Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies
Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

Martha Menchaca


ProfessorPh.D., Stanford University

Professor, Department of Anthropology, Center for Women & Gender Studies, and Center for Mexican American Studies
Martha Menchaca

Contact

Interests


Social anthropology; ethnicity; gender; oral history and oral traditions; legal anthropology; immigration

Courses


ANT 392T • Mesoamerica And Borderlands

30610 • Spring 2016
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.118
(also listed as MAS 392)

The course will begin by exploring theoretical and applied goals shared by archaeology and social anthropology.  A comparative analysis of case studies will follow. The ancient and modern American Southwest and Mesoamerica  (Mexico and Central America) will be the emphasis of the geographical areas. Shifting political boundaries will exemplify how cultural landscapes change over time and space.  The readings will examine contemporary cultures and the ancient societies that lived in Mexico and the American Southwest.   Special attention will be given to the borders of Mexico. 

LAS 324L • Mexican Immigratn Cul Hist

39665 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CLA 0.112
(also listed as ANT 322M, MAS 374)

This course seeks to develop a student's understanding of the history of Mexican immigration to the U.S. It will provide an overview of migratory patterns dating back to the late pre-historic period through contemporary times. The focus of the course, however, will be current immigration issues dealing with: 1) causes of Mexican immigration: globalization, Mexican politics, agribusiness, 2) U.S. Law 3) incorporation, and 4) citizenship.

LAS 324L • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

39435 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GDC 5.302
(also listed as ANT 322M, MAS 374)

This course examines the cultural prehistory and racial history of Mexican Americans from 1519 to the present.  The purpose of the course is to examine how policies and laws enacted by the governments of Spain, Mexico, and the U.S. impacted the ethnic and racial identities of Mexican Americans.  The geographic focus of the course is Mexico and the United States Southwest.

 

LAS 391 • Race/Ethncty In Amer Socty

39704 • Fall 2015
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.118
(also listed as ANT 389K, MAS 392)

Anthropological surveys and analyses of societies and cultures of distinctive world areas.

LAS 324L • Mexican Immigratn Cul Hist

39620 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CLA 0.112
(also listed as ANT 322M, MAS 374)

This course seeks to develop a student's understanding of the history of Mexican

immigration to the U.S. It will provide an overview of migratory patterns dating

back to the late pre-historic period through contemporary times. The focus of the

course, however, will be current immigration issues dealing with: 1) causes of

Mexican immigration: globalization, Mexican politics, agribusiness, 2) U.S. Law,

3) incorporation, and 4) citizenship.

LAS 391 • Oral Traditions And History

39804 • Spring 2015
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.118
(also listed as ANT 391, MAS 392, WGS 393)

This course will examine oral traditions (narratives about the past) and the politics of writing histories. We will explore how ethnographers recover historical information and reconstitute community histories. Auto-ethnography and autobiography will also be explored as historical methods and theoretical approaches that attempt to change the relations between author and informant.

Central issues of analysis include: hermeneutics, oral tradition theories and methods, how people remember the past, memory, the politics of writing, and race.

LAS 324L • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

40560 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.112
(also listed as ANT 322M, MAS 374)

This course examines the cultural prehistory and racial history of Mexican Americans from 1519 to the present.  The purpose of the course is to examine how policies and laws enacted by the governments of Spain, Mexico, and the U.S. impacted the ethnic and racial identities of Mexican Americans.  The geographic focus of the course is Mexico and the United States Southwest

MAS 392 • Amer Immigrant Cul Experiences

36513 • Fall 2014
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.118

Please check back for updates.

ANT 318L • Mexican American Culture

31613 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 0.112
(also listed as MAS 318)

This course seeks to develop a student?s understanding of Mexican American/

Chicano culture in the United States. We will begin with the anthropological

debate over the concept of Mexican American culture. After situating the role of

anthropology in the study of Mexican-origin groups an overview of Mexican

American history and culture will follow. We will then examine other structural

topics that have shaped the Mexican American experience, including:

segregation, immigration, globalization, agribusiness, and U.S.-Mexico relations.

