in a zero for the assignment. Note that late assignments are not accepted for credit, but all assignments in this course are required. Assignments are not accepted via email. Attendance and participation in the in-class activities is required to earn credit. If you miss a HW or in-class activity, take the first one as your drop option; any others missed will result in a reduced course score.

  1. Exams - 150 (50 points each)

Each exam is worth 10% of the total points for the course. Exams will take place during the normally scheduled class time. Late exams will be scheduled ONLY in the case of an emergency and under the following circumstances: 1) you email must me at least 24 hours prior to the exam AND 2) valid documentation must be provided to support your emergency request. Note that weddings, family vacations, work, and the like are not valid excuses for missing an exam.

  1. Methods Section - 100 (50 points each)

We will be engaging in a project so students get experience developing gathering data tools. The specific instructions for this semester-long project will be provided and discussed in class.

UGS 302 • Stem In Society-Wb

62395 • Fall 2021
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

SOC 307L • Gndr/Race/Class Amer Soc-Wb

44620 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
CD SB (also listed as WGS 301)

This course focuses on learning about the ways in which gender, race, class, and sexuality intersect to shape the lived experience in U.S. society. It will primarily focus on the ways in which our identities are socially constructed, how they have changed over time, and on major related social movements (e.g. feminist, civil rights, LGBTQ, etc.). We will discuss the empirical evidence related to power (i.e., domination and subordination) and its relation to the intersections of gender, race, class, and sexuality.

SOC 366 • Deviance-Wb

44820 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM
Internet; Synchronous

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

43460 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 9:30AM-10:30AM RLP 1.404
IIQRWr

Course Description

This course will center on the topic of research methods and data analysis associated with gender and human sexual behavior for the purposes of prediction, explanation and decision-making. Students will be exposed to the process of quantitative and qualitative research including development of research questions, variables for investigation, conducting a content analysis, development of a database, and using basic statistics to answer hypotheses. 

Grading and Requirements:

How to Earn Points:

1. Quizzes – 50 (5 points each)

Quizzes over the readings/assignments will be administered during the first 5 minutes of each class meeting that a chapter begins (as designated by an * on the schedule). There will be 11 quizzes, 10 count for credit so no late or early quizzes are offered for any reason. If you miss class or arrive late on a quiz day, please to use that as your dropped score. No early or late quizzes will be offered for any reason.

2. Homework/Activities – 100 (weighted)

Homework assignments and/or in-class activities are geared to help students master concepts. HW must be turned in at the beginning of class to earn credit. Arriving to class after HW collection or not uploading HW to Canvas (when appropriate) will result in a zero for the assignment. Note that late assignments are not accepted for credit, but all assignments in this course are required. Assignments are not accepted via email. Attendance and participation in the in-class activities is required to earn credit. If you miss a HW or in-class activity, take the first one as your drop option; any others missed will result in a reduced course score.

3. Exams - 150 (50 points each)

Each exam is worth 10% of the total points for the course. Exams will take place during the normally scheduled class time. Late exams will be scheduled ONLY in the case of an emergency and under the following circumstances: 1) you email must me at least 24 hours prior to the exam AND 2) valid documentation must be provided to support your emergency request. Note that weddings, family vacations, work, and the like are not valid excuses for missing an exam.

4. Methods Section - 100 (50 points each)

We will be engaging in a research methods project gathering data from Craigslist personals ads. All major components of a Methods section will be due as you final paper for this class. The specific instructions for the semester-long project will be provided and discussed in class. 

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

43470 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM RLP 1.404
IIQRWr

Course Description

This course will center on the topic of research methods and data analysis associated with gender and human sexual behavior for the purposes of prediction, explanation and decision-making. Students will be exposed to the process of quantitative and qualitative research including development of research questions, variables for investigation, conducting a content analysis, development of a database, and using basic statistics to answer hypotheses. 

