African and African Disapora Studies Department
African and African Disapora Studies Department

AFR 302M • Numbering Race-Wb

31000 • Irizarry, Yasmiyn
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
QR MA
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I. Course Description and Objectives

In this course, you will learn about quantitative methodology and statistics through the lens of race. You will have the opportunity to examine, analyze, and critique real-world data, quantitative research, and public discourse concerning race in America. Some empirical and quantitative skills you will learn this semester include (1) conceptualization and operationalization in quantitative measurement, (2) the calculation and interpretation of descriptive statistics and statistical relationships, (3) the application of statistical techniques to understand social phenomenon, and (4) techniques for presenting results from quantitative analysis. As we cover various statistical techniques, you will also learn about the origins of the concept race, including the actors (many of whom were scientists and statisticians) and actions that brought race into being and continue to justify racial thinking. We will also discuss how these efforts have impacted our current collective and individual understandings of race, especially as they relate to the quantitative study of race and various social problems. This course satisfies the core math requirement and carries the quantitative reasoning flag.

II. Course Requirements

A. Required Readings/ Materials
Leon-Guerrero, Anna, and Chava Frankfort-Nachmias. 2015. Essentials of Social Statistics for a

Diverse Society. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc. (LGFN) Scientific calculator

Additional readings will be available online through Canvas. Some of the readings posted are required for the course. Other readings, exercises, information sheets, and links to websites are posted to assist you in this course and enhance your class experience. I encourage you to look them over.

Numbering Race, Irizarry Fall 2015

B. Assignments and Assessment

Problem Sets

Problem sets include calculation and interpretation questions designed to gauge your understanding of the methodological and statistical concepts covered throughout the semester. Problem sets will be posted on Canvas at least one week prior to their due date. Students will need to show all of their work/calculations to receive full credit. Partial credit will be given to answers that are partially correct.

Reading Quizzes

Almost every week throughout the semester, you will have a short quiz on the material covered in the readings. You will be allowed to refer to your notes while taking the quiz, but not the readings or text. There are no make-ups for quizzes; however, I will drop your lowest quiz grade at the end of the semester.

In-Class Assignments

In-class assignments will offer you the opportunity to practice the mathematical, statistical, and critical thinking concepts covered in class.

Team Lab Assignments

To help familiarize you with quantitative methodology and the interpretation and presentation of quantitative data, there will be two team lab assignments. I will post each lab assignment on Canvas at least one week prior to the deadline. Lab assignments must be done with your team members (team member selections will be made after the final drop/add date).

Essays

Students must complete two essays that summarize/evaluate news articles/stories that present racial comparisons stemming from statistical analysis (due dates are noted on course schedule). Each essay must include a minimum of three news stories on a particular topic. These news stories can be from magazines, newspapers, or credible online news sources (check with your instructor if you have any questions). Essays must (1) be at least three-pages (typed), (2) summarize and critique/evaluate your selected news stories, and (3) incorporate concepts and ideas from class discussion and readings. Note: You may not use advertisements and data highlights (these are usually brief and present no real story or argument), academic articles (articles from peer-reviewed journals), or research articles from course readers to complete this assignment. More details regarding each essay will be provided during the semester.


AFR 303 • Intro To Black Studies-Wb

31005 • Wint, Traci
CDEGC SB
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This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. The first section of the course is devoted to a history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We will then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections as well as culture, power and politics. The second section of the course will focus in on the expression and use of Black Studies in the areas of: Critical Black Studies; Education, Psychology, and Mental Health; Government, Law and Public Policy; Expressive Culture, Arts, Music, Sports; and Africa and its Diasporic Cultures.


