Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Lito Porto


Senior LecturerPh.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Contact

  • Phone: 512.232.4530
  • Office: BEN 3.144
  • Office Hours: T/Th 11:00-12:30
  • Campus Mail Code: B3700

Courses


SPN 327C • Adv Gram & Writing In Ctxt-Wb

44090 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM
Internet
GCWr

Study and practice of Spanish grammar that includes reading exercises and guided composition designed to develop writing skills across styles. Students will be exposed to various topics in Spanish language, literature, and culture.

SPN 327C • Adv Gram & Writing In Ctxt-Wb

44100 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM
Internet
GCWr

Study and practice of Spanish grammar that includes reading exercises and guided composition designed to develop writing skills across styles. Students will be exposed to various topics in Spanish language, literature, and culture.

T C 302 • Process Ecology-Wb

41105 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM
Internet
Wr ID

Description  

There is no such thing as an isolated system. All systems, whether biotic or abiotic, are dependent on other systems to some degree. This course invites students to explore the deep inter-connectedness of perceivable phenomena exhibited by groups of organisms across scales and as manifested via many different modes. The conceptual division that took hold in Early Modern Western Europe and has since spread throughout much of the planet between “the sciences” and “the humanities” will be reconsidered here. First, we read concise explanations that describe key concepts of systems and process ecology and ecosystems theory (Part 1); we then look at various ways of understanding transformations in and among systems that include the human’s “symbolic dimension”, i.e., the realm of language, meaning, myth, etc. (Part 2); and finally, we observe how humans manifest such properties and experience such transformations in both mediated and unmediated ways (through primordial/mythic texts, cosmological and ethnographic documentaries, fiction, visual arts, historical narratives, our worlds that we inhabit today, etc.). Key ecosystemic concepts to be studied include: Self-organized criticality (SOC), resilience, hierarchies, rigidity traps, adaptive cycles, gradient dissipation, exergy, autocatalysis, centripetality, goal orientors, embedded memory, openness and unknowability, and emergent properties, among others.  

Texts/Readings 

— “Introduction,” S E Jørgensen (in Ecosystem Ecology, ed. Sven Jørgensen, Elsevier, 2009)   

— “Process Ecology: Philosophy Passes into Praxis,” R E Ulanowicz  

— “Ecological Systems Thinking,” D W Orr (in EE, ed. Sven Jørgensen 

— “Ecosystems,” A K Salomon (in EE, ed. Sven Jørgensen 

— “Fundamental Laws in Ecology,” S E Jørgensen (in EE, ed. Sven Jørgensen 

“Ecosystem Ecology,” B D Fath (in EE, ed. Sven Jørgensen)   

— “Autocatalysis,” R E Ulanowicz (in EE, ed. Sven Jørgensen 

— “Self-organization,” D G Green, S Sadedin, and T G Leishman (in EE, ed. Sven Jørgensen 

— “Indirect Effects in Ecology,” V Krivstov (in EE, ed. Sven Jørgensen 

— “Emergent Properties,” F Müller and S N Nielsen (in EE, ed. Sven Jørgensen 

“Ecological Complexity,” J L Casti and B Fath (in EE, ed. Sven Jørgensen 

— “Goal Functions and Orientors,” H Bossel (in EE, ed. Sven Jørgensen) 

— “Cycling and Cycling Indices,” S. Allesina (in EE, ed. Sven Jørgensen 

— “Ecological Network Analysis, Ascendency,” U M Scharler (in EE, ed. Sven Jørgensen 

“Exergy,” S E Jørgensen (in EE, ed. Sven Jørgensen 

— “Overview of Ecosystem Types, Their Forcing Functions, and Most Important Properties,” S E Jørgensen (in EE, ed. Sven Jørgensen)   

— “Resilience and Adaptive Cycles,” C S Holling and Lance H. Gunderson (in Panarchy: Understanding Transformations in Human and Natural Systems, ed. Lance H. Gunderson and C.S. Holling, Island, 2002)  

— “Sustainability and Panarchies,” C S Holling, Lance H. Gunderson, and Garry D. Peterson (in Panarchy, ed. Gunderson and Holling 