Grading and Requirements:

How to Earn Points:

1. Quizzes – 50 (5 points each)

Quizzes over the readings/assignments will be administered during the first 5 minutes of each class meeting that a chapter begins (as designated by an * on the schedule). There will be 11 quizzes, 10 count for credit so no late or early quizzes are offered for any reason. If you miss class or arrive late on a quiz day, please to use that as your dropped score. No early or late quizzes will be offered for any reason.

2. Homework/Activities – 100 (weighted)

Homework assignments and/or in-class activities are geared to help students master concepts. HW must be turned in at the beginning of class to earn credit. Arriving to class after HW collection or not uploading HW to Canvas (when appropriate) will result in a zero for the assignment. Note that late assignments are not accepted for credit, but all assignments in this course are required. Assignments are not accepted via email. Attendance and participation in the in-class activities is required to earn credit. If you miss a HW or in-class activity, take the first one as your drop option; any others missed will result in a reduced course score.

3. Exams - 150 (50 points each)

Each exam is worth 10% of the total points for the course. Exams will take place during the normally scheduled class time. Late exams will be scheduled ONLY in the case of an emergency and under the following circumstances: 1) you email must me at least 24 hours prior to the exam AND 2) valid documentation must be provided to support your emergency request. Note that weddings, family vacations, work, and the like are not valid excuses for missing an exam.

4. Methods Section - 100 (50 points each)

We will be engaging in a research methods project gathering data from Craigslist personals ads. All major components of a Methods section will be due as you final paper for this class. The specific instructions for the semester-long project will be provided and discussed in class. 

SOC 366 • Deviance

43600 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ B0.306

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

44265 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM RLP 1.404
IIQRWr

Course Description

This course will center on the topic of research methods and data analysis associated with gender and human sexual behavior for the purposes of prediction, explanation and decision-making. Students will be exposed to the process of quantitative and qualitative research including development of research questions, variables for investigation, conducting a content analysis, development of a database, and using basic statistics to answer hypotheses. 

Grading and Requirements:

How to Earn Points:

1. Quizzes – 50 (5 points each)

Quizzes over the readings/assignments will be administered during the first 5 minutes of each class meeting that a chapter begins (as designated by an * on the schedule). There will be 11 quizzes, 10 count for credit so no late or early quizzes are offered for any reason. If you miss class or arrive late on a quiz day, please to use that as your dropped score. No early or late quizzes will be offered for any reason.

2. Homework/Activities – 100 (weighted)

Homework assignments and/or in-class activities are geared to help students master concepts. HW must be turned in at the beginning of class to earn credit. Arriving to class after HW collection or not uploading HW to Canvas (when appropriate) will result in a zero for the assignment. Note that late assignments are not accepted for credit, but all assignments in this course are required. Assignments are not accepted via email. Attendance and participation in the in-class activities is required to earn credit. If you miss a HW or in-class activity, take the first one as your drop option; any others missed will result in a reduced course score.

3. Exams - 150 (50 points each)

Each exam is worth 10% of the total points for the course. Exams will take place during the normally scheduled class time. Late exams will be scheduled ONLY in the case of an emergency and under the following circumstances: 1) you email must me at least 24 hours prior to the exam AND 2) valid documentation must be provided to support your emergency request. Note that weddings, family vacations, work, and the like are not valid excuses for missing an exam.

4. Methods Section - 100 (50 points each)

We will be engaging in a research methods project gathering data from Craigslist personals ads. All major components of a Methods section will be due as you final paper for this class. The specific instructions for the semester-long project will be provided and discussed in class. 

SOC 325K • Criminology

44330 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RLP 1.104

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course will introduce students to how sociologists and criminologists study crime and delinquency.  Students will learn about the different types of crime with an emphasis on how theories of crime, delinquency, and deviance can be used to help understand and predict illegal behavior. The class will also present current crime statistics to complement the findings from empirical and theoretical readings.