AFR 310 • Blackness And Comics-Wb

31010 • Walter, Patrick
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM • Internet
CDGCWr
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AFR 310 • Race, Deportation, Diaspora-Wb

31015 • Mena, Olivia
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM • Internet
CDGC (also listed as AAS 310, AMS 315, LAS 310)
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AFR 310K • Intro To Modern Africa-Wb

31020 • Falola, Oloruntoyin
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet
GC (also listed as HIS 310)
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This course introduces students to the history of Africa since 1800 to the present. The course is divided into four parts: Part I – an overview of African life before 1800. Part II – an overview of the partition of Africa and the upheavals to economic, political, cultural, and social institutions. Part III – an over view of colonial histories, the struggles for freedom, and the euphoria of independence. Part IV – an overview of the legacies and disappointments of colonialism, and the post-colonialism. Because the continent is so vast, its history complex, and the time period so wide, each part will have a case study to illuminate each section of the course more concretely, giving students both depth and breadth in a subject for which they have little or no prior knowledge. The readings augment the lectures and allow students to follow their interests from the topics covered. This is a great course to take before “that trip to Africa!” The class will also utilize feature films and documentaries to illustrate the historical issues more vividly. Karibu! Welcome!


AFR 311C • Perf/Femin/Socl Change-Wb

31024 • Bridgforth, Sharon
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM • Internet
VP
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This course is an exploration of the ways that engaged performance and feminist practice generate space for social change in the United States and Africa. The course builds on the basic principle that social transformation requires individual awareness, and that awareness necessitates a rigorous examination of race, gender, class, nation and sexuality. Students will create solo, impromptu and ensemble work that illustrate different units of the course. As a result of this course, students will develop tools for productive self-reflexivity; will understand the role of positionality in collaborating across identity markers and cross-culturally; and will acquire writing and performance skills from a wide array of genres from dance and spoken word to theatrical jazz.


AFR 315Q • Black Queer Art Worlds-Wb

31025 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM • Internet
CDGC (also listed as ANT 310L, WGS 301)
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AFR 315S • Liberation In Afr Diaspora-Wb

31030 • Makalani, Minkah
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet
GC (also listed as LAS 310)
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AFR 315T • African American Lit/Cul-Wb

31040 • Jarman, Cody
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM • Internet
CDWr
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AFR 315T • African American Lit/Cul-Wb

31045 • Mishra, Amrita
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet
CDWr
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AFR 315T • African American Lit/Cul-Wb

31035 • Bares, Annie
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet
CDWr
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AFR 315U • Mus Of African Americans-Wb

31050-31075 • Carson, Charles
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM • Internet
CD VP
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AFR 315W • Race, Sex, And Tourism-Wb

31080 • Wint, Traci
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM • Internet
EGCII
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AFR 321L • Sociology Of Education

31085 • Muller, Chandra
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM RLP 0.130 • Hybrid/Blended
Wr (also listed as WGS 345)
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AFR 321L • Sociology Of Education-Wb

31090 • Irizarry, Yasmiyn
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet
(also listed as WGS 345)
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AFR 330J • Toni Morrison-Wb

31095 • Woodard, Helena
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet
CDWr (also listed as WGS 345)
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AFR 330L • Afr Am Lit Snc Harlm Renais-Wb

31100 • Rivera-Dundas, Adena
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM • Internet
CD (also listed as E 376S)
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E 376S  l  African American Literature since the Harlem Renaissance-WB

 

Instructor:  Rivera-Dundas, A

Unique #:  36260

Semester:  Spring 2021

Cross-lists:  AFR 330L, 31100

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  In her description of “visionary fiction,” scholar Walidah Imarisha writes, “Once the imagination is unshackled, liberation is limitless.” Following the call of Black feminist writers, scholars, and activists, this class imagines what kinds of worlds are possible when we tell stories that dismantle systems of power. We will read stories by Black writers that utilize magic realism, fantasy, science fiction, and speculative archives as tools to critique American structures of oppression and domination. In addition to being stories of resistance, these are narratives of power and beauty, magic and joy. What is it about speculative fiction that is a distinctly Black genre? How is Black feminism itself a speculative fiction project? This class will look at the history of speculative fiction in the hands of Black writers to interrogate how our narratives shape our world, and what power lies in bending and breaking the rules of realism.