— “Why Systems of People and Nature are Not Just Social and Ecological Systems,” Frances Westley, Steven R. Carpenter, William A. Brock, C S Holling, and Lance H. Gunderson (in Panarchy, ed. Gunderson and Holling 

— “The Wet and the Dry: Traditional Irrigation in Bali and Morocco,” Clifford Geertz, in Human Ecology, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Mar., 1972)  

— “Satoyama and satoumi, and ecosystem services: A conceptual framework,” pp. 17-54, in SatoyamaSatoumi Ecosystems and Human Well-Being: Socio-Ecological Production Landscapes of Japan, by Anantha Kumar Duraiappah, Koji Nakamura, and Kazuhiko Takeuchi 

— “The Beginnings of a Mediterranean Empire,” pp. 97-104, “The Third Century, The Dominate, and Constantine,” pp. 431-453, in Romans: From Village to Empire, Boatwright, Mary T., Gargola, Daniel J., and Talbert, Richard J. A. 

— “A Foreign View of the Spanish Commercial System,” pp. 91-94, in Latin American Civilization: History & Society, 1492 to the Present, ed. Benjamin Keen 

“Robber Barons and Rebels,” Howard Zinn, in A People’s History of the United States, 1492-Present, pp. 253-295 

— “Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius,” Borges, Jorge Luis 

— “Balthazar’s Marvelous Afternoon” and “The Most Handsome Drowned Man in the World,” García Márquez, Gabriel 

Invisible Cities, Calvino, Italo 

— “Freedom,” “Pain,” “Good and Evil,” “Death,” from The ProphetI, Gibran, Kahlil 

Course Requirements 

—Essays: 2 (4-5 pages with instructor feedback and revisions) x 15%: 30%  

—Reflection on University Lecture Series (2 pages): 5%  

—Reflection Paper on Visiting a “Gem of the University” from a process ecology perspective: 10%  

—Oral Presentation of Final Project: 10%  

—Final Project (8-10 pages): 25%  

—Participation/Discussion: 20%  

SPN 610D • First-Year Spanish II

44540 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM MEZ 1.202
Hybrid/Blended

Focus on the development of multilingual literacy through the analysis and use of Spanish to achieve linguistic competence (commands, subjunctive, hypotheticals, future), communication and interactional competence (disagreeing, suggesting, turn taking), and metalinguistic competence (critical analysis of oral and written texts, dialectal differences).

SPN 328C • Intro To Literatures/Culs

44685 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM GAR 0.128
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Overview of Iberian and/or Latin American literatures and cultures, including the arts and popular expressions, from a multidisciplinary perspective. Among the regions studied are Spain; North, Central, and South America; the Caribbean; and related areas in Africa.

SPN 611D • Second-Year Spanish

44365 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.210
Hybrid/Blended
GC

Focus on the development of multilingual literacy through the analysis and use of Spanish to achieve linguistic competence (aspect, mood, compound tenses, passive voice), communication and interactional competence (pragmatics, cultural perspectives), and metalinguistic competence (critical analysis of oral and written texts, dialectal differences).

 

UGS 302 • Process Ecology Across Life

60595 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM RLP 0.104
Wr ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

SPN 610D • First-Year Spanish II

45085 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM MEZ 1.202
Hybrid/Blended

Focus on the development of multilingual literacy through the analysis and use of Spanish to achieve linguistic competence (commands, subjunctive, hypotheticals, future), communication and interactional competence (disagreeing, suggesting, turn taking), and metalinguistic competence (critical analysis of oral and written texts, dialectal differences).

SPN 328C • Intro To Literatures/Culs

45230 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM RLP 0.122
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

This course offers an introduction to the literature of Spanish America. Readings will depart from the poetry and creation myths of the Pre-Columbian era, to the chronicles of the Conquest and the Early Colonial Period (1492-1600), the Colonial Period (1600-1800), Neoclassicism, Romanticism, and Realism of the Independence Period (1800-1880), Modernismo, las Vanguardias y la Modernizacion, the “Boom,” and the Post-Boom generation (which temporally, and at times aesthetically, coincides with postmodernism in the continental European and North American sense). We shall seek to understand the extent to which each one of these canonical literary periods belies a profound heterogeneity — as the production of metaphors of race, place, money, land, power, history, sexuality, language and labor is not restricted to any one temporal division.