 LEARNING OBJECTIVES

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

·   define criminology and explain how it relates to sociology

·   explain and apply the multiple theories and how they are related to understanding and predicting unlawful behavior

·   describe the concepts and theories associated with the study of crime

 ADDITIONAL OBJECTIVES

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

GRADING

1. In-Class Activities (25 points)

On several occasions throughout the semester we will be engaging in activities in class to help solidify knowledge. Students who attend class and participate in the activity will earn points. At least six activity days will occur; five will count for credit. There are no make-ups, early, or late opportunities to earn these points so make sure to attend class regularly.

2. Discussion Day Lead (50 points)

It is important that each student arrives on time and participates MEANINGFULLY on her/his assigned day. You will be responsible for answering questions regarding both assigned materials as well as any films that are due for that section. 

3. Readings Briefs (75 points total)

Each day, students will come to class with typed summaries of the day’s readings. These summaries will include a detailed summary (bullet points are fine) of the readings as well as two critical comments or discussion questions. On 6-7 occasions. I will collect these for credit (5 will count for 15 points each). 

4. Exams (150 points total)

There will be four exams in this class; three will count for credit. Three exams are based on the preceding module; the final is cumulative. They will be in-class exams on Canvas, multiple-choice, fill in, and/or possibly short answer. No early or late exams will be offered; if you miss an exam, plan to take the final. Bonus points may be earned on exams, as there are 52 points possible to earn out of 50 points possible for each exam.

 

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

44735 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM RLP 1.404
IIQRWr

Course Description

This course will center on the topic of research methods and data analysis associated with gender and human sexual behavior for the purposes of prediction, explanation and decision-making. Students will be exposed to the process of quantitative and qualitative research including development of research questions, variables for investigation, conducting a content analysis, development of a database, and using basic statistics to answer hypotheses. 

Grading and Requirements:

How to Earn Points:

1. Quizzes – 50 (5 points each)

Quizzes over the readings/assignments will be administered during the first 5 minutes of each class meeting that a chapter begins (as designated by an * on the schedule). There will be 11 quizzes, 10 count for credit so no late or early quizzes are offered for any reason. If you miss class or arrive late on a quiz day, please to use that as your dropped score. No early or late quizzes will be offered for any reason.

2. Homework/Activities – 100 (weighted)

Homework assignments and/or in-class activities are geared to help students master concepts. HW must be turned in at the beginning of class to earn credit. Arriving to class after HW collection or not uploading HW to Canvas (when appropriate) will result in a zero for the assignment. Note that late assignments are not accepted for credit, but all assignments in this course are required. Assignments are not accepted via email. Attendance and participation in the in-class activities is required to earn credit. If you miss a HW or in-class activity, take the first one as your drop option; any others missed will result in a reduced course score.

3. Exams - 150 (50 points each)

Each exam is worth 10% of the total points for the course. Exams will take place during the normally scheduled class time. Late exams will be scheduled ONLY in the case of an emergency and under the following circumstances: 1) you email must me at least 24 hours prior to the exam AND 2) valid documentation must be provided to support your emergency request. Note that weddings, family vacations, work, and the like are not valid excuses for missing an exam.

4. Methods Section - 100 (50 points each)

We will be engaging in a research methods project gathering data from Craigslist personals ads. All major components of a Methods section will be due as you final paper for this class. The specific instructions for the semester-long project will be provided and discussed in class. 

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

44740 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 9:30AM-10:30AM RLP 1.404
IIQRWr

Course Description

This course will center on the topic of research methods and data analysis associated with gender and human sexual behavior for the purposes of prediction, explanation and decision-making. Students will be exposed to the process of quantitative and qualitative research including development of research questions, variables for investigation, conducting a content analysis, development of a database, and using basic statistics to answer hypotheses. 

Grading and Requirements:

How to Earn Points:

1. Quizzes – 50 (5 points each)

Quizzes over the readings/assignments will be administered during the first 5 minutes of each class meeting that a chapter begins (as designated by an * on the schedule). There will be 11 quizzes, 10 count for credit so no late or early quizzes are offered for any reason. If you miss class or arrive late on a quiz day, please to use that as your dropped score. No early or late quizzes will be offered for any reason.