 

Texts:  Beloved by Toni Morrison (1988); Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler (1993); The Intuitionist by Colson Whitehead (1999); The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin (2015); Binti by Nnedi Okorafor (2015); and Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments: Intimate Histories of Riotous Black Girls, Troublesome Women, and Queer Radicals by Saidiya Hartman (2019)

 

Requirements & Grading:  Peer review/Preliminary draft of first short paper (4 pages), 10%; Two short papers (4 pages each), 40%; Final critical essay (6-7 pages), 35%; Reading responses 15%.


AFR 330T • Diasporic Magic: Lit/Perf-Wb

31104 • Young, Hershini
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM • Internet
CDGCWr
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Course Description:

A child born when the door between the spirit and material world was swinging open, 100 year old vampires who look like little girls, and crack cocaine as a character with a wicked sense of humor: this class will use satirical and slightly off-kilter texts and performances to examine reallife dark forces that plague contemporary black societies across the world. Moving from Southern Africa to black England to African America, this class explores not just the meaning of race, gender and sexuality, but also how those categories of identity can be reimagined given the omnipresent threat that black lives face. We will pay close attention to both issues of context (historical, socio-economic and anthropological) as well as to questions of structure and genre. Specifically we will think through notions of Afrofuturism, addiction, ecological disaster capitalism, thinking through how the ways black people make and embody art inform the content. The class will also include a large number of contemporary cultural texts such as music videos, popular dance trends and music.

Texts:

1. Fledgling by Octavia Butler

2. An Unkindness of Ghosts by Rivers Solomon

3. Delicious Foods: A Novel by James Hannaham

4. Freshwater by Akwaeke Emezi

5. The Girl with All the Gifts (Film)

6. Pumzi directed by Wanuri Kahiu (Film)

7. “In their Own Form” (Jan 21-May 16): Christian Green Gallery and Idea Lab

8. The Fits directed by Anna Rose Holmer (Film)

9. Performances by Nelisiwe Xaba, Serge Attukwei Clottey, Nora Chipaumire, Wura Natasha-Ogunji and Faka

Supplemental theoretical material will be provided on various authors in course documents.


AFR 335G • Diaspora Visions-Wb

31105 • Okediji, Moyosore
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM • Internet
GC (also listed as WGS 340)
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AFR 335M • Art Of Harlem Renaissance-Wb

31110 • Chambers, Edward
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet
CDWr
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AFR 340M • Geogs Intl Devel In Africa-Wb

31115 • Faria, Caroline
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM • Internet
GCIIWr
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AFR 345C • History Of West Africa-Wb

31120 • Falola, Oloruntoyin
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM • Internet
(also listed as HIS 359R)
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This course examines the history of West Africa from around ca. AD 1000 to the present. The approach focuses on key themes within a chronological framework. The syllabus is divided into four major eras: States and State Formations till 1800; the Nineteenth Century; Colonial period; and the Post-colonial. The course emphasizes key regional innovations generated by women, farmers, political leaders, and others. As many of the events took place in the concept of a "global world", the connections between West Africa and other parts of Africa, Europe and the Americas are woven into the weekly lectures. West Africa operated but at the regional level, but also as part of a larger African continent and the Atlantic World. Local and regional events are treated in relations to global events and their consequences.
 
Course Objectives:
    1    To learn how to assess historical materials (their relevance to a given interpretative problem, their reliability and their importance) and to determine the biases present within particular scholarship. These include not only historical documents, but literature and films as well.
    2    To identify and discuss the main themes in West African history.
    3    To recognize the dynamic nature of African history and culture, and to apply new knowledge of the different agencies that have impacted upon the region.


Required Texts:
Course package, one fiction, and primary documents
 


AFR 345F • Sex & Power In Afr Diaspora-Wb

31125 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM • Internet
CDGC (also listed as ANT 324L, WGS 340)
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AFR 345G • Religions Of The Caribbean-Wb

31130 • Crosson, Jonathan
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet
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AFR 350Q • African-American Politics-Wb

31135 • Philpot, Tasha
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet
(also listed as GOV 371G)
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AFR 350T • Domestic Slave Trade-Wb

31140 • Fourmy, Signe
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM • Internet
CDWr HI (also listed as HIS 350R)
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AFR 351E • Hist Black Entrepren In US

