Department of Sociology

Robert L. Reece


Ph.D., Duke University

Assistant Professor
Robert L. Reece

Contact

Interests


race; colorism; slavery; fatness and weight stigma

Biography


I am interested in pushing race scholarship past the point of simply mapping racial inequality onto a set of taken-for-granted racial categories. My research asks the question "what is race" and explores themes related to the origins of racialization and racialized social outcomes, the slipperiness of racial categories, and how physical appearance maps on to and intersects with race. I explore the origins of racial inequality, the origins of colorism, and draw empirical connections between historical origins and contemporary forms of racialized inequality. Moreover, I am investigating racial differences in health outcomes related to body weight discrimination and the intersections of fatness, race, and skin tone.

A list of my publications is below:

Reece, Robert L. 2020. "The Gender of Colorism: Understanding the Intersection of Skin Tone and Gender Inequality" Journal of Economics, Race, and Policy.

Reece, Robert L. 2019. “Coloring Racial Fluidity: How Skin Tone Shapes Multiracial Adolescents’ Racial Identity Changes.” Race and Social Problems.

Reece, Robert L. 2019. “Whitewashing Slavery: Legacy of Slavery and White Social Outcomes” Social Problems

Reece, Robert L. 2018. "Color Crit: Critical Race Theory and the History and Future of Colorism in the US." Journal of Black Studies

Reece, Robert L. 2018. “Coloring Weight Stigma: On Race, Colorism, Weight Stigma, and the Failure of Additive Intersectionality." Sociology of Race and Ethnicity

Reece, Robert L. 2018. “Genesis of U.S. Colorism and Skin Tone Stratification: Slavery, Freedom, and Mulatto-Black Occupational Inequality in the Late 19th Century.” Review of Black Political Economy 

O'Connell, Heather A. and Robert L. Reece. 2018. "Quantitative Studies of Place and Spatial Regression Analysis: A Study of the Legacy of Slavery in the U.S. South." Sage Research Methods Cases.

Reece, Robert L. and Maggie Hardy. 2017. "Moving Beyond Metrics: A Primer for Hiring and Promoting a Diverse Workforce in Entomology and Other Natural Sciences." Annals of the Entomological Society of America.

Reece, Robert L. and Aisha A. Upton. 2017. "How Skin Tone Shapes Civic Engagement Among Black Americans." Pp. 157-177 in Color Struck: How Race and Complexion Matter in the "Color-Blind" Era edited by L. L. Martin, H. D. Horton, C. Herring, V. M. Keith, and M. Thomas.

Reece, Robert L. 2016. “What Are You Mixed With?: An Analysis of Perceived Attractiveness, Skin Tone, and Mixed Raciality.” The Review of Black Political Economy.

Reece, Robert L. and Heather A. O’Connell. 2016. “How the Legacy of Slavery and Racial Composition Shape Public School Enrollment in the American South.” Sociology of Race and Ethnicity

Reece, Robert L. 2015 “The Plight of the Black Belle Knox: Race, College, Web Cam Models, and the Internet.” Porn Studies

Reece, Robert. 2014. “Blacking Up Critical Whiteness: Dave Chappelle as a Race Theorist.” Pp. 69-90 in (Re)positioning Race: Prophetic Research in a Post-Racial Obama Era edited by S. Barnes, Z. Robinson, and E. Wright III. New York: SUNY Press.

Reece, Robert. 2014. “Sex as Subversion: The Ethnosexual Protestor and the Ethnosexual Defender” Pp. 105-116 in Routledge International Handbook of Race Class and Gender edited by S. Jackson. New York: Routledge.