2. Homework/Activities – 100 (weighted)

Homework assignments and/or in-class activities are geared to help students master concepts. HW must be turned in at the beginning of class to earn credit. Arriving to class after HW collection or not uploading HW to Canvas (when appropriate) will result in a zero for the assignment. Note that late assignments are not accepted for credit, but all assignments in this course are required. Assignments are not accepted via email. Attendance and participation in the in-class activities is required to earn credit. If you miss a HW or in-class activity, take the first one as your drop option; any others missed will result in a reduced course score.

3. Exams - 150 (50 points each)

Each exam is worth 10% of the total points for the course. Exams will take place during the normally scheduled class time. Late exams will be scheduled ONLY in the case of an emergency and under the following circumstances: 1) you email must me at least 24 hours prior to the exam AND 2) valid documentation must be provided to support your emergency request. Note that weddings, family vacations, work, and the like are not valid excuses for missing an exam.

4. Methods Section - 100 (50 points each)

We will be engaging in a research methods project gathering data from Craigslist personals ads. All major components of a Methods section will be due as you final paper for this class. The specific instructions for the semester-long project will be provided and discussed in class. 

SOC 366 • Deviance

44860 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM RLP 0.118
Wr

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

44915 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM CLA 1.404
IIQRWr

Course Description

This course will center on the topic of research methods and data analysis associated with gender and human sexual behavior for the purposes of prediction, explanation and decision-making. Students will be exposed to the process of quantitative and qualitative research including development of research questions, variables for investigation, conducting a content analysis, development of a database, and using basic statistics to answer hypotheses. 

Grading and Requirements:

How to Earn Points:

1. Quizzes – 50 (5 points each)

Quizzes over the readings/assignments will be administered during the first 5 minutes of each class meeting that a chapter begins (as designated by an * on the schedule). There will be 11 quizzes, 10 count for credit so no late or early quizzes are offered for any reason. If you miss class or arrive late on a quiz day, please to use that as your dropped score. No early or late quizzes will be offered for any reason.

2. Homework/Activities – 100 (weighted)

Homework assignments and/or in-class activities are geared to help students master concepts. HW must be turned in at the beginning of class to earn credit. Arriving to class after HW collection or not uploading HW to Canvas (when appropriate) will result in a zero for the assignment. Note that late assignments are not accepted for credit, but all assignments in this course are required. Assignments are not accepted via email. Attendance and participation in the in-class activities is required to earn credit. If you miss a HW or in-class activity, take the first one as your drop option; any others missed will result in a reduced course score.

3. Exams - 150 (50 points each)

Each exam is worth 10% of the total points for the course. Exams will take place during the normally scheduled class time. Late exams will be scheduled ONLY in the case of an emergency and under the following circumstances: 1) you email must me at least 24 hours prior to the exam AND 2) valid documentation must be provided to support your emergency request. Note that weddings, family vacations, work, and the like are not valid excuses for missing an exam.

4. Methods Section - 100 (50 points each)

We will be engaging in a research methods project gathering data from Craigslist personals ads. All major components of a Methods section will be due as you final paper for this class. The specific instructions for the semester-long project will be provided and discussed in class. 

SOC 325K • Criminology

45009 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.112

Course Description

This course will introduce students to how sociologists and criminologists study crime and delinquency.  Students will learn about the different types of crime with an emphasis on how theories of crime, delinquency, and deviance can be used to help understand and predict illegal behavior. The class will also present current crime statistics to complement the findings from empirical and theoretical readings.

 LEARNING OBJECTIVES

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

·   define criminology and explain how it relates to sociology

·   explain and apply the multiple theories and how they are related to understanding and predicting unlawful behavior

·   describe the concepts and theories associated with the study of crime

 

ADDITIONAL OBJECTIVES

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

SOC 366 • Deviance

45047 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 0.132
Wr

Course Description

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).

