Department of Sociology

Nina Palmo


Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Lecturer
Nina Palmo

Contact

Biography


 

Courses


H S 378 • Seminar In Health & Society

29525 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RLP 3.106

Please cconsult with the academic advisor for more information.

H S 378 • Seminar In Health & Society

29540 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM RLP 3.106

Please cconsult with the academic advisor for more information.

SOC 308S • Intro To Health & Society

44210 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WCH 1.120
(also listed as H S 301)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The principle objective of H S 301/SOC 308S is to offer students a broad overview of health and society from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. We will examine how social forces influence health and disease in U.S. society, including cultural, economic, and demographic considerations. We will explore why rates of disease vary among different populations and how cultural and structural inequalities shape access to healthcare and affect morbidity and mortality. How do economic factors, politics, public perceptions of morality, and historical biases against specific populations shape our modern-day understandings and experiences of health and illness? We will also examine how social forces shape the very definitions of health, illness, and disease categories, and thereby medical diagnoses and treatments. We will consider the social consequences of the commodification of healthcare and how new technologies are transforming our current healthcare system and the nature of the patient/physicianrelationship. Our course readings and discussions will help us address current bioethical controversies that continue to influence our beliefs about health and illness and shape our very understandings about human rights and personhood. This course is built around lectures (including guest lectures), class discussion, and film screenings and discussion.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

• Analyze contemporary health issues from a variety of disciplinary and professional perspectives.

• Explain how social location, the media, and economic forces shape health behaviors and outcomes.

• Explain how social and cultural factors shape contemporary understandings and experiences of health and illness and death and dying in the U.S.

• Critically evaluate the assumptions, motives, and evidence that individuals and groups use to make specific claims about health and illness.

COURSE MATERIALS

Gawande, Atul. 2014. Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. New York:Metropolitan.

Marmot, Michael. 2005. The Status Syndrome: How Social Standing Affects Our Health and Longevity. New York: Holt.

Course readings also include scholarly articles, book chapters, and other required readings available on Canvas.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND EVALUATION

This course is organized in a lecture format, but it is greatly enhanced by your participation. For variety’s sake, I will often incorporate short video-clips, group activities, and/or writing exercises in our class session. We will also spend considerable time each week discussing the readings and our own experiences, interests, and knowledge in this area. Please remember that discussions will only be as rich as you all make them, so it is essential that everyone come prepared to speak about the readings thoughtfully and critically. Your final evaluation for the course will be broken down as follows:

Attendance and Preparedness (10%)

Students are expected to attend class, read assignments before each class, and actively participate in classroom discussions during the week. Eight times during the semester the instructor will have students sign in on a class roster or complete a group assignment in the first few minutes of class. Students will be granted one unexcused absence with no penalty. If you have a university-related conflict or medical or family emergency that prevents you from attending class, alert your TA (providing relevant documentation) and you will not be penalized for a particular absence, but you must contact your TA in advance of missing class. NOTE: Tardiness will adversely affect your grade; students who arrive late risk missing this activity or sign-in sheet and will not be allowed to receive credit for the day.

Reading responses (10%)

Students are expected to keep up with the reading for the class. Six times during the course of the semester, I will pose a reading question on the course Canvas page relevant to recent reading. The questions will be posted on Sunday evening and students are expected to write a reading response of one page, double-spaced (between 250 and 350 words) and upload a copy to the Canvas page by 5pm on the Thursday that they are due. Responses will be graded as meets/exceeds expectations (100), meets minimum expectations (70), no credit (0). See course schedule for Reading Responses (marked RR).

Exams (60%)

Two exams (worth 30% each) will be given to assess your level of mastery of the course material, including assigned readings, lectures (including guest lectures), and in-class films and other media presentations. . Both exams will be a combination of multiple choice, true-false, fill-in-theblank, short answer, or short essay items.

Essay (20%)

Students are required to write one of two essay assignments offered during the term. The paper will be approximately 5 pages in length (not to exceed 6 double-spaced pages), and will answer a specific prompt related to course topics. Specific assignments will be posted to Canvas on the dates indicated below. Papers are due in class; electronic submissions of papers will NOT be  accepted. Due dates are firm. Five points will be deducted each day the paper is late, but papers will not be accepted if they are more than five days late. Late papers cannot be emailed or posted to Canvas, so it a student’s responsibility to submit a hard copy of his/her paper to the appropriate TA.

 

H S 340 • Comparative Us Health Systems

29655 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 1.134

Please check back for updates.

H S 378 • Seminar In Health & Society

29660 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 214

Please cconsult with the academic advisor for more information.

SOC 322J • Economic Sociology Of Hlth

44785 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RLP 1.108
(also listed as H S 340)

Description  

This course provides a look at the economics of health and health care through a sociological lens. In neoclassical economics, rational behavior and market transactions provide an efficient allocation of goods and services. From a sociological perspective, markets are social institutions that are shaped by the cultural, political, and historical environments in which they operate.   This course will examine how the multidimensional nature and distribution of health and health care are shaped by a variety of social and economic factors. Throughout the course, students will gain an understanding of the power of incentives, markets, and cost-benefit analysis, as well as the limits of these tools, in creating effective health care policy.     The first part of the course will examine how social environment shapes health and health behaviors and how health disparities are viewed from sociological and economic standpoints. The second part of the course will focus on the institutions that regulate access to health care and the historical developments that led to these arrangements.   Topics include:   - Gender, race, and class differences in health - The creation and reproduction of health disparities - Health behavior and externalities - The demand and supply of health care - Moral hazard, adverse selection, and health care insurance - Health insurance and the labor market - Problems of uninsurance - History of health care reform - Comparative health policies.