We will explore ways in which the conflagration of dominant cosmologies (indigenous, eurocentric, African) is an ongoing one, despite the time or the place of the particular writer. From this conflagration surges a plethora of issues, which includes: the artifice of identity-creation (i.e. the self-consciousness of the Modernistas with regards to their “european-ness” or “american-ness”); the question of “the sacred” and “the profane” and “use” versus “exchange” values as economic foundations for mestizo and indigenista writers; eurocentric biases regarding “Culture” (often material and artifactual) versus indigenous and African biases (often oral and “intangible”); the virulence of social stratification and hierarchization along racial, gender-based, or economic lines; and the ever-present issues  of identity and transculturation (especially in the Americas). Central to this course is our focus on the sources and effects of transplantation, syncretism, mutation, transformation, and autochthonous invention of language, race, and cosmology that characterize much of contemporary Spanish American culture (in general) and literature (in particular).

SPN 610D • First-Year Spanish II

45545 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 10:00AM-12:00PM MEZ 1.210

Focus on the development of multilingual literacy through the analysis and use of Spanish to achieve linguistic competence (commands, subjunctive, hypotheticals, future), communication and interactional competence (disagreeing, suggesting, turn taking), and metalinguistic competence (critical analysis of oral and written texts, dialectal differences).

UGS 302 • Process Ecology Across Life

62165 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM PAR 305
Wr ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

SPN 327C • Adv Gram & Writing In Context

45890 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.210
GCWr

Study and practice of Spanish grammar that includes reading exercises and guided composition designed to develop writing skills across styles. Students will be exposed to various topics in Spanish language, literature, and culture.

SPN 327C • Adv Gram & Writing In Context

45910 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.124
GCWr

Study and practice of Spanish grammar that includes reading exercises and guided composition designed to develop writing skills across styles. Students will be exposed to various topics in Spanish language, literature, and culture.

SPN 355 • Revol Imaginatn Lat Am Cul

45993 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 2.124
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Study of important themes or issues in the cultural production of the Latin American world. Among the regions studied are Spain; North, Central, and South America; the Caribbean; and related areas in Africa.

Topic 1: Fantastic Fiction from Latin America. Analysis of short stories by Latin American writers that in some way represent an alternative to realism.

Topic 2: Nonfiction Narratives from Latin America. Study of nonfiction works written in contemporary Latin America as experimental narrative forms that offer insight about current political, social, and economic problems of the region. Examination of these realities through readings and careful analysis of the works of popular nonfiction Latin American writers.

Topic 3: Jewish Voices from Latin America. Overview of popular Jewish writers from Brazil and Spanish America, with special emphasis on those who portray in their work the situation of the Jewish communities of their respective cities and countries.

Topic 4: Sex and Sexuality in Latin America. Examines different representations of sex, sexuality, and eroticism in the various cultures of Latin America. These concepts do not refer to explicit or provocative texts or images in books, films, or photographs alone. On the contrary, they include a vast gamut of life, love, pain, and social conflict.

Topic 5: Revolutionary Imagination in Latin American Cultures. Explores literary expressions in Latin America that reflect a dissident or transgressive imaginary published during the revolutionary period (1960-1990). Examination of how different sociohistorical experiences require new narrative forms, and innovative ways of exploring and codifying collective community identities.

Topic 6: Violence in Contemporary Mexican Culture. Studies the representation of violence in contemporary literary and cultural production in Mexico in order to understand social, political, and cultural implications of current violence there. Taught in Spanish.

Topic 7: East/West/New World Encounters. Survey of works mostly in the Latin American and Hispanic literary tradition in which images or themes related to the East (Asia, Eastern Africa, the Middle East) are developed.

Topic 8: Memory and Writing in Caribbean Culture. Studies literary works from the greater Caribbean basin (with a focus on Cuba and Puerto Rico) in which the act of remembering is emphatically dramatized and described.