LAS 391 • Race/Ethncty In Amer Socty

41184 • Spring 2014
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.118
(also listed as MAS 392)

LAS 324L • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

40750 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 201
(also listed as MAS 374)

LAS 310 • Mexican Immigration Cul Hist

40314 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CLA 0.112
(also listed as ANT 310L, MAS 319)

This course seeks to develop a student's understanding of the history of Mexican immigration to the U.S. It will provide an overview of migratory patterns dating back to the late pre-historic period through contemporary times. The focius of the course, however, will be current immigration issues dealing with: 1) causes of Mexican immigration: gloabalization, Mexican politics, agribusiness, 2) U.S. Law, 3) incorporation, and 4) citizenship.

LAS 391 • Amer Immigrant Cul Experiences

40645 • Spring 2013
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.118
(also listed as ANT 389K, MAS 392)

This course seeks to develop a student's understanding of American immigrant cultural experiences and the processes that stimulate immigration to the United States. Theories and case studies will be examined to explore three main topical areas: 1) Processes of immigration: globalization and U.S. Law, 2) Incorporation: social class diversity, citizenship, schooling, and 3) Cultural Identity.

 

An overview of immigrant groups will be reviewed, but the focus of the study will be Asians and Latinos as these populations offer distinct examples of our social class immigrant spectrum.

 

ANT 318L • Mexican American Culture

31300 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM MEZ 1.306
(also listed as MAS 318)

 This course seeks to develop a student’s understanding of Mexican American culture in the United States. We will begin with the anthropological debate over the concept of Mexican American culture. After situating the role of anthropology in the study of Mexican-origin groups an overview of Mexican American history and culture will follow.  We will then examine other topics, including:  immigration, ethnicity, Chicano-Mexican relations, agricultural workers, U.S.-Mexico trade relations, and schooling.

LAS 391 • Amer Immigrant Cul Experiences

40475 • Spring 2012
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 4.116
(also listed as ANT 389K, MAS 392)

 This course seeks to develop a student's understanding of American immigrant cultural experiences and the processes that stimulate immigration to the United States. Theories and case studies will be examined to explore three main topical areas: 1) Processes of immigration: globalization and U.S. Law, 2) Incorporation: social class diversity, citizenship, schooling, and 3) Cultural Identity.  An overview of immigrant groups will be reviewed, but the focus of the study will be Asians and Latinos as these populations offer distinct examples of our social class immigrant spectrum.  Course Requirements 2 papers 1 presentation  Texts  Tentative Reading List: Menchaca,  Naturalizing Mexican Immigrants:  A Texas History Tehranian, White Washed:  America's Invisible Middle Eastern Minority, López, The Farmworker's Journey Ngai, Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America  Course Reader

LAS 324L • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

40133 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM ART 1.110
(also listed as ANT 322M, MAS 374)

This course examines the cultural prehistory and racial history of Mexican Americans from 1519 to the present.  The purpose of the course is to examine how policies and laws enacted by the governments of Spain, Mexico, and the U.S. impacted the ethnic and racial identities of Mexican Americans.  The geographic focus of the course is Mexico and the United States Southwest.

LAS 391 • Oral Traditions And History

40415 • Fall 2011
Meets TH 1:00PM-4:00PM SAC 4.118
(also listed as ANT 391, MAS 392)

 This course will examine oral traditions (narratives about the past) and the politics of writing history.  We will explore how ethnographers recover historical information and reconstitute community histories. Auto-ethnography and autobiography will also be explored as historical methods and theoretical approaches that attempt to change the relations between author and informant.             Central issues of analysis include: hermeneutics, oral tradition theories and methods, how people remember the past, memory, the politics of writing, and race.   Requirements:   2 essays (7 pages) and a presentation based on an oral history interview.   Textbooks/tentative;   Fabian, J:  Time and the Other:  How Anthropology Makes its Object Frye:  Indians into Mexicans:   History and Identity in a Mexican Town Bejar An Island Called Home Returning to Jewish Cuba Menchú, Rigoberta:  I, Rigoberta Menchú Hernandez, Maria.  Delirio.     Rodriguez & Fortier, Cultural Memory Singer, The Face of Social Suffering, Miles, Ties That Bind:  The Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and Freedom, Short Reader

ANT 322M • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

31275 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 1
(also listed as MAS 374)

This course examines the cultural prehistory and racial history of Mexican Americans from 1519 to the present.  The purpose of the course is to examine how policies and laws enacted by the governments of Spain, Mexico, and the U.S. impacted the ethnic and racial identities of Mexican Americans.  The geographic focus of the course is Mexico and the United States Southwest.