Courses


SOC 321K • Race, Sci And Race Sci-Wb

44690 • Spring 2021
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM
Internet; Synchronous

Description:
This course is designed to explore the broad history of how race has shaped the development
of science in the United States from the 1800s to the present, including medical treatments,
diagnostic criteria, technological developments, and business ventures. We will examine how
people of color suffered experimental practices that furthered medical science in particular (such
as birth control experiments in Puerto Rico), and through a reading of defunct theories of
inherent racial difference, we will examine how an obsessive focus on biological ideas of race
stunted scientific progress. Moreover, we will examine how ideas built on racial difference
shaped how Americans viewed their bodies and science (such as how the early weight loss
industry targeted white Americans). Finally, we will discuss the reemergence of old ideas about
racial difference through industries such as genetic ancestry testing and pharmaceutical use of
racialized medicine.

Required Texts
Fatal Invention by Dorothy Roberts
The Social Life of DNA by Alondra Nelson
Fearing the Black Body by Sabrina Strings
Medical Apartheid by Harriet Washington
Medical Bondage by Deirdre Cooper Owens

Grading Policy
Students will be graded based on short weekly response papers that evaluate their critical
understanding of that week’s texts, a mid-term research paper on a relevant topic of their choice
where they will be given in-depth feedback on their writing and analysis in preparation for a final
term paper and an accompanying in-class presentation.

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

43565-43590 • Spring 2020
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM
SB

Description:

This course will introduce students to the sociological study of society. It is designed to help students understand the larger factors shaping social life and equip them with the tools to interrogate and comprehend the world around them. The course will introduce basic sociological concepts such as the relationship between the individual and society, the social construction of reality, and the causes and consequences of social inequality along with the methods sociologists use to examine these relationships. We will examine major topics in sociological research, including, but not limited to, inequality, mobility, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, crime, punishment and social control, the family, education, and immigration. 
 
 Readings 

I generally try to spare students the high cost of books, so I will provide all of your readings through Canvas.

Assignments and Grading 

Weekly Quizzes – 60% 

Each week, except those indicated on the syllabus, your TA will issue a quiz during your discussion section. These quizzes will be a combination of short answer and multiple choice and measure your engagement with the reading and lecture content. Each quiz will be five questions, and we will issue a total of twelve quizzes over the course of the semester. That means that each question will be worth one percent of your final grade. 

Midterm – 20% 

The midterm will be a comprehensive take home exam consisting of 20 questions, a combination of short answer (1-3 sentences) and multiple choice. The questions will test your knowledge of the core concepts we’ve covered up until this point and your ability to apply them to real-world situations. While I do not issue formal study guides, I will reserve the Monday of the week of the midterm for students to ask any questions they have related to the test or concepts we have covered in class (this is for clarification and elaboration only; do not expect me to repeat an entire lecture because you missed a day of class). Shortly after class, I will issue the exam to students, and it will be due to their respective TAs by Friday at midnight. 

Final – 20% 

The final will also be a comprehensive take home exam of 20 questions, a combination of short answer (1-3 sentences) and multiple choice. It will be issued the last Wednesday (12-6) of class and due to TAs by the following Wednesday (12-13) at midnight. Our review for the final will be the previous Wednesday. 

Late Work and Makeup Policy 

I understand that sometimes things happen. If you would like to makeup work, I expect you to present formal documentation of these things within a week of the assignment’s due date, and we will schedule a time for your makeup. 

Grading Scale A 94% 

A- 90% 

B+ 87% 

B 84% 

B- 80% 

C+ 77% 

C 74% 

C- 70% 

D 65% 

F< 65% 

 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

43595-43620 • Spring 2020
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM
SB

Description:

This course will introduce students to the sociological study of society. It is designed to help students understand the larger factors shaping social life and equip them with the tools to interrogate and comprehend the world around them. The course will introduce basic sociological concepts such as the relationship between the individual and society, the social construction of reality, and the causes and consequences of social inequality along with the methods sociologists use to examine these relationships. We will examine major topics in sociological research, including, but not limited to, inequality, mobility, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, crime, punishment and social control, the family, education, and immigration. 
 
 Readings 

I generally try to spare students the high cost of books, so I will provide all of your readings through Canvas.