Topic 9: Literary Figurations in the Multimedia Age. Focuses on the figurations of sounds and images in literary language in the context of the multimedia environment of modern and contemporary Latin America.

SPN 610D • First-Year Spanish II

46305 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 2:00PM-4:00PM MEZ 1.102

Focus on the development of multilingual literacy through the analysis and use of Spanish to achieve linguistic competence (commands, subjunctive, hypotheticals, future), communication and interactional competence (disagreeing, suggesting, turn taking), and metalinguistic competence (critical analysis of oral and written texts, dialectal differences).

UGS 302 • Systems Ecology & The Everyday

62250 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 304
Wr ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

SPN 610D • First-Year Spanish II

46360 • Spring 2017
Meets MWF 10:00AM-12:00PM MEZ 1.118

Focus on the development of multilingual literacy through the analysis and use of Spanish to achieve linguistic competence (commands, subjunctive, hypotheticals, future), communication and interactional competence (disagreeing, suggesting, turn taking), and metalinguistic competence (critical analysis of oral and written texts, dialectal differences).

SPN 327C • Adv Gram & Writing In Context

46475 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.122
GCWr

Study and practice of Spanish grammar that includes reading exercises and guided composition designed to develop writing skills across styles. Students will be exposed to various topics in Spanish language, literature, and culture.

SPC 320C • Lat Am Shrt Stry: 1910-2010

46048 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.102
GC (also listed as C L 323, LAS 328)

Study of masterpieces of world literature; of different literary genres; of the relationship between literature and other disciplines, such as psychology, philosophy, and film; and of special topics of a comparative nature.

Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

May be counted toward the global cultures flag requirement.

Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Same As  SPC 320C, LAS 328

 

SPN 327C • Adv Gram & Writing In Context

46420 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.104
GCWr

Study and practice of Spanish grammar that includes reading exercises and guided composition designed to develop writing skills across styles. Students will be exposed to various topics in Spanish language, literature, and culture.

UGS 302 • Lit Express Of Syst Ecology

62015 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MAI 220C
Wr ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

SPN 327C • Adv Gram & Writing In Context

45550 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BEN 1.104
GC

Study and practice of Spanish grammar that includes reading exercises and guided composition designed to develop writing skills across styles. Students will be exposed to various topics in Spanish language, literature, and culture.

SPN 327C • Adv Gram & Writing In Context

45560 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.104
GC

Study and practice of Spanish grammar that includes reading exercises and guided composition designed to develop writing skills across styles. Students will be exposed to various topics in Spanish language, literature, and culture.

SPN 368S • Rhet & Comp For Natv Spkrs

45705 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.124
Wr

Examination of the major structural components of the language and how these are used in context to fulfill a variety of communicative functions.

Topic 1: Rhetoric and Composition for Native Speakers. Writing and oral expression for use in academic and professional settings.

 

SPN 327C • Adv Gram & Writing In Context

45590 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.102
GC

Study and practice of Spanish grammar that includes reading exercises and guided composition designed to develop writing skills across styles. Students will be exposed to various topics in Spanish language, literature, and culture.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

45595 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BEN 1.104
Wr

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

45610 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.104
Wr

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 327C • Adv Gram & Writing In Context

46075 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.104
GC

Study and practice of Spanish grammar that includes reading exercises and guided composition designed to develop writing skills across styles. Students will be exposed to various topics in Spanish language, literature, and culture.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

46095 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.212
Wr

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

46105 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.102
Wr

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

47265 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.104
Wr C2

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

47280 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.126
Wr

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

47290 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.104
Wr

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

47475 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 210

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

47480 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 2.112

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

47520 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.124
Wr

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 325L • Intro Spn Amer Lit Snc Mod

47185 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM PAR 210
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America since Modernism.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

47270 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 1.102
Wr

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

47285 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 208
Wr

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 325L • Intro Spn Amer Lit Snc Mod

46685 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BEN 1.102
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America since Modernism.