SOC F308S • Intro To Health & Society

84814 • Summer 2018
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM CLA 0.128
(also listed as H S F301)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The principle objective of H S 301/SOC 308S is to offer students a broad overview of health and society from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. We will examine how social forces influence health and disease in U.S. society, including cultural, economic, and demographic considerations. We will explore why rates of disease vary among different populations and how cultural and structural inequalities shape access to healthcare and affect morbidity and mortality. How do economic factors, politics, public perceptions of morality, and historical biases against specific populations shape our modern-day understandings and experiences of health and illness? We will also examine how social forces shape the very definitions of health, illness, and disease categories, and thereby medical diagnoses and treatments. We will consider the social consequences of the commodification of healthcare and how new technologies are transforming our current healthcare system and the nature of the patient/physicianrelationship. Our course readings and discussions will help us address current bioethical controversies that continue to influence our beliefs about health and illness and shape our very understandings about human rights and personhood. This course is built around lectures (including guest lectures), class discussion, and film screenings and discussion.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

• Analyze contemporary health issues from a variety of disciplinary and professional perspectives.

• Explain how social location, the media, and economic forces shape health behaviors and outcomes.

• Explain how social and cultural factors shape contemporary understandings and experiences of health and illness and death and dying in the U.S.

• Critically evaluate the assumptions, motives, and evidence that individuals and groups use to make specific claims about health and illness.

COURSE MATERIALS

Gawande, Atul. 2014. Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. New York:Metropolitan.

Marmot, Michael. 2005. The Status Syndrome: How Social Standing Affects Our Health and Longevity. New York: Holt.

Course readings also include scholarly articles, book chapters, and other required readings available on Canvas.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND EVALUATION

This course is organized in a lecture format, but it is greatly enhanced by your participation. For variety’s sake, I will often incorporate short video-clips, group activities, and/or writing exercises in our class session. We will also spend considerable time each week discussing the readings and our own experiences, interests, and knowledge in this area. Please remember that discussions will only be as rich as you all make them, so it is essential that everyone come prepared to speak about the readings thoughtfully and critically. Your final evaluation for the course will be broken down as follows:

Attendance and Preparedness (10%)

Students are expected to attend class, read assignments before each class, and actively participate in classroom discussions during the week. Eight times during the semester the instructor will have students sign in on a class roster or complete a group assignment in the first few minutes of class. Students will be granted one unexcused absence with no penalty. If you have a university-related conflict or medical or family emergency that prevents you from attending class, alert your TA (providing relevant documentation) and you will not be penalized for a particular absence, but you must contact your TA in advance of missing class. NOTE: Tardiness will adversely affect your grade; students who arrive late risk missing this activity or sign-in sheet and will not be allowed to receive credit for the day.

Reading responses (10%)

Students are expected to keep up with the reading for the class. Six times during the course of the semester, I will pose a reading question on the course Canvas page relevant to recent reading. The questions will be posted on Sunday evening and students are expected to write a reading response of one page, double-spaced (between 250 and 350 words) and upload a copy to the Canvas page by 5pm on the Thursday that they are due. Responses will be graded as meets/exceeds expectations (100), meets minimum expectations (70), no credit (0). See course schedule for Reading Responses (marked RR).

Exams (60%)

Two exams (worth 30% each) will be given to assess your level of mastery of the course material, including assigned readings, lectures (including guest lectures), and in-class films and other media presentations. . Both exams will be a combination of multiple choice, true-false, fill-in-theblank, short answer, or short essay items.

Essay (20%)

Students are required to write one of two essay assignments offered during the term. The paper will be approximately 5 pages in length (not to exceed 6 double-spaced pages), and will answer a specific prompt related to course topics. Specific assignments will be posted to Canvas on the dates indicated below. Papers are due in class; electronic submissions of papers will NOT be  accepted. Due dates are firm. Five points will be deducted each day the paper is late, but papers will not be accepted if they are more than five days late. Late papers cannot be emailed or posted to Canvas, so it a student’s responsibility to submit a hard copy of his/her paper to the appropriate TA.

 

SOC 308S • Intro To Health & Society

44865 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CAL 100
(also listed as H S 301)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The principle objective of H S 301/SOC 308S is to offer students a broad overview of health and society from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. We will examine how social forces influence health and disease in U.S. society, including cultural, economic, and demographic considerations. We will explore why rates of disease vary among different populations and how cultural and structural inequalities shape access to healthcare and affect morbidity and mortality. How do economic factors, politics, public perceptions of morality, and historical biases against specific populations shape our modern-day understandings and experiences of health and illness? We will also examine how social forces shape the very definitions of health, illness, and disease categories, and thereby medical diagnoses and treatments. We will consider the social consequences of the commodification of healthcare and how new technologies are transforming our current healthcare system and the nature of the patient/physicianrelationship. Our course readings and discussions will help us address current bioethical controversies that continue to influence our beliefs about health and illness and shape our very understandings about human rights and personhood. This course is built around lectures (including guest lectures), class discussion, and film screenings and discussion.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

• Analyze contemporary health issues from a variety of disciplinary and professional perspectives.

• Explain how social location, the media, and economic forces shape health behaviors and outcomes.

• Explain how social and cultural factors shape contemporary understandings and experiences of health and illness and death and dying in the U.S.

• Critically evaluate the assumptions, motives, and evidence that individuals and groups use to make specific claims about health and illness.

COURSE MATERIALS

Gawande, Atul. 2014. Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. New York:Metropolitan.

Marmot, Michael. 2005. The Status Syndrome: How Social Standing Affects Our Health and Longevity. New York: Holt.