Assignments and Grading 

Weekly Quizzes – 60% 

Each week, except those indicated on the syllabus, your TA will issue a quiz during your discussion section. These quizzes will be a combination of short answer and multiple choice and measure your engagement with the reading and lecture content. Each quiz will be five questions, and we will issue a total of twelve quizzes over the course of the semester. That means that each question will be worth one percent of your final grade. 

Midterm – 20% 

The midterm will be a comprehensive take home exam consisting of 20 questions, a combination of short answer (1-3 sentences) and multiple choice. The questions will test your knowledge of the core concepts we’ve covered up until this point and your ability to apply them to real-world situations. While I do not issue formal study guides, I will reserve the Monday of the week of the midterm for students to ask any questions they have related to the test or concepts we have covered in class (this is for clarification and elaboration only; do not expect me to repeat an entire lecture because you missed a day of class). Shortly after class, I will issue the exam to students, and it will be due to their respective TAs by Friday at midnight. 

Final – 20% 

The final will also be a comprehensive take home exam of 20 questions, a combination of short answer (1-3 sentences) and multiple choice. It will be issued the last Wednesday (12-6) of class and due to TAs by the following Wednesday (12-13) at midnight. Our review for the final will be the previous Wednesday. 

Late Work and Makeup Policy 

I understand that sometimes things happen. If you would like to makeup work, I expect you to present formal documentation of these things within a week of the assignment’s due date, and we will schedule a time for your makeup. 

Grading Scale A 94% 

A- 90% 

B+ 87% 

B 84% 

B- 80% 

C+ 77% 

C 74% 

C- 70% 

D 65% 

F< 65% 

 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

43250-43275 • Fall 2019
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM WCH 1.120
SB

Description:

This course will introduce students to the sociological study of society. It is designed to help students understand the larger factors shaping social life and equip them with the tools to interrogate and comprehend the world around them. The course will introduce basic sociological concepts such as the relationship between the individual and society, the social construction of reality, and the causes and consequences of social inequality along with the methods sociologists use to examine these relationships. We will examine major topics in sociological research, including, but not limited to, inequality, mobility, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, crime, punishment and social control, the family, education, and immigration. 
 
 Readings 

I generally try to spare students the high cost of books, so I will provide all of your readings through Canvas.

Assignments and Grading 

Weekly Quizzes – 60% 

Each week, except those indicated on the syllabus, your TA will issue a quiz during your discussion section. These quizzes will be a combination of short answer and multiple choice and measure your engagement with the reading and lecture content. Each quiz will be five questions, and we will issue a total of twelve quizzes over the course of the semester. That means that each question will be worth one percent of your final grade. 

Midterm – 20% 

The midterm will be a comprehensive take home exam consisting of 20 questions, a combination of short answer (1-3 sentences) and multiple choice. The questions will test your knowledge of the core concepts we’ve covered up until this point and your ability to apply them to real-world situations. While I do not issue formal study guides, I will reserve the Monday of the week of the midterm for students to ask any questions they have related to the test or concepts we have covered in class (this is for clarification and elaboration only; do not expect me to repeat an entire lecture because you missed a day of class). Shortly after class, I will issue the exam to students, and it will be due to their respective TAs by Friday at midnight. 

Final – 20% 

The final will also be a comprehensive take home exam of 20 questions, a combination of short answer (1-3 sentences) and multiple choice. It will be issued the last Wednesday (12-6) of class and due to TAs by the following Wednesday (12-13) at midnight. Our review for the final will be the previous Wednesday. 

Late Work and Makeup Policy 

I understand that sometimes things happen. If you would like to makeup work, I expect you to present formal documentation of these things within a week of the assignment’s due date, and we will schedule a time for your makeup. 