SOC 366 • Deviance

45475 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GDC 4.302

Course Description

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).

 

SOC 366 • Deviance

45480 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.118
Wr

Course Description

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).

 

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45410 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM CLA 1.402
IIQRWr

Course Description

This course will center on the topic of research methods and data analysis associated with gender and human sexual behavior for the purposes of prediction, explanation and decision-making. Students will be exposed to the process of quantitative and qualitative research including development of research questions, variables for investigation, conducting a content analysis, development of a database, and using basic statistics to answer hypotheses. 

SOC 366 • Deviance

45551 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.118
Wr

Course Description

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).

SOC 366 • Deviance

45555 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 1.106

Course Description

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45340 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-10:30AM CLA 1.402
IIQRWr

Course Description

This course will center on the topic of research methods and data analysis associated with gender and human sexual behavior for the purposes of prediction, explanation and decision-making. Students will be exposed to the process of quantitative and qualitative research including development of research questions, variables for investigation, conducting a content analysis, development of a database, and using basic statistics to answer hypotheses. 

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45345 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 1.402
IIQRWr

Course Description

This course will center on the topic of research methods and data analysis associated with gender and human sexual behavior for the purposes of prediction, explanation and decision-making. Students will be exposed to the process of quantitative and qualitative research including development of research questions, variables for investigation, conducting a content analysis, development of a database, and using basic statistics to answer hypotheses. 

SOC 318 • Juvenile Delinquency

45360 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 4.110
SB

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

In this course, we will engage in an analysis of historical, economic, and social conditions affecting both difficulties in socializing youth and the evolution of the state's formal systems of control.  We will also learn about current issues in youth and delinquency as well as programs designed to aid in deterrence and rehabilitation of youth.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the end of this course, students will be able to

  • Describe historical trends in delinquency
  • Identify and describe current trends in youth and delinquency
  • Use sociological theories of deviance to analyze trends
  • Identify and interpret data from government sources
  • Analyze scholarly research on delinquency

Reading Expectations

The readings and assignments for this course are substantial. Please consider the workload before committing to the class. Readings will be due each class and we will used to discuss historical and current issues. 

Grading

1. Discussion Day Lead (50 points)

It is important that each student arrives on time and participates MEANINGFULLY on her/his assigned day. You will be responsible for answering questions regarding both assigned materials as well as any films that are due for that section. Come to class with a strong understanding of the materials and/or questions about items that you are unclear on. Five meaningful contributions to the day’s discussion will earn 50 points

(5=50, 4=40, 3=30, 2=20, 1=10, 0=0). If you miss your assigned day, you will either need to plan on participating on the last Discussion Day or take the zero.

2. Readings Briefs (75 points total)

Each day, students will come to class with typed summaries of the day’s readings. These summaries will include a Brief summary (bullet points are fine) of the readings as well as two critical comments or discussion questions. On 6-7 occasions, I will collect these for credit (5 will count for 15 points each). Students must be in class to be able to turn in Briefs. Briefs turned in without attendance will be considered a violation of the Academic Honor Code and will result in disciplinary action.

3. Writing Assignment (25 points)

Students will write a 1-2 page analysis of a news article related to juvenile delinquency. This paper will use concepts and theories from the class to help understand what was reported in the article. 

4. Exams (150 points total)

There will be four exams in this class; three will count for credit. Three exams are based on the preceding module; the final is cumulative. They will be in-class exams on Canvas, multiple-choice, fill in, and/or possibly short answer. No early or late exams will be offered; if you miss an exam, plan to take the final.

How to calculate your grade

Take the points you have earned and divide by the total possible points for the assignment/exam. Do this as well for your total course grade by adding up the points you have earned and dividing by the total points possible in the class.