Course readings also include scholarly articles, book chapters, and other required readings available on Canvas.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND EVALUATION

This course is organized in a lecture format, but it is greatly enhanced by your participation. For variety’s sake, I will often incorporate short video-clips, group activities, and/or writing exercises in our class session. We will also spend considerable time each week discussing the readings and our own experiences, interests, and knowledge in this area. Please remember that discussions will only be as rich as you all make them, so it is essential that everyone come prepared to speak about the readings thoughtfully and critically. Your final evaluation for the course will be broken down as follows:

Attendance and Preparedness (10%)

Students are expected to attend class, read assignments before each class, and actively participate in classroom discussions during the week. Eight times during the semester the instructor will have students sign in on a class roster or complete a group assignment in the first few minutes of class. Students will be granted one unexcused absence with no penalty. If you have a university-related conflict or medical or family emergency that prevents you from attending class, alert your TA (providing relevant documentation) and you will not be penalized for a particular absence, but you must contact your TA in advance of missing class. NOTE: Tardiness will adversely affect your grade; students who arrive late risk missing this activity or sign-in sheet and will not be allowed to receive credit for the day.

Reading responses (10%)

Students are expected to keep up with the reading for the class. Six times during the course of the semester, I will pose a reading question on the course Canvas page relevant to recent reading. The questions will be posted on Sunday evening and students are expected to write a reading response of one page, double-spaced (between 250 and 350 words) and upload a copy to the Canvas page by 5pm on the Thursday that they are due. Responses will be graded as meets/exceeds expectations (100), meets minimum expectations (70), no credit (0). See course schedule for Reading Responses (marked RR).

Exams (60%)

Two exams (worth 30% each) will be given to assess your level of mastery of the course material, including assigned readings, lectures (including guest lectures), and in-class films and other media presentations. . Both exams will be a combination of multiple choice, true-false, fill-in-theblank, short answer, or short essay items.

Essay (20%)

Students are required to write one of two essay assignments offered during the term. The paper will be approximately 5 pages in length (not to exceed 6 double-spaced pages), and will answer a specific prompt related to course topics. Specific assignments will be posted to Canvas on the dates indicated below. Papers are due in class; electronic submissions of papers will NOT be  accepted. Due dates are firm. Five points will be deducted each day the paper is late, but papers will not be accepted if they are more than five days late. Late papers cannot be emailed or posted to Canvas, so it a student’s responsibility to submit a hard copy of his/her paper to the appropriate TA.

 

SOC 308S • Intro To Health & Society

44870 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CAL 100
(also listed as H S 301)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The principle objective of H S 301/SOC 308S is to offer students a broad overview of health and society from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. We will examine how social forces influence health and disease in U.S. society, including cultural, economic, and demographic considerations. We will explore why rates of disease vary among different populations and how cultural and structural inequalities shape access to healthcare and affect morbidity and mortality. How do economic factors, politics, public perceptions of morality, and historical biases against specific populations shape our modern-day understandings and experiences of health and illness? We will also examine how social forces shape the very definitions of health, illness, and disease categories, and thereby medical diagnoses and treatments. We will consider the social consequences of the commodification of healthcare and how new technologies are transforming our current healthcare system and the nature of the patient/physicianrelationship. Our course readings and discussions will help us address current bioethical controversies that continue to influence our beliefs about health and illness and shape our very understandings about human rights and personhood. This course is built around lectures (including guest lectures), class discussion, and film screenings and discussion.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

• Analyze contemporary health issues from a variety of disciplinary and professional perspectives.

• Explain how social location, the media, and economic forces shape health behaviors and outcomes.

• Explain how social and cultural factors shape contemporary understandings and experiences of health and illness and death and dying in the U.S.

• Critically evaluate the assumptions, motives, and evidence that individuals and groups use to make specific claims about health and illness.

COURSE MATERIALS

Gawande, Atul. 2014. Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. New York:Metropolitan.

Marmot, Michael. 2005. The Status Syndrome: How Social Standing Affects Our Health and Longevity. New York: Holt.

Course readings also include scholarly articles, book chapters, and other required readings available on Canvas.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND EVALUATION

This course is organized in a lecture format, but it is greatly enhanced by your participation. For variety’s sake, I will often incorporate short video-clips, group activities, and/or writing exercises in our class session. We will also spend considerable time each week discussing the readings and our own experiences, interests, and knowledge in this area. Please remember that discussions will only be as rich as you all make them, so it is essential that everyone come prepared to speak about the readings thoughtfully and critically. Your final evaluation for the course will be broken down as follows:

Attendance and Preparedness (10%)

Students are expected to attend class, read assignments before each class, and actively participate in classroom discussions during the week. Eight times during the semester the instructor will have students sign in on a class roster or complete a group assignment in the first few minutes of class. Students will be granted one unexcused absence with no penalty. If you have a university-related conflict or medical or family emergency that prevents you from attending class, alert your TA (providing relevant documentation) and you will not be penalized for a particular absence, but you must contact your TA in advance of missing class. NOTE: Tardiness will adversely affect your grade; students who arrive late risk missing this activity or sign-in sheet and will not be allowed to receive credit for the day.

Reading responses (10%)

Students are expected to keep up with the reading for the class. Six times during the course of the semester, I will pose a reading question on the course Canvas page relevant to recent reading. The questions will be posted on Sunday evening and students are expected to write a reading response of one page, double-spaced (between 250 and 350 words) and upload a copy to the Canvas page by 5pm on the Thursday that they are due. Responses will be graded as meets/exceeds expectations (100), meets minimum expectations (70), no credit (0). See course schedule for Reading Responses (marked RR).