Grading Scale A 94% 

A- 90% 

B+ 87% 

B 84% 

B- 80% 

C+ 77% 

C 74% 

C- 70% 

D 65% 

F< 65% 

 

 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

43280-43305 • Fall 2019
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM WCH 1.120
SB

Description:

This course will introduce students to the sociological study of society. It is designed to help students understand the larger factors shaping social life and equip them with the tools to interrogate and comprehend the world around them. The course will introduce basic sociological concepts such as the relationship between the individual and society, the social construction of reality, and the causes and consequences of social inequality along with the methods sociologists use to examine these relationships. We will examine major topics in sociological research, including, but not limited to, inequality, mobility, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, crime, punishment and social control, the family, education, and immigration. 
 
 Readings 

I generally try to spare students the high cost of books, so I will provide all of your readings through Canvas.

Assignments and Grading 

Weekly Quizzes – 60% 

Each week, except those indicated on the syllabus, your TA will issue a quiz during your discussion section. These quizzes will be a combination of short answer and multiple choice and measure your engagement with the reading and lecture content. Each quiz will be five questions, and we will issue a total of twelve quizzes over the course of the semester. That means that each question will be worth one percent of your final grade. 

Midterm – 20% 

The midterm will be a comprehensive take home exam consisting of 20 questions, a combination of short answer (1-3 sentences) and multiple choice. The questions will test your knowledge of the core concepts we’ve covered up until this point and your ability to apply them to real-world situations. While I do not issue formal study guides, I will reserve the Monday of the week of the midterm for students to ask any questions they have related to the test or concepts we have covered in class (this is for clarification and elaboration only; do not expect me to repeat an entire lecture because you missed a day of class). Shortly after class, I will issue the exam to students, and it will be due to their respective TAs by Friday at midnight. 

Final – 20% 

The final will also be a comprehensive take home exam of 20 questions, a combination of short answer (1-3 sentences) and multiple choice. It will be issued the last Wednesday (12-6) of class and due to TAs by the following Wednesday (12-13) at midnight. Our review for the final will be the previous Wednesday. 

Late Work and Makeup Policy 

I understand that sometimes things happen. If you would like to makeup work, I expect you to present formal documentation of these things within a week of the assignment’s due date, and we will schedule a time for your makeup. 

Grading Scale A 94% 

A- 90% 

B+ 87% 

B 84% 

B- 80% 

C+ 77% 

C 74% 

C- 70% 

D 65% 

F< 65% 

 

 

SOC S302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

83825 • Summer 2019
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GDC 2.410
SB

Description:

This course will introduce students to the sociological study of society. It is designed to help students understand the larger factors shaping social life and equip them with the tools to interrogate and comprehend the world around them. The course will introduce basic sociological concepts such as the relationship between the individual and society, the social construction of reality, and the causes and consequences of social inequality along with the methods sociologists use to examine these relationships. We will examine major topics in sociological research, including, but not limited to, inequality, mobility, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, crime, punishment and social control, the family, education, and immigration. 
 
 Readings 

I generally try to spare students the high cost of books, so I will provide all of your readings through Canvas.

Assignments and Grading 

Weekly Quizzes – 60% 

Each week, except those indicated on the syllabus, your TA will issue a quiz during your discussion section. These quizzes will be a combination of short answer and multiple choice and measure your engagement with the reading and lecture content. Each quiz will be five questions, and we will issue a total of twelve quizzes over the course of the semester. That means that each question will be worth one percent of your final grade. 

Midterm – 20% 

The midterm will be a comprehensive take home exam consisting of 20 questions, a combination of short answer (1-3 sentences) and multiple choice. The questions will test your knowledge of the core concepts we’ve covered up until this point and your ability to apply them to real-world situations. While I do not issue formal study guides, I will reserve the Monday of the week of the midterm for students to ask any questions they have related to the test or concepts we have covered in class (this is for clarification and elaboration only; do not expect me to repeat an entire lecture because you missed a day of class). Shortly after class, I will issue the exam to students, and it will be due to their respective TAs by Friday at midnight. 

Final – 20% 

The final will also be a comprehensive take home exam of 20 questions, a combination of short answer (1-3 sentences) and multiple choice. It will be issued the last Wednesday (12-6) of class and due to TAs by the following Wednesday (12-13) at midnight. Our review for the final will be the previous Wednesday. 

