Center for Asian American Studies
Center for Asian American Studies

Asian American Studies Courses

AAS 302 • Immigration And Ethnicity

32815 • Hsu, Madeline
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLP 0.112
CD HI (also listed as HIS 317L, MAS 316C)
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Description:  Widely considered a wellspring for U.S. greatness, immigration has also been an abiding site of our deepest conflicts.  The republican foundations of the United States with its promises of democracy and equality for all seem to strain against ever increasing numbers of immigrants from parts of the world barely conceived of by the Founding Fathers, much less as sources of new citizens.  What is the breaking point for the assimilating powers of U.S. democracy and how much does national vitality rely upon continued influxes of a diversity of immigrants with their strenuous ambitions and resourcefulness?  Today we remain embattled by such competing beliefs about how immigration shapes our nation’s well-being and to what ends we should constrain whom we admit and in what numbers.  

This survey emphasizes the following themes:  the changing population of the United States from colonial times; ethnic cultures, communities, and cuisines; ideologies concerning eligibility for citizenship and for restricting immigration; the development of immigration law as an aspect of sovereign authority; the entwining of immigration policy with international relations; and the evolution of institutions for immigration enforcement.   

This course may be used to fulfill three hours of the U.S. history component of the university core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.  

This course also carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of American cultural experiences. A substantial portion of your grade stems from assignments concerning the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.  


Texts/Readings: *main texts are on 2-hour reserve at PCL
*Roger Daniels, Coming to America: A History of Immigration and Ethnicity in American Life (Harper Perennial, 2002 edition)
Supplemental readings are available on Canvas


Grade Distribution: Final grades will be allocated as follows: A 93-100; A- 90-92; B+ 88-89; B 83-87; B- 80-82; C+ 78-79; C 73-77; C- 70-72 and so forth  
    Family Immigration Narrative:  10%; 2-page essay
    Midterm: 20% bluebook exam; short essay IDs
Final: 30% bluebook exam; short essay IDs and long essay
    Attendance and class participation: 15%
    Primary document analysis: 25% research and 4-5 page essay


AAS 310 • Psy Persp Asian Amer Ident

32820 • Jin, Arnold
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RLP 1.108
CD
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For more than 50 years, the ideas, assumptions, and language of psychology has been central to American cultural life and increasingly influential in arenas as diverse as the criminal justice system, education, business, and politics. Until recently, however, psychology was seen as a “one-size-fits-all” system; most psychological professionals and researchers were unaware of the ways in which cultural differences impacted notions of self, identity, formation, childrearing, family relationships, and other aspects of human experience. Worse, they sometimes stigmatized the resulting differences as being “abnormal.”

This course examines the unique culturally influenced psychology of various Asian American groups from two main directions: students will explore the current research pertaining to Asian American psychology, and they will examine mainstream psychological assumptions to evaluate their usefulness for Asian American populations. Students will learn to think critically about identity formation, enculturation, assimilation and resistance, and racial and psychological normativity. They will also interrogate the ways in which other dimensions of identity, such as gender, sexual orientation, class, and food affect various Asian American experiences and psychologies.


AAS 325G • Hist Se Asian Diasp In US

32830 • Chhun, Lina
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 2.128
CD HI
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Which groups comprise the Southeast Asian diaspora in the United States? How has labor migration, war, and imperialism historically shaped the formation of various Southeast Asian communities in the U.S.? How does the history of a Southeast Asian diaspora in the U.S. complicate the idea of Asian America as a social project and a political critique?

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the history of Southeast Asians in the United States. Chronologically, the course will begin in 1898, with the history of U.S. empire in the Philippines, and the course will end with a discussion of the recent migration of refugees from Myanmar in Texas. By the end of the course, students will be able to identify important dates and events that have shaped Southeast Asian diasporas in the U.S. Students will also be able to define and discuss the following core concepts of the course: racial formation and racism; war and militarization; labor and class; gender; ethnicity; diaspora; and citizenship. 

This course carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.


AAS 325J • South Asian Migration To US

32835 • Bhalodia, Aarti
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM RLP 0.122
CD HI (also listed as WGS 340)
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Course Description

This course examines the South Asian diaspora in the United States. We will cover migration of people from India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh to United States and other parts of the world. While studying the history and culture of South Asian America, we will discuss globalization, transnationalism, migration, assimilation, formation of a diaspora, discrimination, and gender and sexuality, all major themes in Asian American Studies. The course is arranged chronologically and thematically. We will start in the nineteenth century following the journey of the first South Asian migrants to the U.S. We will then move on to studying the formation of Bengali-African, Punjabi-Mexican and other multiracial communities. We will study how American immigration laws have facilitated or inhibited South Asian migration to the U.S. in the twentieth century. Topics covered include economic and social reasons for migration, adaptation to American life, cultural and religious assimilation, changing family structures, and discrimination and exclusion. We will end the semester by discussing South Asian American life in the twenty-first century.

This course carries the Cultural Diversity in the United States flag. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present. http://www.utexas.edu/ugs/ccc/teaching-resources/syllabus

Course Objectives

Through the semester we will study more than a century of South Asian American history. A primary goal of this course is to highlight the diversity within South Asian America. We will encounter a diaspora whose members belong to different religious, linguistic, economic and social groups. Many came to the United States forcibly to seek economic opportunities lacking at 2 home. Others came enthusiastically with dreams of making it “big” in the land of abundant opportunities. We will also examine South Asian American interactions with other Americans in the fields of social activism and community development.

You are encouraged to participate in South Asian American life in Austin. I will bring to your attention relevant films, lectures, art, music, and dance performances. Our class meetings will be a blend of lectures and discussions.


AAS 330E • Sociology Of Race And Work

32840 • Bhalodia, Aarti
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GAR 0.132
CD
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Course Description

Work is a central activity in the lives of most people. Along with providing an income, the type of work one does shapes the worker’s sense of personal identity. Social interaction in the work place provides workers with a set of skills, values, and mindset that influences how the work is done. Structure of a society determines the kind of work it does, who does what type of work, and how much people are paid for their efforts. In the United States, individuals’ racial and gender characteristics deeply shape how labor markets emerge and how skills are evaluated. Jobs are often gender segregated and men and women are remunerated differently. This course is a critical examination of work through a gendered and racial lens. The purpose of this course is to examine concepts such as labor markets, globalization, racial segregation, and gendering of the work place. This course is cross-listed with Asian American Studies and Women’s Studies. This course carries the Cultural Diversity in the United States flag. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.

Course Objectives

Students will be able to sociologically identify concepts such as global markets, transnational labor, care work, service industry, gendered work, and racial segregation in the work place. A majority of the readings, films, and class meetings will focus on contemporary work environment. Students will examine workers in the retail industry, care workers such as nannies, maids, and nurses, transnational workers in the STEM fields, and migrant labor. We will start the class with a survey of different forms of labor throughout the United States’ history. Students will be able to make historical connections between American citizenship, work, and value of one’s labor.


AAS 335 • Screening Race-Wb

32849 • Mallapragada, Madhavi
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
CD (also listed as AMS 321)
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Please check back for updates.


AAS 379 • Conf Crs In Asian Amer Studies

32850
II
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Supervised individual study of selected problems in Asian American studies.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of the director of the Center for Asian American Studies.

May be counted toward the independent inquiry flag requirement.

Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class. May be repeated for credit.