LAS 391 • Race & Ethncty In Amer Socty

40820 • Spring 2011
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.118
(also listed as ANT 389K, MAS 392)

This course seeks to develop a student’s theoretical and historical understanding of race and ethnicity in the United States.  We will begin by examining the different historical processes of ethnic group incorporation in the United States.  After examining the American ethnic and racial structure we will review a broad spectrum of topics dealing with American culture and identity. Topics receiving particular attention in this course include:  ethnic and racial identity formation, globalization, cultural citizenship, Latino immigration, poverty, deficit thinking in Anthropology, segregation/civil rights, and mestizaje.

ANT 318L • Mexican American Culture

30095 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 201
(also listed as MAS 318)

This course seeks to develop a student's understanding of Mexican American/Chicano culture in the United States.  The writings of anthropologists and other scholars will be analyzed to provide an overview of the various regional expressions of Chicano culture and to examine the contributions of anthropology to the field of Chicano Studies.  We will begin with the anthropological debate over the concept of Chicano culture.  After situating the role of anthropology in the study of Mexican-origin groups, an overview of Chicano culture in the Southwest and Midwest will be examined. Topics that receive particular attention in this course include race, education, Chicano-Mexican relations, immigration, gender relations, the Chicano Movement, and segregation.

LAS 391 • Amer Immigrant Cul Experiences

40375 • Fall 2010
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM EPS 1.130KA
(also listed as ANT 389K)

This course seeks to develop a student’s understanding of American immigrant cultural experiences and the processes that stimulate immigration to the United States. Theories and case studies will be examined to explore three main topical areas:  1)  Processes of immigration:  globalization and U.S. Law, 2) Incorporation:  social class diversity, citizenship, schooling, 3)  Cultural Identity.

An overview of immigrant groups will be reviewed, but the focus of the study will be Asians and Latinos as these populations  offer distinct examples of our social class immigrant spectrum.


Tentative Reading List:

Stephen, L. Transborder Lives:  Indigenous Oaxacans in Mexico, California and Oregon (2007)

Fone, N. and G. Fredrickson.  Not Just Black and White  (2004)

Ngai, Mae, Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America (2004)  

Rumbaut, R. and A. Portes.  Ethnicities:  Children of Immigrants in America (2001)

Rothenberg, D., With these Hands:  The Hidden World of Migrant Farmworkers Today (2000).




A reader will also be required.


Class Requirements:

2 papers, 1 presentation


MAS 392 • Race & Ethncty In Amer Socty

36005 • Spring 2010
Meets F 1:00PM-4:00PM EPS 1.128

Please check back for updates.

LAS 324L • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

40805 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 201
(also listed as ANT 322M, MAS 374)

Menchaca  Fall 2009

Anth 322M / MAS 374/LAS324L                                                                          

TTH 9:30-11:00a                                                                                                   

WAG 201, UN: 30425A, 36255M, 40805L

 

 

Mexican American Indigenous Heritage

 

 

August           

27       TH            Introduction

September         

 1        T            The Chicano Movement & Racial Empowerment         

 3        TH            Film:  Chicano Civil Rights            (Prof.)                                  

 8        T                                               

 10       TH             Ancient Indians of Mexico & the American Southwest

                                                 Film:  Mesoamerica            (Prof.)

 15       T                       

 17       TH            Film:  Spirits of the Canyon (Prof.)           

 22       T            The Spanish Period                                   

 24       TH            Film:  Cabeza de Vaca (vc4607)           

 29       T                                                           

October               

1         TH                       

 6         T                                     

 8         TH                          

13        T            ReadingDay!           

15        TH            MIDTERM           

 20        T                                   

 22        TH                       

27        T                       

29        TH            The Mexican Period           

November               

3         T                                                                      

5         TH            Film:  Mexican Independence (vc7525, vol. 2)                                                                 

10        T                                                                       

12        TH            Anglo American Period                                                                                                     

 17        T                                               

 19        TH                                   

 24        T            Film:  Los Mineros  (vc2890)                       

26        TH            Holiday:  Thanksgiving!           

December             

 1         T                                                              

 3         TH            Conclusion                                                                       

 

11        F            Final Exam:  9-12noon  

                   (Do not make plans until you have official notification by the university).

 

 

 

Required Readings

 

            You will be expected to read parts of the following books:  Diaz,  The Conquest of New Spain, Menchaca, Recovering History, Constructing Race, and Meyer, Sherman and Deeds, The Course of Mexican History (2007 ed). The  books may be purchased at the University Co-op at Guadalupe St.   In addition, a short class reader will be required.  It may be purchased at Speedway Copying (2025 Guadalupe St., Suite 140, phone 478-3334).  You may use an earlier edition of the Meyer book, but check with professor to obtain page numbers.   The chapters we are reading did not change in the later editions.