Late Work and Makeup Policy 

I understand that sometimes things happen. If you would like to makeup work, I expect you to present formal documentation of these things within a week of the assignment’s due date, and we will schedule a time for your makeup. 

Grading Scale A 94% 

A- 90% 

B+ 87% 

B 84% 

B- 80% 

C+ 77% 

C 74% 

C- 70% 

D 65% 

F< 65% 

 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

44040-44065 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM BEL 328
SB

Description:

This course will introduce students to the sociological study of society. It is designed to help students understand the larger factors shaping social life and equip them with the tools to interrogate and comprehend the world around them. The course will introduce basic sociological concepts such as the relationship between the individual and society, the social construction of reality, and the causes and consequences of social inequality along with the methods sociologists use to examine these relationships. We will examine major topics in sociological research, including, but not limited to, inequality, mobility, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, crime, punishment and social control, the family, education, and immigration. 
 
 Readings 

I generally try to spare students the high cost of books, so I will provide all of your readings through Canvas.

Assignments and Grading 

Weekly Quizzes – 60% 

Each week, except those indicated on the syllabus, your TA will issue a quiz during your discussion section. These quizzes will be a combination of short answer and multiple choice and measure your engagement with the reading and lecture content. Each quiz will be five questions, and we will issue a total of twelve quizzes over the course of the semester. That means that each question will be worth one percent of your final grade. 

Midterm – 20% 

The midterm will be a comprehensive take home exam consisting of 20 questions, a combination of short answer (1-3 sentences) and multiple choice. The questions will test your knowledge of the core concepts we’ve covered up until this point and your ability to apply them to real-world situations. While I do not issue formal study guides, I will reserve the Monday of the week of the midterm for students to ask any questions they have related to the test or concepts we have covered in class (this is for clarification and elaboration only; do not expect me to repeat an entire lecture because you missed a day of class). Shortly after class, I will issue the exam to students, and it will be due to their respective TAs by Friday at midnight. 

Final – 20% 

The final will also be a comprehensive take home exam of 20 questions, a combination of short answer (1-3 sentences) and multiple choice. It will be issued the last Wednesday (12-6) of class and due to TAs by the following Wednesday (12-13) at midnight. Our review for the final will be the previous Wednesday. 

Late Work and Makeup Policy 

I understand that sometimes things happen. If you would like to makeup work, I expect you to present formal documentation of these things within a week of the assignment’s due date, and we will schedule a time for your makeup. 

Grading Scale A 94% 

A- 90% 

B+ 87% 

B 84% 

B- 80% 

C+ 77% 

C 74% 

C- 70% 

D 65% 

F< 65% 

 

 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

44110-44135 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 3:30PM-4:30PM BEL 328
SB

Description:

This course will introduce students to the sociological study of society. It is designed to help students understand the larger factors shaping social life and equip them with the tools to interrogate and comprehend the world around them. The course will introduce basic sociological concepts such as the relationship between the individual and society, the social construction of reality, and the causes and consequences of social inequality along with the methods sociologists use to examine these relationships. We will examine major topics in sociological research, including, but not limited to, inequality, mobility, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, crime, punishment and social control, the family, education, and immigration. 
 
 Readings 

I generally try to spare students the high cost of books, so I will provide all of your readings through Canvas.

Assignments and Grading 

Weekly Quizzes – 60% 

Each week, except those indicated on the syllabus, your TA will issue a quiz during your discussion section. These quizzes will be a combination of short answer and multiple choice and measure your engagement with the reading and lecture content. Each quiz will be five questions, and we will issue a total of twelve quizzes over the course of the semester. That means that each question will be worth one percent of your final grade. 