Exams (60%)

Two exams (worth 30% each) will be given to assess your level of mastery of the course material, including assigned readings, lectures (including guest lectures), and in-class films and other media presentations. . Both exams will be a combination of multiple choice, true-false, fill-in-theblank, short answer, or short essay items.

Essay (20%)

Students are required to write one of two essay assignments offered during the term. The paper will be approximately 5 pages in length (not to exceed 6 double-spaced pages), and will answer a specific prompt related to course topics. Specific assignments will be posted to Canvas on the dates indicated below. Papers are due in class; electronic submissions of papers will NOT be  accepted. Due dates are firm. Five points will be deducted each day the paper is late, but papers will not be accepted if they are more than five days late. Late papers cannot be emailed or posted to Canvas, so it a student’s responsibility to submit a hard copy of his/her paper to the appropriate TA.

 

SOC 333K • Sociology Of Gender

45020 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ B0.306
(also listed as WGS 322)

Description:

n this course we will study the meaning of gender in contemporary American society, along with its meaning historically and across cultures. We will chart the ways in which gender is produced and regulated through social institutions such as the workplace, family, and religion, and how this shapes our everyday. The course will also explore how race/ethnicity, class, and sexuality shape conceptions of gender.  
 
Readings: 
 
Course readings will consist of peer-reviewed journal articles. 
 
Grading: 
 
Grading will be based on exams and 3-4 brief writing assignments. 

SOC 369K • Population And Society

45050 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.102
(also listed as WGS 322)

 

Description:

Population studies or demography is an interdisciplinary field, incorporating insights from sociology, economics, geography, anthropology, biology, and other disciplines. Fertility, mortality, and migration are the social processes through which populations change and so these are the foundations of demography. Yet understanding these mechanisms of population change requires us to draw on theory and research on political, economic, cultural, and natural forces. 

One goal of this class is to provide students with a basic understanding of human population composition and variation across time and space. Demography has developed useful tools to describe population change and a second goal of this class is to teach students about demographic theory, data, and method.

Grading:

There will be three exams. There will not be a cumulative final.

Be sure to mark your calendar!  No make-up exams except in extreme circumstances.  Make ups may be 100% essay.

Assignments - You will choose 4 of 6 written assignments to complete.

Note: We will not accept late assignments.

Grades are calculated as a weighted average of grades on assignments, papers, and exams. A=93-100; A-90-92; B+=87-89; B=83-86; B-=80-82; C+=77-79; C=73-76; C-70-72; D+=67-69; D=63-66; D-=60-62; F < 60.

Reading Materials

Required text: Demography: The Study of Human Populatin by Lundquist, Anderton, & Yaukey. Waveland Press, Inc.

On-line Readings: There are a number of short reading assignments, marked with an [Readings].

 

 

SOC 323 • The Family

45415 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM JES A307A
(also listed as WGS 345)

Family life today differs dramatically from that of previous generations. The goal of this course is to understand how changes in American family life occurred and what these changes mean for adults and children in contemporary society. In this course, we will examine trends over time in specific aspects of family life, including marriage, cohabitation, mate selection, divorce, parenthood, family structure, and work-family balance. Students will also gain an understanding of the methods that sociologists and demographers use to study the family. 

SOC 354K • Sociology Of Health & Illness

45473 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 212

Course Description


This course provides an introduction to central topics in the sociology of health and illness. The material covered in this course will encompass individual, institutional and theoretical approaches to health & illness.  The course is designed to provide a critical framework for exploring how social, political, economic and cultural forces shape the understanding and experience of health and illness.  We will explore the following themes: 1) the social production and distribution of disease and illness; 2) the meaning and experience of illness; 3) the social organization of medical care; 4) health politics and health systems.

Course Objectives


At the completion of this course, the student will learn and understand:

• how the concepts of health and illness are socially constructed
• how social, political and economic factors shape an individual’s experience of health and illness
• the major methods and theories used to understand the distribution of health and illness in society
• the structure and organization of the health care system 


Course requirements
Your grade will be determined by three criteria:
1) Three exams 
2) Short writing assignments
3) Class participation 

SOC 308S • Intro To Health & Society

45375 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.126
(also listed as H S 301)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The principle objective of H S 301/SOC 308S is to offer students a broad overview of health and society from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. We will examine how social forces influence health and disease in U.S. society, including cultural, economic, and demographic considerations. We will explore why rates of disease vary among different populations and how cultural and structural inequalities shape access to healthcare and affect morbidity and mortality. How do economic factors, politics, public perceptions of morality, and historical biases against specific populations shape our modern-day understandings and experiences of health and illness? We will also examine how social forces shape the very definitions of health, illness, and disease categories, and thereby medical diagnoses and treatments. We will consider the social consequences of the commodification of healthcare and how new technologies are transforming our current healthcare system and the nature of the patient/physicianrelationship. Our course readings and discussions will help us address current bioethical controversies that continue to influence our beliefs about health and illness and shape our very understandings about human rights and personhood. This course is built around lectures (including guest lectures), class discussion, and film screenings and discussion.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

• Analyze contemporary health issues from a variety of disciplinary and professional perspectives.

• Explain how social location, the media, and economic forces shape health behaviors and outcomes.

• Explain how social and cultural factors shape contemporary understandings and experiences of health and illness and death and dying in the U.S.

• Critically evaluate the assumptions, motives, and evidence that individuals and groups use to make specific claims about health and illness.

COURSE MATERIALS

Gawande, Atul. 2014. Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. New York:Metropolitan.

Marmot, Michael. 2005. The Status Syndrome: How Social Standing Affects Our Health and Longevity. New York: Holt.