31145 • Walker, Juliet
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 1.104
CDIIWr HI (also listed as AMS 370, HIS 350R)
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Within the construct of African American Business history, race, contemporary American popular culture and global capitalism, this course will focus on an important aspect in the contemporary political economy of black Americans. Specifically, the commodification (sale) of black culture provides the conceptual frame for an examination of the phenomenon of both the superstar black athlete as an entrepreneur and the Hip Hop Superstar as an entrepreneur in post-Civil Rights America. The emphasis in this course, then, is to critically examine and analyze the impact of a multiplicity of societal, cultural and economic factors in the post-modern information age, propelled by new technologies in the New Economy of Global Capitalism.  Also, consideration will be given to the new diversity as it impacts on the political economy of African Americans.

Proceeding from an interdisciplinary perspective, the course considers both the financial successes of superstar black athletes and hip hop entrepreneurs as well as their emergence as cultural icons, contrasted with the comparatively overall poor performance of Black Business not only within the intersection of race, gender, class, but also within the context of transnationalism in the globalization sale of African American Culture in post-Civil Rights America. But who profits?

Most important, why is it that business receipts for African Americans, who comprise almost thirteen percent of this nation's population, amounted in 2007 to only .5%, that is, less than one (1) percent of the nation's total business receipts? In addition, why is it that among the various occupational categories in which blacks participate in the nation's economy, especially as businesspeople, that black entertainers and sports figures are the highest paid? What does this say about race, class, gender and hegemonic masculinities in America at the turn of the new century?

Anderson, Maggie, Our Black Year: One Family's Quest to Buy Black in America's Racially Divided Economy
 
Jones, Marvin D. Fear of a Hip Hop Planet: America’s New  Dilemma
 
Marable, Manning, How Capitalism Underdeveloped Black America: Problems Race, Political Economy, and  Society  
 
Rhoden, William C. Forty Million Dollar Slaves: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Black Athlete
 
Smith-Shomade, Beretta,   Pimpin’ Ain’t Easy: Selling Black Entertainment Television
 
Stoute, Steve, The Tanning of America:  How Hip Hop Created a Culture That Rewrote the Rules of a  New Economy

Walker, Juliet E. K. “History of Black Business in America: Capitalism, Race, Entrepreneurship”           
      Course Packet chapters 6-11 from The History of Black Business in America:  Capitalism, Race,
                      Entrepreneurship (New York/London:  Macmillan/Prentice Hall International, 1998)  


Critical Book Review Analysis                           25%
    (5 reviews, 2-3 pages 5 points each)
Class Discussion/participation                             25%
Oral Summary of Research Paper                         5%
Seminar Research Paper (15 pages)                    45%


AFR 352E • African Americans In Sports

31150 • Thomas, Daniel
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SZB 416 • Hybrid/Blended
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AFR 352F • Sociocul Influencs On Learn-Wb

31155 • De Lissovoy, Noah
Meets TH 1:00PM-4:00PM • Internet
CD
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AFR 357D • African Amer Hist Since 1860

31160 • Walker, Juliet
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM JGB 2.216
CD HI (also listed as AMS 321F, HIS 357D, URB 327D)
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Assessments of the historic experience of African Americans from the Civil War and Reconstruction to the Civil Rights Era and the Second Reconstruction, i.e., the post-Civil Rights Era from the 1970s through 2020, provide the focus of this course.  Emphasis will be placed on the political, economic, including the business activities, as well as social and cultural activities of African Americans. The course begins with assessing the Black American experience during the Civil War and Reconstruction.  In the immediate first post-Reconstruction, the Exodus of 1879 is considered along with the founding and building of Black Towns. Also, legal and extralegal means, including violence, disfranchisement and segregation of Blacks, that is, the rise of Jim Crow, at the turn of the century and the Great Migration of the WWI era are examined. Ideologies of black leaders during that period, W.E.B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells and Marcus Garvey are compared.