Midterm – 20% 

The midterm will be a comprehensive take home exam consisting of 20 questions, a combination of short answer (1-3 sentences) and multiple choice. The questions will test your knowledge of the core concepts we’ve covered up until this point and your ability to apply them to real-world situations. While I do not issue formal study guides, I will reserve the Monday of the week of the midterm for students to ask any questions they have related to the test or concepts we have covered in class (this is for clarification and elaboration only; do not expect me to repeat an entire lecture because you missed a day of class). Shortly after class, I will issue the exam to students, and it will be due to their respective TAs by Friday at midnight. 

Final – 20% 

The final will also be a comprehensive take home exam of 20 questions, a combination of short answer (1-3 sentences) and multiple choice. It will be issued the last Wednesday (12-6) of class and due to TAs by the following Wednesday (12-13) at midnight. Our review for the final will be the previous Wednesday. 

Late Work and Makeup Policy 

I understand that sometimes things happen. If you would like to makeup work, I expect you to present formal documentation of these things within a week of the assignment’s due date, and we will schedule a time for your makeup. 

Grading Scale A 94% 

A- 90% 

B+ 87% 

B 84% 

B- 80% 

C+ 77% 

C 74% 

C- 70% 

D 65% 

F< 65% 

 

 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

44710-44735 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM BEL 328
SB

Description:

This course will introduce students to the sociological study of society. It is designed to help students understand the larger factors shaping social life and equip them with the tools to interrogate and comprehend the world around them. The course will introduce basic sociological concepts such as the relationship between the individual and society, the social construction of reality, and the causes and consequences of social inequality along with the methods sociologists use to examine these relationships. We will examine major topics in sociological research, including, but not limited to, inequality, mobility, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, crime, punishment and social control, the family, education, and immigration. 
 
 Readings 

I generally try to spare students the high cost of books, so I will provide all of your readings through Canvas.

Assignments and Grading 

Weekly Quizzes – 60% 

Each week, except those indicated on the syllabus, your TA will issue a quiz during your discussion section. These quizzes will be a combination of short answer and multiple choice and measure your engagement with the reading and lecture content. Each quiz will be five questions, and we will issue a total of twelve quizzes over the course of the semester. That means that each question will be worth one percent of your final grade. 

Midterm – 20% 

The midterm will be a comprehensive take home exam consisting of 20 questions, a combination of short answer (1-3 sentences) and multiple choice. The questions will test your knowledge of the core concepts we’ve covered up until this point and your ability to apply them to real-world situations. While I do not issue formal study guides, I will reserve the Monday of the week of the midterm for students to ask any questions they have related to the test or concepts we have covered in class (this is for clarification and elaboration only; do not expect me to repeat an entire lecture because you missed a day of class). Shortly after class, I will issue the exam to students, and it will be due to their respective TAs by Friday at midnight. 

Final – 20% 

The final will also be a comprehensive take home exam of 20 questions, a combination of short answer (1-3 sentences) and multiple choice. It will be issued the last Wednesday (12-6) of class and due to TAs by the following Wednesday (12-13) at midnight. Our review for the final will be the previous Wednesday. 

Late Work and Makeup Policy 

I understand that sometimes things happen. If you would like to makeup work, I expect you to present formal documentation of these things within a week of the assignment’s due date, and we will schedule a time for your makeup. 

Grading Scale A 94% 

A- 90% 

B+ 87% 

B 84% 

B- 80% 

C+ 77% 

C 74% 

C- 70% 

D 65% 

F< 65% 

 
 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45150-45175 • Fall 2017
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM ART 1.102
SB

Description:

This course will introduce students to the sociological study of society. It is designed to help students understand the larger factors shaping social life and equip them with the tools to interrogate and comprehend the world around them. The course will introduce basic sociological concepts such as the relationship between the individual and society, the social construction of reality, and the causes and consequences of social inequality along with the methods sociologists use to examine these relationships. We will examine major topics in sociological research, including, but not limited to, inequality, mobility, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, crime, punishment and social control, the family, education, and immigration. 
 
 

  • Department of Sociology

    The University of Texas at Austin
    305 E 23rd St, A1700
    RLP 3.306
    Austin, TX 78712-1086
    512-232-6300