Course readings also include scholarly articles, book chapters, and other required readings available on Canvas.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND EVALUATION

This course is organized in a lecture format, but it is greatly enhanced by your participation. For variety’s sake, I will often incorporate short video-clips, group activities, and/or writing exercises in our class session. We will also spend considerable time each week discussing the readings and our own experiences, interests, and knowledge in this area. Please remember that discussions will only be as rich as you all make them, so it is essential that everyone come prepared to speak about the readings thoughtfully and critically. Your final evaluation for the course will be broken down as follows:

Attendance and Preparedness (10%)

Students are expected to attend class, read assignments before each class, and actively participate in classroom discussions during the week. Eight times during the semester the instructor will have students sign in on a class roster or complete a group assignment in the first few minutes of class. Students will be granted one unexcused absence with no penalty. If you have a university-related conflict or medical or family emergency that prevents you from attending class, alert your TA (providing relevant documentation) and you will not be penalized for a particular absence, but you must contact your TA in advance of missing class. NOTE: Tardiness will adversely affect your grade; students who arrive late risk missing this activity or sign-in sheet and will not be allowed to receive credit for the day.

Reading responses (10%)

Students are expected to keep up with the reading for the class. Six times during the course of the semester, I will pose a reading question on the course Canvas page relevant to recent reading. The questions will be posted on Sunday evening and students are expected to write a reading response of one page, double-spaced (between 250 and 350 words) and upload a copy to the Canvas page by 5pm on the Thursday that they are due. Responses will be graded as meets/exceeds expectations (100), meets minimum expectations (70), no credit (0). See course schedule for Reading Responses (marked RR).

Exams (60%)

Two exams (worth 30% each) will be given to assess your level of mastery of the course material, including assigned readings, lectures (including guest lectures), and in-class films and other media presentations. . Both exams will be a combination of multiple choice, true-false, fill-in-theblank, short answer, or short essay items.

Essay (20%)

Students are required to write one of two essay assignments offered during the term. The paper will be approximately 5 pages in length (not to exceed 6 double-spaced pages), and will answer a specific prompt related to course topics. Specific assignments will be posted to Canvas on the dates indicated below. Papers are due in class; electronic submissions of papers will NOT be  accepted. Due dates are firm. Five points will be deducted each day the paper is late, but papers will not be accepted if they are more than five days late. Late papers cannot be emailed or posted to Canvas, so it a student’s responsibility to submit a hard copy of his/her paper to the appropriate TA.

 

SOC 321K • Economic Sociology Of Hlth

45435 • Spring 2017
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM CLA 3.106

Description  

This course provides a look at the economics of health and health care through a sociological lens. In neoclassical economics, rational behavior and market transactions provide an efficient allocation of goods and services. From a sociological perspective, markets are social institutions that are shaped by the cultural, political, and historical environments in which they operate.   This course will examine how the multidimensional nature and distribution of health and health care are shaped by a variety of social and economic factors. Throughout the course, students will gain an understanding of the power of incentives, markets, and cost-benefit analysis, as well as the limits of these tools, in creating effective health care policy.     The first part of the course will examine how social environment shapes health and health behaviors and how health disparities are viewed from sociological and economic standpoints. The second part of the course will focus on the institutions that regulate access to health care and the historical developments that led to these arrangements.   Topics include:   - Gender, race, and class differences in health - The creation and reproduction of health disparities - Health behavior and externalities - The demand and supply of health care - Moral hazard, adverse selection, and health care insurance - Health insurance and the labor market - Problems of uninsurance - History of health care reform - Comparative health policies.

SOC 333K • Sociology Of Gender

45525 • Spring 2017
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM CLA 0.102
(also listed as WGS 322)

Description:

n this course we will study the meaning of gender in contemporary American society, along with its meaning historically and across cultures. We will chart the ways in which gender is produced and regulated through social institutions such as the workplace, family, and religion, and how this shapes our everyday. The course will also explore how race/ethnicity, class, and sexuality shape conceptions of gender.  
 
Readings:
 
Course readings will consist of peer-reviewed journal articles. 
 
Grading:
 
Grading will be based on exams and 3-4 brief writing assignments. 
 

SOC 321K • Economic Sociology Of Hlth

45373 • Fall 2016
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 304
Description   This course provides a look at the economics of health and health care through a sociological lens. In neoclassical economics, rational behavior and market transactions provide an efficient allocation of goods and services. From a sociological perspective, markets are social institutions that are shaped by the cultural, political, and historical environments in which they operate.   This course will examine how the multidimensional nature and distribution of health and health care are shaped by a variety of social and economic factors. Throughout the course, students will gain an understanding of the power of incentives, markets, and cost-benefit analysis, as well as the limits of these tools, in creating effective health care policy.     The first part of the course will examine how social environment shapes health and health behaviors and how health disparities are viewed from sociological and economic standpoints. The second part of the course will focus on the institutions that regulate access to health care and the historical developments that led to these arrangements.   Topics include:   - Gender, race, and class differences in health - The creation and reproduction of health disparities - Health behavior and externalities - The demand and supply of health care - Moral hazard, adverse selection, and health care insurance - Health insurance and the labor market - Problems of uninsurance - History of health care reform - Comparative health policies

 

SOC 323 • The Family

45410 • Fall 2016
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:30PM CBA 4.332
(also listed as WGS 345)

Course description

Family life today differs dramatically from that of previous generations. The goal of this course is to understand how changes in American family life occurred and what these changes mean for adults and children in contemporary society. In this course, we will examine trends over time in specific aspects of family life, including marriage, cohabitation, mate selection, divorce, parenthood, family structure, and work-family balance. Students will also gain an understanding of the methods that sociologists and demographers use to study the family.