SPN 325L • Intro Spn Amer Lit Snc Mod

46690 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.102
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America since Modernism.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

46760 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.104

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 322K • Civilization Of Spanish Amer

46380-46405 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 4.122
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Survey of the social and cultural evolution of the Spanish American countries.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

46505 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CAL 221
Wr C2

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

46507 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.126
Wr

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN F322K • Civilization Of Spanish Amer

88935 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 2:30PM-4:00PM PAR 301
GC (also listed as LAS F370S)

To grab at a composite is to overlook the particulate. And yet, in order to deal with systems, histories, identities... even language as a semi-stable continuum, we must grab at composites. In our case, as we embark upon the study of a so-called Spanish American Civilization, we are certainly at risk of over-extension, as the contours and constituents of this space are—in spatial, temporal, and qualitative terms—quite vast. The designated space points to “established” cultures which are, in the strictest sense, well over 3200 years old, to more than 360 million living human beings who make their homes in 18 countries (and the “Estado Libre Asociado” of Puerto Rico) which spread across 8.6 million miles2 (22.3 million km2) and range from the wettest lands on Earth (the Chocó region of Pacific Coastal Colombia) to the driest (Atacama Desert in Chile), from the largest tropical rain forest on Earth (Amazon) to the glaciers of Patagonia. The people of this vast space represent hundreds of ethnic and linguistic groups; and though the ethnicities are too many and too diverse to mention, the major indigenous and African linguistic groups are Tupi-Guarani in south-central South America, Maya (Cakchiquel, Kekchi, Mam, Quiché, or Yucatec) throughout Central America, Aymara in Bolivia, Quechua in Peru, Nahuatl in Mexico, and Yoruba in Cuba.

      Even this most cursory depiction of the vastness of Spanish America already presents the complexity of our subject. Our positioning vis-à-vis this course, therefore, will actually be where we most often reside in consciousness: between narrative and specimen; that is, between a story that “makes sense” and the details which seem to be left out of the seemingly complete jig-saw puzzle, between a sense of describable identity and a slew of idiosyncratic traits.

      Why then, or how, can we speak of a Spanish American Civilization? Leaving aside the fact that we have probably engaged in the common practice of “othering” the unknown, there is also the fact that the region has undergone four distinct periods or processes: i) a time before European domination; ii) the period of conquest and colonization; iii) the period of national independence; and iv) a “modern” and, in a more complex sense, post-modern period. Though these categories may not look all that different from the periods and processes that occurred to the north, the particular ways that they were experienced in Spanish America certainly did differ. Also, the region differs markedly from the rest of the Americas by way of its predominantly Hispanic and Portuguese cultural heritage, its predominantly Catholic religious culture, and a judicial system based in Roman Law.

 

 

The lectures and discussions will be conducted entirely in Spanish. Very rarely, a particular topic or text may warrant a brief switching into English, but only rarely. On the other hand, you will note that a few readings are in English—these were either originally written in English, in a third language (i.e., Quiché or French), or are too long to include in Spanish. Students are responsible for completing the assigned readings before each class.

SPN 325K • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

46405 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.118
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America from the sixteenth century through Modernism.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

46515 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 3.116
Wr

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

46525 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.104
Wr C2

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

46370 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A203A

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

46400 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.122

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

46415 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.104
Wr

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

47080 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.106

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

47085 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.102

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 327W • Adv Gram/Comp II-Biling/Bicul

47105 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.124
Wr C2

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 325K • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

46475 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 2.124
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America from the sixteenth century through Modernism.

SPN 326L • Intro To Spn Lit Since 1700

46500 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.104
GC

Main trends and principal writers, with emphasis on the Romantics, the Realists of the nineteenth century, the Generation of '98, and contemporary figures.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

46530 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BEN 1.122

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

46545 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.118

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN F325K • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

88475 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 2:30PM-4:00PM BEN 1.108
GC

coming soon

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

47705 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM MEZ 2.124

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

47710 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BEN 1.122

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar & Composition II-W

47737 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM MEZ 1.120
C2

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 325K • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

47990 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.126
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America from the sixteenth century through Modernism.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

48065 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BEN 1.122

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

48090 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 1.204

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN S325L • Argentine Literature-Arg

89965 • Summer 2008
Meets MTWTH 11:00AM-1:00PM

 SPN 325L Introduction to Spanish American Literature since Modernism (2nd summer session).
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course offers a survey of major literary trends and writers of Spanish American literature since Modernism within a cultural context. While the course uses a selection of works that are recognized by critics, specialists, and readers as the most outstanding, it will also include other less-known authors that are equally notable in order to reflect the diversity of Spanish American literature. Most works will be read in their entirety; however, an occasional work may be abridged. The course will include the four genres and will require both textual and thematic analyses of the works so as to prepare students for more advanced courses.
 