The rise of the black urban ghetto and impact of African American working class as it relates to African American culture provide the focus for examining the twentieth century Black Experience. The Harlem Renaissance and the conditions of blacks in the Great Depression and WWII to the 1954 Brown decision provide an introduction to the Black Freedom Movement of the 1960s. Assessments are made of the riots in the 1960s, ideologies of Black leaders and black organizations, CORE, SNCC, and Black Panthers. Agendas of post-Civil rights era black social, political and business leaders are examined, such as Houston’s Case Lawal, hip hop entrepreneurs and the first two black billionaires, Robert Johnson (BET) and Oprah Winfrey..

Significantly, the course begins with a Civil War, marking an end of slavery and the beginning of black political participation. It ends with the historical phenomenon of the election of Barack Obama, the first African American President of the United States. What does this say about race/racism in America? What about Katrina and Black Reconstruction in New Orleans in 2009 as well as “the $40 Million Dollar slave” 149 years after the 13th Amendment? The course ends with commentaries on retrenchment in affirmative action, commodification of African American culture, and assessments of America’s changing racial demographics on African Americans in the 21st century.


Texts:
Franklin, John H. and Evelyn Higginbotham,  From Slavery to Freedom,9th ed, paper
Henry, Charles P, Allen, R , and Chrisma, R. The Obama Phenomenon: Toward a Multiracial Democracy
Holt Thomas and Barkley-Brown, E., Major Problems, African American History vol 2  
Rhoden, William C., Forty Million Dollar Slaves: The Rise, Fall,  Redemption of the Black Athlete
Smith-Shomade, Beretta,   Pimpin’ Ain’t Easy: Selling Black Entertainment Television
Walker, Juliet E. K. The History of Black Business in America -course packet


Grading:
Exam 1  (Take home)                    30
History Research Paper                 30
Student Panel Presentation           10
Exam  2(Take Home)                  30


AFR 370 • Afr Religion In New World-Wb

31169 • Coleman Taylor, Ashley
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM • Internet
(also listed as LAS 322, R S 361)
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Often interpreted as witchcraft, superstition, or paganism, Africana religions remain some of the most misunderstood traditions in the Americas. In this course, we will explore the contributions of scholars and artists who engage African diaspora religions in their work through multiple conceptual approaches. The course focus includes topics such as ritual and material culture, corporeality and aesthetics, cosmology and philosophy, and decolonization and sovereignty within the traditions. Students can expect to gain an understanding of Kongo, Vodun, and Yoruba-based traditions across the Americas and the Caribbean as well as U.S. conjure culture.


AFR 370 • Africa And Rome-Wb

31170 • Patterson, James
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet
GC (also listed as C C 348, HIS 366N, MES 343)
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This course is a history of Roman Africa with emphasis on what is now Tunisia and northern Algeria. Our focus is on the 2nd-5th centuries CE when competing brands of Christianity were taking root and Africa gave birth to what is now called “Catholic” theology. However, we begin with the Phoenician colonization of the African coast in the 9th century BCE and move from there through the fall of Carthage and the rise of the Kingdom of Numidia to the complete provincialization of Africa by Rome. We study the amalgamation of various ethnic groups over time, including Libyans (Berbers?), Punics, and Romans. Ancient Africa was arguably the greatest melting pot the Mediterranean had ever seen. Our study connects North Africa to Sub-Saharan Africa via Berbers and Ethiopians, Asia via Phoenicians, Medes, and Persians, and Europe via Italians, Iberians, and Vandals.

Most ancient histories written about Africa were colonialist and Roman. These histories have informed modern Eurocentric narratives that, like their ancient predecessors, cast Africa as barbaric yet claim African intellectual products as their own. This course looks through these narratives to uncover the reality of life in Roman Africa. We examine African identities in contrast to colonial mythologies and explore the ways this rich history has been received in Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco. To this end, we study ethnography, colonialism, post-colonialism, racialization, immigration, and emigration, among other topics, both in antiquity and today.

Among the ancient authors we read are Vergil, Livy, Polybius, Sallust, Pseudo-Caesar, Tertullian, Cyprian, various African martyr narratives, Augustine, and Procopius. The course concludes with Fawzi Mellah’s Elissa, a creative and distinctly Maghribi take on the ancient myth of Dido. Along the way, the course also exposes you to the literature of Assia Djerbar, Frantz Fanon, Abdelaziz Ferrah, Tahar Ben Jelloun, Albert Memmi, and other modern North African authors.