Required reading

There is no textbook for this course. Instead, the readings come from articles posted on Canvas for each topic. I will post two or three readings per topic – typically one article from a peer-reviewed academic journal and one or two from a newspaper or magazine. You should read all of the articles.

Attendance

Class discussions are an important component of your learning. As such, attendance and participation are critical to the success of this course. Students are expected to attend class daily and attendance will be taken at the beginning of each class period. Each student may miss up to 4 days of class without penalty. This allows you to attend to any conflicts that may arise during the semester, including illness, travel, court appearances, doctor’s appointments, oversleeping, etc. Missing more than 4 days of class will result in a failing grade (F). Exam review days are optional.

Course requirements

There are five primary course requirements:

1. Reading response papers (50%)

After you have finished the readings for each week, compose a 500-1000 word reading response paper. In the first half of the paper, briefly summarize the main point(s) of each article. In the second half of the paper, offer some discussion. For example: What did you find interesting or surprising? What do you think of the author’s arguments? If the reading discusses a problem, what do you see as a solution?

A total of seven response papers is due over the course of the 21 topics we will cover this semester. You may choose the topics you write and do not write papers about, but I highly recommend that you turn in your first paper early in the semester. Papers are due at the beginning of class on the date listed on the course calendar. Papers turned in after the class discussion will receive half credit.

2. Group presentation (5%)

Five topics will be covered student group presentations, rather than by theinstructor. A sign up sheet will be passed around early in the semester so that you can sign up for a topic.

3. Family interview assignment draft (5%)

For this assignment, you will interview a family member or another individual over the age of 65. The purpose of the interview is to get another generation’s perspective on family life. You should plan to turn in a 4-5 page paper. More details will be provided later in the semester.

4. Family interview assignment final paper (10%)

A final copy of the paper is due at the end of the semester.

5. Exam 1 (15%)

The first exam will cover the topics from the first half of the semester.

6. Exam 2 (15%)

The second exam will cover the topics from the second half of the semester.

Participation

There is no official participation grade, but at the end of the semester I will consider bumping final grades by one third of a grade (e.g., from an A- to an A, or a B to a B+) for a few students who contributed regularly and thoughtfully to class discussions and demonstrated that they had read the assigned articles.

Extra credit

No extra credit assignments will be offered. However, if you would like to improve your grade on the reading response papers, you may write additional papers to replace grades that you feel need improvement.

Grading

Final letter grades will be assigned as follows:

A 93-100 B 83-86 C 73-76 D 63-66

A- 90-92 B- 80-82 C- 70-72 D- 60-62

B+ 87-89 C+ 77-79 D+ 67-69 F 59 or below

 

SOC 323 • The Family

44570 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 1.102
(also listed as WGS 345)

Description:

This course explores the family as a social institution in American society. The primary goal of this class is to encourage students to step beyond their personal experiences and cultivate a more sociological and analytical approach to the family.  By the end of the term, students will be able understand the cultural and structural forces that shape family life, and how these dimensions can shift, but also resist change over time. We will begin with a historical overview of the family where we will contextualize and challenge nostalgic depictions of the family in popular culture.  Throughout the term we will chart multiple dimensions of family life, including dating, cohabitation, marriage, parenting, childhood, and divorce, and changing ideas of the American family, to name a few.  We will adopt a sociological perspective, considering how gender, race, class, sexuality, and other social factors shape family relationships and family life.  We will also consider alternate family structures that were once dismissed as deviant (e.g. having children outside marriage and gay marriage) but are increasingly common and continue to shape public policy in the 21st century.  This course carries a writing flag designation and so also seeks to develop students’ writing skills throughout the term.

Texts:                         

TBA

Grades:           

Two Papers 45%

Journal Writing Assignments  20%

Peer Reviews   5%

Attendance and Participation  20%

Group Presentation on a topic about the Family 10%

                        

SOC S323 • The Family

88295 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM CLA 0.112

Description

American family life today differs dramatically from that of previous generations. The goal of this course is to understand how changes in American family life occurred and what these changes mean for adults and children in contemporary society. In this course, we will examine trends over time in specific aspects of family life, including marriage, cohabitation, mate selection, divorce, parenthood, family structure, and work-family balance. Students will also gain an understanding of the methods that sociologists and demographers use to study the family. 

 

SOC 308 • American Families Past & Pres

45605 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 203

Course description

American family life today differs dramatically from that of previous generations. The goal of this course is to understand how changes in American family life occurred and what these changes mean for adults and children in contemporary society. In this course, we will examine trends over time in specific aspects of family life, including marriage, cohabitation, mate selection, divorce, parenthood, family structure, and work-family balance. Students will also gain an understanding of the methods that sociologists and demographers use to study the family.

Required reading

There is no textbook for this course. Instead, the reading comes from articles posted on Blackboard for each topic. I will post two or three readings per topic – typically one article from a peer-reviewed academic journal and one or two from a newspaper or magazine. You should read all articles.

Course requirements

1. Reading response papers (50%)

After you have finished the readings for each week, compose a 400-800 word reading response paper. In the first half of the paper, briefly summarize the main point(s) of each article. In the second half of the paper, offer some discussion. For example: What did you find interesting or surprising? What do you think of the author’s arguments? How do the readings relate to each other? If the reading discusses a problem, what do you see as a solution? A total of six response papers is due over the course of the fifteen topics we will cover this semester. You may choose the weeks that you write and do not write papers, but you must turn in at least two papers before spring break. Papers are due at the beginning of class on the date listed on the course calendar. Because we will discuss the papers during class, late papers will not be accepted.

2. Group presentation (10%)

Some topics will be covered by an in-class presentation instead of or in addition to a lecture/discussion. The presentations will be done in groups of three students vs. three students.