COURSE OBJECTIVES
This course is designed to help you
·       read and understand literary texts within an historical and cultural context;
·       foster and develop an individual critical points of view;
·       analyze and compare different literary texts; and
·       write short responses and essays that focus on text and thematic analysis.

SPN S346 • Practical Phonetics-Arg

90010 • Summer 2008
Meets MTWTH 4:00PM-6:00PM


SPN 325L • Intro Spn Amer Lit Snc Mod

48100 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 2.104
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America since Modernism.

SPN 325L • Intro Spn Amer Lit Snc Mod

48105 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.124
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America since Modernism.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

48180 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 210

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 325K • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

49190 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RLM 6.114
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America from the sixteenth century through Modernism.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

49275 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BEN 1.102

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

49290 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.104

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 322K • Civilization Of Spanish Amer

47645-47670 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CAL 100
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Survey of the social and cultural evolution of the Spanish American countries.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

47750 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BEN 1.102

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

47780 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.208

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 325K • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

48945 • Fall 2006
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM BEN 1.102
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America from the sixteenth century through Modernism.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

49035 • Fall 2006
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM BEN 1.104

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

49045 • Fall 2006
Meets MWF 4:00PM-5:00PM CAL 200

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN F322K • Civilization Of Spanish Amer

89550 • Summer 2006
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 308

 

SPAN 322K/LAS 370S: Civilization of Spanish America

 

Summer (first) 2012                                                                 Instructor: L.E. Porto, Ph.D.

                                                                                                Office/Hrs: BEN 1.114;

 

Description:

 

To grab at a composite is to overlook the particulate. And yet, in order to deal with systems, histories, identities... even language as a semi-stable continuum, we must grab at composites. In our case, as we embark upon the study of a so-called Spanish American Civilization, we are certainly at risk of over-extension, as the contours and constituents of this space are—in spatial, temporal, and qualitative terms—quite vast. The designated space points to “established” cultures which are, in the strictest sense, well over 3200 years old, to more than 360 million living human beings who make their homes in 18 countries (and the “Estado Libre Asociado” of Puerto Rico) which spread across 8.6 million miles2 (22.3 million km2) and range from the wettest lands on Earth (the Chocó region of Pacific Coastal Colombia) to the driest (Atacama Desert in Chile), from the largest tropical rain forest on Earth (Amazon) to the glaciers of Patagonia. The people of this vast space represent hundreds of ethnic and linguistic groups; and though the ethnicities are too many and too diverse to mention, the major indigenous and African linguistic groups are Tupi-Guarani in south-central South America, Maya (Cakchiquel, Kekchi, Mam, Quiché, or Yucatec) throughout Central America, Aymara in Bolivia, Quechua in Peru, Nahuatl in Mexico, and Yoruba in Cuba.

      Even this most cursory depiction of the vastness of Spanish America already presents the complexity of our subject. Our positioning vis-à-vis this course, therefore, will actually be where we most often reside in consciousness: between narrative and specimen; that is, between a story that “makes sense” and the details which seem to be left out of the seemingly complete jig-saw puzzle, between a sense of describable identity and a slew of idiosyncratic traits.

      Why then, or how, can we speak of a Spanish American Civilization? Leaving aside the fact that we have probably engaged in the common practice of “othering” the unknown, there is also the fact that the region has undergone four distinct periods or processes: i) a time before European domination; ii) the period of conquest and colonization; iii) the period of national independence; and iv) a “modern” and, in a more complex sense, post-modern period. Though these categories may not look all that different from the periods and processes that occurred to the north, the particular ways that they were experienced in Spanish America certainly did differ. Also, the region differs markedly from the rest of the Americas by way of its predominantly Hispanic and Portuguese cultural heritage, its predominantly Catholic religious culture, and a judicial system based in Roman Law.