 

Exams

 

            Students are required to take a midterm and final examination.

 

Grading

 

            Attendance is required and excessive absences will affect your grade.  Students who have a perfect attendance record will receive a 3 point credit.

             Only a doctor’s letter or a death in your family will be acceptable excuses for a make-up exam. 

 

            Grade distribution

            45% Midterm

            55% Final Exam

 

Office Hours   Dr. Menchaca’s office hours:  Anthropology Dept., E.P.S. 1.144, Tuesday 11-1:30 and by appointments.

 

 

 

 

                                          Mexican American Indigenous Heritage

 

                                              Reading Assignments by Topic

 

 

Location Code for Readings:                        (T)              Textbook  (Only read assigned pages)

                                                            (R)              Reader (Read in order as assigned)

                                                            (S/R)              Suggested Reading in reader

                                                            (L)              Library                        _________________________________________________________________

 

Introduction

 

            No reading

 

The Chicano Movement and Racial Empowerment

 

            (R)            Vigil, J.D.  1984.  Breakup and Transformation of the Social Order.  In                                       From Indians to Chicanos.  Pp.184-213.  Prospects Heights, Ill:                                                 Waveland Press.                                     

 

            (R)            Ybarra-Fausto, T.  1978.  The Chicano Movement and the Emergence                                     of a Chicano Poetic Consciousness.  In  New Directions in Chicano                                     Scholarship, Romo, R. & Paredes, R. eds. Pp. 81-109. San Diego,                                                 CA: Chicano Studies Monograph Series.

 

            (R)            Rendon, A.  1971.  Revolution in the Making.  In Chicano Manifesto.                                      Pp. 103-137.  New York:  The MacMillan Co.

 

            (R)            Rendon, A.  1971. The People of Aztl‡n  In Chicano Manifesto. 

                        Pp. 7-16.  New York:  The MacMillan Co.

 

 

Ancient Indians of Mexico and the American Southwest

 

            (T)            Menchaca, Martha.  2001.  Recovering History, Constructing Race:  The                                     Indian, Black, and White Roots of Mexican Americans.  Austin, TX:                                      University of Texas Press.   Read:  1-48.

 

            (T)            Meyer, M. C., W. L. Sherman, and S.M. Deeds.  2007.  The Course                                     of Mexican History.  Oxford:  Oxford University Press.  Read: Chapters                                     1-5.

 

            (R)            Newcomb, W. W. 1985.  The Beginnings.  In The Indians of Texas. 

                        Pp.3-29.  Austin, TX:  The University of Texas Press.

 

            (R)            Hester, T. R.  1989.  Perspectives on the Material Culture of the                                                 Mission Indians of the Texas-Northeastern Mexico Borderlands.  In                                     Columbian Consequences:  Vol. 1, Archaeological and Historical                                                 Perspectives on the Spanish Borderlands West.   D. H. Thomas,                                                                  ed. Pp. 191-229. Washington, D.C.:   Smithsonian Institution Press.           

 

            (R)            Hall, T. D.  1989.  The Southwest:  The Region, the Peoples and                                                 Prehistory.  In Social Change in the Southwest, 1350-1880.   Pp.                                                  33-49.  Lawrence, KS:  University Press of Kansas.

 

            (R)            Costello, J.G. and D. Hornbeck.  1989.  Alta California:  An Overview.                                       In Columbian Consequences:  Vol. 1, Archaeological and Historical                                     Perspectives on the Spanish Borderlands West.   D. H. Thomas,                                                 ed.  Pp. 303-331. Washington, D.C.:   Smithsonian Institution Press.           

 

 

The Spanish Period

 

            (T)            Diaz, B.  1963.  The Conquest of New Spain.  NY:  Penguin Books.

The following chapters may be skipped:  The Expedition of Juan de Grijalva, The Expedition of Hernando Cortes:  Preparations, Cortes Collects Fresh Strength, Expeditions Around the Lake.

 

            (T)            Meyer, M. C., W. L. Sherman, and S.M. Deeds. 2007. The                                                   Course of Mexican History.  Oxford:  Oxford University Press. 

Read:              Chapters 8-11.