3. Family interview assignment (10%)

For this assignment, you will interview a family member or another individual over the age of 65. The purpose of the interview is to get another generation’s perspective on family life. You should plan to turn in a 4-5 page paper. More details will be provided later in the semester.

4. Exam 1 (15%)

The first exam will cover the topics from the first half of the semester.

5. Exam 2 (15%)

The second exam will cover the topics from the second half of the semester. 

SOC 308 • American Families Past & Pres

45410 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM BUR 134

Description:

Is dating dead? Is cohabitation a good idea? Are divorce rates on the rise? Why are there so many single parent families? What does same sex marriage mean for the future of marriage? In this course, we examine recent trends in family life from a sociological perspective. The goal of this course is to understand how diverse family forms came to exist and what these changes mean for adults and children in contemporary society. We will examine recent trends in several aspects of family life, including dating & courtship, cohabitation, marriage, divorce, parenthood, family structure, and work-family balance. Students will also gain an understanding of the methods that sociologists and demographers use to study the family.

Required Texts:

Academic and non-academic articles posted on Blackboard. Selections include:

 Martin King Whyte. 1992.  “Choosing Mates – The American Way.” Society.

Jeffrey Jensen Arnett. 2000. “Emerging Adulthood: A Theory of Development From the Late Teens Through the Twenties.” American Psychologist.

Andrew Cherlin. 2004. “The Deinstitutionalization of American Marriage.” Journal of Marriage and Family.

Linda Waite. 1995. “Does Marriage Matter?” Demography.

Steven Nock. 2005. “Marriage as a Public Issue.” The Future of Children.

Peter McDonald. 2006. “Low Fertility and the State: The Efficacy of Policy.” Population and Development Review.

Suzanne Bianchi, Melissa Milkie, Liana Sayer, & John Robinson. 2000. “Is Anyone Doing the Housework? Trends in the Gender Division of Household Labor.” Social Forces.

 Brad Wilcox. 2009.“The Evolution of Divorce.” National Affairs.

Jeremy Travis, Elizabeth Cincotta McBride, & Amy Solomon. 2005. “Families Left Behind: The Hidden Cost of Incarceration and Reentry.” Urban Institute (Justice Policy Center).

Grading Policy:

Reading response papers (60%)

Family interview assignment (20%)

Final exam (20%)

Final letter grades will be assigned as follows:

A (93-100), A- (90-92), B+ (87-89), B (83-87), B- (80-82), C+ (77-79), C (73-76), C- (70-72),

D+ (67-69), D (63-66), D- (60-62), F (59 or below) 

SOC F323 • The Family

88545 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM BUR 220


SOC 308 • American Families Past & Pres

45955 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 301

Description:

Is dating dead? Is cohabitation a good idea? Are divorce rates on the rise? Why are there so many single parent families? What does same sex marriage mean for the future of marriage? In this course, we examine recent trends in family life from a sociological perspective. The goal of this course is to understand how diverse family forms came to exist and what these changes mean for adults and children in contemporary society. We will examine recent trends in several aspects of family life, including dating & courtship, cohabitation, marriage, divorce, parenthood, family structure, and work-family balance. Students will also gain an understanding of the methods that sociologists and demographers use to study the family.

 

Required Texts:

 Academic and non-academic articles posted on Blackboard. Selections include:

 Martin King Whyte. 1992.  “Choosing Mates – The American Way.” Society.

 Jeffrey Jensen Arnett. 2000. “Emerging Adulthood: A Theory of Development From the Late Teens Through the Twenties.” American Psychologist.

 Andrew Cherlin. 2004. “The Deinstitutionalization of American Marriage.” Journal of Marriage and Family.

 Linda Waite. 1995. “Does Marriage Matter?” Demography.

 Steven Nock. 2005. “Marriage as a Public Issue.” The Future of Children.

 Peter McDonald. 2006. “Low Fertility and the State: The Efficacy of Policy.” Population and Development Review.

 Suzanne Bianchi, Melissa Milkie, Liana Sayer, & John Robinson. 2000. “Is Anyone Doing the Housework? Trends in the Gender Division of Household Labor.” Social Forces.

 Brad Wilcox. 2009.“The Evolution of Divorce.” National Affairs.

 Jeremy Travis, Elizabeth Cincotta McBride, & Amy Solomon. 2005. “Families Left Behind: The Hidden Cost of Incarceration and Reentry.” Urban Institute (Justice Policy Center).

 Grading Policy:

 Reading response papers (60%)

Family interview assignment (20%)

Final exam (20%)

 Final letter grades will be assigned as follows:

A (93-100), A- (90-92), B+ (87-89), B (83-87), B- (80-82), C+ (77-79), C (73-76), C- (70-72),

D+ (67-69), D (63-66), D- (60-62), F (59 or below) 

SWE 604 • Accelerated First-Year Swedish

38860 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 9:00AM-11:00AM SZB 380

Course Description

An introduction to spoken and written Swedish with an emphasis on active communication, this course will cover basic grammar and vocabulary. By the end of the semester you should be able to read short texts with some ease and to carry on a conversation about an everyday subject with a native speaker. Since Swedish is very similar to English, you'll probably be able to say and understand more than you think you will before you begin to study it! Graded readings in Swedish will also introduce you to aspects of Swedish and Scandinavian culture, and we’ll also view some recent Swedish films—for fun and practice understanding spoken Swedish. Swedish 604 is the first part of a two-semester accelerated course which satisfies the undergraduate language requirement in one year. The first semester covers the basics of Swedish grammar and vocabulary. In the second, students read a variety of texts on literary and cultural issues and respond to them in weekly essays in Swedish.