AFR 370 • Afro Latinos: Memry/Lit/Cul-Wb

31175 • Arroyo Martinez, Jossianna
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet
GC
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AFR 370 • Afro-Latinidades US/Lat Am-Wb

31180 • Vaz, Priscilla
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM • Internet
CDGC (also listed as LAS 322, MAS 374)
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AFR 370 • Black Cops Afr Am Pop Cultr-Wb

31200 • Walter, Patrick
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM • Internet
CDWr
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AFR 370 • Black Geographies-Wb

31184 • Reese, Ashante
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet
CD
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AFR 370 • Exploring Uk Education-Gbr

31185 • Reddick, Richard
GC
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AFR 370 • Political Autobiographies-Wb

31205 • Alagraa, Bedour
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet
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AFR 370 • Power/Place: Making Tex His-Wb

31190 • Gordon, Edmund
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM • Internet
CDEII HI
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AFR 370 • Race And Social Policy

31195 • Thomas, Kevin
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CMA 2.306 • Hybrid/Blended
CD
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AFR 376 • Senior Seminar-Wb

31210 • Alagraa, Bedour
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM • Internet
Wr
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A capstone course fpr AFR majors focusing on black intellectual traditions.


AFR 380P • Race/Debt/Law In Caribbean-Wb

31220 • Jimenez, Monica
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet
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AFR 381 • Black Radical Traditions- Wb

31225 • Makalani, Minkah
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM • Internet
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AFR 381 • Global Race And Racism-Wb

31230 • Ohueri, Chelsi
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet
(also listed as ANT 391, REE 388)
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In this graduate level course, students will trace the concept of race over time and critically examine various socioracial configurations across the globe through an anthropological lens. Though race and racism are often framed as American or Western constructs, this course provides students the opportunity to engage these concepts from a global perspective, as they examine historical and contemporary aspects of race, racialization, and white supremacy. In this course we will ask questions about comparative analysis and how scholars study race in varying local contexts, for example the study of race in Eastern Europe vs. parts of the Americas. In doing so, students will additionally learn more about the relationship between race and related concepts of ethnicity and nation. Additional topics that will be addressed in the course include colonialism, genocide, xenophobia, and anti-blackness.  


AFR 381 • Material Culture In Africa-Wb

31235 • Osseo-Asare, Abena
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM • Internet
(also listed as HIS 382L)
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Fabric is at the heart of cultural production in African spaces. From birth, to initiations, to weddings, to funerals, fabric binds together communities, adorning families, and providing the basis for personal wealth. This course explores emerging research on the social history of textiles and clothing, with special reference to cases in Africa and comparative work in South Asia, the Middle East and Latin America. It seeks to integrate this work with ongoing debates in the field of science and technology studies on innovation, and technology transfer and appropriation. Through the lens of fabric, we will examine the meanings of diaspora, empire, modernity, postcolonialism and globalization for everyday people. Case material address the history behind fibers, dyes, weaving, and construction techniques, as well as issues of industrialization, intellectual property rights, sustainability, and global fashion. Course participants will also learn to “read” fabrics, clothing, and textile technologies for historical information through textile and clothing analysis exercises.


AFR 387D • Surveillance: Art/Theory

31240 • Browne, Simone
Meets T 11:00AM-2:00PM • Hybrid/Blended
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AFR 391 • Black Studies Methods-Wb

31245 • Reese, Ashante
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM • Internet
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A survey of seminal black studies texts and methods that have transformed the social sciences, humanities, and fine arts in producing a distinct black studies epistemology. Explores what black studies scholars have done to transform traditional methods and disciplines in pursuit of a distinct black studies methodology.


AFR 392 • Black Studies Theory II-Wb

31250 • Young, Hershini
Meets TH 11:00AM-2:00PM • Internet
(also listed as WGS 393)
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An in-depth exploration of the innovative, complex, and distinctively African diaspora social structures and cultural traditions, as well as the historical, cultural, political, economic, and social development of people of African descent.