Center for Asian American Studies
Center for Asian American Studies

Asian American Studies Courses

AAS 310 • Psy Persp Asian Amer Ident

31479 • Jin, Arnold
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 203
CD
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AAS 314 • Asian American Lit & Culture

31480
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 201
CDWr (also listed as E 314V)
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E 314V  l  Asian American Literature and Culture

 

Instructor:  Schlund-Vials, C.

Unique #:  34380

Semester:  Fall 2020

Cross-lists:  AAS 314, 31480

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  We will consider the many histories, experiences, and cultures that shape Asian American Studies, an interdisciplinary field marked by what cultural critic/literary scholar Lisa Lowe observed is a distinct heterogeneity, hybridity, and multiplicity. Through history, literature, drama, photography, digital/social media, and film, we will examine the dominant characterizations of Asian immigrants and Asian Americans alongside the works of authors and other cultural producers who challenge these notions. Racial formation, immigration, citizenship, citizenship, gender, sexuality, class, and war will serve as guiding themes for the course.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

Texts (A partial list, subject to change):  Yang, Gene Luen. The Shadow Hero; Otsaka, Julia. When the Emperor was Divine; Keller, Nora Okja. Comfort Woman; Phan, Aimee. We Shall Never Meet; Ng, Celeste. Everything I Never Told You; Lee, Chang-Rae. On Such a Full Sea; Nguyen, Viet Thanh. The Sympathizer; Linmark, R. Zamora. Leche; Hong, Cathy Park. Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Participation in Class discussion, 15%; Weekly Responses, 20%; Cultural Artifact Paper (6-8 pages), 30%; and Final Paper/Project (10-12 pages), 35%.


AAS 325G • Hist Se Asian Diasp In US

31485 • Chhun, Lina
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 420
HI
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Which groups comprise the Southeast Asian diaspora in the United States? How has labor migration, war, and imperialism historically shaped the formation of various Southeast Asian communities in the U.S.? How does the history of a Southeast Asian diaspora in the U.S. complicate the idea of Asian America as a social project and a political critique?

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the history of Southeast Asians in the United States. Chronologically, the course will begin in 1898, with the history of U.S. empire in the Philippines, and the course will end with a discussion of the recent migration of refugees from Myanmar in Texas. By the end of the course, students will be able to identify important dates and events that have shaped Southeast Asian diasporas in the U.S. Students will also be able to define and discuss the following core concepts of the course: racial formation and racism; war and militarization; labor and class; gender; ethnicity; diaspora; and citizenship. 

This course carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.


AAS 325J • South Asian Migration US-Wb

31490 • Bhalodia, Aarti
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM • Internet
CD HI (also listed as WGS 340)
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Course Description

This course examines the South Asian diaspora in the United States. We will cover migration of people from India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh to United States and other parts of the world. While studying the history and culture of South Asian America, we will discuss globalization, transnationalism, migration, assimilation, formation of a diaspora, discrimination, and gender and sexuality, all major themes in Asian American Studies. The course is arranged chronologically and thematically. We will start in the nineteenth century following the journey of the first South Asian migrants to the U.S. We will then move on to studying the formation of Bengali-African, Punjabi-Mexican and other multiracial communities. We will study how American immigration laws have facilitated or inhibited South Asian migration to the U.S. in the twentieth century. Topics covered include economic and social reasons for migration, adaptation to American life, cultural and religious assimilation, changing family structures, and discrimination and exclusion. We will end the semester by discussing South Asian American life in the twenty-first century.

This course carries the Cultural Diversity in the United States flag. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present. http://www.utexas.edu/ugs/ccc/teaching-resources/syllabus

Course Objectives

Through the semester we will study more than a century of South Asian American history. A primary goal of this course is to highlight the diversity within South Asian America. We will encounter a diaspora whose members belong to different religious, linguistic, economic and social groups. Many came to the United States forcibly to seek economic opportunities lacking at 2 home. Others came enthusiastically with dreams of making it “big” in the land of abundant opportunities. We will also examine South Asian American interactions with other Americans in the fields of social activism and community development.

You are encouraged to participate in South Asian American life in Austin. I will bring to your attention relevant films, lectures, art, music, and dance performances. Our class meetings will be a blend of lectures and discussions.


AAS 330E • Sociology Of Race And Work-Wb

31495 • Bhalodia, Aarti
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM • Internet
CD
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Course Description

Work is a central activity in the lives of most people. Along with providing an income, the type of work one does shapes the worker’s sense of personal identity. Social interaction in the work place provides workers with a set of skills, values, and mindset that influences how the work is done. Structure of a society determines the kind of work it does, who does what type of work, and how much people are paid for their efforts. In the United States, individuals’ racial and gender characteristics deeply shape how labor markets emerge and how skills are evaluated. Jobs are often gender segregated and men and women are remunerated differently. This course is a critical examination of work through a gendered and racial lens. The purpose of this course is to examine concepts such as labor markets, globalization, racial segregation, and gendering of the work place. This course is cross-listed with Asian American Studies and Women’s Studies. This course carries the Cultural Diversity in the United States flag. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.

Course Objectives

Students will be able to sociologically identify concepts such as global markets, transnational labor, care work, service industry, gendered work, and racial segregation in the work place. A majority of the readings, films, and class meetings will focus on contemporary work environment. Students will examine workers in the retail industry, care workers such as nannies, maids, and nurses, transnational workers in the STEM fields, and migrant labor. We will start the class with a survey of different forms of labor throughout the United States’ history. Students will be able to make historical connections between American citizenship, work, and value of one’s labor.


AAS 330F • Transnational Korea

31499 • Oppenheim, Robert
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM RLP 1.104
GCWr (also listed as ANS 379)
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The focus of this course is on various recent and contemporary manifestations of “the Koreas in the world, and the world in the Koreas.” We begin with various historical formations of Korean out- and return migration, notably encompassing both Koreas. From there, we go on to look at various movements of people, products, ideas, and institutions in the last twenty years. These include labor and marriage migration from and to the Koreas, educational sojourning (and so-called “kirogi” families split by the practice), transnational adoption, tourism, international sport, and media flows (e.g., the “Korean Wave”).


AAS 330J • Asian Mobilities-Wb

31500 • Hindman, Heather
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM • Internet
GC (also listed as ANS 361)
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This class explores alternative research methods and spatialities, in an attempt to produce new understandings of how people live in an increasingly mobile world. While mobility is a desire for many, it is also restricted and dangerous for others. This class will take movement as an object of study, rather than a particular space or identity. An introduction to the developing field of mobilities research will begin the class, including key thinkers like John Urry, Pal Nyiri, Tim Cresswell and Noel Salazar. The central portion of the course will examine how this new approach to movement allows scholars to rethink simplistic ideas of migration and to see process of circular and impermanent movement. In particular, we will be looking at topics often neglected in migration theory, such as educational migration, infrastructural and legal barriers to mobility, transnational borders and identity in situations of mobility. Cases will be drawn from movements within Asia, those between Asia and elsewhere, and those with an Asian imaginary.