 

            (T)            Menchaca, Martha.  2001.  Recovering History, Constructing Race:  The                                     Indian, Black, and White Roots of Mexican Americans.  Austin, TX:                                                  University of Texas Press.   Read:  49-160.

 

            (T)            Meyer, M. C., W. L. Sherman, and S. M. Deeds. 2007.  The Course of                                     Mexican History. Oxford:  Oxford University Press.  Read:  Chapter 12.                        

            (R)            Kessell, J.  1989.  Spaniards and Pueblos:  From Crusading Intolerance to                                     Pragmatic Accommodation.  In Columbian Consequences:  Vol. 1,                                                 Archaeological and Historical Perspectives on the Spanish Borderlands                                     West.   D. H. Thomas, ed.  Pp. 127-138. Washington, D.C.:   Smithsonian                                     Institution Press.           

 

 

(R)                        Dale, E.  1941.  The Indians of the Southwest.  In The Indians of the                                    Southwest.  Pp. 11-24.  Norman, OK:  University of Oklahoma Press.

 

 

The Mexican Period

 

            (T)            Menchaca, Martha.  2001.  Recovering History, Constructing Race:  The                                     Indian, Black, and White Roots of Mexican Americans.  Austin, TX:                                      University of Texas Press.   Read:  161-214.

 

            (T)            Meyer, M. C., W. L. Sherman, and S.M. Deeds. 2007.  The Course of                                     Mexican History. Oxford:  Oxford University Press.  Read:  Chapters 15,                                     16, 18.

 

            (R)            Mason, W. M.  1986.  Alta California During the Mission Period,                                                 1769-1835.   Masterkey 60(2/3):4-14.

 

            (R)            Pubols, Louise.  2004.  Fathers of the Pueblo:  Patriarchy and Power in                                     Mexican California 1800-1880.  In Continental Crossroads:  Remapping                                     U.S.-Mexico Borderlands History.  Samuel Truett and Elliott Young, eds.                                      Pp. 67-93. Durham:  Duke University Press.

 

            (R)            Engstrand, I. 1991.  An Enduring Legacy:  California Ranchos in                                                 Historical Perspective.  In Spanish and Mexican Land Grants and the                                     Law.  Malcom Ebright, ed.  Pp. 36-47.  Manhattan, KS:  Sunflower.

 

 

The Anglo American Period

 

            (T)      Menchaca, Martha.  2001.  Recovering History, Constructing Race: The 

                        Indian, Black, and White Roots of Mexican Americans.  Austin, TX:                                      University of             Texas Press.   Read:  215-276.

 

(R)            R’os-Bustamante, A.  1986.  The Barrioization of Nineteenth-Century Mexican Californians:  From Landowners to Laborers.   Masterkey 60(2/3):  26-35.

 

Racial Segregation and its Social Evolution

 

            (T)            Menchaca, Martha.  2001.  Recovering History, Constructing Race:  The                                     Indian, Black, and White Roots of Mexican Americans.  Austin, TX:                                      University of Texas Press.   Read:  277-309.

 

            (R)            Glazer, N.  1994.  The Emergence of an Ethnic Pattern.  In From                                                 Different Shores, R. Takaki (ed.).  Pp. 11-23.  Oxford:  Oxford                                                 University Press.

 

           (R)            Takaki, R.  1994.  Reflections of Racial Patterns in America.   In From                                     Different Shores, R. Takaki (ed.). Pp. 25-35.  Oxford:  Oxford                                                 University Press. 

MAS 392 • Oral Traditions And History

36300 • Fall 2009
Meets TH 1:00PM-4:00PM EPS 1.130KA

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

35450 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 201

Please check back for updates.

MAS 392 • Intro To Graduate Anthropology

35488 • Spring 2009
Meets F 2:00PM-5:00PM EPS 1.130KA

Please check back for updates.

MAS 392 • Amer Immigrant Cul Experiences

36475 • Fall 2008
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM EPS 1.130KA

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

36235 • Spring 2008
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 201

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

35710 • Spring 2007
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 201

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

34705 • Spring 2006
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 201

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

34080 • Fall 2004
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GEO 2.202

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

32050 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BUR 220

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

31760 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BUR 220

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

31690 • Spring 2001
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM RAS 218

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

31540 • Spring 2000
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 301

Please check back for updates.

Profile Pages


External Links



  • Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
    SRH 1.310
    2300 Red River Street D0800
    Austin, Texas 78712