 

 

The lectures and discussions will be conducted entirely in Spanish. Very rarely, a particular topic or text may warrant a brief switching into English, but only rarely. On the other hand, you will note that a few readings are in English—these were either originally written in English, in a third language (i.e., Quiché or French), or are too long to include in Spanish. Students are responsible for completing the assigned readings before each class.

 

 

Important: If you have any questions or concerns regarding these qualifications, or if any other concerns arise during the semester, please see me in my office immediately to discuss them. Remember that summer classes cover a lot of material in a brief amount of time, so the sooner we discuss your concerns, the better.

 

 

Texts/Class Materials:

Required: Course Packet, Spanish American Civilization, Porto; available at Jenn’s Copies (22nd /Guadalupe)

 

Grading Criteria:

Participation: 10%

Weekly Topic Report; 5 x 3 15%

Weekly Topic Presentation: 5%

Midterm Exam: 30%

Final Exam: 40%

SPN 322K • Civilization Of Spanish Amer

46875-46905 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 1
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Survey of the social and cultural evolution of the Spanish American countries.

SPN 327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

46995 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.120

Study and practice of Spanish grammar, focusing on grammar points of particular concern to English speakers. Includes oral exercises and guided composition.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar & Composition II-W

47015 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 215
C2

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.

SPN 325K • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

47020 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.126
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America from the sixteenth century through Modernism.

SPN 352 • Latin American Short Story

47212 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.102

Major writers and works of Spanish and Spanish American literature.

Topic 1: Spain in 1492.

Topic 2: Literature of the Spanish Civil War.

Topic 3: The Latin American Short Story. Examination of the most representative Latin American authors as a course of study in the art of storytelling, literary history, individual poetics, and narrative theories.

Topic 4: Contemporary Caribbean Literature.

 

SPN 312L • Sec-Yr Spn II: Oral Ex/Rd/Comp

45375 • Spring 2005
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM BEN 1.124

Second-Year Spanish II.

SPN 312L • Sec-Yr Spn II: Oral Ex/Rd/Comp

45390 • Spring 2005
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM BEN 1.122

Second-Year Spanish II.

LAS 370S • Contemp Spanish Amer Prose

39200 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RAS 313A

Please check back for updates.

SPN 322K • Civilization Of Spanish Amer

46490-46515 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SZB 104
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Survey of the social and cultural evolution of the Spanish American countries.

SPN 325L • Intro Spn Amer Lit Snc Mod

46550 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 208
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America since Modernism.

SPN 322K • Civilization Of Spanish Amer

43665-43700 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 1
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Survey of the social and cultural evolution of the Spanish American countries.

SPN 325L • Intro Spn Amer Lit Snc Mod

43720 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BAT 318
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America since Modernism.

SPN 325L • Intro Spn Amer Lit Snc Mod

43725 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BAT 202
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America since Modernism.

SPN 325K • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

44885 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 111
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America from the sixteenth century through Modernism.

SPN 325K • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

44895 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BAT 307
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America from the sixteenth century through Modernism.

SPN 352 • Latin American Short Story

45065 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 303
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Major writers and works of Spanish and Spanish American literature.

Topic 1: Spain in 1492.

Topic 2: Literature of the Spanish Civil War.

Topic 3: The Latin American Short Story. Examination of the most representative Latin American authors as a course of study in the art of storytelling, literary history, individual poetics, and narrative theories.

Topic 4: Contemporary Caribbean Literature.

 

SPN 315N • Readings In Hispanic Lit

44705 • Fall 2002
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 308

Readings in various literary genres and in the literatures of the Spanish-speaking countries. Development of skills needed to read and to discuss literary texts in Spanish. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

SPN 325K • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

44760 • Fall 2002
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM BAT 202
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America from the sixteenth century through Modernism.

SPN 325L • Intro Spn Am Lit Since Mod

44785 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BAT 101
(also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America since Modernism.

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