 

Grading Policy

Attendance and class participation: 30%

Weekly quizzes: 30%

Weekly compositions: 30%

Examination: 10%

 

Texts

Nybörjarsvenska (BlueText) Nybörjarsvenska (Yellow Workbook) Säg det på svenska (Red Text, not the workbook) Prisma's svensk-engelsk ordbok (Swedish-English Dictionary) Recommended: Prisma’s engelsk-svensk ordbok (English-Swedish Dictionary)

GER 506 • First-Year German I

37355 • Spring 2009
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM JES A305A

Course Description

German 506, a first semester German course, assumes no prior knowledge of German. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) German 506 introduces students to the language and culture of the modern German-speaking world. Every effort is made to present opportunities to use the language: for self-expression in everyday situations, for basic survival needs in German-speaking language communities, and for personal enjoyment. To this aim, lessons center on linguistic, communicative, and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class. 

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

1  Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2  Homework (15%)

3  Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)

4  Chapter tests (25%)

5  Structured reflections on learning experiences (5%)

6  Regular quizzes (10%)

7  Short collaborative video project (10%)

8  Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

 

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 507 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 507 • First-Year German II

38620 • Fall 2008
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM JES A307A

Course Description

German 507, a second-semester German course, continues instruction begun in German 506. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German and did not take GER 506, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) By the end of German 507, students will be familiar with most basic structures of the German language and will have developed basic cultural knowledge about the German-speaking world. As vocabulary and grammar sophistication grow, students will become increasingly proficient at expressing their thoughts, feelings, and opinions on a variety of subjects related to everyday life. To this aim, each lesson centers on linguistic, communicative and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class.

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Homework (20%)

3      Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)

4      Chapter tests (30%)

5      Regular quizzes (10%)

6      Reading journals (5%)

7      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

 

There are no incompletes given in German 507. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 612 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

SWE 612 • Accelerated Second-Yr Swedish

38970 • Spring 2008
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM MEZ 1.104

Course Description:

This is an intermediate course in Swedish language that emphasizes oral and written Swedish. Graded readings will introduce you to various aspects of Swedish and Scandinavian literature and culture, and we will continue to review and refine your knowledge of Swedish grammar. We will also see and discuss a number of Swedish films. Completion of this course satisfies the four-semester language requirement in many programs at UT.

Grading Policy:

Weekly compositions (35%) and quizzes (35%), one hour examination (10%), and class participation (20%).

Texts:

Nybörjarsvenska (Blue text) Nybörjarsvenska (Yellow workbook) Nybörjarsvenska (facit ? answer key) Nya Mål 3 (textbook and workbook) Prisma's Swedish-English Dictionary Prisma?s English-Swedish Dictionary

SWE 604 • Accelerated First-Year Swedish

39645 • Fall 2007
Meets MW 8:00AM-9:00AM BEN 1.106

Course Description

An introduction to spoken and written Swedish with an emphasis on active communication, this course will cover basic grammar and vocabulary. By the end of the semester you should be able to read short texts with some ease and to carry on a conversation about an everyday subject with a native speaker. Since Swedish is very similar to English, you'll probably be able to say and understand more than you think you will before you begin to study it! Graded readings in Swedish will also introduce you to aspects of Swedish and Scandinavian culture, and we’ll also view some recent Swedish films—for fun and practice understanding spoken Swedish. Swedish 604 is the first part of a two-semester accelerated course which satisfies the undergraduate language requirement in one year. The first semester covers the basics of Swedish grammar and vocabulary. In the second, students read a variety of texts on literary and cultural issues and respond to them in weekly essays in Swedish.

 

Grading Policy

Attendance and class participation: 30%

Weekly quizzes: 30%

Weekly compositions: 30%

Examination: 10%

 

Texts

Nybörjarsvenska (BlueText) Nybörjarsvenska (Yellow Workbook) Säg det på svenska (Red Text, not the workbook) Prisma's svensk-engelsk ordbok (Swedish-English Dictionary) Recommended: Prisma’s engelsk-svensk ordbok (English-Swedish Dictionary)

SWE 612 • Accelerated Second-Yr Swedish

38395 • Spring 2007
Meets MWF 8:00AM-10:00AM MEZ 1.104

Course Description:

This is an intermediate course in Swedish language that emphasizes oral and written Swedish. Graded readings will introduce you to various aspects of Swedish and Scandinavian literature and culture, and we will continue to review and refine your knowledge of Swedish grammar. We will also see and discuss a number of Swedish films. Completion of this course satisfies the four-semester language requirement in many programs at UT.

Grading Policy:

Weekly compositions (35%) and quizzes (35%), one hour examination (10%), and class participation (20%).

Texts:

Nybörjarsvenska (Blue text) Nybörjarsvenska (Yellow workbook) Nybörjarsvenska (facit ? answer key) Nya Mål 3 (textbook and workbook) Prisma's Swedish-English Dictionary Prisma?s English-Swedish Dictionary

GER 506 • First-Year German I

38755 • Fall 2006
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM JES A305A

Course Description

German 506, a first semester German course, assumes no prior knowledge of German. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) German 506 introduces students to the language and culture of the modern German-speaking world. Every effort is made to present opportunities to use the language: for self-expression in everyday situations, for basic survival needs in German-speaking language communities, and for personal enjoyment. To this aim, lessons center on linguistic, communicative, and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class. 

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

1  Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2  Homework (15%)

3  Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)

4  Chapter tests (25%)

5  Structured reflections on learning experiences (5%)

6  Regular quizzes (10%)

7  Short collaborative video project (10%)

8  Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

 

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 507 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

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  • Department of Sociology

    The University of Texas at Austin
    305 E 23rd St, A1700
    RLP 3.306
    Austin, TX 78712-1086
    512-232-6300