SOC 318 • Juvenile Delinquency

44505 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.126

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

In this course, we will engage in an analysis of historical, economic, and social conditions affecting both difficulties in socializing youth and the evolution of the state's formal systems of control.  We will also learn about current issues in youth and delinquency as well as programs designed to aid in deterrence and rehabilitation of youth.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the end of this course, students will be able to

  • Describe historical trends in delinquency
  • Identify and describe current trends in youth and delinquency
  • Use sociological theories of deviance to analyze trends
  • Identify and interpret data from government sources
  • Analyze scholarly research on delinquency

SOC 366 • Deviance

44630 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WEL 4.224
Wr

Course Description

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).

 

 

SOC 318 • Juvenile Delinquency

44970 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.128

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

In this course, we will engage in an analysis of historical, economic, and social conditions affecting both difficulties in socializing youth and the evolution of the state's formal systems of control.  We will also learn about current issues in youth and delinquency as well as programs designed to aid in deterrence and rehabilitation of youth.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the end of this course, students will be able to

  • Describe historical trends in delinquency
  • Identify and describe current trends in youth and delinquency
  • Use sociological theories of deviance to analyze trends
  • Identify and interpret data from government sources
  • Analyze scholarly research on delinquency

SOC 366 • Deviance

45070 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 1.102
Wr

Course Description

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).

 

 

SOC 366 • Deviance

46293 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PMA 5.122
Wr

Course Description

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).

 

 

SOC 318 • Juvenile Delinquency

46371 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.102
SB

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

In this course, we will engage in an analysis of historical, economic, and social conditions affecting both difficulties in socializing youth and the evolution of the state's formal systems of control.  We will also learn about current issues in youth and delinquency as well as programs designed to aid in deterrence and rehabilitation of youth.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the end of this course, students will be able to

  • Describe historical trends in delinquency
  • Identify and describe current trends in youth and delinquency
  • Use sociological theories of deviance to analyze trends
  • Identify and interpret data from government sources
  • Analyze scholarly research on delinquency

SOC 366 • Deviance

46500 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GDC 6.202
Wr

Description 

Substantively, the course is an introduction to sociological perspectives on deviance and social control.  Students will read sociological research on a variety of topics, ranging from relatively harmless social diversions to serious and possibly shocking rule violations. 

By its very nature, the study of deviance involves subject matter that some people regard as offensive.  You are not asked to give up your own ethical standards.  You are expected to:

(1) examine your own values dispassionately, as one kind of datum about your own socialization and culture; and

(2) bracket your own values while you apply sociological perspectives to understand various examples of deviance. 

Your own experience is a resource for critical thought about the concepts examined here; at the same time, you should try not to become overly sensitive or defensive about sociological handling of social arenas in which you participate.  The objective of the sociological approach is to understand social processes, not to judge.

Texts

Required

Adler and Adler, Constructions of Deviance, 7th ed.

Recommended

ASA Style Guide, 4th ed. (order from ASA online book store:  http://www.e-noah.net/asa/asashoponlineservice/ProductDetails.aspx?productID=ASAOE701S10); or

ASA Style Guide, 3rd ed. (short version available online free:  http://www.asanet.org/Quick%20Style%20Guide.pdf)

 

 

Requirements and grading:                                            

Writing Requirement:

The writing emphasis is on developing a scholarly voice and style.  The assignments are six short papers (250-300 words), each focusing on the analysis of a scholarly article, and a longer review of the literature (6-8 pagers), analyzing and organizating information on a topic of particular interest to you.

The assignments for the course should take an average of about six hours per week to complete. 

Grading:

7 short papers (omit one or drop the lowest grade)                   30%

Long paper (draft and final version)                                        30%

Presentation                                                                          5%

Feedback on classmates’ presentations                                     5%

Hour exam                                                                           20%

Daily work

(informal writing, pop quizzes feedback on short papers)   10%

Specific instructions for all papers will be posted on Blackboard. 

Grading Scale

94-100+           A

90-93               A-

87-89               B+

84-86               B

80-83               B-

etc.

Profile Pages



  • Department of Sociology

    The University of Texas at Austin
    305 E 23rd St, A1700
    RLP 3.306
    Austin, TX 78712-1086
    512-232-6300